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ISSUE NO. 10

www.thearchitectmagazine.com

QUARTER 1 • 2016

T H E O F F I CIA L M AG A Z IN E OF T H E A R C H I T E CTS CH A P T E R, A RCH I T E CT U RA L A S S O CI AT I O N O F K E N Y A

WATERSHED MOMENTS PLUS: CONNECTING THE DOTS • THROWBACK TO THIGIRA • OF SUITS AND PURSUITS • PUSHING ON TOMORROW


Contents

DURA COAT AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE PAGE 24

THE TEAM EDITOR George Arabbu SUB EDITOR Nisha Shah-Alphonso Florence Nyole CONTRIBUTORS Anthony Manyara Diana Lee Smith Elizabeth Ndindi Eric Kigada Etta Madete Gad Opiyo Harrison Maroa Hitesh Mehta Keith Atito Maryann Kariuki Nisha Shah-Alphonso Marylyn Mumbua Musyimi Waweru Gathecha

REGULARS Editor’s Note Chairman’s Message What Architects Talk About Online Profiles Membership List

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FEATURES CONNECTING THE DOTS Critically looking back at the journey and its milestones helps to clarify the present and justify the future.

PAGE 10 WILL THE REAL ARCHITECT PLEASE STAND UP!

PUBLISHED BY Parliament Road The Professional Centre AAK Architects Chapter P. O. Box 44258 - 00100, Nairobi Tel. +254 20 2224806 Mobile: 0721 691 337 Fax. +254 20 2220582 Email: aak@aak.or.ke www.aak.or.ke Design and Production: Centrepress Media Ltd Email: info@centrepressmedia.com www.centrepressmedia.com DISCLAIMER All correspondence to the editor are assumed to be intended for been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this journal, the authors, publishers and editors accept no responsibility for any loss, financial or otherwise, sustained by any other person using this information. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval systems or transmitted in any form or any means without prior written permission from AAK. All rights reserved.

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This is version two of the article that I am writing. The first version was more of a biography listing key watershed moments in my career as an architect.

PAGE 19 AAK 2016 YEAR PLANNER PAGE 38

COMMENTARIES

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PUSHING ON TOMORROW For most architects, their watershed moments occur when they are able to shake the dust off their employee sandals, and strap on shiny boots stamped with ‘I am the boss.’

Architectural Association of Kenya AAK Architects Chapter

@aak_arch

aakmagazine.kenya@gmail.com PAGE 29 www.thearchitectmagazine.com

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EDITOR’S NOTE

GEORGE ARABBU

MY SNEAKER MOMENT

O

n hindsight, that sneaker was my best shoe. It was comfy. It was snug. It was a pencil sketch done during my fresher year, sixteen years ago, which has stuck in my head like an earworm track. It wasn’t obvious what I was getting myself into when joining the school of architecture. I had always wanted to be a filmmaker because I thought I knew what the film industry was all about. Many

“Information Systems.” To me, that’s what came close to filmmaking.

because their exposed feet smelt of rotten eggs and dead rats.

Like all my classmates - 57 of them or so I settled inside the dull concrete building amongst the white pin-up boards waiting for the first lessons on “drawing houses!” This would take another 2 years to materialize in a different form, by which time almost half the group had found greener pastures elsewhere.

Smirks and laughter followed the unpleasant smells, quickly giving way to a long moment of contemplation and pencil scratches. As I got down to put graphite on my sketchpad, I felt a light bulb moment slowly creeping in. A tutor strolled towards my station, posed then spoke softly but firmly on the need to deliberately manipulate the pencil weight. Let the lightweights highlight the edges, bring out depth by showing what is far and what is close, attempt to capture the soft and the hard elements and feel what you are attempting to depict. I remember snippets of what was said during that studio class. That, to me was a significant event in the journey to being an architect.. I am nobody’s fine artist, still the finished product didn’t look bad at all. I saw the perfect shoe from a different perspective. I had turned the corner. Subsequent exercises seemed like a breeze. Feeling a burst of new found confidence, I stepped hard on the accelerator and stayed on course.

years later, I realized that the knowledge I had couldn’t have been any further from the real reel business. Architecture was my second choice, in mind, but a first choice in the application forms that ranked the course higher. “You must fill something in the first box. Anything.” a friend advised. If I had had my way, I would have ended up at Moi University in the year 2000 starting out on a Major named

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Every session seemed more and more removed from the business of doing house plans. We drew music, straight lines, letters, each other’s bodies in random sitting positions, and then my famous shoe still life. The lecturers walked around in their characteristic manner engaging individuals in small chit chats before one of them raised his voice and asked everyone to remove a shoe, and place it on the table. A couple of guys were apprehensive, not because they were impatient to hear the rationale, but

Most of us have experienced critical turning points that marked an important milestone in our careers. The Architect magazine wants to celebrate these personal stories of moments in time when everything changed, when nothing after was the same as before. This could be about schooling when a particular concept finally clicked and stuck, or about a project when a big commissioning finally materialized, or about professional relationships, good or bad. arabbu@gmail.com


CHAIRMAN’S MESSAGE

GAD OPIYO

AAK MEMBERSHIP - CRISIS AND OPPORTUNITIES To run, to grow and to transform aak AAK will die in the next 10years. Membership has been dwindling steadily from 2010: 2009

                  589

2010

710

2011

                  585

2012

                  708

2013

                  673

2014

                  666

Figures don’t lie. We have over 1500 registered Architects in Kenya, over 500 graduate Architects, over 2000 Licentiates and Technicians, over 1000 Architecture Students and over 1000 technical students. This gives us a pool of over 6000 potential members. We only have about 10% of that in our association. This is a grim statistic. It is a feedback that we cannot ignore. It is a wake up call. We have done a bad job! Yes, I share in the responsibility as one of the leaders. But there is hope. In Chinese the symbol for both danger and opportunity is an “I”. In every crisis there is an opportunity. The over 5000 members outside the association is a fertile seed bed. It is like a large maize farm full of mature crops ready for harvesting. We are called upon to go to the field and harvest the crops. Our focus has been on revenue generation and indeed our revenues have been growing steadily thanks to the generous Industry players. But to cut short the party, our revenue pyramid is upside down compared with the best practices and associations in other countries. Membership fees should account for 80% of our revenue with sponsors bringing in the rest. In our case it is the reverse. The day the Industry changes its attitude, it will be the end of us. We exist at their mercy. AAK is a nonprofit association. Our focus should not be money. Our strength is in the number of members we have who we represent and speak for. The real danger is that when so many members are outside the association, we lose legitimacy and there is a high likelihood that new associations will emerge which will cannibalize AAK. Already IQSK is growing its membership at a much faster rate than our QS chapter. Their

AGMs are better attended and more vibrant than our AGM. We cannot ignore these statistical facts. By growing our membership we will automatically grow our revenue. To ensure sustainability, I have proposed wide ranging reforms in the structures and processes of AAK to bring it in line with AAK’s 2014 strategic plan and give the chapter REAL Autonomy as provided by our constitution to run our affairs and grow our membership. We are targeting to recruit 500 new members every quarter. To achieve this we will collaborate and sign MoUs with BORAQS, NCA, Schools of Architecture, Polytechnics and Technical schools. This will make it a requirement to produce AAK annual license before registration or issuance of annual practice license. We will also register all the institutions as members of AAK. We will make our registration forms available at these institutions and link our website with their websites. I am proposing that we abolish fees for students and institutions for new members. All registration fees and membership fees should be paid to the chapter who will then subscribe to GC (Governing Council). For our survival we must change the association from a push to a pull structure. From autocratic self serving leadership to a participatory leadership. To make this possible I am proposing certain amendments to our constitution. The proposed ammendments to aak constitution and by laws Name of the association (amend cap 1.0) Change of Name to Built environment association of Kenya (BAK). Chapters to have names that resonate with their professions e.g. AAK for Architects, QAK for Quantity surveyors, PAK for planners etc.

In every crisis there is an opportunity. The over 5000 members outside the association is a fertile seed bed.

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CHAIRMAN’S MESSAGE Abolish the executive Remove positions of Secretary, Registrar and Treasurer. These roles to be played by the Secretariat and Chairmen of these committees: Membership services (Vice chairman and Registrar), Communication & Advocacy (Secretary and Editor), and Finance & Admin (Treasurer) as proposed by the 2013-2018 AAK strategic plan. Membership categories and fees (amend cap 4.0 & 6.2 & Bl 22.0) Align Membership categories with the recommendations of the AAK strategic plan 2013-2018: 1. Institutions & Firms 50k registration/25k annual fees. 2. Fellow 50k Registration/25k annual fees 3. Member 20k Registration/10k annual fees 4. Associates 10k Registartion/5k annual fees (Includes graduates, Licentiates and technicians) 5. Students Nil (Includes university and technical students) Chapters to collect fees and pay to Governing Council 10% of all revenue. Graduation ceremony and recognition to be held for members moving to the next category at every annual convention. No need for fresh applications and registration fees for progression in the categories. Members required to produce certificates/Proof with annual fees for the next category. All this process should be concluded at the CEO and Membership services committee level with the Council to receive reports. The catch is that those who join as students will never have to pay registration fees. This will be an incentive for students to join en mass. Council meetings (bl 13.12) Quarterly meetings with a total of 8 meetings per session: January, April, July and October. Increase sitting allowances to Ksh. 3,000 for members and Ksh. 5,000 for Chairman. The committees to meet monthly and at least 8 times a year.

GC membership and elections (amend cap 5.3 & 5.4) To avoid duplication of roles GC Membership should be limited to the chairmen of chapters who will choose from among themselves a Chairman. There is no need for committees at this level. Its only function will be to coordinate and synchronize activities of chapters. To meet only twice a year: July and December. Cap 525 reforms (amend bl 19.0 & 20.0) To bring the practice of Architecture to the digital age, I am proposing the following: 1. Secretariat to own the process with clear milestones and deadlines. 2. Abolish scale fee to align with free market economy, Kenya constitution 2010 and to counter the perception by the populace that Architectural services are exorbitant and unaffordable. 3. Allow marketing of services to promote competition, growth, innovation and protection of the profession. Failure to define boundaries of the practice due to lack of competition, innovation and visibility has made it possible for various professions to chip away at our profession. eg Project Managers, Developers, Interior designers, Planners, Housing professionals etc. These are roles traditionally played by Architects and is adequately covered in our university training and practice. Relationship with gok bodies and institutions of higher learning

Secretariat (amend cap 6.0 & Bl 17.0) Chapter to have its own secretariat staff following the structure proposed in the AAK 2013-2018 strategic plan. This can be done incrementally by first hiring Membership services and Communications manager. All to report to CEO who will report to Governing Council. The finance and administration resources can be shared by all chapters under the CEO. The Membership manager must be a registered Architect.

Improve relations with BORAQS, Ministry, NCA, NHC, County Governments and Educational institutions.

Annual convention. (No amendment required) The chapter to run its own annual convention every July to focus on Industry specific matters. I am proposing an East African Architecture convention to be held in July as we will be hosting EAIA AGM and council meetings this July. This event can be hosted in Naivasha, Nairobi or Mombasa.

Strengthening the secretariat (strategic plan) 1. Hire competent staff 2. Increase salaries 3. Modernize equipment 4. Full automation of processes

Disciplinary actions (repeal bl 12.9) Abolish expulsions as AAK is a volunteers’ association. This is counterproductive to the association which ends up losing valuable and committed members. It does not take into consideration individual member’s circumstances and 4

situation. Members who fail to pay annual subs should remain in the register as debtors to the association and whenever they require current AAK licenses, they be required to clear all their debts to the association.

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Targets for 2016 1. Improve members’ satisfaction and perception of AAK in that it will add value 2. Increase revenue by 20% annually 3. Increase membership by 50% annually

Long Live AAK! By Gad Opiyo Chairman - Architect’s Chapter. opiyo@diasporadesignbuild.com


STRATEGIC PLAN 2013 - 2018

The Professiona l Centre, Parliam ent Road P.O. Box 44258 – 00100, Nairo bi Tel: 2224806. Fa x: 2220582 Email: aak@aa k.or.ke www.aak.or.ke

Full Document copies available at the aak secretariat. Download go to www.aak.or.ke


WATERSHED MOMENT

WHO WILL YOU BE DESIGNING FOR? AFRICANS LIVE IN MUD HUTS! Interview with David Mutiso ETTA MADETE

T

his was the last comment David Mutiso heard as he was leaving an interview with Archer and Scammell, an architectural firm where he was looking for an apprenticeship. Suffice to say he didn’t get called back. Let this not surprise you, this was in 1952 and a student looking for a job now probably has an easier time. This entire issue is dedicated to Water shed moments: that critical moment you realised that architecture was your future. We have heard stories from architectural students to practicing Architects. However, we could not miss out the founding father’s story. In an interview with The Architect magazine, David Mutiso shared his story, and what a journey it has been! Full of ups and downs and round abouts that leave you a little dizzy but also in awe. Mr. Mutiso’s story is well documented, so here I will just highlight what came out as his moment of clarity. That singular moment when the hypothetical light shone through the horizon and he saw his future in architecture mapped out before him. Blue prints in the Jiko “I went to visit my uncle who worked as a cook for a white man. One evening he was lighting the Jiko to make ugali (yes, muzungus ate ugali back then) and to do so he was using a Blue print. He was stuffing it in the jiko so I asked to look at it and I saw that it was signed Imray Rosa, Architect. When I went back to Alliance High school, I took a Britannica Encyclopedia and looked up the word “architect” and it was described as a “Master builder.” I said to myself, “That is what I’m going to do!” ….

His architectural dream rose from the jiko flames like a phoenix. Literally.

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Excerpt from the interview. Master builder is what he became. This story is a classic. His architectural dream rose from the jiko flames like a phoenix. Literally. The title Master builder has a majestic and purposeful meaning to it. Right now when you look up the definition, you get: “One who designs buildings “, or “One who orchestrates life and movements in space.” Le Corbusier simplifies even further to say that an Architect is an acrobat. But I’m rambling, that is an article for another day. In his journey of being rejected from architectural firms in Nairobi to working at Government public works as a draftsman, his dream remained alive. His big break came when he was awarded a government bursary to study Architecture in the UK. He eventually got registered with RIBA and gained valuable experience in UK and Italy. He returned to work in Kenya after a chance encounter with Richard Huwes in the RIBA Library and getting offered a job (another reason you should visit a library). As they say, the rest is history. He went on to become the first African registered Architect, Kenya’s first African Chief Architect, and the list goes on and on. This all began with paper being stuffed into a jiko, a moment too late and his dream would have gone up in flames; or maybe not. What we can learn is that we should always remain curious; we have no idea where our dreams will come from.


