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VA N C O U V E R

download the archive app

& help make the mag


I’m bored but that’s not the problem Larry Chen, 63.4%


Archive is Vancouver’s people-powered magazine.

Download the app. Help make the mag.

ARCHIVE MAGAZINE


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H OW A R C H I V E WO R K S Our app finds the most popular photos in Vancouver and we publish them in a monthly magazine.

H OW T H E A P P WO R K S

It’s like Tinder for photography. Swipe up if you like a photo. Swipe sideways if you don’t care. If a photo sucks, swipe it down. You can swipe a photo only once, every swipe is equal, and all swipes are kept secret. Each photo is assigned a score based on these swipes. SUBMISSION DEADLINE

There’s a timer in the app that counts backwards from sixty days. When it reaches zero we stop counting swipes, pull the winning photos off the server, and make the magazine. A week later, copies of Archive can be found in cafés, restaurants, and shops across Vancouver. W H AT T O P H O TO G R A P H

There are four categories for your photos: People, Places, Things, and Monthly. People is self-explanatory. If a person is the focus of your photo it belongs in the People category. Places is for photos on a big scale like sunsets, landscapes, beaches, or architecture.

6    Archive

Things is for the small stuff like food or animals. If the subject of the photo could fit in your living room, it belongs in the Things category. Monthly will change every issue. It could be tattoos, the beach, cats, or black and white photos. Its purpose is to make each magazine different. If you’d like to suggest a monthly category, email it to info@elective.ca. W H AT N O T TO P H O TO G R A P H

Don’t be antisocial. Don’t post nudes. Don’t embarrass people. Don’t upload copyrighted material. Don’t post photos with watermarks. Don’t use the service to try to sell products. For fuck’s sake, do NOT post inspirational quotes. There are lots of ways to be a jerk with a camera, please avoid them all. If you encounter a photo that breaks one of these rules you can bring it to our attention by touching the three dots beside the photographer’s name. We will review it as soon as possible.


T H E P H O TO S T R E A M

The default photostream consists of every photo on the network presented in reverse chronological order (newest to oldest). You can refine your stream at any time by touching the sandwich icon in the top left corner of the app. Browse a category by touching People, Places, or Things. If you want easy access to the photos your friends have submitted, touch the Following filter. L E A D E R B OA R D

Top Photos is a list of the top 50 images based on score. It resets each month. Top Photographers is a list of people ranked by the average score of their five best photos in a given month. The winner will be interviewed and given a six-page spread to showcase their best photography in the following month’s magazine. CO M M E N T S

We didn’t include commenting in the app because user-generated comment sections often devolve into an orgy of racism and harassment. Instead, we

will hand-pick someone from Vancouver each month to provide the text that accompanies the photography in the magazine. That person might be a comedian, a musician, or a bartender. Their profession is irrelevant so long as their comments are insightful, interesting, or funny. If you would like to be the commenter, read the three questions below and send your answers to info@elective.ca. 1. If you could fight one person from Vancouver (past or present, alive or dead) who would it be and why? 2. What is the worst restaurant (or bar) in Vancouver that is secretly good, and why? 3. Use a metaphor or simile to describe how people in Vancouver dress. TRU E STORIES

Our readers submit stories about their lives and we publish them. A story should be between 1200 and 1500 words, set in Vancouver, and based on real events. If interested, email a draft of your story to info@elective.ca. We are hiring writers for other elements of

the magazine. If you’d like to write for Archive, True Stories is a good way to introduce us to your writing. F E E D B AC K

Nothing is more valuable than accurate criticism. If you have any comments, complaints, or ideas about how we could make a better magazine or do a better job running Archive please email them to info@elective.ca. I read every message and will respond when I can. BUGS

If the app isn’t working the way you think it should be working, that’s something we want to fix. Archive is still in its early stages and we want to build the best possible experience. If you notice something buggy, think something could be made better, or you want to get involved in other ways please send an email to info@elective.ca. T H E M AG A Z I N E

Archive is a record of the moments that animate life in Vancouver.

S U B S CRI B E A T P A T RE O N . C O M /A RCHIVE M A G A Z I N E     7


I S S U E 0 8

Contents Editor’s Letter

14

Staff Picks

15 A Vancouver Crossword (with dick jokes) By Harrison Mooney

26 CAR2LMFAO By Douglas Haddow

28 Vancouver Listicle By Sam Kerr

30 Blow It Out Your Ear With Trevor Risk

32 In Your Mouth With David Stansfield

33 Adult Colouring Book

34 People Comments by the Archive Staff

46 Places Comments by Dusty Baker

72 Things Comments by Aaron Von Hagen

84 The Great Outdoors Comments by Roy Pat

Art by Michelle Yu

62 Top Photographer Roy Pat

96 Top Rated Photo of Them All

SIERRA ON 35MM  DanielaArbaje, 63.1%

SHOOT THE SHOOTER Alex Ballingall, 61.9%

DON’T LOSE YOURSELF   ClaireRozek, 62.2%

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Top Photographers is a list of people ranked by the average score of their five best photos in a given month. The winner will be interviewed and given a six-page spread to showcase their best photography in the following month’s magazine. Rank

Name

Avg. Score

1

Aaron Von Hagen

8 6 .6%

2

Sharon Wish

85 . 4%

3

Jordan Ting

8 4 . 9%

VA N C O U V E R

ISSUE 08 photos submitted between may. 13 – july 17, 2017 PUBLISHER

Elective Media Inc.

CTO

4

Gabriel Richard

8 4 . 9%

5

Marija Bojanic

81 . 9%

6

Isaac M Zipursky

81 .7%

7

Jashua Grafstein

81 .6%

8

Sonika Arora

81 .6%

9

Alex Ballingall

80. 9%

10

Justin Parenteau

80. 5%

11

Filomena Rosati

80. 5%

12

Emmett Sparling

80. 3%

13

Grace Liu

80. 2%

Allan Harding allanharding@elective.ca

EDITORS AT LARGE

Douglas Haddow Michael Mann

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Karim Kadi Danny Fazio BUSINESS INQUIRIES

info@elective.ca

EIC

Samuel Kerr samuelkerr@elective.ca

COPY EDITOR

John Lucas

UBC REPRESENTATIVE

Steven Hu

COMPLAINTS

samuelkerr@elective.ca

PRINTING PARTNER

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Andy Paul

79. 9%

15

Milan Stanic

78 .7%

16

Biliana Panic

78 .6%

17

Isabella Roosevelt

78 . 2%

18

Luke Welland

77. 9%

19

Bon Bahar

77. 9%

20

Danika Lee

77. 4%

Aaron Von Hagen won for the third time in a row but he’s been gracious enough to pass the torch… so Congratulations to SHARON WISH on winning a spread in next month’s magazine. If we don’t get ahold of you, please email info@elective.ca

Still Creek Press

ADDRESS

280-1090 West Georgia Vancouver, BC  V6E 3V7

 archiveapp  

  www.archive.live

Developed with the participation of Creative BC and the British Columbia Arts Council


2321 MAIN STREET • WWW.FOXCABARET.COM

All Photos © Lindsay’s Diet www.lindsaysdiet.com

A TWO FLOOR VENUE + NIGHTCLUB IN THE HEART OF MOUNT PLEASANT FOXCABARET

FOXCABARET

FOXCABARET

FOXCABARET


OH SHIT LUKE WELLAND, 64.6%

HOW WE CHOSE THE COVER — I take offense at the way this woman is appropriating my man bun. This woman thinks she can just appropriate my top knot as if her hair style isn’t literally violence against my samurai culture? SMDH.

