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09.1999 - 04.2009

“A building with presence, with a kind of mute awareness of its doors left ajar and windows open, finally seems attentive to our presence. Immensely patient, surrounding us with a benign otherness, it “falls to hand,” as Heidegger put it. Dimensioned and hinged just so, it meets us exactly. It waits for our return.” Michael Benedikt For an Architecture of Reality


DESIGN narrative

The most satisfying aspect of design is synthesizing owner and occupant needs into three-dimensional space. However, there is more to architecture than style or function. Great architecture is developed from an idea that gives meaning to the design. The overriding idea within a project creates a sense of cohesion that allows every decision to connect and fall into place. For me, the meaning of a project can be found in the quality of it’s detailing, response to its site, social awareness and its level of environmental stewardship. Designers are in a unique position as we enter into a critical time in our human history. We have the opportunity to shape the way people interact with their environment and promote environmental stewardship. I think there are four areas where designers can have the greatest influence in society. The first is being proactive and informing others of the changing paradigm in the construction industry. The proliferation of environmental stewardship is dependant on increased social awareness. The second greatest influence is in the way a design reflects its unique environmental conditions or context. A good design should be configured to capture daylight, prevailing breezes, and mediate solar radiation. Spaces should connect inhabitants to their surroundings and give them a heightened appreciation for their surroundings. Ultimately space needs to reflect its site, region and climate. The selection and specification of materials is another area where designers have a significant influence on the quality of a project. Building products can have extremely broad reaching

impacts that begin in the manufacturing process. As designers it is our responsibility to specify materials that promote sustainable practices and do not adversely affect the people we design for. The quality of the materials and systems also play a large role in the embodied energy of design. The idea of life-cycle cost of building materials is gaining traction and when databases and easy to use tools are created it will give designers a deeper understanding of the materials they use. The final and most significant aspect of sustainable design is the lasting quality and relevance of the building or space. Architecture that reflects a profound social awareness will be timeless and therefore sustainable. We should strive to create designs that have a useful life of a hundred years and are readily adaptable to fit changing needs. I am excited to be in the design professions at this juncture. Designers are trained problem solvers. Our ability to conceive of multiple solutions for complex problems and our close connection to the building industry puts us in a position of leadership. We should welcome and strive to meet the challenge presented by William McDonough and Michael Braungart: “Ask: How can we support and perpetuate the rights of all living things to share in a world of abundance? How can we love the children of all species--not just our own--for all time? Imagine what a world of prosperity and health in the future would look like and start designing for it right now. This is going to take us all, and it is going to take forever. But, then that is the point.� -Cradle to Cradle


TABLE contents

Section

I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX X XI XII XIII XIV XV XVI XVII XVIII XIX

Title DESIGN narrative TABLE contents LTD Springfield Station International Quilt Center Ride Source Dispatch Western Beverage Inc. Roseburg Public Safety Center Tip-Top Building Office PacNW Salmon Center State Office Renovation Study Omaha Vision Unlimited METRO Affordable Housing Pinhook Flats 22 Floors Martha’s Vineyard Home Gillespie Butte Housing Courtyard Typological Study Agents of Change Project ECOTRUST Rebuilt Green BRING Chapel of Second Chances THANKS resources

Collaboration

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PIVOT architecture APM architecture PIVOT architecture PIVOT architecture PIVOT architecture APM architecture ROBERT thallon PIVOT architecture APM architecture PIVOT architecture APM architecture APM architecture Don corner PIVOT architecture LANCE lavine ALISON kwok ECOTRUST Inc. MICHAEL cockram FAMILY friends

1 2 3-4 5-6 7-8 9-10 11-14 15-16 17-24 25-26 27-30 31-36 37-38 39-44 45-46 47-50 51-54 55-56 57-58 59-62 63

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402.541.4203 c o m | 68106 o . | ne o omaha . a h

Harriet Cherry & Tobias Barwood PIVOT Architecture Springfield Station serves as a primary transfer hub bus service and is the eastern terminus for the new Bus Rapid Transit corridor, connecting Springfield and neighboring Eugene. A covered boarding platform accommodates 8 bus bays. A 5,200 square foot building houses a 2,000 square foot Guest Services Center, including restrooms for drivers and the public, a modest waiting area, and required space for station maintenance and administration. The remainder of the building houses a coffee shop and Burrito Boy Restaurant.