WATERSHED MOMENT

THROWBACK TO ‘THINGIRA’ Studying East African homesteads since 1969 DIANA LEE-SMITH

House of Mzee Gitu wa Kahengeri, main house (left), Thingira (right), crop production (foreground).

J

anuary 1969 was my watershed moment. Arriving to teach students at the University of Nairobi’s Department of Architecture (then University of East Africa) I had to throw out my preconceptions acquired from practicing in UK, Sweden and Greece and a first-class education at the Architectural Association in London. Students in the first year in Nairobi came from all parts of Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania and from such different backgrounds from mine that all social, economic and technical groundings in architecture did not apply. I had to quickly start learning from them – what are the principles of design and use of space in East Africa. We began looking at drawings and notes they brought back from the next holidays in their home areas, and making analyses of the way Kenyans used space in buildings in Nairobi, from houses and flats to police lines and informal settlements. Meanwhile they were learning from me and colleagues about structures, construction, materials, graphics, environmental issues and computers (yes it was still 1969). Twelve years later I published a book chapter, co-authored with Davinder Lamba, about what the study of students’ home areas revealed – the principles of design of the East African homestead. The idea of a house in East Africa was (and arguably still is), a fenced or walled compound enclosing structures (then we called them huts) for different social and practical uses and carrying important meanings. The homestead is designed for people, livestock, the family’s life style and especially for the methods of production, processing and consumption of food. It was all very different from just designing a kitchen layout with gas or electric cooker and sink etc. I had learned about the Thingira, Thome and

their equivalents in different ethnic cultures, places where men meet (ironically my first encounter with gender issues in design, which later became another of my specializations). I am not sure whether these ideas are currently included in architectural education in East Africa, but I do know they are still current in what people build and live in across Kenya in particular. Last month I visited a home near Thika where all these principles are apparent in the design. (See illustrations). The main house has two stories but the houses for sons, livestock and the Thingira are there, though these days women and men meet together. Preparing and eating food in the social setting of the home, often outside, continues. After leaving the University of Nairobi in the early 1970s, East African architecture and how it impacts people’s lives continued to fascinate me in my academic work in North America. On returning to Nairobi in 1975 I and my husband, Davinder Lamba, carried out research on the use of urban housing designs where we lived in Golf Course estate. This study influenced some of my ex-students for improved urban house and neighbourhood design in the city. Around that time we also started Mazingira Institute as a civil society research and development organization “to integrate knowledge and practice to advance human dignity for all, common interest and sustainable built and natural environments”. I don’t think I have ever looked back from that watershed moment in January 1969 that determined my life course in architecture, and I am still learning as well as being back to designing again, even though most of my ex-students have retired.

DIANA LEE-SMITH Diana Lee-Smith lives and works in Nairobi, Kenya, where she was oneof the founders of Mazingira Institute, an independent research and development NGO and carried out the first survey of urban agriculture in Kenya in 1985. Prior to retiring in 2005, she led the African Regional programme of Urban Harvest, an initiative of the Consultive Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR).  She is also a gender specialist and has published on these and other urban issues.  Diana holds a PhD in Architecture and Development Studies.  Currently, she is a Visiting Professor at the University of Toronto’s Dalla Lana School of Public Health, where she is working on editing two books on urban agriculture in Africa.

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PROJECT PROFILE

CONNECTING THE DOTS ETTA MADETE Making the connection “You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking back.” Steve Jobs. I did not understand this saying until I looked back and tried to think of a time before I stepped into the world of architecture. This new world I found myself in changed my perceptions, views and understanding of the environment and people around me. I traced back into my past and wondered about how I used to see the world before. Does flipping through dusty old archives really matter? I think it does. Critically looking back at the journey and its milestones helps to clarify the present and justify the future. Like reflecting on the seedlings of a mango tree as you bite into its juicy fruit. Connecting with people I remember my water shed moment clearly. The moment I began to understand architecture from its roots to the fruits and started to connect the dots. It came while sitting under a tent at Voi Primary school. I was there to present the new design and master plan of the School to the students, staff, parents and community. This was a CSR project by Morphosis Ltd that I worked on during my Internship after fourth year. Also present were third year architecture students (University of Nairobi) who were with their year master Arch Adnan Mwakulomba to do site inventory and analysis for their studio project. (Arch Mwakulomba and Arch Yassir Brek are Directors of Morphosis Ltd). Up until that point the project was just that; a project. As many of you know that means late nights, lengthy crits, clicking

then sketching then clicking again, zooming in and out and the usual design frustrations. Seated there it dawned on me that it was more than just a project; it was the dream of an entire community. I realised that I wasn’t just looking at fancy renders, interesting concepts and models; I was looking at the community’s future. From 1st year architecture was portrayed as this powerful and meaningful force that shapes and transforms the world around us. Project after project we were encouraged to think outside the box and always strive for meaning in design. Yet in fourth year the too fast and too furious speed of project production left me breathless and empty and I missed the chance to put it all together. This CSR project helped me connect architecture with the real world. Architecture with meaning and a sense of place. It helped clarify all the lessons and helped justify the long hours and the late nights and connect them with architecture’s meaningful contribution to the world. The project A school in a community is a Centre for inspiration, knowledge and growth. It breathes life and joy to the students, staff and community. Voi Primary school formerly District educational Board School (D.E.B) is one of the oldest schools in Voi and the heart of the community. The vision • Design and build a centre of excellence for the school and the community. • To revitalise, re-energise & inspire the community. • Improve, add value and give back through design. The current situation • Dilapidated, poor lighting, leaky roofs. • Inadequate classrooms • Missing facilities i.e hall, clinic, staff rooms etc The task was to revitalize the schools spirit through an architectural design that will inspire and motivate not only the students and staff at the school but the county and country at large. Adopting salient features within the region and the school itself, the strategy the Morphosis team employed was to adopt the regional architecture of the Taita people and its culture.

The current situation

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The design and presentation was only the first step. Now the work is trying to make the dream come true through public participation and sponsorships.


PROJECT PROFILE Connecting with the present Now its 4 months down the line and I have a completely changed view on the meaning and power of architecture. I understand now that what we do can change lives and even a single sketch or a render can bring life and joy to hundreds of people. Sitting on a table in ADD and pouring over plans and details may seem exhausting and pointless at times, but once you get out there and walk the streets and see the impact architecture has then you can see beyond the pencil to the brick and beyond the brick to the building and beyond the building to the people who will breathe life into it. So far 5th year has been the icing on the cake. With its urban planning objectives; one is forced to look at the bigger picture. Hence thinking not of the cornice but of the street corner. Diving into slums and low income housing has broken my idea of the word” shelter” and clarified the meaning of the term coined by Bernard Rudofsky “architecture without architects”.

Proposed masterplan

Now I see that the connections are everywhere around you but no-where in particular. One just has to be free, awake, alive and curious. “As an architect you design for the present with an awareness of the past, for a future which is essentially unknown.” Norman Foster.

Now I see that the connections are everywhere around you but no-where in particular. One just has to be free, awake, alive and curious.

Presentation to the school

ETTA MADETE Etta Madete is a 5th year student at the University of Nairobi. When asked why she loves to write her response is “because I’ve always been a reader and all readers secretly want to be writers”. Her other passions include hiking, violin performance and drinking tea under the avocado tree.

The vision

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FEATURE

OF SUITS AND PURSUITS MARYLYN MUMBUA MUSYIMI

W

e had been friends all through campus. John, David, Paul, Nancy and I. John and David were in a different university in the city, while the rest of us studied at another university in the countryside. All the same we met often, to compare notes on life as an Architecture student, to share our fears and dreams. Our friendship had held strong through all the six years of study under the Kenyan undergraduate system for Architecture. We had managed to convince David to complete his degree when he thought he wanted to quit after four years. After all he had a Bachelor in Architectural Studies, he argued, and he was tired and wanted to start a family. We held together

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when Nancy lost her parents and had to rely on HELB money and her internship stipend to get through her final year of Architecture. We had survived, and all graduated with a Bachelor of Architecture. We now stood at the precipice of our dreams. We had been studying for days, nay months…meeting every weekend to go over the items we had studied individually over the week. It was fast approaching, and with each passing week, each of us thought of this life defining moment countless times. We thought what it would be like to have our own registration numbers. To be able to use the title


FEATURE ‘Architect’. We thought of the millions we were going to make, now that we would no longer be obligated to work under other registered Architects. We thought of the freedom, the sheer joy of passing the examinations. In the days leading up to the professional examination by the Board of Registration of Architects and Quantity Surveyors, our anticipation reached a crescendo. We thought of nothing else, we spoke of nothing else. The examining board set up training sessions to prepare us for the examinations. They told us what to do, how to dress, how to talk, how to walk (may be not, but you get the point). Times and venues were given to us and identity cards to access the examination room issued. The big day was finally here. The written exam would take 2 days while the oral exam would take one. On the first day, I arrived late. Instructions were to arrive 15 minutes to the start of the paper. I arrived to find everyone seated hunched over their desks, some wildly scribbling away, others with brows furrowed in thought, thinking out their answers. I took my seat. After a disapproving look, the invigilator brought my answer sheet and question paper to my desk and whispered into my ear that if I was late again I wouldn’t sit the next paper. The next four hours were a blur as we all did our best to triumph through this initiation. And so went the next day. After the written exam we met one more time to discuss our strategy for the oral exam, but we dared not review the papers we had just done. The results were best not speculated about. On the day of the orals, I dressed in the suit my mother gifted me, for good luck, and left 5 hours early. I preferred to wait rather than be late. Nancy and I were scheduled for the afternoon, she before me. I found Nancy already sitting at the reception of the oral examination venue, glass of water in hand. We both were too hot in our jackets but dared not take

I walked into the board room to find a panel of familiar faces, Architects I had either seen at professional gatherings or others I had had the chance to work with.

them off. I got a glass of water too and we sipped nervously as we waited our turn. Soon, Nancy was called in. It wasn’t long before she came out, tissue in hand dabbing at her eyes. Something had gone terribly wrong by the look on her face, but I had no time to ask, my name had been called out and I had to go in. I walked into the board room to find a panel of familiar faces, Architects I had either seen at professional gatherings or others I had had the chance to work with. I was offered a seat, and we began to introduce ourselves. The panel was friendlier than I thought, and the interview turned out to be more about me than about Architecture generally. I relaxed, and I found myself smiling as I answered the questions. To my surprise, I was even able to make the panel laugh a few times. Before I knew it, the oral examination was over. I gathered my portfolio, thanked the panel and headed home. This was late October. We would know our fate in two months. The wait was the hardest part. There was no way of predicting the outcome of the examination. Top students had been known to fail, not once, but up to three times. It was best not to speculate, therefore we waited. Just before Christmas, we received the long awaited letters. We had all passed, save for Nancy. We organised a little party to celebrate our success, even Nancy came. John and David announced at the party that they were quitting their jobs to start out on their own as partners. Paul, though he was happy to have passed, had come to the decision that Architecture was not for him, and decided to go into business procuring and selling building materials instead. Nancy also decided that she would try her hand at something else that would engage her creative mind. We all thought fashion would be a good option. I had no idea what I was going to do now that I had passed. Five years have passed and Nancy is now a renowned couture designer, dressing the rich and famous in the East African region. Speaking to her recently, she’s grateful to have failed the examinations because though it did not seem that way then, it opened new opportunities to her. John and David recently split up their partnership. David carried on and is quite successful, John has gone into politics. Paul has a fleet of trucks and transports construction materials in addition to buying and selling them. I’m still at my old job, I still nurture dreams of a big career on my own. Maybe it’s time I decide how to pursue them.

MARYLYN MUMBUA MUSYIMI I am an open-minded, friendly and resourceful go-getter. I possess the special skill of being able to bring people together and make things happen, while comfortably fitting into any environment. I’m trained as an Architect and Construction Project Manager, and am currently working with Mutiso Menezes International.

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REPORT

A SPINELESS SOCIETY OF SECOND HAND MEN “I’d rather be someone’s shot of whiskey than everyone’s cup of tea.” Carrie Bradshaw. A very powerful sentiment that was expounded on by AAK President Waweru Gatheca during the AAK Presidents Dinner in December, 2015 where he gave a very eloquent speech. Bradshaws’ quote summarizes his speech’s main point: stop living a second hand life. He quoted from the Fountain head where Ayn Rand advocates for reason, self-interest and individual rights.

“If we did all the things we are capable of doing, we would literally astonish ourselves.” Thomas Edison. COMMENTARY ON AAK PRESIDENT WAWERU GATHECHA’S SPEECH BY ETTA MADETE.

‘The Eleventh Hour’ part of a series called ‘Life of an Architect’

“Isn’t that the root of all despicable action? Not selfishness, but precisely the absence of self. Look at them. The man who cheats and lies but preserves a respectable front. He knows himself to be dishonest, but others think he is honest and he derives his self-respect from that, second hand. He knows himself to be mediocre, but he is great in the eyes of others.” Howard Roarke (Fountain head). Harsh but not entirely untrue. Sometimes we hide behind society’s low standards and simply make do with less than average. Instead, we cower behind niceties and pleasantries so much so that we make no real progress. Arch.Gathecha’s speech pointed out that a spineless society is built on men who do not do but give the impression of doing. What would happen if all we had was showmanship, friendships and lucrative networks? Who would work, think and produce? “After centuries of being pounded with the doctrine that altruism (the practice of being selfless for the wellbeing of others) is the ideal, men have accepted it the only way it could be accepted: by seeking self-esteem through others. By living second hand.” Howard Roark (Fountain head). Modern society has confused the meaning of selfless-ness to mean the negation of self. It has showered praises and blessings on the man who looks and acts like he is not thinking of himself (altruism) when in actual fact he is not thinking at all. Arch.Gathecha advocates for the revival of man’s self-sufficient ego against the drawbacks of living second hand off the approval of others and whose success is dependent on public opinion.

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Sujesh Patel


FEATURE

WHY ARCHITECTURAL LINGO? MARYANN NG’ENDO KARIUKI are simply going to have to learn. These terms, by design, will get the client feeling addlepated (I could have said ‘confused’ but then again…) and get the job done in a more ‘sophisticated’ manner. Then you anticipate higher consultancy fees – or if you are in school - higher grades. What really happens is that people stop listening to you and attempt to accept that your words are all righteous and holy. Architectural  lingo can, of course, be used in genuine circumstances. Sometimes, design concepts are too complex to express in everyday language, and some words refer to obscure ideas that a common person would not have knowledge of. The Urban Dictionary defines ‘archi speak’ as: “Large, made-up words that architects and designers use to make themselves sound smarter than you [the client or the confused observer]. It does nothing to inform or enlighten the consumer of architecture and mostly serves to numb them into obedience or self-doubt.”