Editor’s Letter BABY STEPS

Boring can be good. It may seem like nothing’s happening but Archive’s community of photographers is growing and the magazine is improving as a result. The process is slow and there is still much work to be done but progress is taking place. Vladimir Lenin said, “There are decades where nothing happens, and weeks when decades happen.” He was referring to the communist revolution in Russia but the same principle applies to running a magazine like Archive. The incremental contributions of every individual member of the Archive community helps to create a city magazine that feels organic and unique. The improving quality of the magazine, in turn, encourages more people to participate. Their subsequent contributions improve the magazine again. The virtuous cycle feeds on itself. Can we speed this process up? If we change the software to improve the user experience it may lead to increased engagement by our contributors. More engaged contributors would mean a better magazine. Right now the Archive app isn’t fun enough because it doesn’t give any feedback. People upload photos and then they wait until the magazine is published before they can have an “ah ha” moment. We want to let people know about the popularity of their photos right away. So we’re building a notification centre that will help create a good reason to check the app more frequently. Apps are useful because of their purpose, they’re addictive because of the feedback they give you. What happens if we win? At some point won’t the virtuous cycle collapse under its own weight? Let’s play this thought experiment out to its logical endgame. At some point, having too many users may break the system. If 20,000 people are contributing photos it’s probable that the democracy would no longer function. Bad photos could slip into the magazine merely because nobody was voting in the middle of the night. This outcome would undermine the integrity of the democracy that underpins Archive. What would we do then? The answer: write an algorithm. If software is eating the world than surely it can fix our stupid magazine.

DON’t LOOK BACK MATT SCHROETER, 73.2%

STOCKISTS C H I N AT OW N El Kartel – 104 E Pender St The Tuck Shoppe – 237 Union St

G A S T OW N The Latest Scoop – 159 Water St Save On Meats – 43 W Hastings St

MAIN STREET Still Life – 2315 Main St

YA L E T OW N Small Victory – 1088 Homer St

WEST END Delany’s Coffee House – 1105 Denman St

SOUTH GRANVILLE National Standards – 3012 Granville St

— SAM KERR

12    Archive

CHECK OUR WEBSITE OR INSTAGRAM FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF DISTRIBUTION LOCATIONS.


PARTNER BEER FOR #SEAWHEEZE 2017


SUBSCRIBE TO ARCHIVE VA N C O U V E R $9.95 SHIPPING INCLUDED

If you like Archive, now you can support it as we started a Patreon page to run our subscription service. For $9.95 we will mail you the latest copy of Archive Vancouver as soon as it comes off the press. Shipping is included. Ten bucks may seem like a lot for a magazine but it’s pretty close to what you’d pay for a beer at the Cactus Club and it’s less than a pack of smokes. Hell, I paid $25 for nachos at Colony last week and that’s cheese melted on chips.

If you can’t afford to part ways with 10 bucks but you still want to support Archive, we will take the change in your couch. For more information check   www.patreon.com/archivemagazine

THANK YOU TO OUR PATRONS We would like to thank all of our generous patrons. You have excellent taste in magazines. You’re also very good looking. Our patrons don’t simply buy cool magazines, they support the work that makes Archive Vancouver possible. So, if you like Archive, consider becoming a patron. ALLAN HARDING BILIANA PANIC BRIANNA JOHNSON CHARLIE KERR CHRISTINE GIESBRECT CHRISTONE TAM CHRIST Y CLARKE DAVE DEVISSER DENNIS FUHR

DESEAN O’FLAHERT Y FRISCO HORSE WRIGHT JESSIE M. GIGUERE JOANNA RICK ARD JOHN BELLO KIMBERLY LOW K YLA HAWKINS LEANNE FUHR MATT HANNS SCHROETER

MEREDY TH MCINNEYS MICHAEL BUBLÉ RON BANKS ROY PAT SCOTT LYON SILVIJA CRNJAK TIM BRODY TIM CUSTANCE

ARCHIVE VANCOUVER IS MADE POSSIBLE WITH THE GENEROUS SUPPORT OF THESE LOCAL BUSINESSES. IF YOU LIKE ARCHIVE SUPPORT OUR FRIENDS.

14    Archive


Serving the Mount Pleasant Community For 10 Years Walk-ins welcome, appointments recommended. Book online at belmontbarbers.ca 111 East Broadway at Main Street, Vancouver


Archive Staff Picks Readers of Archive tell me that they love seeing portraits in the magazine, but pictures of human faces have been highly unpopular on the app lately. To square this circle, I asked the guys to choose a portrait as their staff pick. So, enjoy these fine portraits in spite of their terrible scores.

I was watching Netflix and I stumbled across The Joy of Painting with Bob Ross. It’s weird because he’s the most relaxed person I’ve ever seen on television yet he used to be a drill sergeant in the American military. His job was yelling at people. Anyway, if Bob Ross were to paint this woman, he would use a paper towel and foam brush with alizarin crimson and yellow ochre for texture. And why don’t we just put a happy little tree over here while we’re at it.

1 6     S taff P i c ks

Pop Kyla Hawkins, 68.2%


Saturday Summer Sizzler Series CELEBRATE TOGETHERNESS AND ABSTINENCE FROM WORK

ON SELECT SATURDAYS 1-7 PM

SATURDAY SATURDAY SATURDAY SATURDAY

CRAFT CIDER RARE RELEASES GROWLER FILLS

JUNE 3 JULY 15 AUGUST 12 SEPT 16

OUTDOORS AT SUNDAY CIDER 1575 VERNON DR, VANCOUVER BC SUNDAYCIDER.COM

@SUNDAYCIDER

KIDDOS ‘N DOGS WELCOME

STREET FOOD PACIFIC RHYTHM SOUND SELECTORS


I would bet $1000 that she doesn’t own that hat. I’m not saying it doesn’t look great on her in the context of this photo, but there’s no way a girl that cool owns a pink dad hat. It doesn’t even fit her head. Plus, pink and red clashes. You’re not fooling anyone.

Style Grace Liu, 75.6%

1 8     S taff P i c ks


Hand Crafted Cocktails & Nigiri Specials 6 POWELL ST. GASTOWN www.di6mond.com diamondgastown

thediamondgastown

gastowndiamond


This woman is holding a pinecone and it looks great. It’s no wonder that advertising uses pretty women to sell things. I’d buy that pinecone. As a thought experiment, what’s the worst thing she could be holding without ruining the photograph? A diaper? A dead animal? Donald Trump’s severed head? The fact that the pinecone doesn’t ruin this image is a photographic achievement. Bravo.