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LTD Springfield Station Springfield, OR

Celebration of rainwater and daylight are apparent in all features of the site and building. Roof runoff is collected at central and expressive downspouts, spouted from scuppers, and allowed to trickle from roof edges into gardens. Anchoring the station and its central garden is a stainless steel rain funnel that sends rain water over a textured-glass column then across rivulets in the pavement below to the headwaters of the garden. Throughout the site, gardens and bioswales filter all storm water before sending it to the Mill Race. At the building, daylighting is emphasized by the extensive use of high-performance, clerestory glazing in the façade. The structure and mechanical systems are left exposed to create a space that feels light and open. Durable finishes such as polished concrete floors were chosen to withstand the many years of public use the station will receive.


I

LTD SpringďŹ eld Station 02.2005 - 06.2005

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402.541.4203 c o m | 68106 o . | ne o omaha . a h | st. y briggs @ 5602 n MEENDERING | m e e JONATHAN w j o n

International Quilt Study Center & Museum University of Nebraska; Lincoln, NE Alley Poyner Macchietto Architecture The International Quilt Study Center provides a dramatic setting for the study and display of quilts and a signature gateway to the East Campus of the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. The Center is a compact, three-story, brick building combining simply massed volumes with a bowed facade composed of glass panels “stitched together” to create a large-scale pattern suggesting the activity within. The sequence for visitors is carefully orchestrated. The entrance lobby provides access to restrooms, ticketing, a digital gallery, and a seminar room beyond. A curved stepped ramp runs the length of the east façade, gently leading visitors to the dramatically shaped second-floor reception hall, a grand, light-filled space overlooking the landscaped forecourt and the East Campus beyond. The progression of visitors is meant to be a journey from the brightly lit entrance spaces to the recessed and protected gallery spaces beyond the second-floor reception hall. The building achieved LEED Silver status and was the first LEED certified building on the University of Nebraska at Lincoln Campus. I assisted in the LEED credit integration, documentation and verification for this project. While there are many ecological design aspects to this building it was most challenging to meet daylighting and view requirements while maintaining the stringent requirements for archiving textiles. Materials were selected for their high percentage of recycled content, durability, and low VOC content.


II

FIRST FLOOR

SECOND FLOOR

THIRD FLOOR

International Quilt Study Center & Museum 6 03.2007 - 10.2007


Kari Greene PIVOT Architecture

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Ride Source Dispatch Eugene, OR

Ride Source is a non-profit service in the Eugene and Springfield area that provides transportation for the elderly and handicapped. The Ride Source dispatch building is a 9,000 SF project that includes meeting spaces, an open office area and a maintenance garage. The site is designed for zero runoff from the building and paved parking lot. All runoff is detained on-site and slowly reabsorbed into the rain water gardens. The landscaping softens the parking area, gives occupants pleasing views, while treating water runoff. The building envelope is super insulated and its form maximizes daylight access within the open office area. The configuration also takes advantage of thermal mass by using direct gain on the exposed CMU wall to capture solar radiation throughout the day. In warm summer months overhangs protect the windows from direct sunlight in order to reduce heat gain in the building.


III

Ride Source Dispatch 8 03.2005 - 06.2005


Curt Wilson & Tobias Barwood PIVOT Architecture Western Beverage is a new regional distribution center in west Eugene, which centralizes operations for the regional distributor of Anheiser Busch products. The new facility’s 105,000 square foot warehouse includes 45,000 square feet of refrigerated space and 30 loading docks. The company’s administration offices are housed in an attached 25,000 square foot office building. The project also includes 12 acres of site improvements.

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Western Beverage Inc. Eugene, OR

The greatest challenge in this project was overcoming the owners apprehensions toward conservation measures. We educated the client on not only the environmental benefits of sustainable design measures, but also the long term cost benefits. The owner was very receptive to the information we provided them and included the following measures on the project: R-35 insulated walls, more efficient HVAC equipment, Low-E glazing, daylight and views in all office, motion sensor switches and a refrigeration system with no CFC or HCFC refrigerants.