June 2014. Going for my 2nd year internship at one of the most sought after architectural firms in Kenya, I came to a rather startling conclusion that Architects truly are a species unto their own. Arriving bright and early, I appreciated the rather simplistic reception which nevertheless drove across the point of serious architecture in progress. Shown to me workstation, I make my acquaintance with a friendly desk mate who somehow looked ‘too serious’ for life. To cut this long story short, have you ever talked to a person, trying to hide, in a cavalier manner, the fact that you do not understand the words that he is using? Architects have this seemingly supernatural ability to make you feel like taking a guilt trip to that Library that you had said you would never visit. That was me, that first day, of weeks and months of internship at that firm engaging with these macho men known as Architects. But I did what Romans do. When in Rome…? Slowly, but surely I picked up the lingo. Once you decide to be an architect, there are words that you 14

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Architects tend to be vague and use words rarely uttered by regular human beings in normal conversations. In any case, more than half the words coming out of an architect’s mouth could be replaced by a simpler one. What I can conclude, the habit has its root in naming complex ideas that don’t have meaningful expressions elsewhere. This is pretty common in other fields of design as well. Some say an Architect is a creature that sleeps two hours a week, consumes entirely too much caffeine, and likes to overuse words such as juxtaposition. I say, Architects are complex beings who just happen to have mastered a special lingo for their trade. That said, next time you sit down with your Architect to review a design, ask: “What’s the parti pris for the design?” Your Architect will get blown away. A discount might even be in order!

MARYANN NG’ENDO KARIUKI is a interior design student at the University of Nairobi. maryann.ngendo@gmail .com


Sustainability is Our Core Belief! Sadolin Paints donates 400 litres of paint to Korando Eductional Center –Kisumu Kenya “Colour Your World” is what we love to do! W e started this year by spreading happiness through colour to 200 impoverished children in an orphanage/ school in Kisumu. Not only did we add happiness by donating paint for the new dormitories, the water tower and latrines, but we supported by providing paint for a unique and sustainable dome structure. We partnered with “Cheap Impact” spear headed by a 26 year old German national who cares deeply about sustainability and for the livelihood of Korando Education Centre. This CSR initiative was very close to our heart, as we saw a beautiful architectural design turn into an amazing and sustainable structure. We wanted to be a part of it especially since sustainability is our core belief. What amazed us even more was the great thought which went into the dome structure to ensure it was sustainable , comfortable but also served the intended purpose. The main purpose of the structure was to find a way to attract volunteers from all around the world to come and volunteer at Korando Education Centre to impart knowledge to the children. The dome home has been constructed with the use of locally available material and assembled by local craftsmen. The aim of the design is to maximize the use of natural light, air climate and rainwater to be self sustainable. Grey water is recycled into the perma-culture garden and food forest outside the structure, thereby eliminating its negative impact on the environment and in fact producing healthy food for consumption. Cheap Trip - BIG Impact has greatly reduced the cost and minimized the environmental impact of the construction itself and wants to plant even more trees to offset the remaining carbon footprint. Solar panels power LED lights and the self-built solar water heaters provide hot water and greatly reduce the dependence on fossil fuels.

Sadolin Paints donated high quality paints to ensure that such a beautiful structure would have a beautiful finish. In addition, the colours donated were also provided as per what was requested to ensure that the mood/ambience which Cheap Impact wanted to create was achieved, because we as colour experts understand how colours affect our mood and we wanted to provide the best and most comfortable environment. We also fully supported Cheap Impact by providing them with technical advice in terms of surface preparation, application and advised on the most suitable products to use for each surface. At present the paint works are ongoing. We take pride in being a partner with Cheap Impact and Korando Education Centre for this unique and sustainable project and we are so glad to be have been able to Colour the World of Korando Education Centre by adding happiness through colour. Sadolin Paints ensures to spread happiness through colour wherever we go by participating in many more CSR initiatives. Below are the two project aims which Cheap Impact aims to achieve: • Creation of a unique landmark on the Trans African Highway, drawing attention and help from all over the world towards the centre. 100% of the funds contributed will be spent directly on the school and orphanage and the supported children. • Turning the KEC into a financially sustainable, lasting educational institution that continues to provide shelter, education and a nutritious diet for children of this community To help us achieve Cheap Impact’s projects aims, we welcome any assistance. Please contact us on marketing@sadolin.co.ke for further discussion about how you can help Cheap Impact and in turn Korando Educational Centre.

LET SADOLIN COLOUR YOUR WORLD!


FEATURE

Learning Resource Centre at the Catholic University of Eastern Africa, Karen Nairobi by architect Musau Kimeu

ARCHITECTURAL SUSTAINABILITY, A VITAL INGREDIENT FOR BUILDINGS ANTONY MANYARA

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several definitions of the verb “sustain”: to support, to keep up, to keep going, to provide for by furnishing means or funds.

Dictionaries cite the adjective “sustainable” and the noun “sustainability” only after offering

Does this mean that a sustainable building is one with a skeleton that will prevent it from falling down, a building with technical systems that keep it functioning well year after year, or a building with revenue and expenses that

ardly any architect today design without sustainability in mind. Sustainability is on practically every conference agenda related to design, planning, construction and real estate development. But what does it mean to create sustainable architecture?

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continue to meet its owner’s funding and investment objectives? As an architectural student and an aspiring architect, I know quite well that the sustainability ideal lies elsewhere. It is about conserving energy and material resources, safeguarding the health of occupants, and protecting and enhancing the natural environment. Sustainability in architecture means


FEATURE minimizing not only the waste and pollution generated by buildings, but also that attributable to their construction. At the sight of any building with an outstanding aesthetic value, is not its general appearance that interests me, but how sustainable it is. What impact does it have on the environment? Does it employ an architectural design that is in harmony with its surrounding? Is it adequately sustainable? Kenya is slowly joining the league of countries employing environmental sustainable architecture in real estate development today. The move is largely informed by the dwindling natural resources such as fossil fuels and water resources that were once thought were inexhaustible. Kenyan architects have posed a remarkable upward trend in innovative ideas of putting up structures with great sustainability techniques. This is fueled by the present competition now that it’s evident Kenya is endowed with many ambitious architects.

are in harmony with the environment. But high ratings aren’t the only reasons for being green and environmentally sensitive. With energy prices soaring, economic motivation is greater than ever before. A high rating, however, does not guarantee great architecture. Energyefficient buildings can be ugly. Buildings with green roofs can be ugly. Indeed, the nature of assessment avoids making value judgments about a building’s visual or symbolic qualities. Nevertheless, sustainability has artistic implications. Architects who aspire to garner high ratings do not have to abandon aesthetic exploration and invention.

Take for instance the Library at the Catholic University of Eastern Africa in Kenya’s capital; the building awesomely sandwiches its aesthetic and inventive aspects with its sustainable techniques very well without losing its utility motives. Interestingly, the building’s energy-efficient design won it an award of the year from the Kenya Association of Manufacturers’ Centre for Energy Efficiency as the best green building in Kenya. The University of Nairobi Architectural and Building Department took the same group’s Green Architecture award for promoting the design of green buildings in Kenya. Am inclined to think that any building that does not employ architectural sustainable techniques does not meet its environmental standards and therefore reflects a regressive trend in

It is about conserving energy and material resources, safeguarding the health of occupants, and protecting and enhancing the natural environment.

Architects are not alone. Sponsors of cultural, commercial and government projects increasingly seek silver, gold or platinum ratings by well established energy and environmental design organizations for the structures they erect. Such ratings are calculated by adding up points earned for favorable site and building design. Those characteristics include brown-field redevelopment; access to existing transit and utilities; use of locally available or minimally transported materials as well as recycled or naturally replenishable materials; avoidance of materials that emit noxious gases or particles; use of solar energy, daylight and natural ventilation; recapture of waste heat; capture of rainwater and recycling of wastewater; efficiency of building form; tightness and insulating efficacy of building skin; and ecologically sensitive landscaping. Increasing numbers of architects have studied and taken courses that major on sustainable architectural designs that

Coca Cola East and Central Africa Business Unit head office, Upper Hill by GAPP and Triad Architects

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FEATURE terms of technological development. This astern course definitely poses a major threat on the livelihoods of people either directly or indirectly. As a classic example, Dubai ascended from a desert and transformed into a city of concrete, skyscrapers, shopping malls, posh residences, rainforests and a city where the real estate industry boomed. However, this also became the very place that got ranked as the worst carbon dioxide polluter in the world. Dubai produces around 2.5 Kg waste per day and water usage in Dubai is double than the global average. This is now changing, and Dubai is again transforming. Development goes hand in glove with sustainability and is transforming from being known as the city of skyscrapers into a green city with great buildings and infrastructural facilities. After all, making buildings comfortable, fireproof, and accessible to the disabled has not stopped architects from designing beautiful structures. Why should designing for sustainability be an impediment to visual and intellectual delight? In fact, the language of sustainable design expression is rapidly developing, although its grammar and vocabulary are still evolving.

a building’s energy consumption is determined to a great extent by volume and cladding characteristics, architects must still concentrate design attention on building form and facades. Generally, more compact buildings require fewer materials, which means less energy invested in construction and, with reduced exterior surface, less energy to heat and cool buildings after construction. At one extreme is the sphere, the most efficient form because its skin-tovolume ratio is lower than any other geometric shape. This suggests that for optimum sustainability, blob-like architecture might be the wave of the future. But blobs are less than ideal for accommodating most building functions or for harmonizing with adjacent structures. Conversely, geometrically distended, multifaceted or fragmented buildings are the least efficient. They have greatly increased exterior surface area and skin-to-volume ratios, which adds significantly to costs, in Kenyan shillings and energy, for construction and operation. Accordingly, rectilinear volumes are more prevalent and practical, since

And facades continue to offer architects their greatest opportunity for developing new modes of artistic expression based on sustainabilityrelated composition. Some tactics for making buildings sustainable, primarily involving material specifications and engineering systems design, are important, but often not visible. What is apparent are building geometries and exterior enclosures, clearly the most visible manifestation of sustainability. Because energy conservation is a major goal of sustainability, and because 18

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much of the fabricated world is based on straight lines and right angles. Sometimes architects transform rectilinear volumes using circular and spherical geometries -- for instance, the Sarakasi Dome -- although usually not for reasons of sustainability. No matter how efficiently configured, a compact form remains aesthetically mute until its exterior walls are composed. And facades continue to offer architects their greatest opportunity for developing new modes of artistic expression based on sustainabilityrelated composition. Such opportunities are numerous: employ visually diverse cladding materials and textures; control, filter, reflect or transmit daylight to the interior; shade summer sun but admit winter sun to provide heat; cast everchanging shadow patterns; allow natural ventilation; exploit views to and from the interior; and create overall window and door patterns, juxtaposing transparency and opacity, to animate and impart order to facades. Yet few of these moves are new. Ancient Greek and Roman builders, Renaissance and Enlightenment architects, and architects of the Modern movement understood these moves long before energy was an issue and long before anyone used the word “sustainability.” Designing for sustainability merely continues an ageless architectural tradition, based on the idea that “necessity is the mother of invention.” Thus pursuing sustainable design is not only the ethical and, in the long run, the most economical thing to do, but also the smart thing to do to make buildings look and perform better.

ANTONY MANYARA A 1st year Architectural student at the University of Nairobi. He is the Organizing Secretary, Architectural Students Association (ASA); Director of Youth Talent and Sports, Meru County Youth Senate(MCYS) and Director, Mantox Theatre.


FEATURE

WILL THE REAL ARCHITECT PLEASE STAND UP! ERIC KIGADA

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Every society or nation is governed by a philosophical belief. The Romans created their empire not by military might but because they understood order. Their military had rank and file that is legendary to this day. Order was present in everyday activities, from town planning, water and food supply to the road network. In China, inventions like gunpowder were shelved because of Confucius (religious) beliefs. It is only after 70 years of shunning religion that China has pulled an incredible feat off by modernising in 20 years. Catching up where they would have been leading years ago. The Egyptians were so consumed with the afterlife, that materials were not used for the present life but reserved for the afterlife. Millennia afterwards we still wonder and speculate how the Pyramids were built. What philosophical belief drives us Kenyans to accept the mediocre as normal? Vision 2030 is a restorative vision not a forecasting one. Why have we not accelerated it so that once we have caught up with the modern world, we can now cast a new vision of where we should go as a nation? Japan was devastated by two nuclear bombs in 1945. By the mid 50’s they

KENNETH KINOTI

his is version two of the article that I am writing. The first version was more of a biography listing key watershed moments in my career as an architect. There are many moments. In this version, I want to deal with a thing or a few issues that have come to my attention in Kenya, that are affecting how I practice architecture. I have just come from terminating a contractor for mediocrity & might sound very philosophical. Why is Kenya or are Kenyans satisfied with the mediocre? Have we lacked so much that we consider having something bad/ shoddy better than nothing? Why can’t we do something right from the get go?

were already industrialised. The same thing happened to Germany. The 50’s are known as the “Wirtschaftswunder” (economic miracle) times in Germany. Reconstruction, in both countries, after the war happened very rapidly. Kenya received independence in 1963, and 50 years later, we are still mediocre in our skills level and workmanship. Why

is it so? Joblessness exists because our skill levels are wanting or are meant for problems that we have already solved. We run the risk with technology that our youth will learn from YouTube, skills that will take them away from Kenya. The brain drain will happen because the environment to manifest their skills will not be present for them to stay. THE ARCHITECT • ISSUE 10 • Q1 2016

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COMMENTARY It happened in the 90’s during Moi’s presidency and could happen again. Kenya is still clinging on to the oral culture and yet we are in the Digital age. In an oral culture we interpret what one says. You do not take someone’s words literally but interpret what he could have meant making the words your own. Next time you are on site, give a verbal instruction and see what happens. Ideas grow when they are given attention. Ideas are intrusive, ideas have a purpose. Ideas need to be believed. Belief lends to ideas power and persuasion. You become the embodiment of an idea. Powerful ideas thrive in environments where there is an equally strong opposing idea. In Kenya right now, if an idea is attacked, the attack is perceived to be personal by the holder/originator of the idea. Ideas need broadness of mind and a depth in the heart to thrive. In the Kenyan culture right now, we mistake broadness for depth. We see ideas sprouting up and everyone adopts the idea without checking the roots to see if the idea will stand the test of time (Quail business, land buying companies, Golf Resorts etc.) When there is a lack of will and skill to execute ideas, there is no value for execution. You eventually end up in a place where you are managed by others. Yet, in Kenya we wonder why foreigners are taking over our work. Bad ideas thrive when the good do not talk. When an idea is born bacterially, it spreads virally. Ideas become an epidemic. Ideas come easy, but they are a combination of different things from our personalities. Who you are affects the ideas. The strands of possibilities due to the permutations are endless. The fear we have is to think broad and is only possible if you are rooted. Our imagination is easily lured to that which has already been done. One of my professors taught me that you can steal an idea, but never copy. The adding or removing to an idea is a process that is meant to teach you exactness. The shortcut is copying. Copying betrays self-assurance as you are in bondage of someone else’s identity. Corruption is encouraged by a society that has a strong philosophy of shortcuts. Corruption (perverted) – shortcut – copy – low identity. An Author means one who breeds authority. You are authoritative 20

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because it accurately represents you. Every time you take a shortcut, you lose authority. Ask yourself why Kenya is setting up numerous government authorities like NEMA, NCA & NTSA etc. Do they really have authority as their names suggest? We have street protests about corruption forgetting that we are provoking nothing, lunging at the fruit instead of pursuing the root. Glorified activists, happenings and events. In Kenya, we laugh at those who fail but once you over-humourise a situation you kill the conscience. We have become comfortable in shortcuts and the mediocre. “Hivi ndivyo vitu hufanywa!” I would get rich every time I hear someone say that statement when they want to justify mediocrity. From contractors refusing to learn new ways of doing things. Students who believe just because it is in the computer it will work. Collapsing buildings blamed on quarks, not realising that we, the professionals, are the quarks. How many times have I had to deal with clients who have gone through a string of architects and are so damaged that they only have me because they must have an architect to work on the project. If it was up to them, they would do without consultant’s altogether as “they add no value.” On the other hand, the same client will happily pay a foreign consultant team. I have had to be obstinate to such clients to the point one of them interpreted it as me being rude. The obstinacy is caused by the client wanting to take control of the project, since in his view and experience, no value will be added by the consultant team. In effect, the client becomes the author of the project. I, as the architect, then end up losing my authority. I have been told by some not to care as long as I am being paid. Why then am I an architect?