2 0     S taff P i c ks

Nathalie Kyla Hawkins, 65.2%


GE T R I G GE T T I G

IT H T IT H T

- PERS ON AL TRAI N IN G BY T IGHT C LU B AT HL E T IC S LET’S GE T YO U STAR T E D Mention “archive17” and save 1 0 % of f yo u r pe rso n a l t ra in in g pa cka g e . Email info@ tightclu bat hle t ics. co m to f in d o u t m o re .

@tightclub

604.620.0209

tightclubathletics.com


This may seem like a staff pick but it’s actually guerilla marketing for Robson Sports. Their messaging is next level. They sell Jerseys! Hoodies! Caps! and Toques! as you can see in the tiny, crappy white poster beside this woman. Ignore the fact that she’s standing on her tip toes for no good reason and shop for your sporting needs at Robson Sports!

Minty Riun Garner, 70.9%

22    Archive


C L I N I C A L M AS SAG E T H E R A PY

Get treated. We are a collaborative and diverse group of RMTs that are dedicated to helping people recover from the pain and stress caused by hunching over keyboards, recovering from injury, or pursuing athletic greatness.

Book Online or Contact Us: www.treatmentroomhealth.com 604-730-1156 #3-1854 West 1st Ave info@treatmentroomhealth.com

S U B S CRI B E A T P A T RE O N . C O M /A RCHIVE M A G A Z I N E     2 3


So I heard this person is famous. Apparently she’s Madison on a show called UnReal. I’ve never seen it but people tell me it’s excellent. I’m happy for her too. Vancouver is a good place for famous people. I was at the Stone Temple Cabaret on that night in the 90s when Ben Affleck rolled in like William Longpenis and started hitting on teenagers. A brush with greatness. That same night he cheated on Jennifer Lopez with a stripper from Brandi’s and it ended his marriage. I don’t know if he’s done something to fix his head since but he was wearing a hairpiece that night, no fucking lie.

Just A Gaze Of Your Beauty Grace Liu, 70.6%

24    Archive


- WHY THE TUCK NOT? www.thetuckshoppe.com | 604.620.6773 | 237 Union St. Vancouver, BC


What has two thumbs, enjoys great photography, and can’t get ever enough of delicious spaghetti?   This guy!

Bubble Pop Jordan Ting, 81.1% DON’t LOOK BACK MATT SCHROETER, 73.2%

26    Archive


A VANCOUVER CROSSWORD

WITH DICK JOKES

Puzzle by Harrison Mooney. Edited by Merlin Von Duck.

  ACROSS 1

Like woodwinds, such as the clarinet or saxophone 7 Hindu woman’s garment 11 Ryan Reynolds and Blake Lively have this 14 Put something on 15 “No ___!” (“Piece of cake!”) 16 Gardening tool (or your ex-girlfriend, maybe) 17 Runner with a statue on the seawall 19 Kit ___ Ace 20 From ___ Z 21 One working on ReBoot or The Raccoons 23 These bastards had me on hold for 40 minutes to change my plan 25 Eater of Vancouver-based Daiya “cheese” 26 Where Marty McFly is trapped in “Back to the Future” 29 Aladdin’s monkey 31 Fall, like a Jenga tower 33 Via ___ (famous Roman road) 36 Place for a plumber’s snake 39 “___ the laaaaand of the freeee...” 40 Explorer with a statue in front of City Hall 43 Words for the deaf (abbr.) 44 Examining closely, as a bikini body 45 Like a crust, or your friend who clicks “maybe” on Facebook invites 46 Suppress 48 Emily Carr degree (abbr.) 49 City home to Pickton’s farm, familiarly 50 Weird French children’s book elephant 54 Perlman married to Danny DeVito 58 Thing you hate doing at the gym 60 Afr. country whose capital is Addis Ababa 61 Last word in many Donald Trump tweets 63 Famous Canadian with a statue in the park (and a cup named after him) 66 Much ___ About Nothing 67 ___’ Pea (Popeye’s kid) 68 Unstoppable, in NBA Jam 69 SMS or Chinese food ingredient 70 Type of manager or coach (abbr.) 71 “The Lion Sleeps Tonight” band (or stockings)

LAST MONTH’S ANSWERS

  DOWN 1

Amy Winehouse song where she says “No, no, no” 2 Related on one’s mother’s side 3 Actor Flynn who died in Vancouver 4 Palme ___ (Cannes Film Festival prize) 5 BC Attorney-General 6 Eerie feeling you get when they change something in The Matrix 7 Piece of parsley 8 Fragrance 9 Like a Valentine’s Day dinner at Le Crocodile 10 Sarcastic exclamation of disbelief (2 words) 11 Tennis star Maria who won the first ever Vancouver Open in 2002 12 A long, long time 13 Crossed out 18 Opposite of WSW on compasses 22 Naughty By Nature wants to know if you’re down with this 24 Cave for a dragon 27 Smooth and aerodynamic, like a sports car 28 With 47-down, one-legged marathoner with four statues at BC Place 30 Food served at Solly’s and Siegel’s 32 Type of switch 33 Shocked... absolutely shocked

34 Weird green pasta sauce made with pine nuts 35 Furry VPD member who stars in an annual charity calendar 36 506, in old Rome 37 Vied for office, or did a marathon 38 Director Lee of “Brokeback Mountain” 41 Women are getting these tattooed on their faces nowadays 42 Suffix with sec or tit 47 See 28-down 48 Newfoundland’s Cape ___ Island, where Stephen Harper once wanted to build that stupid “Mother Canada” statue 51 Parcels of land 52 Fixture next to the toilet used for cleaning your 53-down 53 See 52-down 55 Prefix with -centrism indicating the sun is at the centre of our solar system 56 Forever, to Keats or Byron 57 “I remember it well...” (2 words) 59 “Frozen” princess 61 Pianist told to “play it again” in Pacific pastels Casablanca Steph Hunter, 76.3% 62 Things found on several pages of this magazine 64 ___ port in a storm 65 League for Tom Brady and concussions