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Western Beverage Distributors Headquarters 03.2005 - 08.2005

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402.541.4203 c o m | 68106 o . | ne o omaha . a h | st. y briggs @ 5602 n MEENDERING | m e e JONATHAN w j o n

Roseburg Public Safety Center Schematic Design Roseburg, OR Curt Wilson & Kari Greene PIVOT Architecture The Roseburg Public Safety Center is a joint fire and police headquarters building, along with an Emergency Operations Center (EOC), that will serve the city for at least 50 years. The building is approximately 30,000 square feet in size. For the Fire Department, the new facility is a staffed station with dorm, locker rooms, shower and restroom areas, living space, kitchen/eating space, as well as administrative offices. The Police portion of the new facility includes a kitchen/break area, secure evidence storage, evidence processing area, secured double vehicle bay for vehicle processing, secure fleet parking, report writing area, private offices, conference rooms and two interview rooms. The project is also energy efficient, well day lit, with an emphasis on healthy interior spaces.


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Roseburg Police & Fire 01.2007 - 02.2007

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V

Fire Department Police Department Shared Public

Lower Floor

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Roseburg Police & Fire 01.2007 - 02.2007

Ground Floor


V

South Elevation

North Elevation

Upper Floor

East Elevation

Roseburg Police & Fire 01.2007 - 02.2007

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402.541.4203 c o m | 68106 o . | ne o omaha . a h | st. y briggs @ 5602 n MEENDERING | m e e JONATHAN w j o n

APM Tip-Top Building Office Omaha, NE Alley Poyner Macchietto Architecture The new Alley Poyner Macchietto Architecture office is located in the historic Tip-Top Building in North Downtown Omaha. The space had a number of tenants over the years, including an auto factory and show room, hair curler factory and most recently a video arcade. The previous tenants were discovered in research of the historic significance of the building. They were useful resources to acquire images and descriptions of the buildings history, an essential part of acquiring State Historic Preservation funds. The newly renovated space plays on the existing architectural character by using contrasting colors, which help accentuate the column detailing. An open office design was employed to both facilitate office collaboration and maximize access to daylight and views through the large storefront windows. The design is based on LEED Gold standards. It is an exemplary demonstration of the potential to transform an existing historic space into a contemporary office.


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22 Floors Mixed-Use Development 08.2008 - 04.2009

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402.541.4203 c o m | 68106 o . | ne o omaha . a h | st. y briggs @ 5602 n MEENDERING | m e e JONATHAN w j o n

Pacific Northwest Salmon Center Belfair, WA Advanced Studio Professor Robert Thallon University of Oregon The Pacific Northwest Salmon Center is located in Belfair, WA. We worked with designers in the Miller Hull office to develop the schematic design for the project. We had numerous charrettes and critiques with design professionals from the firm and were able to present our projects to the board of the Pacific Salmon Foundation. The project consists of approximately 50,000 SF which includes: a lobby, cafe, gift shop, museum, fish viewing gallery, salmon hall of fame, and research facilities. The site for the Pacific Northwest Salmon Center was a 25-acre parcel of land on the southern edge of Belfair, WA at the mouth of the Hood Canal. The project connects to the existing network of trail and wetland board walks along the Hood Canal. The design of the interpretive center heightens the awareness of our place as humans within nature by emphasizing the annual path of the salmon. The building form has a strong presence on the site, with a strong lateral wall at he entrance. The wall directs visitors to the entrance and isolates the center from the nearby highway. The undulating volumes along the south edge create pockets that blur the boundary between exterior and interior spaces. Interior vegetated areas add to the blurred interior and exterior experience.