Some say the client is paying too little so there is no need to put in a lot of effort in the work. The thing is, the frustration of lack pushes you into a domain of sweat. You end up being a hustler and not a professional. The money that you leave on the table by under charging will always torment you. Money is a slave master. You will either work for the extra money or you will have a deficiency that can lead to debt. We undercharge because we do not know who we are. You value your work, once you have worked on yourself. You must have integrity for your work to have integrity. Lack of integrity means your integration is not complete thus you are corrupt. Imagine my shock when I found out that the minimum thickness for tarmac on a standard road in Europe is 100mm! What roads have we been building in Kenya all these years? What of when a Kenyan steel fabricator tells me that he cannot achieve a tolerance of +/-50mm…this is for steel being fabricated off CAD systems by machines and I am being charged per kilo. And when a Kenyan consultancy team insists on having a contingency of 20% to cover for “unforeseen” changes, while the contractor happily files for variations… would I as the client ever trust Kenyan consultants? Shortcuts fill the pocket for now, but kill your authority forever. When a group of people decide they are superior to others, they ultimately strive for the elimination of the others they perceive to be inferior. Is this the end of architects, death by developers? In the end, the question is, who are you? Nai ni Who, was a question asked recently by the Godown Arts Centre. Who is Kenyan? How can you be good in a bad world? Will the real Kenyan Architects please stand up and do good?

ERIC KIGADA Eric holds a Masters degree in Architecture from The RWTH University of Aachen, Germany and is registered as an architect in Kenya with the Board of Registration of Architects and Quantity Surveyors (BORAQS) and the Architectural Association of Kenya (AAK). He is the principal of B&A Studios and architectural practice based in Nairobi, Kenya.


COMMENTARY

GOODWILL ISN’T BOUGHT WITH CASH KEITH ATITO

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hen we think business we all have one objective in mind; profits. These may be financial or some other form of gratification that one considers important. In my first year in high school I was introduced to the basic tenets of business. The factors of production were listed as land, labour and capital. For the longest time this was the basic known needs of a business starting and going forward. In my opinion, it is high time we bring in the next factor of production; goodwill. To most people in the Kenyan market, goodwill is easily understood as the lump sum of money paid in to a landlord of a business premises at the onset of your time there and is never recovered even upon exit. It is usually stated as an amount of money that is held as a retainer to show other tenants that you are willing to work in the same environment without doing anything to jeopardise the existing work relations in the place. Whoever came up with the concept had a good motive but has been terribly skewed and misguided over time. A standard English dictionary defines goodwill as the established reputation of a business, etc. as enhancing its value. In my basic understanding it is equitable to kindness and favour. Now, I know some of you are probably about to stop reading at this point and dismiss this article as a utopian concept being brought in to a naturally hostile business environment. Give it a moment that I may help you see my light. As members of the built environment our objective is to provide a product and service to our clients. These are in form of structures, space renovations, conceptual ideas, building assessment, etc. Is this all we can do for our clients? Are our contracts the end of the relationship with our clients? Is the bottom-line the bottom line? I should think not. Allow me to deviate for a bit. Let us look at the airline and maritime construction industry. The day a ship is completed, tested and ready for handing over to the client, it is christened by breaking an expensive bottle of champagne against the bow of the ship. This is done at the cost of the builder as a final gesture of kindness to the client. At the ceremony there may only be a few minutes of pleasantries before the vessel sats off to a life of adventure but an impression has been made. For a plane, the bottle of champagne is toasted after all paperwork is signed off and the cork is also signed and wedged into a nook on the table. These seem like pointless traditions that are a waste of valuable time and more so money. From an accounts perspective, these few thousands every now and then are adding up to costly losses that risk sinking your company. Do they really? No. on the contrary, these subtle gestures just may be what save your company at its dying point (God forbid it get there).

These are gestures of goodwill. The little acts of kindness, off the contract, that you do for the client to add value to their experience of working with you. It might be as obscure as realising an important day for them, like anniversaries and birthdays and sending a surprise note/gift/voucher or as meticulous as pushing the project, within realistic and quality assured standards, to deliver it on these unique days. Such efforts are fairly costly and require diligent effort but the impression left will be priceless. If you know your client is the kind to note detail in the structure, you could hide some nifty ‘’errors’’ in façade and finishes that they discover in due time as they enjoy the space you’ve created. The devil’s in the detail. These are the elements that are likely to get your client talking about you to other would-be clients. Don’t we all know and want projects completed in time? That’s the obvious. Up your ante and go beyond. Sometimes it may call for unorthodox moves. I know we have encountered clients who are willing and able to fully finance the project but have just run in to financial storms. You would know that the project you are on is likely to revive their situation. Do you stall the project and await your dues or push the limit to try by all means to keep it on course? The safe bet is to hold off. Your accountant will have a cow if you even mention pushing forward. Your lawyer will spite you. Truth is whether or not this gamble pays off, your client will know that they can count on you to do all within your power to safeguard their interests. Like one Antonio in Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice, the forces above will eventually shift the tide in your favour, usually when you least expect it. In essence goodwill is a wild card. It is the unexpected goodness to clients, staff and suppliers that makes them feel the urge to come together with you to achieve that which may seem impossible. I was taught, you become the best by meeting expectation but you beat the best by exceeding expectations.

A standard English dictionary defines goodwill as the established reputation of a business, etc. as enhancing its value.

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PICTORIAL

2015 PRESIDEN

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PICTORIAL

NT'S DINNER

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10 1. Basco Product's marketing team. 2. Basco Product's Marketers, Zarina Khan and Silvia Njeri have a hearty moment. 3. QS. Alfed Aluvala, Chair, AAK Quantity Surveyors' Chapter. 4. Arch. Juma Oino, and other guests keenly listen to the proceedings of the evening. 5. Basco Products' Ziad El Khoury speaks on Duracoat range of products. 6. Arch. Aidah Munano PS, Housing and Urban Development addresses the function. 7. Basco Products' Ziad El Khoury and a happy customer. 8. AAK President Arch. Waweru Gathecha tips Chief Guest Polycarp Igathe on healthy eating (more vegetables less carbs). 9. Chief Guest Polycarp Igathe makes his speech. 10. AAK President Arch. Waweru Gathecha alongside AAK Vice President Arch. Emma Miloyo present the Chief Guest, Polycarp Igathe, with a gift. 11. From left, Arch. Naomi Ndolo, AAK's First Lady, Basco Products' Mrs. Zarina Khan, Chief Guest Mr. Polycarp Igathe MD. Haco Products Ltd and Eng. Grace Kagondu, Chair of AAK Engineers' Chapter.

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AWARDS

AAK AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE 2016 “People are rewarded in public for what they practise for years and years in private” – Tony Robbins We often exclaim and point fingers when things go wrong but never when they go right. The Kenyan Built environment has had its ups and down but we can’t deny that we have been doing some things right for years and years. The AAK Awards of Excellence is a step in the right direction. Instead of our usual endless discussions of what could be and what should be; this event marks what is and what has been done. This year the outstanding projects exemplified elements of

sustainability, social responsibility and were appropriate to both context, materials and technology. This echoes the move the world of architecture is taking showcased by the recent Pritzker prize laureates such as Alejandro Aravena (2016) and Shigeru ban (2014). This not only sets the standards for the industry but also encourages those who have been at the fore front of excellent Kenyan architecture to keep doing what they are doing. At the end of the day there are no real losers and our very own industry grows in quality, accountability and excellence. So we are all winners. Cheers!

Announcement of Results by the Jury comprising Arch. Shamla Fernandes (Kenya), Arch. Janfrans van der Eerden (Netherlands), and Dr. Allan Kenneth Birabi (Uganda), 18th February 2016. Best Concept/Ongoing Project Beglin Woods Architects - Nova Apartments

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Best Building Transformation/ Renovation Project Triad Architects -The Nairobi National Museum


AWARDS

Best Landscaping Project AAK Landscape Architects Chapter – Uhuru Highway Landscaping Project

Best Health Care Project Planning Systems Services –Pamoja Shell of Steel

Best Educational Institution Project Planning Systems Services –Braeburn Garden Estate

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AWARDS

Best Commercial Building Project Planning Systems Services-Kenya Commercial Bank Headquarters

Best Residential Building Project Urko Sanchez Architects-Lamu Apartments

Best Urban Design / Town Planning Project Planning Systems Services –Nairobi Intervention

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AWARDS

Best Cultural Building Project Space and Systems –Don Bosco, Upper Hill Nairobi

BEST CONCEPT / ONGOING PROJECT Beglin Woods Architects - Winner– Best Concept / Ongoing Project – Nova Apartments Planning Systems Services - First Runner Up- Best Concept / Ongoing Project - Kipande Road Zone Aleem Manji Architects – Second Runner Up – Best Concept / Ongoing Project - The Elegance, Westlands, Nairobi Planning Systems Services – Honourable Mention – Best Concept/Ongoing Project - Community Cooker BEST BUILDING TRANSFORMATION/ RENOVATION PROJECT Triad Architects – Winner - Best Building Transformation/ Renovation Project – The Nairobi National Museum BEST LANDSCAPING PROJECT AAK Landscape Architects Chapter – Winner – Best Landscaping Project - Uhuru Highway Landscaping Project County Government of Machakos – First Runner Up, Best Landscaping Project – Machakos Peoples Park BEST EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION PROJECT Planning Systems Services – Winner – Best Educational Institution Project - Braeburn Garden Estate Planning Systems Services – First Runner Up – Best Educational Institution Project - Aga Khan Academy, Mombasa Dimensions Architects & Interior Designers – Second Runners Up – Best Educational Institution Project Brookhouse Preparatory School BEST HEALTH CARE PROJECT Planning Systems Services – Winner – Best Health Care Project - Pamoja Shell of Steel BEST CULTURAL BUILDING PROJECT Space and Systems – Winner – Best Cultural Building Project - Don Bosco, Upper Hill Nairobi

Best Hospitality Industry Project Dimensions Architects & Interior Designers –Enashipai Resort & Spa

Triad Architects – First Runner Up – Best Cultural Building Project - Sacred Heart Cathedral, Kericho Dimensions Architects & Interior Designers – Second Runners Up – Best Cultural Building Project - All Saints Trinity Center, Nairobi BEST HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY PROJECT Dimensions Architects & Interior Designers – Winners – Best Hospitality Industry Project - Enashipai Resort & Spa Beglin Woods Architects – First Runners Up – Best Hospitality Industry Project – Naivasha Simba Lodge Morphosis Limited – Second Runners Up – Best Hospitality Industry Project – The Boma Hotel, Nairobi BEST URBAN DESIGN / TOWN PLANNING PROJECT Planning Systems Services – Winner – Best Urban Design / Town Planning Project – Nairobi Intervention BEST RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PROJECT Urko Sanchez Architects, Winner, Best Residential Building Project, Lamu Apartments Otto Mruttu & Partners, Architects – First Runner Up – Best Residential Building Project, Enkaji, Windy Ridge, Karen Planning Systems Services, Second Runner Up, Best Residential Building Project - Sultan Palace Beach Retreat Design Artitude – Honorable Mention – Best Residential Building Project – Lockwood Apartments BEST COMMERCIAL BUILDING PROJECT Planning Systems Services – Winner – Best Commercial Building Project – Kenya Commercial Bank Headquarters Beglin Woods Architects – First Runner Up – Best Commercial Building Project – The Watermark ,Karen Bowman Associates – Second Runners Up – Best Commercial Building Project – The Oval Planning Systems Services – Honourable Mention – Best Commercial Building Project - Imperial Health Sciences Building

Congratulations to all participants and winners!

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AWARDS

Far left BORAQS Chairman ; Arch Nathan Kureba exchanging pleasantries with guests. Kamlesh Shah (Managing Director Basco Products LTD) sharing words David Beglin and Simon woods (Beglin Woods Architects)

Team from Planning systems LTD receiving award

PHOTOS BY - KENNETH KINOTI

AAK President; Arch Waweru Gathecha making opening remarks.

Distinguished Jury panel: Arch. Janfrans van der Eerden (Netherlands), Arch. Shamla Fernandes (Kenya) and Dr. Allan Kenneth Birabi (Uganda)

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Mophosis directors Arch.Adnan Mwakulomba and Arch.Yassir Brek receiving award.