S U B S CRI B E A T P A T RE O N . C O M /A RCHIVE M A G A Z I N E     2 7


28    Archive

Big Rig Jig Jashua Grafstein, 63.5%


CAR2LMFAO

A

By Douglas Haddow

nyone who regularly leaves their home knows that commuting in Vancouver can present a challenge. Sure, it’s no L.A., with its byzantine parking regulations and casual freeway executions. Nor is it Detroit, where a two-hour bus wait in the bitter doom of winter is not an uncommon experience. To be fair, it’s not even all that comparable to Montreal, home to the infamous bottleneck between Pie IX and Chemin de la Côte-de-Liesse, which has seen the spectrum of conception, birth, and death all on a stretch of concrete under a kilometre long. Given enough perspective, getting around in Vancouver isn’t all that difficult. Our monorail is still new and shiny, our traffic is only congested by Canadian standards, and our busses are relatively disease-free. But Vancouverites were never one for perspective. We’re the type of people who are willing to pay two grand for a hastily renovated 1BR in the West End just so we’re within walking distance of a job that can barely cover said rent. The type who will tell out-of-towners dumb shit like “you know, this really is the best place on earth”, and actually believe it. So much so that we put it on our fucking license plates. And we are definitely the type who thinks that bike lanes are the apex of progressive politics and the surest sign that a city is, ahem, world-class. If you live in Vancouver proper, you should be cycling— transforming the foot work of the rat race into burnt calories and chiseled calves. But for me personally, that just seems like a lot of sweat and misery. While the socialist in me values a strong, well-funded, and unionized transit system, my inner selfish cunt has grown tired of sharing precious personal space with members of the public who think it’s acceptable to play YouTube videos on their phones at full volume, without headphones, five inches away from your face. And I’ve seen some of the greatest minds of my generation crippled by the paranoia of the parking tickets, break-ins, and tow-jobs that come with bringing your own car to work. So that’s out too. That leaves one viable commute option: a car share account. But at 41 cents a minute, they only make fiscal sense if you can get from A to B in a brisk manner. Fifteen minutes tops all said and done or you might as well be taking a cab, Mr. Rockefeller. At low tide, I can get from door to door in 10 minutes. During rush hour it can take up to 30, depending on how many N-stickered SUVs I encounter. There’s only so much wiggle room once you’re on the road, so entering and exiting the share cars must be flawlessly executed. Luxuries like listening to your own music are a no go, as connecting your phone via Bluetooth to the Prius

sound system can eat up an extra 90 seconds. That leaves commercial radio or the news as your two entertainment choices. With the news, the bad juju is relentless. It’s all fascist slumlord politicians, boiling oceans, seal attacks, charred forests, suicidal robots, viral drownings, and opioid crisis this, housing crisis that. Absorbing the infinite bummers of the world through your ear holes will only slow you down. So the only logical choice is commercial radio: JRfm, Z95.3, JackFM, and Virgin. All these stations are staffed by nattering idiots that play deeply alienating music produced by some faraway corporate algorithm that was designed to correlate Shazam analytics with the daily volume of the NASDAQ. But at least it won’t make you think. Because thinking about anything other than shaving seconds off your commute is the enemy here. Keep that in mind. But once and while, when you’re jockeying for position to get that extra edge by taking Quebec rather than Main, or avoiding Broadway by busting a hard right down East 6th Ave and breezing through residential stop signs like nobody’s business, you catch a break. A brief oasis of aural tranquility that will remind you of all the good in world. Yesterday I had one of the moments. Traffic was backed up on East Hastings due to a hit and run, so I clipped down Campbell to Prior, turned the radio up and heard a string of words I hadn’t heard in far too long. Everybody just have a good time. And we gon’ make you lose your mind. Party rock is in the house tonight. It was “Party Rock Anthem” by LMFAO. Only a few years old, the song now seems like it’s from a different century. A parallel dimension even. One where Barack Obama was still president. And one where Steve Jobs was still alive, designing awesome stuff. Where Osama Bin Laden was still on the run and no one had ever heard of ISIS before. A time when things were more chill and less complicated. When people could wear neon kufiyahs and everyone loved those American Apparel hoodies. When Lost was still a TV show. And also when Mad Men was still a TV show. Prince was still alive. And so were a bunch of other really great people. Some bad people too. Like Gadhafi and Kim Jong-il. That was a simpler time. A time before car shares. A time when we didn’t have to obsess over seconds. And if you listen to the radio long enough, you might catch a glimpse.

@ A RCHIVE A P P     2 9


Top 1 Vancouver Listicle Of The Month By Sam Kerr

W

riting the phrase “Millennials love listicles” makes me feel like one of those dreams where you show up at school with no pants on. Unfortunately, I don’t get to choose what people like to read and if I wanted to “do what I love” I should have pursued a career in competitive eating. So here goes, welcome to Archive Vancouver’s second ever Bottom 1 Vancouver Listicle of the Month.

Even objectively good things like alcohol can be abused. With that in mind, here’s a list of the 4 worst places to wake up from a blackout in Vancouver! 4. The Hospital I heard about a guy who woke up from a bender in a hospital bed with a mysterious pain in his abdomen. He didn’t know how he got to the hospital and he had no memory of undergoing emergency surgery to remove the bullet from his stomach. Also, he was handcuffed to the bed. Apparently it started with money problems. The guy lost his job. He had a big mortgage and the financial stress was weighing on his marriage. He loved his wife and didn’t want to lose his home so he needed some cash, fast. The answer to his money problem revealed itself near the bottom of a bottle of inexpensive rye. It was so obvious. He’d steal his brother’s handgun and rob the local bank. Robbing a bank is difficult under normal circumstances but it’s nearly impossible when you’ve consumed 20 ounces of Canadian liquor. Unsurprisingly, things went badly from the start. He caught his shoe on the welcome mat as entered the bank and fell to the ground. The gun, naturally, slipped out of his pocket and slid across the shiny marble floor. His attempt to retrieve the weapon was so panicked and clumsy that he accidentally squeezed the trigger and discharged a round into the wall. Bank patrons screamed. A nearby security guard stopped Snapchatting, coldly analyzed the situation, drew his sidearm, and shot our friend in the stomach. Bank robbery over. At least the guy got sober in jail. 3. Jail (or the Drunk Tank, probably) I was in the drunk tank once. The room was a concrete box with fluorescent lights and a metal drain in the centre of the floor. It contained six extremely intoxicated men in various states of dishevelment.

30    Archive

One of the men was around 50 years old and appeared to be homeless. Around 4AM he unzipped his fly and attempted to masturbate. Another one of our cellmates, a 20-something douche dressed like a reality TV bro, didn’t take kindly to the public masturbation. So, there was a beating. Nobody wants to see that. 2. Rogers Arena, 300 level. I was at a game last year and some dude passed out in the row in front of me. He was extraordinarily intoxicated. His head tilted back and his mouth dropped open and he was done. The Canucks were getting caked so everyone in the row decided we’d entertain ourselves by seeing how much stuff we could put in the guy’s mouth before he woke up. His friends didn’t seem to care. In fact they started it by placing a pair of ticket stubs in his gaping pie hole. Next, someone used a soggy foam finger to mime fellatio. Then we began stacking empty beers in his mouth like a cup holder. The stack was six high at its apex. He woke up just as Jayson Megna scored a utterly meaningless goal in garbage time. 1. BC Ferries Back when Archive started we considered doing a listicle outlining the top five BC Ferries Bathrooms in which do to drugs. Our new, more mature, editorial board rejected that story because it was not cool in any way. Speaking of not cool, my mother lives on Galiano Island and when I was 18 I would go visit her on weekends. There was only one sailing from the mainland to and from Galiano each day. It leaves from Tsawwassen and it services a number of the gulf islands, Galiano being the first stop on the journey. Problem is, if you happen to black out and don’t get off on Galiano you’re screwed. Let’s assume that you’re 18 and you’ve been up all night drinking with friends and you have to go visit your Mum on Galiano so you take the bus from UBC to the Tsawwassen ferry terminal at 6AM. When you arrive you’re still very drunk and once you’ve paid for your ticket and gotten on the boat you immediately pass out. Here’s what might happen next, some BC Ferries employee will kick you off the boat on Saturna Island and you’ll end up barfing in the bushes beside the ferry terminal. Then you’ll sit around with pukebreath all day until the evening ferry takes you back to Galiano. Hi mum!