VII

PaciďŹ c Northwest Salmon Center 01.2004 - 05.2004

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VII

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PaciďŹ c Northwest Salmon Center 01.2004 - 05.2004


VII



        

            



       

        Pacific Northwest Salmon Center 01.2004 - 05.2004

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VII

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PaciďŹ c Northwest Salmon Center 01.2004 - 05.2004


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9%

4% 2%

3%

4%

5% 4%

Daylight Factor (%)

7% 7% 7%

5%

2% 1% 32

28

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16

12

8

4

Distance (ft)

PaciďŹ c Northwest Salmon Center 01.2004 - 05.2004

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State Office Building Renovation Study Eugene, OR Bill Seider PIVOT Architecture

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The Eugene State Office Building is a 20,000 SF building owned by the State of Oregon. It was constructed in the early 70s and is located in the heart of downtown Eugene. The office spaces were previously occupied by Veteran Affairs and the State Attorney’s offices. The building is now vacant and the state asked PIVOT to study alternatives to update the building facade, mechanical systems and interiors.

������������������

One of the distinguishing characteristics of the building was a sinusoidal metallic sun screen that covered the south facade. The metal screen had been painted over, and was beginning to chip and discolor. The screen was also a source of occupant complaints, since it significantly restricted the view to the outdoors. Our strategy for the facade was to clean and retain portions of the unique sun screen. We proposed to remove the portions in front of the office spaces, while keeping the portions that covered the vertical circulation paths within the building. We also studied adding supplemental shading devices to maintain proper solar control within the office spaces in order to maximize daylighting while reducing occurrences of glare.


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State OfďŹ ce Building Renovation 07.2005

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402.541.4203 c o m | 68106 o . | ne o omaha . a h | st. y briggs @ 5602 n MEENDERING | m e e JONATHAN w j o n

Omaha Vision Unlimited Mixed-Use Development Omaha, NE Alley Poyner Macchietto Architecture Lot 9 is a unique combination of retail, office and housing space. The project is a joint venture between two local developers to continue the rejuvenation of North Omaha. The building sits adjacent the site of the future College World Series baseball stadium and is a former Union Pacific Railroad brownfield site. “This effort links North Downtown and North Omaha together and will add to the exciting diversity of the area,” said Ed Cochran, executive director, North Omaha Development Project. “We want Omaha Vision Unlimited I to serve first as an economic development project, to provide jobs for people in North Omaha, to provide the services and goods they want,” said Lisa Davis, chief financial officer for Davis Companies and managing director for Davis Business Ventures. “Omaha Vision Unlimited I will create a framework for future private and non-profit development projects and joint ventures in North Omaha,” Davis said. “This vehicle is fulfilling our dream to relocate back to our roots.” Based on his long-term engagement with the planning of the North Omaha Capacity Building Consortium, U.S. Rep. Lee Terry said, “This venture is a wonderful new opportunity. We’ve listened to the concerns of the community and their wishes for new jobs in the area, and this partnership has stepped up in a big way. When the project is completed, we will see a measurable positive impact on the quality of life and economic vitality.” -Omaha Chamber News

The first floor houses approximately 7,100 SF of retail space, including space that is designed to accommodate a restaurant. The second floor is dedicated to Davis Companies Offices as well as two white box future tenant spaces. Residential units are located on the third and fourth floors.


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retail

retail

restaurant

entry FIRST FLOOR

SECOND FLOOR

lounge

COMMERCIAL

OFFICE

THIRD FLOOR FOURTH FLOOR SIM

RESIDENTIAL

retail

retail

Omaha Vision Unlimited Development 01.2009 - Present

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Omaha Vision Unlimited Development 01.2009 - Present


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UNIT TYPE 02

UNIT TYPE 01

Omaha Vision Unlimited Development 01.2009 - Present

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402.541.4203 c o m | 68106 o . | ne o omaha . a h | st. y briggs @ 5602 n MEENDERING | m e e JONATHAN w j o n

METRO Affordable Housing Development Eugene, OR Harriet Cherry & Ray Dodson PIVOT Architecture The Prairie View Project is a response to a proposal submitted by the City of Eugene for a 70 to 80 unit affordable housing project in West Eugene. PIVOT Architecture teamed with Michael Roberts Construction and Pitts Jennings Development to design the project. The design team worked closely with the developer and contractor throughout schematics to keep construction costs manageable and work through potential problems early in the project. The contractor and developer were instrumental in developing a realistic cost structure for the project and utilizing various financing programs that are available for affordable housing projects. The design of the site and apartments had a number of goals, foremost was the need to create a sense of community and connection. To accomplish this we focused on centralized open spaces that weave through the complex. The massing and siting of the buildings reinforces the idea of a small community or village. We also integrated sustainable measures such as: a community garden, rain garden, well lit apartments spaces, solar hot water, and FSC certified lumber. All of these elements culminated in a healthy, energy efficient and affordable project.