MATERIALS

INTENSIFIED CAMPAIGNS TO END USE OF LEAD-BASED PAINTS DR FARIDAH HUSSEIN

L

ead is widely used in the industrial processes due to its useful properties. It is however one of the elements that is highly acknowledged as toxic at all concentrations with no known biological function. It affects practically every system within the human body, and has devastating consequences for the health and intellectual wellbeing of the world’s children. At high levels of exposure, lead affects the central nervous system and causes coma, convulsions and even death. Children who survive acute lead poisoning usually experience mental retardation and behavioural disorders. Even at low level of exposure, lead causes spectra of permanent manifestations such as memory loss, altered behaviour, dyslexia, attention deficit disorder, hypertension, renal impairment, including reproductive organ toxicity. Until recently, it was leaded petrol that caused considerable lead poisoning. It took joint international efforts to have leaded petrol phased out in almost all countries. Lead in paint is a major source of lead exposure in developing countries especially since there are no established legal limits. It is one of the most common causes of clinical lead toxicity and significant source of childhood poisoning. This is because paint manufacturers may add lead compounds to paint to have brilliant colours, to prevent rusting and to make oil-based paint dry faster and evenly and these paints are extensively used in interiors and exteriors of homes, schools, public, and commercial building, toys, furniture, playground equipment and other articles in which children easily get into contact with. Paints containing lead are also used in industrial and automotive applications, which can contaminate soils and waterways as well as being tracked into homes. Workers are exposed to lead during the manufacture and processing of lead-containing materials. Renovation, demolition and lead-based paint removal can also be a major source of lead exposure for construction workers as well as residents. Dry sanding, abrasive blasting, and burning, welding or heating lead painted surfaces usually generate significant levels of airborne lead that can easily be inhaled or ingested. This can bring about adverse health effects such as renal manifestations, cardiovascular and increased blood pressure that result in incidences of hypertension. It is in this context that in 2009, International Conference on Chemical Management under the UN called for the elimination of lead in paint. The conference also launched the Global Alliance to Eliminate Lead in Paint under the leadership of the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNEP. The Lead Alliance focuses and catalyzes the efforts of diverse stakeholders

KIIRDI CEO, Dr. Charles Moturi and Environment Secretary Dr. Alice Kaudia applauds as Basco Products MD, Mr. Kamlesh Shah donates Lead Safe paint to the Headmistress-of OLM, Mrs. Regina Nzomo

to achieve international goals to prevent children’s exposure and minimize occupational exposure to lead in paint. The overall goal is to phase-out lead in paint and eventually eliminates the risks that such paints pose. From 2013, Kenya Industrial Research and Development Institute (KIRDI) has been conducting related research projects including holding national fora with several partners to observe and create awareness during the International Lead Poisoning Prevention Week of Action. These events are held annually during the last week of October. Dr. Faridah Hussein Were who is a senior research scientist at the institute was nominated as a member of the Advisory Group of Lead Paint Alliance under auspices WHO/UNEP to facilitate the overall co-ordination of

When the peeled off paint surface is leadbased then airborne lead is released in form of dust and is a common exposure pathway through which children are exposed.

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MATERIALS

Lead poisoning prevention awareness through traditional dance by pupils of OLM

international activities that are geared towards elimination of lead in paint ahead of 2020. This year several events were organized by KIRDI to mark the 3rd National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week of Action that ran from 26th to 31st October 2015 with involvement of several collaborators, partners and media. Among these activities, KIRDI in collaboration with Basco Paint Products Ltd and UNEP launched the week of action by creating awareness and demonstrating professional painting of deteriorated paint surfaces that was previously painted with lead-based paint to minimize child exposure to lead at Our Lady of Mercy Primary School, Nairobi South. Lead-based painted surface is a source of lead exposure The painted surfaces of the walls, doors and windows usually deteriorates overtime and peels off and become airborne. When the peeled off paint surface is lead-based then airborne lead is released in form of dust and is a common exposure pathway through which children are exposed. Lead dust can be created during normal wear, demolition, renovation activities, which results in invisible film that contribute to lead loading. Children may ingest lead paint chips, which is enhanced in those who engage in pica. Airborne lead is highly persistent in the environment and is easily inhaled. It can contaminate the soil or water and get into human beings through various food chains. Inherent curiosity, hand-to-mouth activities and extended outdoor activities of children result in their bringing lead-coated materials including contaminated soil and dust into their mouth, thereby greatly increasing the risk of lead exposure. Children who are under 6 years of age as well as those who suffer from malnutrition, absorb lead at an increased rate. Their developing brains are more susceptible to the damage caused by lead exposure. Workers inhale very fine particles of airborne lead especially when they carry out heat-gun stripping of painted surfaces, welding and torch-cutting or burning lead contaminated materials which is common practice among construction workers. 30

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In conclusion there is need for intensified campaigns given the adverse health impact that is associated with lead exposure. These campaigns inform the public about lead poisoning prevention, the presence of lead in paints for sale and use on the market; lead paint as a significant source of lead exposure; availability of technically superior and safer alternatives; spells out the necessary precautions to be undertaken when preparing a previously painted surfaces with lead-based paint for repainting; urging paint manufacturers to voluntary eliminate lead compounds from their paint formulation processes and provision of relevant information on paint can labels that warns of risks that may arise from lead dust when preparing previously painted surfaces. These information can be obtained from the toolkit, which is accessible on the Lead Alliance Website: www. unep.org/noleadinpaint According WHO, socioeconomic factors are important predictors of exposure to lead. Poor families are more likely to live near industrial areas and in deteriorated lead painted houses where they are exposed to lead. Their children are more likely to have iron or calcium deficient diets, and as a result they absorb more lead. However, when lead exposure is prevalent in a community then the health and well-being of the whole society is compromised. The economic costs in terms of medical care and diminished opportunity, undermine the growth of entire the nation. The good news is that lead poisoning is preventable. The evidence of lead safe paints and lead-based paint co-existing in our local market and retailing at the same prizes suggests that there are no economic barriers to introduce regulatory controls and the elimination of lead paint. Substitutes for lead are readily available, making the global elimination of lead in paint an achievable goal. It is however necessary to label and certify the paint cans to enable the consumers to purchase lead safe paint. National efforts to promote the establishment of appropriate legal and regulatory framework to control the manufacture, import, export, sale and use of lead paints and products coated with lead paints is recommended.


STUDENT PROFILE

DAVID MWANGI Year 4, University of Nairobi, Architecture Department TA: What interesting projects, previous or present, can you tell us about? DM: We recently designed a primary school in Voi. It was quite an exhilarating experience, because it was a project that was to be implemented, and we were the first group that was going to come up with designs that were to help in the final design. Apart from that, we also did a Mixed Use Development (MUD) project, which was also interesting because it allowed us to give our own opinions on how we’d like Nairobi’s city scape to be, adding our own ideas to it. TA: What has been your experience through architecture school to this day? What do you find most challenging in the study of architecture? DM: Architecture school has been an array of mixed emotions and experiences, but all in all it has been an exciting journey. First year was the simplest, with simple introductory projects. Second year was a little more complex, where we designed small buildings. Third year was even more engaging, where we were involved in larger projects such as the Mixed Use Development project. All this helped build up our resilience as architecture students, and we have become more skilled and equipped to handle even larger and more demanding projects. Currently in fourth year, we are used to the long working hours and sleepless nights, and I must say it has impacted our social lives, because one tends to struggle to balance between the course and the social life, and at some point you have to sacrifice one, haha. The trick is achieving a balance, which we are all trying to do. TA: What do you do outside of class? DM: Outside of class I’m a freelance artist. I paint and draw as a small business to earn some income, which I use to support my education. I also play the drums and the guitar in church. TA: Would you say studying architecture has had a negative impact on your social life? DM: I wouldn’t say negative, but I have really struggled to balance my social life and my school work, which has affected them. At times the course work precedes the social life, and you end up disappointing friends who want to spend time together. But when the course work recedes, you find time to interact with your friends, and this helps to restore the balance. TA: Where do you see yourself, academically, socially, and proffessionally, in 5 years’ time? DM: Academically, I will hopefully have acquired a master’s degree in architecture. Socially, I would like to have settled down and started a family, haha. Professionally, I hope to have acquired enough skills to define myself as an architect and apply my own style of architecture to my designs.

consider in the near future? If so, why? DM: Yes, I would consider self-employment, but before that I would like to work under a seasoned professional in order to acquire enough skills. I think self-employment is a good opportunity to define yourself as an architect and apply your style of architecture to your designs without the limitations of corporate bureaucracy.

Third year was even more engaging, where we were involved in larger projects such as the Mixed Use Development project.

Ta: Is self employment something you would THE ARCHITECT • ISSUE 10 • Q1 2016

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ARCHITECT PROFILE

HM DESIGN BAGS A UN AWARD

At the Conference HM Design delivered a presentation entitled “Sustainable Tourism as a Tool to Enhance Indigenous Settlements and Protect Biodiversity”.

I

t was an eco-cheery day in October 2015 when HM Design was presented a prestigious award by GFHS (Global Forum on Human Settlements) in collaboration with UNEP (United Nations Environment Programme). Originally set up in Kenya in 1990, the firm won for “Outstanding Contribution” in helping alleviate poverty in rural areas and protecting biodiversity through Sustainable Tourism Physical Planning and Design. The firm’s unique one-of-a-kind planning and design philosophy balancing economic, environmental, social and spiritual aspects impressed the GFHS whose mandate is to “Build Sustainable Human Settlements and promote the United Nations Habitat Agenda.” Held in New York, over 300 delegates from the world over attended the 10th Global Forum which coincidentally also marked the ‘World Cities Day 2015.’ This year’s theme was ‘From Sustainable Development Goals to New Era for Sustainable City and Sustainable Urbanization.’ The Director, Hitesh Mehta, sees his firm’s work as an opportunity to improve earth for all. HM Design strives to be “the change it wishes to see in the world,” in the footsteps of Gandhi’s

HM Design (far right) with the UN “Outstanding Contribution” award.

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principles. Their designs are tailored to be all-encompassing and holistic in nature and sustainable in all aspects of the planning and design process. Each plan and design is tailor-made to fit the local context in terms of physical, metaphysical and cultural issues. Not exactly a novice in the field, they have built projects and provided consultation services in over 55 countries, and are also no strangers to winning multi-international awards. Based in Florida currently, HM Design thanked all their professional consultants and communities with whom they have worked with world all over. The memorable evening was wrapped up with opera singers, classical music and poetry readings that reached out to an audience composed of diplomats, enterprise principals, specialists and scholars among many others. We at AAK wish to extend our congratulations to HM Design on behalf of all Architects and Professionals in the construction industry.

Hitesh (Royal Nigerian gown) and wife Liz (Chinese dress) enjoying the Award Ceremony at the United Nations Hqs.


COMMENTARY

NISHA SHAH-ALPHONSO

PUSHING ON TOMORROW

Bombax House, Nairobi, Kenya by HM Design

F

or most architects, their watershed moments occur when they are able to shake the dust off their employee sandals, and strap on shiny boots stamped with ‘I am the boss.’ The possibility that such breaks could come laden with hidden clomps of murky dirt never crosses one’s mind. In cases where the goose is shimmering with countless golden eggs, how many architects have the courage to say no? One balmy day, a young struggling architect received a call: Would he mind taking on a project for a beach side resort? Hardly daring to believe his luck, he spent days and nights working on it, scintillating between wave-like or palm-like forms. The sites were numerous, tiny islands with some being as small as 3km long by 0.5km wide, barely large enough to sling a cricket ball across. There was only one eensy-weensy problem: the islands were the ancestral homes of poor villagers who barely managed to survive through fishing. Some of the islands even housed architectural masterpieces, 400 years old churches which had withstood the ravages of time. With one click of the mouse, our architect swept clean the islands,

and slated in gleaming condos with state-of-the-art apartments. The architect was one happy man. His future was filled with iconic projects flooding in. The developers were happy men. Their futures were filled with yachts and stately mansions. The religious leaders and elders who sold the land were happy men. Their futures were filled with ample riches. The only unhappy men were the poor villagers who suddenly found themselves on the wrong end of the oar, floundering in the water! All was going swimmingly swell, until one day a hole in the ship appeared and all started sinking south. Had our architect suddenly develop a social conscience? Alas, no. A priest who realized that the religious institution was responsible for the impending doom decided to dig in his feet and speak up. And for all his merry efforts, after a short while he received a nicely engraved letter telling him that his services were no longer required. As simply as that, he was defrocked after over 10 years of servitude. That tiny stumbling block did not deter him. In fact, it gave him that added kick to fight for what he believed Turn to page 30

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COMMENTARY From page 29

was right. Many people approached him, some bearing expensive gifts, others brandishing crude threats. Too broke to even have credit in his mobile phone at times, he still weathered the storm to form a powerful network uniting the villagers and creating awareness. A formidable movement arose, strong enough to check the developments. And the developers themselves? Let’s just say happy campers they were not. Their solution was pretty simple, if not very original. Bump him off in the middle of the night. And the sad part, it worked. Because it needed another hero to stand up and take his place, which apparently real life is running short on as they are all busy at Hollywood. So, there you go. The End. You might be wondering where exactly this story is going, if anywhere. When I was approached to write on watershed moments, I was stumped for a long time. Yet after the occurrence of this story, I decided that I was not going to be like that thoughtless architect, only interested in his own gains and riches. I was not going to design without thinking of the consequences of my design, especially the social ones. When graduation hats are donned on our heads, our eyes are starry eyed and shining with ideals. We have great dreams: to make a difference in the world, perhaps to even save the environment with never-hitherto thought of designs. Yet at what point did the overwhelming and consuming need for success tear apart our ideals? A client says, I want a design for some modern creative houses. Only catch? Some of them are on the riparian reserve. Our conscience puts up a brief struggle and is promptly squashed. It’s a small river anyway, we console ourselves. Yet, better than anyone else, we know the critical importance of riparian reserves. A client says, add 3 more storeys to the apartment block to make it more financially viable. He knows someone in the local authority who will approve it. Without hesitation, lest the project that will launch our career disappears like a smoky mirage, we quickly copy and 34

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paste upwards. What about the bursting overladen infrastructure and zoning byelaws? The government needs to upgrade the system, the zoning bye-laws are outdated, and we are solving the housing problem anyway, we tell our conscience witheringly. It slinks away, abjectly defeated. Do architects have social consciences? Or is it something that is shed like snake skin once one tackles the real world away from the idealism of youth in university institutions? There are many Le Corbusiers and Frank Wrights out there, brilliant designers famed for their iconic buildings. Yet, I have not come across the Gandhis and Martin Luther Kings of architecture. As guardians charged with the built environment, including yes, preserving it, architects bear the strongest responsibility of ensuring that our environment, culture and heritage is conserved. After all, who better to appreciate an eons-old building that defied gravity to stay up in spite of lack of cement, than architects themselves? Yes, development is crucial, but it should not take the form of a spinning tornado, tearing through and leaving destruction in its wake. That would be akin to yanking down Fort Jesus in Mombasa,

and plonking apartments in its place. Designing and building should be done responsibly. Social conscience is not taught in the universities, nor is it exactly encouraged in the field. The construction industry has myriads of effects capable of spanning across generations. We are the keepers and defenders of the future. Architects design on fringes of national parks, and justify that it was part of the Client’s briefs. Their job is just to design and build. Yet who will speak and say that it is wrong? The local authorities? Wangari Maathai? Or can it possibly be just you or me, a simple architect? I ask myself, if I had been in that architect’s shoes, would I have made excuses regarding bringing down of historic buildings, and not caring about the ancestral land which had been acquired through dubious means, and that thousands of poor people would have been displaced? Or would I have had the courage to stand up and say no, like that priest? It is for me to determine the price of my integrity, and whether I will be able to look the future in the eyes, and say: I didn’t ruin it for you. Rest in peace, Fr. Bismarque.