DEPARTURE BAY 

Brian Giesbrecht, 63.9% 

@ A RCHIVE A P P     3 1


Excuse me sir, can you park elsewhere Luke Welland, 67.7%

BLOW IT OUT YOUR EAR with Trevor Risk Local man describes everything terrible about the music business in Vancouver. 32    Archive


R

ecently I got in a Twitter fight with David Crosby. Well, “fight” implies there were two sides battling. It was more like me questioning his logic and him and his sycophantic followers just calling me infantile names instead of addressing the point. This isn’t surprising. Boomers, especially music industry clods, are mostly known at this point for preaching being part of a “peace and love” generation, but they make ad hominem attacks, did drugs made by militias, and drove cars made by Nazis. It’s all very predictable in 2017 dealing with any of these types of artists who made more money than anyone should have during a bloated period of music financials. The vestigial point that the starter spore of Melissa Etheridge’s child was trying to make is that streaming sites don’t pay artists anything. His argument was a very thin caterwauling routine about how his latest album hasn’t made him any money—I’m sure anyone reading this far into a long-form bitch-piece about the music industry can tell that there are some very obvious holes in his argument. Not the least of which is that David Crosby’s likely got a legion of toadies getting high sniffing his farts, telling him his latest work is genius. If Crosby could fast track past the great unwashed and get a new brain transplant like he did with his liver years ago, he might have enough time to realize that the people telling him he’s not making any money are the ones taking his money. Two or so years ago, I skimmed the umpteeth article where an artist complained about not making money with the new streaming model. I believe it was Portishead who was up-to-bat for making loud noises about not having the same income they did when CDs were $25. They named the amount of money they made in their last quarter and it caught my eye because I thought to myself “Wait. That’s only $200 more than I made this quarter, and nobody listens to my band.” I won’t run down my CV, but I’ve done most jobs in this business (except agent, which is a position I’m waiting to be replaced by an app). So with my album, I did the 40 minutes worth of work uploading, ISRC coding, and licensing my own music. There was no make-work middle-person between me and my audience, and despite having meagre attention paid to my release (minus a pornographic music video that feminist pornographers latched onto accidentally) I made some money. It wasn’t enough to float my life, but it was nearly as much as famed trip-hop legacy act, Portishead. The first issue that artists don’t seem to understand about streaming is that it’s not all just one medium. On-demand platforms like Spotify are as different from streaming radio as the record store is from terrestrial radio. Screeching that “streaming doesn’t pay” is grouping together varying platforms that shouldn’t be. They also all payout different amounts and percentages. Furthermore, back in the days of record sales, artists and the people on the take they employed, would see a cash bubble on release day from

sales, and then it would dissolve, later hoping to revive those numbers with special edition releases and television/ movie syncs. With all the streaming platforms, if an artist creates something for the ages, the payment never stops. It’s continuous. It’s almost like how we ridicule athletes for going broke, but they make what’s expected to be their life’s income in 1.8 years, and at the age of 23, while the rest of us stretch it out, and usually make most of our income in our 50s. It’s shocking to me (not actually that shocking anymore, having worked with artists for so long) that artists can’t tell that the people who are telling them that Spotify et al. are the bad guys, are the exact people who are taking that money. Artists can do their own work. A label stooges’ starting salary is below the poverty line. It’s not difficult to do that job. The thing is, artists don’t think they should have to do it. It’s not their job, in their mind. My friends with business degrees constantly say they do not understand the music industry. If you put it through the filter of business semantics, you can see why. Artists aren’t the commodity, the music is. They aren’t the labour force, the label employees and managers are. This is the only way I have explained it to business people: imagine you were an egg farmer, and the chickens yelled at you all the time about how you were handling and selling the eggs, but they refused to do anything other than sit in their coop and squeeze out product. On a larger scale, what bothers me most about the whole argument is that NOBODY CARES ABOUT THE WORK. Artists used to be interesting. They used to say provocative things, and lead the entire culture of fashion and slang and everything else that was cool. Now the ranking list of influence in popular society goes something like: 1. Instagram models 2. Satirical Twitter accounts 3. RuPaul 4. Actors 5. Celebrity pawn shop owners 6. Right wing pundits online 7. People yelling at right wing pundits online …. 4734. Musicians And it’s because musicians and pop artists don’t do anything now other than talk about how the sausage is made, which is about as interesting as when your girlfriend comes home from work, sits you down and goes over the mindless minutiae of how Colleen is a total bitch and calls too many meetings. Playing the guitar as a form of musical expressions is speaking in a dead language for a myriad of reasons, but the biggest one might be that the language guitar owners are speaking in is baby talk, and their parents are the ones stealing their allowance.

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with David Stansfield

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et’s talk about desert island selections. This is a matter of great personal interest. Whenever people find out what I do for work, the first question is inevitably, “what’s your favourite wine?” In my mind, I answer something like, “Man, I don’t know. What do you do for a living? Oh, you’re an accountant. What’s your favourite Excel equation? That’s right. They’re all great.” Of course, this is not what I say. Instead, I waff le something about context. It’s the answer of a coward who can’t pick favourites, but it’s true. Context matters. Tom Petty sounds better in a car. Beer tastes better after sports. And, street tacos beat restaurant tacos every time. That brings us to desert island selections. While I may not have a favourite wine, I know with unwavering certainty my choice for desert island album. It’s Michael Jackson’s Thriller. It is a perfect work of art. The only thing you can knock it for is Paul McCartney. He may be the third best Beatle, but he’s still a fucking Beatle. That’s crazy. While it may not be my all-time favourite album, it’s definitely my desert island album. No album makes me happier. Think about it. You’re marooned on a desert island. Things are not looking good. Despite that, you’ve got to dig deep and find the motivation to fish, forage, build shelter, and survive. This is not the time for Leonard Cohen. Oh no, this is thriller night. From the first gong of “Beat It” to the last echo of Vincent Price’s cackle on “Thriller”, I’d be dancing around that desert island getting shit done. Boats could cruise by and I’d just wave them off like, “Nah, it’s cool. Come back after ‘Baby Be Mine.’” Context matters. With that in mind, here are my desert island selections for drink, food, and drugs.

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David began his wine career as a teenage cellar hand 20 years ago. Today, he works as an independent sommelier and is a co-host of the popular Sunday School wine school. When not ruminating on the grape, his interests include spy novels, escape rooms, contact juggling, Slovenian design, and beer.