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METRO Affordable Housing 12.2005 - 03.2006

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06.21 10AM

06.21 12PM

06.21 2PM

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METRO Affordable Housing 12.2005 - 03.2006


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METRO Affordable Housing 12.2005 - 03.2006

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X

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METRO Affordable Housing 12.2005 - 03.2006


X

Studio 450 SF

Townhouses Floor 1325 SF

2nd Floor

2 Bedroom 885 SF

METRO Affordable Housing 12.2005 - 03.2006

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402.541.4203 c o m | 68106 o . | ne o omaha . a h | st. y briggs @ 5602 n MEENDERING | m e e JONATHAN w j o n

Pinhook Flats Mixed-Use Development Omaha, NE Alley Poyner Macchietto Architecture Pinhook Flats is a mixed-use development which is part of the new Aksarben Village nodal development project. The Aksarben development project is built on the former Aksarben horse track and livestock show site. When completed the development will consist of commercial office, retail, entertainment and housing spaces. Pinhook Flats is a two building development with a first floor consisting of commercial tenant space and tenant parking. The upper two floors contain sixtyfour residential units ranging from 800 SF studios to 1200 SF two bedroom units. There are shared office amenities provided to tenants to promote live work opportunities. Our design will be an integral part of the new walkable community, providing destinations for the nearby student population as well as the surrounding single-family neighborhood.


TWO BEDROOM

KITCHEN & DINING

BEDROOM

BATH & LAUNDRY

LIVING

ONE BEDROOM

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STUDIO

Pinhook Flats 02.2007 - 03.2009

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402.541.4203 c o m | 68106 o . | ne o omaha . a h | st. y briggs @ 5602 n MEENDERING | m e e JONATHAN w j o n

22 Floors Mixed-Use Omaha, NE Alley Poyner Macchietto Architecture 22 Floors is a mixed-use apartment building geared towards people in their 20s. The first floor is predominantly retail space, but also includes a shared tenant lounge, laundry, and open exhibition art space. The art space will be available to local artists for free, to help promote the local art scene. The building sits adjacent Film Streams Theatre and The Slowdown concert venue. The project will add to the momentum of development in the blighted North Downtown region of Omaha. The apartments consist of 600 to 800 SF studios. The apartments were designed to allow for privacy while using a minimal number of walls to maintain a feeling of openness. The bathroom is shifted to the core to allow maximum exterior access for livable spaces and also creates a sense of entry into the apartments, something that tends to be lost in units of this size. The units are designed with a contemporary urban feel. They are meant to be durable, but have aspects that will be interactive and begin to show their history. Tenants will be able to leave their mark on the exposed CMU “tag wall” and have impromptu art exhibitions in the digital gallery. The public spaces in the project foster relationships between tenants and create a sense of community.


XII

entertain sleep

eat bath

arrive

22 Floors Mixed-Use Development 08.2008 - 04.2009

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LOUNGE

39

22 Floors Mixed-Use Development 08.2008 - 04.2009


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22 Floors Mixed-Use Development 08.2008 - 04.2009

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22 Floors Mixed-Use Development 08.2008 - 04.2009

THIRD FLOOR SIM.