As guardians charged with the built environment, including yes, preserving it, architects bear the strongest responsibility of ensuring that our environment, culture and heritage is conserved.

NISHA SHAH-ALPHONSO is a graduate of University of Nairobi quite a few green summers back, is currently at Mutiso Menezes International, where she can be found toiling away diligently on master plans (reminder note to thyself – must make sure bosses read this). With quite a few years of experience tucked haphazardly under her belt, her passions include dealing with unreasonable clients, rogue contractors, and writing when the said bosses yank the grindstone away from her.


CALL FOR PAPERS AND ARTICLES The Architectural Association of Kenya is pleased to announce the AAK Annual Convention 2016, AAK’s premier annual CPD Event. This year’s theme-BUILD. RESILIENT will address subsistence in practice, urban context, building and project planning. We will focus our discussion on the following sub-themes: BUILDING FOR RESILIENCE

CLIMATE CHANGE AND RESILIENCE

URBAN RESILIENCE IN EAST AFRICA

PROFESSIONAL AND PROJECT RESILIENCE

1. Transport/ Mobility: How mobility networks impact the resilience of Cities. 2. Designing for Resilience: Fundamental design principles for Consultants in designing for resilience

1. The growth of resilient cities as a response to climate trends (a case study of Tsunami in Sumatra, Indonesia in 2004 or similar case study)

1. Social/ Security issues in the region. How current factors e.g. terrorism have informed resilience in the built environment 2. Resilient Cities: How does urbanization inform resilience? Besides the physical aspects, population growth and cultural trends that should be anticipated.

1. In Professional Practice, what principles can be employed to ensure a resilient career that survives economic and political changes? 2. Project planning and ensuring that projects from inception to the ‘life of the project (building or city). Planning for survival.

AAK therefore invites interested persons to submit the following for consideration by the Editorial Committee • Articles for Publication in the Conference magazine: To be received by 15th May, 2016 • Conference papers in any of the sub-themes above: Submission of an abstract (1 A4 size sheet) to be received by 15th April, 2016. Presenters whose abstracts are accepted will be expected to submit full papers by 30th June 2016. Further details expected of each paper / presenter will be shared upon acceptance of abstract. All submission to be sent by email to aak@aak.or.ke

For sponsorship and exhibition opportunities, please contact Jacob Mwangi on jacob@aak.or.ke The Architectural Association of Kenya

@arch_ke

www.aak.or.ke


FORUMS

ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION 2-2015 HELD ON 12TH NOVEMBER 2015. CONSTRUCTION SITE SAFETY:

“HOW CAN CONSTRUCTION PROFESSIONALS CONTRIBUTE TO IMPROVING SAFETY AND HEALTH ON CONSTRUCTION SITES?” SUMMARY OF THE DISCUSSIONS The current state of Safety and Health on construction sites in the Kenya is wanting. The issue of construction site safety and health is not given the attention or priority it deserves and as a result players in the industry have developed an attitude of reacting to arising disasters, as opposed to proactively preventing them.

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1. Historic nature of the problem Lenient implementation of safety and health policies in the Kenya construction industry can be attributed to the manner in which construction was carried out during the colonial days. The natives engaged as construction labourers by the colonialists were not regarded as equal beings. In effect, the employers did not give much thought to the safety and health of the labourers on their sites. After gaining independence, the attitude towards the construction worker seems to have been carried forward from generation to generation resulting in the current deplorable safety and health conditions on Kenyan construction sites.

2. Commodification of labourers How the management views the labourers has a great impact on how they will cater for their safety and health. Currently, workers on site are commoditized and injuries to them viewed in terms of time lost in the project schedule. This in effect dehumanises the workers making contractors and construction professionals to not consider the workers as precious lives but instead view them as mere labour being provided on site.

4. Poor policy enforcement Currently, the Occupational Safety and Health Act: 2007 governs safety and health in the work environment, and there are statutory bodies set up to ensure compliance. The presence of these bodies is rarely felt on the construction

An accident is reviewed on the basis of its effect on the project; the impact an accident would have on the workers’ life and livelihood is not considered. As a result, most of the safety and health measures taken tend to be reactive in nature as opposed to the proactive protection of the workers.

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It is noteworthy that a different school of thought could argue that commodification of labourers may help lead the contractors to put in place measures to reduce the amount of time lost in injuries.

3. Self-awareness/ Self-value Labourers seem to have an inferiority complex which leads them to accept the less than acceptable safety and health conditions on sites without complaint. This is observed where these very workers rush to rectify any apparent hazards in their work environments whenever project consultants are carrying out routine inspections. Regardless of the policies put in place by the relevant authorities, construction workers will continue to accept mediocre safety standards if they do not value themselves and see the need to be protected on sites. Ultimately, the standards envisioned in the safety and health laws and codes of practice (The Occupational Safety and Health Act: 2007, Safety and Health in Construction published by International Labour Organization: 1992, etc.) will not be realized on Kenyan construction sites.


FORUMS sites and consequently there is laxity in the implementation by the contractors. 5. Lack of leadership and accountability There is a lack of clear guidelines on the role of the building team in the enforcement of safety and health on construction sites.

Being primarily responsible for construction workers’ safety and health, contractors have failed in its implementation. Consultants are seemingly oblivious to the contractors’ laxity and rarely get involved in ensuring safety and health policies are implemented, yet they too are exposed to the same risks as the labourers on site.

If anything, the professionals are at greater risk since they are only on site once or twice a month in comparison to labourers who are based on site and are aware of the existing hazards.

6. Cost The implementation of safety and health measures in construction requires a significant cost investment to be made by contractors.

Most contractors view safety and health related costs from the aspect of the initial acquisition cost. They do not consider the more holistic view encompassing the direct and indirect costs that would be saved during the course of the project as a result of proper implementation of safety and health measures.

The worry that adequately pricing for safety and health will reduce their competitive edge during tendering leads the contractors to under-price for it in their tenders. Hence, most contractors provide bare minimum levels of safety and health on construction sites.

On most sites, personal protective equipment and a wellstocked first aid kit are not available.

7. Knowledge on Occupational Safety and Health The current formal education system does not adequately orient aspiring construction professionals on implementation of the safety and health policies in Kenya. The knowledge on where to find training services offered by Directorate of Occupational Safety and Health (DOSH) services approved training institutions is also inadequate resulting in a huge deficit of construction personnel who are competent in matters of safety and health. There is no requirement for construction industry practitioners (contractors, labourers, consultants, etc.) to have training in safety and health. Additionally, it is not commonplace for safety and health professionals to be involved in construction projects as independent consultants. 8. Safety personnel The project team does not include any safety and health consultants that would be able to oversee the provision of safety and health of labourers. In the running of the project, it is important to have an independent person whose sole role is to ensure the safety and health of workers on site.

The Roundtable is a platform that brings together passionate people who want to change the construction industry for the better. It harnesses the experience and intelligence of stakeholders across the construction sector in an open and interactive environment where ideas and views on pertinent industry topics can be exchanged, new issues explored and desire for actualisation of innovative thinking nurtured. At The Roundtable, we challenge the construction practitioners to quit complaining about things not being done right and dare them to be the change they want to see in the industry. The Roundtable is an initiative run by Centreline Projects Ltd. (www.theroundtable.co.ke)

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JANUARY

FEBRUARY

MARCH

APRIL

MAY

JU

WEDNESDAY

1

THURSDAY

2

FRIDAY

1

New Years Day

1

The Architect Magazine BORAQS Educational Trip to Singapore, Malaysia & Doha BORAQS Educational Trip to Singapore, Malaysia & Doha

3

SATURDAY

2

2 3

1

4

2

5

3

SUNDAY

3

MONDAY

4

1

TUESDAY

5

2

WEDNESDAY

6

Office opening

THURSDAY

7

Construction Project Management Chapter Council

4

FRIDAY

8

CPM Chapter Council

5

SATURDAY

9

SUNDAY MONDAY

3

College of Fellows Meeting Membership Services Committee

2

6 Advocacy and Communications Committee T/Planners Chapter Council

5

Mombasa Branch Council Meeting

7

6

4 5

QS Chapter Meeting

4

8

CPM Chapter Council

6

CPM Chapter Council / AGM QS Chapter CPD Seminar

6

5

9

7

11

10

7

6

10

8

12

11

8

7

11

9

13

WEDNESDAY

13

Engineers Chapter Council QS Chapter Meeting

9

T/Planners Chapter Council and AGM QS Chapter Meeting and AGM

Engineers Chapter Council and AGM QS Chapter Meeting and AGM Advocacy and Communications Committee

10

14

3

8

Engineers Chapter Council QS Chapter Meeting

9

11 CPM Chapter Council and AGM Landscape Architects Chapter Council and AGM

11

CPM Chapter Council

15

SATURDAY

16

13

12

16

SUNDAY

17

14

13

17

18

Membership Services Committee

12

15

Membership Services Committee

14

Architects C

12

16

Engineers T/Planners C

13

17

14

18

15

19

Architects Chapter Council

15

EDC Chapter Council

15

13

FRIDAY

18

EDC Chapter Council

Membership Services Committee EDC CPD Seminar

16

Membership Services Committee

Members Com

Administrati Com Landscape Ar

16

Mombasa Branch Council and AGM

15

Landscape Architects Council

19

Landscape Architects Council

17

Landscape Architects Council

21

20

Architects Chapter Council

17

Architects Chapter Council and AGM

16

Architects Chapter Council

20

Architects Chapter Council

18

Architects Chapter Council

22

21

Administration and Finance Committee T/Planners Chapter Council AUA Council Meeting, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

18

T/Planners Chapter Council and AGM

17

T/Planners Chapter Council

21

Administration and Finance Committee T/Planners Chapter Council

19

T/Planners Chapter Council

23

FRIDAY

22

AUA Council Meeting, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

19

Construction Project Management Chapter Council and AGM Architects Award of Excellence EDC Chapter Council and AGM

18

SATURDAY

23

20

19

SUNDAY

24

21

20

19

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

MONDAY

25

TUESDAY

26

WEDNESDAY

27

22

Executive Committee Meeting Governing Council Meeting

EDC Chapter Council Mombasa Branch Council Meeting

22

20

23

21

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22

21

Membership Services Committee Administration and Finance Committee

25

Executive Committee Meeting Governing Council Meeting

26

23

Executive Committee Meeting Governing Council Meeting

22

24

Engineers Chapter Council and AGM

23

Executive Committee Meeting Governing Council Meeting

27

24

AAK Annual General Meeting and Gala Dinner Launch of AAK @50 Commemorative Activities

28

25

Good Friday BORAQS Educational Trip to Singapore, Malaysia & Doha

29

30

24

CAA Validation of Courses in Architecture - UON, JKUAT, TUK Executive Committee Meeting Governing Council Meeting

28

25

CAA Validation of Courses in Architecture - UON, JKUAT, TUK

29

26

CAA Validation of Courses in Architecture - UON, JKUAT, TUK QS Chapter CPD

30

27

CAA Validation of Courses in Architecture - UON, JKUAT, TUK Mombasa Branch Council Meeting

29

Mombasa Branch Council Meeting AAK e-Newsletter

26

SATURDAY

30

EAIA Council Meeting Arusha

27

26

BORAQS Educational Trip to Singapore, Malaysia & Doha

SUNDAY

31

EAC Partner States Regulators Meeting (Architects)