Le Vieux Pin Vaila Rosé | $24 direct from winery Rosé as a meme—the Rosé Lifestyle—jumped the shark this summer. Frosé, Brosé, White Girl Rosé: we get it. Pink wine is delicious. But that’s just it, pink wine is delicious. This isn’t the 90s anymore. We’re allowed to like things even if they’re dumb and popular. And you know what? Thank God for that. Because I’ve got a bucket of rosé and half a season of Riverdale to get through. As long as it’s dry, pink wine is also refreshing. I like mine made from something light like Gamay or, like Le Vieux Pin’s Vaila Rosé, Pinot Noir. It’s perfect for chilling under a palm tree while listening to “P.Y.T.” Lois Lake Steelhead Trout Ceviche $13 at Cuchillo I’m not very handy. There will be no fires on my desert island. There may, however, be citrus. That means ceviche, delicious, tart, nourishing ceviche. Fish cooked by the acidity of fruit. It’s a beautiful thing. Vancouver’s best ceviche is at Cuchillo in Railtown. The Lois Lake Steelhead Trout Ceviche with cucumber, chayote, jalapeno, lychee, and mint may be one of the city’s best bites. It’s perfect for chilling under a palm tree and listening to “P.Y.T.” while sipping rosé. Blue Dream | $12/gram at various dispensaries I may not be handy, but I can garden. My garden is lush and bountiful. My hippie neighbour’s kids feast on all of my berries and that’s totally cool. Can you imagine what it must feel like to be bush height, eye-to-eye with a ripe blueberry? You’ve got to eat that thing. The legendary Blue Dream strain is a gardener’s delight. It grows bushy and tall in a bunch of different climates with little care needed making it ideal for desert islands. The high balances a full-body mellow with a gentle trip. It’s perfect for chilling under a palm tree, etc.


R ADULT COLOURING BOOK “A NEW HOPE”

Art by Michelle Yu | www.whenimanoldman.com @michellewhyu on Instagram

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PEOPLE

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Commenter of the Month

Each month, we choose people from Vancouver to supply the comments that accompany the photos in the magazine. If you would like to be the commenter, check the questionnaire on page 5 and send your answers to info@elective.ca.

A R C H I V E S TA F F

LorettaCella 56.8%

When you work on a publishing schedule you find out that people are unreliable. This month, the professionally funny person we asked to supply the commentary for the People section didn’t show up to work. So that responsibility fell onto the Archive staff. We apologize in advance.

Yared N.  Illya Swan, 78.7%

Time & Space John Bello, 85.6%

There’s been a torrent of backlash against the Archive staff’s comments in these spaces. Apparently our jokes aren’t funny. For this month only, we’ve decided to let you snowflakes enjoy the People section without commentary. Congratulations, the terrorists won.

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Take a piece of my heart Grace Liu, 83.3%


Making Friends Connor Merrick, 88.3 %

Business call  Jon Cranny, 71.6%

Blooming love  Grace Liu, 62.5 %

Def3  Joel Dufresne, 75%

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Through The Eyes Of The Beholder  Tristan Cabida, 83.9%

LATE NIGHT COWBOY ChelseaKer, 76.5% 4 0     P e opl e

QuinN Daniela Arbaje, 83.3%


TRANQUILITY  Laura Mohr, 75.5%

Emilija GRACE LIU, 77.4% @ A RCHIVE A P P     4 1


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Summer Time w/ D

Victor Yuen, 75.6%

Stanley Park  Kyla Hawkins, 74.5%


Sarah GRACE LIU, 80%

Summer is here Victor Yuen, 71.7%

Extraordinary GRACE LIU, 75.7%

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Heavy Hitter  Envy Bota, 63.4.7%

Kaleidoscope colours Claire Rozek, 62.2%

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Cherry gum friends JORDAN TING, 75.0%

Stephanie Hansen Cristina Simaika, 63.0 %


Ice cream for days Kyla Hawkins, 77.7%

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Daniela Arbaje, 74.1% 2 BLUE BALLS  BRETT BURNS, 78.7 % 3 LOVERS  Daniela Arbaje, 77.5% 5 JOELLE AND THE CELESTIAL ODyssey LarryChen, 69.6.% 2

4 The Pauper and the KinG Ty Webb, 65.9% 6 LOst in thoughts  Grace LIU, 74.3% 7 ROBIN  BriannaJohnson, 79.2% 8 DRIVING MISS DAISY BRETT BURNS, 75.0% 9 I DON’t see you anymore LARRY CHEN, 75.1% 10 ...And then i woke up IllyaSwan, 74.6%

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P L AC E S

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Little Red Riding Hood exists! BON BAHAR, 88.1%


AARON: Excellent use of light to bring out the human element in the image, giving us a sense of scale and making the colour pop.

Commenter of the Month

AARON VON HAGEN Aaron Von Hagen was born in Yellowknife but he has called Vancouver home for 12 years. When he’s not taking pictures he’s working in the film industry or planning a trip or an adventure of some sort, assuming he’s had his daily caffeine intake of course.

It’s lonely at the top  Gianna Mara 86%

AARON: Great perspective and I dig how the buildings aren’t the same size, showing the height of the fog more clearly.

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The Water Mirror  Gianluca Bongo, 81.9%

LACMA JORDAN TING, 85.8%

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ESCALATED 

JORDAN TING, 84.4%


Directions 

Sharon Wish, 78.9%

Moraine Lake  Isaac M Zipursky, 80.7%

Jordan Ting, 84.4% AARON: While I’m not scared of heights, I get a little woozy from the perspective and thinking what it would be like to be up top. Nice work!

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Cold Storage  Nathan Skirrow, 83%

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AARON: This image is a perfect example of how light and shadows can add so much interest to an otherwise “uninteresting” location. Love this.

  BRIAN FOGERTY, 82.8%

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negative space 

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Sonika Arora, 85.7%


Moraine Lake 

Jashua Grafstein, 87.5%

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Clouds in the ‘Couve Aaron Von Hagen, 83.3% AARON: I remember the day I took this photo, secretly hoping that this was the start of the real life “Independence Day

AARON: Loving the colour gradient in the water, and how it leads my eye to the silhouetted figure.

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SPRAY Milan Stanic, 84.4%


The Art of Being Alone  SHARON WISH, 82.3% Gastown in the rain... ANDY PAUL, 84.8%

STANLEY PARK DAYDREAM  ANDY PAUL, 82.3%

Never miss a sunset Gabriel Richard, 84.4%

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LAKE LOUISE Marija Bojanić, 84.1%

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SUNNY DAYS Marija Bojanić, 82.6%

Lighthouse park at sunset Emmett Sparling, 81.8%

CLOUDS Marija Bojanić, 81.5%

BEACH VIBES  Sonika Arora, 84.1% S U B S CRI B E A T P A T RE O N . C O M /A RCHIVE M A G A Z I N E     5 9


AARON: One of my favourite adventures so far this summer was running around Dinosaur Provincial Park by myself at night, letting my imagination run wild.

Hoodoos Aaron Von Hagen, 83.3%

Biliana Panic, 81.5% 6 0     P la c e s

Deep Shadows  JUSTIN HO, 80.2%


It’s all within reach SHARON WISH, 79.7%

BIKER Milan Stanic, 64.9%

It’s closing time Christopher Trottier, 81.5% S U B S CRI B E A T P A T RE O N . C O M /A RCHIVE M A G A Z I N E     6 1


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AARON: Oh good, I can grab a few packs before hitting the slots. Such a clean image/reflection with what some would consider “dirty” subject matter. 14 STOP FOR A WHILE DAVE BAROS, 83%

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1 TOFINO  JEN PICKLE, 61.2% 2 EAST VAN   JEN PICKLE, 64.4% 3 So Vancouver  LUKE WELLAND, 64.4% 4 TESTING THE WATERS  SYDNEY HERZOG, 58.7% 5 Skate and destroy  ANDY TRASLIN, 67.1 %

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Top Photographer: Roy Pat Top Photographer is a ranking based on the average score of a person’s best five photos in a given issue. The winner will be awarded this section of the magazine to do with as they please. Last issue’s winner was Roy Pat.