SECOND FLOOR

FIRST FLOOR

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22 Floors Mixed-Use Development 08.2008 - 04.2009

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402.541.4203 c o m | 68106 o . | ne o omaha . a h | st. y briggs @ 5602 n MEENDERING | m e e JONATHAN w j o n

Martha’s Vineyard Home Martha’s Vineyard, MA Don Corner University of Oregon The Martha’s Vineyard Home is a wood frame detailing exercise, the first of three different exercises we performed over the course of a ten week quarter. The program is a small vacation home on the coast line of Martha’s Vineyard. I drew inspiration from the design work of Glenn Murcutt for this project. I enjoy his use of materials, delicate siting of buildings, and superb control of daylighting. For my corner window detail I wanted a sense of security, while maintaining the expansive views of the coast line. To accomplish this I designed a sliding screen that gives occupants control over their exposure. I also created an interior soffit to reduce the scale of the space at the window. The change in height emphasizes the sense of enclosure and refuge. Deep overhangs also aid in creating a sense of protection from the harsh coastal elements.


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Martha’s Vineyard Home 09.2003

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402.541.4203 c o m | 68106 o . | ne o omaha . a h | st. y briggs @ 5602 n MEENDERING | m e e JONATHAN w j o n

Gillespie Butte Housing Development Competition Eugene, OR Eric Gunderson & Harriet Cherry PIVOT Architecture Gillespie Butte is a privately owned parcel of land in Northwest Eugene. The owner desired to develop the land with detached single family dwellings, duplexes and row houses. She placed an emphasis on density, privacy, views and a desire for a “Northwest Aesthetic”. Views to Downtown Eugene were easily achieved by following the natural contours of the site. The topography also created visual separation between units. To further reinforce the privacy within each unit the floor plans were designed with an active side that was focused outward to the view. While, the private spaces were focused inward on the uphill side. This type of configuration allowed for maximum density while maintaining privacy.


VIV

Gillespie Butte Housing Development 03.2006 - 05.2006

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VIV

47

Gillespie Butte Housing Development 03.2006 - 05.2006


VIV

Gillespie Butte Housing Development 03.2006 - 05.2006

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402.541.4203 c o m | 68106 o . | ne o omaha . a h | st. y briggs @ 5602 n MEENDERING | m e e JONATHAN w j o n

Courtyard Typological Study Oaxaca, Mexico Lance Lavine University of Minnesota In my third year of undergraduate study I took part in the Architecture and Allied Arts study abroad program. The program consisted of design studio, architectural theory, building technologies, and Spanish immersion classes. I was first introduced to John Reynolds in this studio, which later influenced my decision to attend the University of Oregon. The primary focus of the studio was the study of Latin American Cities and the significance of the courtyard as an organizing element. The diagram at the left illustrates the varying elements and scales of the city. The significant elements are the Cathedral, the Zocalo, streets, walls, entries, and voids. In the Latin City the courtyard is an oasis, a place of refuge from the unrelenting sun, autos and hard surfaces of the walled street. By studying multiple courtyards around the city we were able to distill the courtyard into a list of basic characteristics: shape, order, colonnade, light, water and often vegetation. Using these elements we were able to apply and manipulate the basic idea of the courtyard within our own designs.


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Oaxaca Courtyard Studies 01.2000 - 05.2000

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Oaxaca Courtyard Studies 01.2000 - 05.2000


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Oaxaca Courtyard Studies 01.2000 - 05.2000

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402.541.4203 c o m | 68106 o . | ne o omaha . a h | st. y briggs @ 5602 n MEENDERING | m e e JONATHAN w j o n

Agents of Change Project Eugene, OR (various locations) Professor Alison Kwok, AIA As a graduate research fellow at the University of Oregon I worked closely with my advisor Alison G. Kwok on the Agents of Change project. The goal of the project was to disseminate an innovative, successful case-study approach to teaching architectural technologies. The project was implemented by training students and faculty to examine building design and performance first-hand, develop research methodologies, and mentor graduate students for future teaching roles. The study demonstrated the correlation between student engagement and understanding of core concepts. The case study process allows students to help shape their educational experience and begin to think critically about the built environment. As a graduate researcher I assisted in the organization and management of tools and laboratory space. I lead a number of small group case study sessions at venues across the United States. I was responsible for teaching professors, students and professionals how to use building analyses tools, such as; daylight meters, environmental data loggers, and pyrometers. Then using the toolkits I lead groups in forming a hypothesis and methodology for testing existing buildings. I also co-authored papers in conjunction with my graduate research; “The Power of Peer-to-Peer Teaching” and “Thermal Diary”, both published as part of the proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society.