28

27

BORAQS Educational Trip to Singapore, Malaysia & Doha

29

28

BORAQS Educational Trip to Singapore, Malaysia & Doha Easter Monday

30 31

MONDAY

29

AAK e-Newsletter

TUESDAY

29

BORAQS Educational Trip to Singapore, Malaysia & Doha

WEDNESDAY

30

BORAQS Educational Trip to Singapore, Malaysia & Doha

THURSDAY

31

AAK e-Newsletter

26

27

FRIDAY

Mombasa Branch Council Meeting Architects Golf Day at Karen Country Club

25

23

28

Mombasa Branch Council Meeting

24

CAA Validation of Courses in Architecture - UON, JKUAT, TUK

THURSDAY

25

EDC Chapter Council

EDC Cha

20

Landscape Architects Council

TUESDAY

CPM Cha

11

10

14

10

EDC Chapte T/Planners C

Engineers C QS Chap

Engineers Chapter Council

10

Engineers Chapter Council QS Chapter Meeting

9

14

12

Engineers Chapter Luncheon

College Me

8

7

12

MONDAY

4 Labour Day

Advocacy and Communications Committee T/Planners Chapter Council

TUESDAY

THURSDAY

1

Mada

28

AAK e-Newsletter

Executive Me Governing C

Architects A Alliance Fran Museum


2016 Year Planner

UNE

JULY

AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

DECEMBER

araka Day

e of Fellows eeting

er CPD Seminar Chapter Council

apter Council

1 1

2

3

1

4

2

1

Advocacy and Communications Committee

5

2

Engineers Chapter CPD Seminar

6

3

4

7 8

T/Planners Chapter Council CPM Chapter Council

4 5

5

Advocacy and Communications Committee

3

6

College of Fellows Meeting

4

7 CPM Chapter CPD Programme T/Planners Chapter Council CPM Chapter Council

8 9

9

6

10

10

7

11

8

12

Chapter Council

13

apter Council

2

3 Advocacy and Communications Committee

The Architect Magazine

4 5 1

5 Engineers Chapter CPD Seminar T/Planners Chapter Council CPM Chapter Council

6 7

3

2 Advocacy and Communications Committee T/Planners Chapter Council EDC Chapter Council

7

3

Advocacy and Communications Committee T/Planners Chapter Council

4

QS Chapter Chairman’s Dinner

8

5

10

11

9

6

11

12

10

7

12 Engineers Chapter Council QS Chapter Meeting World Town Planning Day/ Conferences/Awards of Excellence

11

Engineers Chapter Council QS Chapter Meeting

8

12

Landscape Architects CPD

9

14

10

15

Engineers Chapter Council QS Chapter Meeting

13

10

AAK Annual Convention Leisure Lodge

14

11

AAK Annual Convention Leisure Lodge

15

T/Planners Chapter Council

13

12

AAK Annual Convention Leisure Lodge EAIA Council Meeting

16

EDC Chapter Council

14

16

13

AAK Annual Convention Leisure Lodge EAIA Annual General Meeting

17

15

12

17

17

14

18

16

13

18 19

14

15

EDC Chapter Council

CPM Chapter Council

11

CPM Chapter Council

16

18

Membership Services Committee

15

Membership Services Committee

19

Membership Services Committee

17

Membership Services Committee

14

ion and Finance mmittee rchitects Council

19

Landscape Architects Council

16

Landscape Architects Council

20

Landscape Architects Council

18

Landscape Architects Council

15

Landscape Architects Council

20

Administration and Finance Committee Architects Chapter Council

19

Architects Chapter Council

16

Architects Chapter Council

21

20

T/Planners Chapter Council Mashujaa Day

17

T/Planners Chapter Council

22

e Committee eeting Council Meeting

Academic talk at ncaise / National m of Kenya

Architects Chapter Council

17

Architects Chapter Council

21

21

Administration and Finance Committee T/Planners Chapter Council

18

T/Planners Chapter Council

22

EDC Chapter Council

23

20

24

22

19

24

21

25

23

20

26

22

Executive Committee Meeting Governing Council Meeting

23

CPM Chapter CPD

26

Executive Committee Meeting Governing Council Meeting

27

21

18

19

25

23

Administration and Finance Committee EDC Chapter Council

22

24

Executive Committee Meeting Governing Council Meeting

25

27

24

28

26

28

25

29

27

28

29

Mombasa Branch Council Meeting AAK e-Newsletter

26

Mombasa Branch Council Meeting

30

31

Mombasa Branch Council Meeting AAK e-Newsletter

Executive Committee Meeting Governing Council Meeting

24 25

Christmas Day

21

26

Boxing Day

22

Executive Committee Meeting Governing Council Meeting

27

28

Architects Charpter CPD Breakfast Meeting

24

29

Mombasa Branch Council Meeting

25

27

29

26

31

28

30

27

29

31

31

Mombasa Branch Council Meeting

28

30

30

31

29 AAK e-Newsletter

AAK Office Closure

23

23

AAK e-Newsletter

The Architect Magazine

Membership Services Committee Administration and Finance Committee

30

30

EDC Chapter Council

Jamhuri Day

13

ship Services mmittee

20

AAK President’s Dinner

9

8

Engineers Chapter Council QS Chapter Meeting

College of Fellows Meeting

6

9

Engineers Chapter Council QS Chapter Meeting

CSR Activity Kongoni Primary school walling

1

2

Chapter Council pter Meeting

s Chapter CPD Chapter Council

The Architect Magazine

Advocacy and Communications Committee

AAK e-Newsletter


MEMBERSHIP

LIST OF INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS IN GOOD STANDING MEMBER NO.

NAMES

FELLOWS

MEMBER NO.

NAMES

MEMBER NO.

NAMES

MEMBER NO.

NAMES

2372

BISHER F.A.

3301

KAMAU K.M

2727

MARIERA F.M.

1445

NGUMMO R.M.K.

1856

BOWMAN T.S.

848

KANYUE P.E.

1847

MARSHALL J

1518

MEHTA H.S.

750

BUSOLO W.S.W.

1183

KANYANGWESO J.O

1043

MARUTI E.K.

804

CAVANAGH J.A.

2406

CHANDABHAI A.T.I.

1341

KARAGO J

2423

MATHENGE J.W

889

GITOHO J.N

1464

CHANGILWA S.A.

2647

KARAMA Y.B

2116

MATIVO J.K

363

KAPILA S.

2415

CHARFARE A.A.

944

KARANJA W.M.

2599

MATOLE D.K.

1563

KARURI L.G.

1996

CHEBII K.

2891

KARANJA D.K

954

MATASYO J.

839

KEBATHI S.

2719

CHIIRA M.J.M.

2338

KARIITHI J.K

1139

MATHAROO S.S.

595

KIMATHI J.

54

CHUDHA J.S.

1821

KARIUKI D.M.

548

MBINDA J.J.M

950

KUNGU P.

1811

DECHE A.

2807

KARIUKI S.M.

1882

MBICHA S.

1014

MAGUTU G.J. (PROF)

1386

DESAI S.A.

3676

KARIUKI W.

2660

MBITI I.M

1759

MULYUNGI G.M.

1177

EBRAHIM Y.H.

2737

KARUGA V.

2982

MBOGO S.M

1040

MUNGAI F.G.

3629

EBOYI J.I.

1376

KARUGO P.M.

891

MBUGUA N.

1758

MUNYANYA M.K.

1472

ESHANI M.

2468

KASANGA S.M

2581

MBURATHI K.

5

MUTISO D.M.

879

FARRANT G.

1873

KASSIM M.O.

1217

MBURU G.I.

729

NJENDU K.J.G.

1189

FERNANDES S. (MRS)

1557

KATUA C.M.

1192

MBURU J.M.

741

NDONG J.E.O.

3287

FRANCIS P.K

1311

KHAN A.L.

2438

MECCA J.P

1322

NGUNJIRI P.G. (PROF)

2429

GACHANJA J.K.

701

KHANDWALLA A.A.

941

MEHTA H.

640

MUTISO R.G.M. (DR)

3382

GACHANJA P.K.

2321

KIAI S.K.

1230

M'GITHAE B.N.

1515

SIKA P.O.

2386

GATAI H.M.

2615

KIBOWEN K.C

2645

MCHARO L.B

636

SIMU A.C.M.

2084

GATHECHA W.

2318

KIEMA M.M.

2528

MICHIRE D.M.

288

WAWERU J.G.

3060

GATHECHA N.N

2819

KIBE G.M

3289

MILGO N.C

824

GITHUNGURI G.N.

1925

GATHAGA P.W.

1186

KIBUE S.N. (MS)

2010

MILIKAU E.S

699

HIRANI R.M.

1269

GATIMU D.N.

1176

KIBWAGE J.

2512

MILOYO E.K

443

KITOLOLO A.S.

1312

GICHOHI J.N.

2595

KIGADA E.E.

2097

WAITITU L.M

113

MANGAT H.S.

2515

GICHUGU E.G.

2587

KIGAI E.K.

960

MISIANI C.A.O

2601

ODINGA R.A

1559

GICHUHI F.M.

1326

KIGONDU S.

2994

MISEDA E.E

22

PATEL I.B.

2380

GICHUHI S.M.

3138

KILONZI A.K

1388

MONG'ARE S.G

1069

KIBINDA P.M.

1795

GICHURI O.W.M

888

KIMANI J.W.

2517

MUCHOGU J.W

311

NJAU G.J.

2681

GIKERA I.M

1938

KIMEU M.

1809

MONARI A.O.

422

WANG'ONDU M.H.C.

457

GITAU G.G.M

2467

KINGOO C.W

2156

MOTANYA D.O.

278

OHAS J.M

2536

GITAU H.N.

2535

KINUTHIA S.N.

542

MRUTTU I.R.

740

ALUVAALA A.I.

1207

GITHAIGA A.G.

2736

KINYUA E.G

2738

MRUTTU .O.S

418

GICHUIRI O.M.

2548

GITHATU F.G.

1995

KINYUA S.M

1668

MUANGE V.N.

1090

KIMORO D.N.

2344

GITHENDU J.G.

1614

KIPKETER J

2416

MUCHERU S.K

575

LITIKU F.M.

2917

GOKO G.M

1629

KIPSANG' TITUS

1765

MUGO E.D.G

489

MARJAN A.S.

2305

GONO E.J.O.

1939

KIRATHE E.M.

635

MUHWEZI J.K.

382

MATHU K.

2182

GREMLEY A.J.

2975

KITHISYA D.K

3282

MUIRURI I.N

577

NJUGUNA D.M.

1465

GRONLKKE T.

2308

KITHAKA J.M.

2665

MUKABWA E.M

488

MBAYA J.S.

2155

GUCHU J.K.

749

KITHAKYE D.I.

2134

MUKEKU.J

578

MURAGE S.K.

748

HAMEED SALMANN M.M

1519

KUNDU P.W.

2077

MULI P

1762

HAMZALI T.

529

LALL C.J.S.

1798

MUMO M.

MEMBERS 1690

ABONYO DOROTHY

3336

HOFF J.H

2445

LATI FELIX

3430

MUNALA G.K (DR.)

1505

ABUNGE O.O

1746

IKINU O.W.

1167

LEE-SMITH D. (MS)

3097

MUNDIA T.G

1931

ACHARYA T.S.

2778

IMRAN S.W

948

LIKU E.K.

1562

MUNGAI C.M.

1701

ADEDE G.O.

2820

ISMAIL ABDI

1560

LORD M.A.

2593

MUNGAU K.J.S.A.

2533

ADAMJEE M.F.

2409

JASPAL SINGH

702

LUKWAGO J.M.

3270

MUNYOKI J.M

2530

ADEGA B.O.

777

JOHNSON S.H.

1733

LUTTA J.C.

1362

MURAYA K.P.

2851

AGUTU M.I.A

3122

JUMA J.

2669

MABONGA W.D

2843

MURIITHI J.M

2381

AGWARO K.O.

1221

KABIRU M.N.

1669

MACHARIA J.N

3439

MUSYIMI M.M

1830

AIZPUN F.

3433

KABIRU M.K

2333

MACHARIA W.M

931

MUSYOKI N.

1279

AKATSA A.

2749

KABUTU J.W

1012

MACKENZIE N.P.

2421

MUSUVA M.W.

847

ANDREWS T.J.

959

KAFUNA J.K

3213

MAKAGUTU N.O

2501

MUTAI E.K.

320

ANGORE P.D

2078

KAGIRI G.K.

2174

MAINA D.

2306

MUTAKAA J.

2520

ANJARWALLA S.

2080

MAGAMBO J.K.

1401

MAINA J

1743

MUTHUSI P.M.

919

DR. ANYAMBA T.J.C

1634

KAHURA C.M.

878

MAINA K.

2106

MUTISO E.K.

475

ARCHER J.H.

1065

KAISI K.

1695

MAINGI P.M.

1703

MUTUA J.A.

2013

ASIENGA E.

3296

KALYA W.C

1141

DR. MAKACHIA P.A.

3398

MUTUA U.M

1790

ATKINS W.G.

1923

KAMARU E.K.

826

MAMDANI M.A.

2102

MUTUKU M.

1753

BAMRAH.K.

2157

KAMAU F.G.

2015

MANDUKU D.

1745

MUTUKU J.N.

500

BEGLIN D.W.

3188

KAMAU T

1920

MANKU G.S.

1628

MWACHARO M.S.

670

BHULLER M.S.

2750

KAMWERU G.K

2508

MANJI A.A

892

MWALUKWARE W.M

40

THE ARCHITECT • ISSUE 10 • Q1 2016


MEMBERSHIP MEMBER NO.

NAMES

MEMBER NO.

NAMES

MEMBER NO.

2337

MWANGI B.G.

3831

OKANGA C.O

1118

1927

MWANGI G.W

1846

OKELLO J.F

832

2591

MWANGI E.I.W.

1406

OKOTH T.O.

2123

MWANGI S.G.

1885

1265

MWANGI S.W.

2779

MEMBER NO.

NAMES

3787

LATABO F

WANYONYI J.S.

3681

LIMO S.K

2995

WARFA A.R

3401

LUVAI W.M

OLAWO G

1029

WASIKE P.S.

3689

MAGHANGA C.M

3671

OMBISA J.B

2154

WASILWA P.O

3318

MAVIA E.K

MWANGI M.K

2597

OMENYA A.O.(DR)

2301

WAWERU R.K. (MISS)

3491

MENZA A.K

3210

MWANGI M.N

1524

OMORO A.B.O.

2824

WETUNGU C.M

1071

MPUNGU P.J

442

MWATHI J.M.

2781

ONDIEKI C.O

563

WILL P.A.

3265

MALECHE D.S

2806

MWATU O.K.

2863

ONYANGO D.A

1078

WOODS S.R

3609

MASIBILI F.N

1788

MWAURA A.M.

2114

ONYANGO D.P.O

1390

JETHWA J

2903

MUHANDI G.M

2411

MWAURA N.K.

2751

OPIYO G.O

3679

AJEGA S.K

2717

MEDIRATTA KAVIT

913

MWENDWA M.I.

1815

OPON P.N.

2107

AMBROSE S.K

3415

MUDOME T.V

1926

MWEU J.M.

3315

OSIDIANA D.N.

2900

ARAKA S.K

3226

MATHU J.M

1922

MWITI G.

2437

OTIENO E.K.

3224

ASEMBO K.A

2845

MATHU W.

2320

NAMULANDA D.M.

1890

OUNDO S.W.

2747

BHOYYO B.M

3440

MIINGI G.M

648

NANDHRA H.S

1986

OWENDE M.O.

3820

BHOYYO P.K

3670

BOB NJOROGE MUHIA

2507

NAICCA C.M.

2780

OUYA D.O

3819

CANONIZADO G.A

2514

MULANG'A M.M.

2583

NDANU R.M.M.

2319

OYUGI A.O.

2649

CAROLEI M.

3326

MULANGO S.S

2376

NDAMBUKI D.M

2463

PATEL K.M

2549

CHELIMO T.K.

1937

MUNENE G.M.

2099

NDETA B.S.

1280

MUKESH P.

3821

CHEMEI M.

3307

MUNENE L.M

3102

NDEGE L.K

758

PATEL R.P

3624

DEOGUN I.S.

2773

MUNGA M.G

2686

NDICHU N.S

657

PATEL V.K.L.

3369

VAN DER EERDEN J.F.M.

3180

MUNYAO V.M

2827

NDOLI J.O.

1734

RAI J.N.

3732

ESMAIL F.I

3776

MURAGURI T.M

1851

NDUNGU C.N.

2146

RAI J.N.

2893

ETAMUKU K.O

3139

MUSANGI H.W

1209

NDUNGU D.K.

2329

RAJNOVIC P

3727

FRENDIN M.E.

3268

MUSYOKA P.M

2998

NDUNG'U K.K

3747

RAFROUF A.A

2846

GACHUHI E.K

3853

MUTIGA A.M

3108

NGATIA E.M

1813

REHAL S.S.

3312

GATHECERE D.M

3462

MUTINDA P.W

2503

NGUMUTA M.N.

1313

RUKWARO W.R. (PROF)

1706

GICHUKI D.K.