@ ROY PAT

W H O A R E YO U A N D W H AT D O YO U D O W H E N YO U A R E N ’ T TA K I N G P I C T U R E S ?

I’m a commercial real estate agent, focused solely on industrial real estate. (Please don’t blame me for housing prices!) Although I have a pretty heavy workload and am office-oriented Monday to Friday, in my spare time, aside from taking photos, I love to cycle, hike, ride my motorcycle, climb, play squash, and travel. W H AT K I N D O F C A M E R A D O YO U U S E ? C A N YO U G I V E U S A T I P O N H OW T O TA K E A G R E AT P H O T O?

I was shooting with a Sony NEX-5N for a number of years and then upgraded to a full frame Sony a7 about a year-and-a-half ago. I love mirrorless digital cameras since you can adapt old film camera lenses to them with cheap adapters you can buy off eBay. I actually use one of my dad’s old Canon FD film camera lenses that he originally bought over 30 years ago and it still works great. As far as tips, I personally try to stick to basics like the “rule of thirds” in most of my photos to make sure that they feel generally pleasing to look at. But more importantly, I try to make sure I’m regularly going to interesting places so that the landscape and location are already doing most of the work for me!

and make sure I visit four new places every year, near, or far. Life is short! W H O I S YO U R FAVO U R I T E L O C A L P H O TO G R A P H E R A N D W H Y ?

There are plenty of local photographers who take amazing travel/hiking photos but I think I really respect other photographers that have a different aesthetic/subject from what I usually shoot. @jjudelee puts out some awesome portraiture and other work. W H AT D O YO U L OV E A B O U T VA N CO U V E R ?

I was travelling in mainland China this past February. Beijing and Shanghai each have a population of over 20 million people, and you realize after spending time in the hordes of people at train stations, in the subway, in line for anything, and basically anywhere that we have it pretty good over here. I remember seeing a few train station posters advertising what I think was some sort of retirement fund, and their imagery of an “ideal retirement” were things like a person paddling a kayak in a pristine lake surrounded by pine trees, or a lady rock climbing. It made me realize that most who live in a city of 20+ million people would rather be somewhere else with less people and more outdoors activities. We are lucky! W H AT D O YO U H AT E A B O U T VA N CO U V E R ?

D O YO U H AV E A N Y T R I P S P L A N N E D T H I S S U M MER?

I’m heading to Tofino for the first time and staying there for a few nights in August, and then have a trip planned to visit Taipei and the Philippines for the first time in November. One of the entries in my annual “personal/business plan” is to try

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Everyone complains about the weather from October to April, which is a totally fair complaint and I’m not exactly a fan myself. But I think what bothers me more about Vancouver is the tendency for friend groups to be somewhat cliquey and less open to new members. People in the city are usually very friendly in the polite asking-for-directions sense. But the most


Hiking up to Isthmus Peak near Wanaka, New Zealand

common complaint I hear from new migrants to the city is that it takes a lot of effort until someone invites you to social events with their established inner circle. W H AT ’ S YO U R FAVO U R I T E P L AC E T O H AV E A B E E R I N VA N CO U V E R ?

R&B Brewing in Mount Pleasant has a nice patio, a great selection of craft beer (try the Vancouver Special IPA), and surprisingly good pizza to boot. Plus, it’s always nice to be able to support local businesses that actually have a far better product than the bigger players. I F YO U CO U L D C H A N G E O N E O R A F E W T H I N G S A B O U T A R C H I V E , W H AT WO U L D T H E Y B E ?

Firstly, I think that the photo preview system for ranking photos in-app unfairly favours certain kinds of photos—

squarer format, larger and bolder subjects. You can’t assess anything with fine detail. Higher resolution previews and/or a system to zoom in on each photo would be a nice addition. Secondly, although it’s a photography-focused magazine (which I love), I think that there should be more structure with the way that non-photo content is featured in the magazine. I think a “new in Vancouver” section would be great—talking about any new restaurants, coffee shops, clothing stores etc. within the city. Why not partner with local food bloggers that could provide photography and reviews? Lastly, I think the Archive editor commentary on photos, which seem to sometimes be unrelated to the photos themselves, should be removed entirely. I find it actually distracts from appreciating the photography.

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(Above) I was walking around Lima, Peru and heard a really loud group of birds in a tree. When I walked closer to take a look, I realized there were about 50 (Right) A sunrise hot air balloon ride in Cappadocia, Turkey

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Runyon Canyon Park, Los Angeles

A quick stop at sunset when I rented a motorcycle for a week (pictured in foreground) and rode the Cabot Trail around Cape Breton, Nova Scotia

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The northern lights above a small viewing cabin at the lodge I was staying at, near Whitehorse in the Yukon. I was sipping a glass of whiskey in this cabin looking at this view, and it was really something else

The bamboo forest in Arashiyama near Kyoto, Japan where I stumbled upon a couple getting their wedding photos taken

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I set up for a star trail, and within twenty minutes the clouds rolled in. “Make hay,” as they say…true Celestial Goddess.

An incredibly stressful bridge crossing in Qibao, Shanghai

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A clear night in Scotland, a country not known for its cloudless skies, rendered some amazing images of the Milky Way at the Old Man of Storr.

An oddly peaceful hike in the smog at the Jinshanling section of the Great Wall (It was quiet because everyone was away for Chinese New Year)

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(Above) An Icelandic horse on the south coast of Iceland - I wish my hair could look this well styled

(Left) Reflections along the ring road on the south coast of Iceland

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THINGS

WHEN OUR VISION FADES MARK ANDERSON, 85.2%


Each month, we choose people from Vancouver to supply the comments that accompany the photos in the magazine. If you would like to be the commenter, check the questionnaire on page 5 and send your answers to info@elective.ca.

Dusty: Is anybody else worried that Canuck the Crow has started using his powers for evil? He tampered with evidence at that crime scene a while back, I think he stole a murder weapon or something. And then he stole that lady’s french fries at McDonald’s recently. And I’ve never seen him pay to use the SkyTrain. We should expect more out of our celebrities. Canuck is a role model.

Commenter of the Month DUSTY BAKER Dusty is best known for taking part in the world’s first ever high five on October 2nd 1977. Baker is also the pseudonym of a software engineer who works in Gastown and would like to remain anonymous.

Eleven Sharon Wish, 86.0%

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Strawberry Milk Helen Anna, 77.5%

Herbs and Spices Amberlee Pang, 76.9%

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Chicken and PotaToes Ira Matthew, 73.6%

SUSHI NATHAN CHEN, 73.6%


Poke Bowl  biliana panic, 75.9% TUNA Ira Matthew, 76.6%

MELON BALLS Amberlee Pang, 76.3%

Dusty: . It’s no wonder the Japanese invented sumo wrestling. If I lived in that country I’d weigh 500 pounds too. Look at that sushi. I’m tempted to rip out the page and eat it.