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The Agents of Change Project 54 09.2004 - 12.2006


402.541.4203 c o m | 68106 o . | ne o omaha . a h | st. y briggs @ 5602 n MEENDERING | m e e JONATHAN w j o n

ECOTRUST The Natural Capital Center Rebuilt Green Portland, OR Melissa Tatge & Eugenie Frerichs ECOTRUST Editor Over the summer of 2003 I worked as an architectural illustrator for ECOTRUST. They were assembling a book called Rebuilt Green. The book documents the process of converting an existing downtown warehouse into a LEED Gold mixed use commercial building. Working with such an environmentally conscious organization was very rewarding. I gained a deeper understanding of sustainable design practices and the LEED certification process. I became distinctly aware of the strong energy toward conservation in the building. All of the tenants care deeply about the environment. For example Hot Lips Pizza has a heat exchanger connected to their ovens that heats the water used for washing dishes and their entire fleet of delivery vehicles are electric. Some interesting aspects of the building renovation include: site water retention systems, heat recovery systems, retrofit green roofs, seismic upgrades and renewable building materials. The completed book is a good source for anyone seeking more information on sustainable design and the LEED process. The building itself is also a wonderful case study in sustainable design.


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ECOTRUST Re-built Green 07.2003 - 08.2003

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Design Build Studio Professor Michael Cockram University of Oregon The Bring Chapel is a design-build project that caters to couples renewing their wedding vows and is incorporated into Bring Recycling’s new recycled goods outlet. The chapel holds approximately twenty people and is constructed primarily of offal found on the Bring Recycling site.

MEENDERING | m e e

The first five weeks of the term were devoted to multiple individual and small group design cycles. As well as team building exercises, such as the “land sculpture” exercise inspired by the work of Andy Goldsworthy. The concept; decided upon by the studio, represents two halves coming together. The halves are reflected in the two wings of the chapel and are united by the light of the sky. The idea of pairing is also represented in the joining of reused dimensional lumber to form the columns and rafters.

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Bring Recycling Chapel of Second Chances Eugene, OR

The project was a good experience in construction management and the importance of staying on schedule. It was also wonderful to have such a collaborative working environment while in school.


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BRING Recycling Chapel 09.2003 - 11.2003

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BRING Recycling Chapel 09.2003 - 11.2003


XVIII

BRING Recycling Chapel 09.2003 - 11.2003

60


I would like to thank all of the colleagues and mentors that I have worked closely with over my professional and academic careers. They have given me endless inspiration and support. I would also like to thank my family, friends and above all my wife Jessica for their understanding, encouragement and love. Without these people I would not have been able to achieve the accomplishments presented in this portfolio. My only wish is that I have been and will be as positive an inuence in their lives as they have been in mine. Sincerely,

JONATHAN w j o n

MEENDERING | m e e

5602 n

briggs @

st. y

|

a

omaha, h

ne o

|

68106 o .

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402.541.4203 c o m

THANKS resources

resources: Michael Benedikt, For an Architecture of Reality, (Lumen Books, 1988). Lisa Heschong, Thermal Delight in Architecture, (The MIT Press, 1980). James Lovelock, GAIA: A New Look at Life on Earth, (Oxford University Press, 2000). William McDonough & Michael Braungart, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things, (North Point Press, 2002). David E. Miller, Toward a New Regionalism: Environmental Architecture in the PaciďŹ c Northwest, (University of Washington Press, 2005). Junichiro Tanizaki, In Praise of Shadows, (Leetes Island Books, 1980).

port-fo-li-o


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port路fo路li路o Jonathan W Meendering Alley Poyner Macchietto Architecture 1516 Cuming Street Omaha, NE 68102 USA 5602 Briggs Street Omaha, NE 68106 USA P: 402.541.4203 Email: jmeendering@alleypoyner.com

Meendering Portfolio 2009  

Portfolio 2009

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