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There is a light at the end of the tunnel LEON Zhou, 79.1% Alex: I find some hallways scary. Maybe I’ve been conditioned by horror movies. Or maybe it’s the fact that the guy who lived down the hall in my apartment complex was just convicted of triple homicide.

RING OF FIRE JUSTIN PARENTEAU, 79.7%

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BULLET IN THE SKY SHARON WISH, 80.3%


WHITHERED//35mm DANIELLE COSTELO, 81.3%

STRIDE BY SILVJiA CRNJAK, 80.7%

THE DINOSAURS OF MADAGASCAR LUKE WELLAND, 77.0%

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FRELENSE DANIKA LEE, 78.4%

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Knock Knacks SAM MASIH, 74.4%

Skulls and Scrolls Mark Anderson, 74.5%

American Muscle Mark Anderson, 75.0%

Dusty: I watched Rocky last week and a few things struck me. First, they really knew how to make movies in the 70s. Second, Stallone looked like a normal human being before he started doing all those steroids. Third, American cars used to rule. Fourth, why are people always setting garbage cans on fire and then standing around them for heat? Was that really a thing?

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BLOB HELEN ANNA, 75.7%

seeing red KAITLIN FORTALEZA, 73.2%

PAYLOAD MARK ANDERSON, 74.0% 8 2     T h i ngs

It’s kind of romantic JEN PICKLE, 73.6%

Secret Hideout KAITLIN FORTALEZA, 75.2%

exhausting the effort/ease relationship JennaMazur 71.7%


Dusty: “French fries come from the Netherlands.” *heritage moment music

GUARANTEED FRESH NATHAN CHEN, 77.5%

When a cat rolls around in blue chalk Claire Rozek, 78.0%

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1 THIS IS JAXON Steph Hunter, 77.2% 2 BEAN  JUSTIn PARENTEAU, 73.3% 3 SPRING SHOWER STEPH HUNTER, 71.8% 4 MAGIC SHARPENER NATHAN CHEN, 72.1% 5 STACKED BRAD DEMELO, 72.0%  6 ELEVATED  Isaac M Zipursky, 71.8% 7 ICED FLOWERS  Amberlee Pang, 72.4% 8 COFFEE LOVE MAURO ADDARI, 71.7%

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T H E G R E AT O U T D O O R S

putting milk on the fire Aaron Von Hagen, 89.6%

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Commenter of the Month R OY PAT Roy Pat is a commercial real estate agent who uses his spare time to cycle, hike, ride his motorcycle, play squash, and travel. He’s also an excellent photographer.

Roy: Whenever I see a shot of the Milky Way I still have a difficult time comprehending the scale of how small we are and how much more “stuff” is out there. Wikipedia tells me that the Milky Way is estimated to contain between 100 and 400 billion stars... whoa.

Monthly is a category that changes in every issue. It could be cats, the beach, your lunch, or concert photos. It’s purpose is to make every issue feel different. Last month’s category was The Great Outdoors. Summer is the best time of year in our part of the world and we wanted to feature the majesty of nature. British Columbia is beautiful and we wanted a section that reflected what we love about the natural glory of our province. Next issue’s category is Places for People Downtown. This summer we’re proud to partner with the City of Vancouver to discover what Vancouverites want out of their public spaces. Streets, plazas, squares, laneways, pathways, or waterfront; they’re the areas where the public life of a city happens. So take some photos while the sun is still shining and show us your favourite Places For People Downtown.

Don’t look down 

Isaac M Zipursky, 89.0%

Roy: I love how much this shot has going on—the spots of flare, the low hanging clouds on the treetops, and of course, that all important element of danger.

Monthly

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FULL MOONS IN JOSHUA TREE AARON VON HAGEN, 86.9%

RAISED WILD Kat Grabowski, 87.2% 8 8     T HE G RE A T O U T D O O R S

FROZEN PARADISE JORDAN TING, 88.0%

FIRST DAY OF SUMMER JUSTIN PARENTEAU, 87.2%


Glacial Flow Biliana Panic, 89.4%

Roy: I wonder if one day climate change will result in Iceland no longer having any ice, and kids will ask their parents why the country was ever named that in the first place.

S U B S CRI B E A T P A T RE O N . C O M /A RCHIVE M A G A Z I N E     8 9


MILKY REFLECTION Aaron Von Hagen, 86.6%

Roy: There is something innately pleasing about looking at a perfect reflection. I wonder if it’s related to humans craving symmetry. For example, if someone puts a slice of cheese on my burger and it’s way off to one side, I can’t help but rip the cheese and reposition it until I’ve got even coverage.

9 0     T HE G RE A T O U T D O O R S


Stacking Stones (Moraine Lake Alberta)  Jashua Grafstein, 86.0

THE BEST TYPE OF ROOM  Connor Merrick, 83.8%

The Darkest Nights Produce The Brightest Stars Isaac M Zipursky, 85.2%

@ A RCHIVE A P P     9 1


KICKING IT ON TOP Lia Zheng, 78.5%

GLASS LukeWelland, 83.9% 9 2     T HE G RE A T O U T D O O R S

GO FORTH Connor Merrick, 81.1%


VASTNESS Gabriel Richard, 84.8%


9 4     T attoos

TREE TOPS SHARON WISH, 87.2%


Roy: This blend of blue fading into orange reminds me of those two-sided Faber-Castell pencil crayons that I used from the ages of 6 to ... now.

PASSING THROUGH DANICA LEE, 89.4%

DAYS IN THE RAIN SHARON WISH, 85.3%

THE LOWDOWN ALISON BOULIER, 81.6%

S U B S CRI B E A T P A T RE O N . C O M /A RCHIVE M A G A Z I N E     9 5


THE FOREST IS LISTENING  SHARION WISH, 83.9%

AFTER THE HIKE  JUSTIN PARENTEAU, 84.7%


S U B S CRI B E A T P A T RE O N . C O M /A RCHIVE M A G A Z I N E     9 7

NIGHTS AT LONG BEACH AARON VON HAGEN, 87.8%

NIGHTS AT LONG BEACH AARON VON HAGEN, 87.8%


Top Rated Photo of Them All —

98    Archive

GEOMETRY Gabriel Richard, 89.5%

Is this a still from Alfred Hitchcock’s…. oh wait, that’s how we began the write up the last time one of these vertigo-inducing stairwell shots won top photo of them all. So go back and re-read issue two if you want to lesson on Hitch and Brian De Palma’s Body Double. And to whoever wants to claim the inside back cover of our next issue, you know what to do now!


Avery Grace Liu, 67.1%

S U B S CRI B E A T P A T RE O N . C O M /A RCHIVE M A G A Z I N E     9 9


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Archive Vancouver Issue 08  
Archive Vancouver Issue 08  

Archive Vancouver magazine and app. Crowd sourced photography from in and around Vancouver, BC. We print the most popular photos and we publ...