2901

MWANGI C.M.

3127

NGUTI W.W

3228

SAMOKA K.O

3680

GITHAIGA D.M

3838

MWANGI S.N

1404

NGUNJIRI F.K.

2654

SANCHEZ U.

3365

GITHINJI F.N

3335

MWENJE B.N

1275

NIXON R.A.

242

SARDELLI G.A.

2373

GOME S.O.

2666

NAMBATI I.K

2153

NJENDU G.M.

2083

SARDELLI M.E.

3343

HUSSEIN A

2511

NDEGE G.A.

2534

NJENGA D.K.

429

SARDUL S.

2579

EBRAHIMJEE M.Y.

3399

NDUNGU G.W

1884

NJENGA E.W

1041

SARNA Y

3303

JACKSON M.M

2822

NDUNGU K.M

2502

NJERU P.M.

746

SHAH S.Z.

3850

JUMAAN S.S

2855

NDUNG'U J.W

2811

NJERU J.M.

952

SHIHEMBETSA L.U.

2393

KAGIINA J.K

3166

NDUNG'U J.B.K

2181

NJUGUNA A.M

2876

SIKHILA H.W

2657

KAGIRI P.K

3835

NG'ANG'A P.M

1038

NJUGUNA F.K

2715

SINGH MAYANK

3201

KAGO J.M

3786

NG'ENO F.C

2454

NJUGUNA B.M

1861

3445

KAIRU J.N

3822

NGUGI K.M

1435

NJUE M.G.

1564

SITUMA D.W.

3250

KAMUNYU

3371

NGWAI F.M.

885

NJURU M.

1030

SOIN R.K. (MRS)

3165

KIMANI G.N

2589

NJOROGE S.M.

1631

NUNGARI F.N.

3530

SSEMWOGERERE K.

3422

KAMAU G.K

3685

NJOROGE J.K

2312

NYAGAH A.G

2164

SUERO I.M.

3533

KANTARIA R.

3621

NJAGI J.M.

2546

NYAGA D.K.

1383

TARMOHAMED N.E

3135

KIAMBA L.N

3121

NJUGUNA W.

2342

NYAMATO S.O.

997

THARA M.N.

1817

KIARAHO D.N.

3836

NYAKOIRO C.M

732

NYANJA G.B.

975

THATTHI P.S.

3696

KIBOR E.J

2774

NYACHWA W.N

1343

NYARIKI W.M.

3315

TIMITIM B.R

3066

KIPYAB C.J.M

3663

OBWAR E.O

3444

NYOLE F.C

834

MUCHIRI D.T

2125

KILILO T.L

3448

OLUGA P.S

2451

NYONGESA A.W

808

THOMAS P.D.

3824

KILUNGYA T.N

3684

PANESAR G.S

933

NZIOKA S.N.

2307

TOROITICH C.K.

3748

KIMANI M.G

2782

OMEDO R.G

1850

OBANYI D

3851

TURYAHABWE R

3630

KIMANZI J.

2861

ONWONG'A T.O

2748

OBALA P.O

912

VAGADIA G.M.

3833

KIMUYU A.N

2682

OPIATA C.O

1689

OBIRI J.W.

275

VAULKHARD T.G.

3476

KIOKO S.M

3692

OPWONDI P.M

1228

OCHIENG C.C.

1653

VIRDEE A.S.

3510

KING'E V.N

3839

OTIENDE J.M

1218

OCHIENG R.O.

2137

WACHIRA P.N.

3266

KITHEKA J.K

3261

OYUGI C.O

2173

OCHIENG V.M.

1328

WACHIRA S.K. MAJOR

3832

KOILEGE L.K

3834

PATEL G.G

1200

OCHONG' D.O.W.

806

WAGAIYU E.K.

3162

KOINANGE K.

3823

PONDA S.M

2823

ODINYO A.E

712

WAHEED A.

3100

KOTENG P.O

2430

SALIM F.A.

1760

OGAI I.L.O.

3283

WAHOME C.N

3446

KUBAI M.M

1389

SEHMI K.S.

3110

OGONJE A.O

2537

WAIHINYA C.N.

3669

KURIA D.E.K

3098

SEHMI J.S

1810

OGUNDE O.O.

683

WALIA T.S.

1913

KURIAH P.J.

2663

SHAH N.P

2446

ONGUTO O.O.

2405

WAMBUA J.M.

3818

KWON H.C

2865

THETHY J.S

2379

OHAWA E.K

2897

WAMBUA P.K

2158

KYALLO A.M

1749

THIMANGU A.

1950

OINO E.J

1096

WAMBUGU F.W.

2786

KYALO S.M

1227

THUO K.

2518

OJWANG' P.O.

893

WAMBUGU M.M.

3153

LATESTE M.O.W

3225

TIROP A.K

SINHA A.

NAMES WAMWANGI J.M

THE ARCHITECT • ISSUE 10 • Q1 2016

41


MEMBERSHIP MEMBER NO.

NAMES

MEMBER NO.

NAMES

MEMBER NO.

NAMES

MEMBER NO.

NAMES

3140

TOO K.K

766

HONGO J.V.

763

NGUGI P.K.

3861

MUYEYIA S.O

2122

VIRDEE S.

1367

HUSSEIN W.H.

1024

NGUYO D.M.

2239

OGUTU C.M

3251

WACKER R.

730

JABBAL S.S.

2425

NJUGUNA A.N.

1988

MBUI P.M.

3837

WAKHUNGU J

2147

KIBUNJA H.M.

1437

NJUGUNA P.K

2035

MICHOMA J.G.M.

3286

WALIJEE W.S

2724

KAHURIA T.K.

869

NYAKIONGORA M.A.

3103

MUGENDI G.M

1970

WARIITHI P.M.

772

KAHORO D.K.

1249

NYAKUNDI H..G

1983

MULONGO L.S.

3693

WARUHIU N.K

700

KAMAU M.D.

1672

NYAMAI R.K.

1957

MUSYOKA R.M. (MRS)

2435

WEKESA D.S.

1203

KAMICHA A.K.

782

OBAE S.G.

423

MUTISO DAVID M

3149

WERE E.O

1539

KANGARA D.K.

1157

ODHIAMBO E.O.

1628

MWACHARO M.S.

3749

WEYN V.A.L

2948

KANYI P.K

1532

ODONGO V.B.O.

2165

MWAURA A.M.,

3672

AWITI C.O

789

KARIGUH R.M

676

ODUNDO W.A.

2041

MWAURA P.M.

2311

BOLO D.O.

1396

KIMANI F.N.(Ms)

3173

OGUTU B.W

1735

MWANZIA A.M.

3729

GITOGO D.W.

2331

KIMANI R.K

668

OGODA J.A.M.

2065

NDEGWA E.N.

3788

JOEL K.S

738

KINYANJUI W.

2051

OKAKA J.O.

2254

NDUNGU K.K.

3253

KABETHI J.N

1100

KITHINJI N.B.

854

OKEROSI J.O.

3518

NDUNG'U G.N

2309

KINYANJUI MUNGAI

1902

KIRUI D.K.

684

OKETCH T.O.

569

NGARI J.J.

3750

MISAO C.O

1206

KISIA P.S

604

OLUOCH J.M.O.

3429

NGIGI S.W (Mrs)

2740

MUNYORI S.N

2704

KOBIA M.M

1725

OMUFIRA A.N. (MS)

2630

NTABO J.M

3751

MWASI S.N

771

KOIGI G.K.

2707

OMONYO L.O

1131

NTHIGA N.M.

3214

NJOROGE A.M

1655

KUNG'U J.N.

485

OORO M.A.

1947

NYABUTI J.A.

2729

OGUTU C.Y.N.

1497

KUSIENYA C.M

2444

OTIENO O.S.

3219

NYAMWENO I.M

3372

OMUNJALU S.O.

426

LEVITAN A.

550

OTUKE J.O.

2219

NYIKA D.

2340

RACHUONYO V.O

859

MANDHRY A.A.

1641

RUKWARO S.M.

2171

OMONDI F.O.

3854

SAID F.S

791

MANGURU F.K.

628

SANYA A.

2229

OMOLLO W.O.

3417

TONUI W,C

1872

MANYUIRA T.G.

1865

SAVALA D.M.

3238

OMOTI K.M

3005

ADOTE J.A

408

MARI C.P.

1755

SIKUKU C.W

2450

ONYANGO M.O

1770

ATER M.O.

1874

MASESE G.M.

1671

TOROITICH B.K.

2886

PATEL M.

2228

BARASA I.B.

726

MASU S.M.

3734

WAFUBWA M.W

2625

PAUL J.M

2166

DEYA E.O

1245

MATHENGE J.M.

708

WAITE S.G.K.

2248

RITA J.N

1767

GATUNDU J.W.

770

MAUNGU N.

781

WANDA A.G.

2280

WANJIRU N.W

2184

KAMAU J.N.

1699

MBAYA F.R.N.

1494

WOSE L

3239

ARWA G.A

2814

KIBUCHI D.L.

835

MBINGA G.S.M.

48

DABASIA D.D.

2351

LIYAI A.C

2343

MABIA G.K.

1525

MBUGUA L.G.

2016

HALAI D.P.

2685

MIHESO H.M

2392

MBURU G.K.

1419

MIRITI P.K.

449

HARUNANI M.A.

3780

MUCHIRI C.N

2129

MUCHEMI S.N.

2643

MOHAMUD M.A

1786

HERD S.N.C.

2617

MUKETHA S.M.

2813

MUCHUNU A.M.

1164

MOMANYI I.J.O

3503

KIMEMIA S.M

3564

MURIGI G.N

3363

MURIANTHI N.N

677

MUAMBI H.K.

3231

KOIGI S.N.K

3425

MWANGI E.M

2652

MWENJE M.A

3198

MUCHEMI W.

2422

MANGWA D.

3406

NABWILE M.M

2688

KUOGOH G.N

1551

MUCHINA J.N.

1462

MATHARU N.S.

2255

NJUGUNA B.M

3817

OGOLA S.V.L

1656

MUCHUNGU P

1533

MUSUYA J.S.

2281

OCHIENG B.O

2110

OKEYO J.P.

1732

MUCHUNGU A.

3117

ODUOL A.O

3628

OKOTH C.A.A.

2637

OKICH P.O

768

MUGAKI P.N.

1799

ARIWI D.J.O.

3613

OTIENO W.J.O.

3852

OMOM T.O

3350

MULONDO R.P

2706

KIOK T.M

2835

SAKWA W.

3095

OTIENO P.G.J

2330

KASILI L.M.

2121

LAGAT S.K.

3352

SIMIYU J.R

2187

SIAMA P.V.

1301

MUNALA B.

2725

MASSAM B.

564

BHUNDIA B.B.

2375

SHISIA W.Y.A.

1102

MUNENE P.M.

1052

AKATCH S.O.

361

BOGA R.K.

2322

TSENGA D.S.S.M

3142

MUNYAKHO G.O

3857

BUDZUMA A.A

1274

GORO E.C.

745

VIRDEE G.S.

3062

MURAGE M

2063

CHERUIYOT W.K.

2047

GUMBE L.

709

ADAM A.M.

866

MUSYIMI J.M.

3719

EWOI M.E

2602

GUMBO N.

3784

AKOKO D.O.C

2050

MUTAI A.K.

2622

GICHUKI D.K

2055

HIRANI N.R

2026

AMBATSA J.P.

1834

MUTAI N. (MS)

3407

GITHINJI E.M

2731

KAGONDU G.M.

698

ASSAVA A.M.

836

MUTISYA P.T.

3428

KAMAU C.N

2205

KHABURE O.C.W.

2230

ASURA E.

1250

MUTUNG'A K

1153

KAMENYI A

2313

KHAN M.A.

876

BACHIA F.K.

1125

MWANGI C.M.

2209

KAROKI E.

1726

KHAN A.K.M

802

BUNEI R.K.C.

2573

MWANGI J.

993

KEBATHI S.

2732

KIMANI F.M

3278

CHEK DENIS

721

MWAURA C.J.

1602

KEINO I.C

2150

LOVEDAY J.I.W.

20

FENWICK H.R.

687

NAYAR K.

2830

KEMONI J.O

2151

MACO'DAWA G.O.

619

GACHAGUA F.A.

1017

NDERITU C.K.

2207

KIMANI M.W.

3101

MAINA E.M

490

GAKUYA H.N.

2888

NDULI M.N

1354

MAIRURA E.O.

2053

MBUI J.M.

1741

GICHUIRI J.W.

1099

NDUNGU P.M.

513

MANASSEH J.M. (MRS)

2100

MSAFIRI A.S.

572

GITHUO G.N.

1479

NGARUIYA W..G

2944

MANG'IRA P.C.K. (MRS)

2890

MUMENYA S.W

2195

GITONGA A.M.

2889

NGAYWA B.L

2623

MARANGA H.N

2162

MUTEA E.K.

734

GRANTHAM D.J.

3843

NGORU E.M

2712

MASAKI S.T

2733

MWANIKI A.W

626

HAJEE B.H.

481

NGUGI B.N.

2043

MASINDE A.

3237

NDERITU M.N

1891

HIRANI N.H.

2170

NGUGI G.K.

2487

MUCHERU N.N

2227

NJENGA G.N.

42

THE ARCHITECT • ISSUE 10 • Q1 2016


MEMBERSHIP MEMBER NO.

NAMES

MEMBER NO.

NAMES

MEMBER NO.

NAMES

MEMBER NO.

NAMES

2054

NJOROGE G.M.

2941

NDETA B.S

3560

KENYATTA M.O

3174

AHURA B.O

2859

NYAWADE B.O

3389

NDULI M.K.

3501

KIMANI J.N

1449

AKATCH S.O. (DR)

731

ODONGO M.W.O.

3390

NGAYWA B.L.

3815

MASUDI W.M

2120

ARCHER A.S.

3562

OJENDO D.

3245

NYAIGOTI M.O.

3816

MUIGAI J.M

1448

GITOHO J.N.

3612

OTWANI J.A.

3814

NZIOKI D.K

3637

NGIGI P.N.

1447

MUTISO R.G.M.

2023

MATALANGA N.W. O

2938

OCHONG' D.O

3722

NJOKA B.K

2817

MURAGE D.G.

1305

SHANKLA A.

2939

OGAI I.L.O

3773

NYAIRO J.M

2816

NJIRAINI R.M.

1455

VARSANI R.M.

3058

OGUNDE O.O

3760

OGADA A.O

1454

NGUNJIRI P.G.

2815

WAIRAGU J.M.

2924

OHAWA E.K

3638

ONGUNDO D.I.O.

2690

OBATSA P.A

2734

WANDAY P.O

2923

ORIKO D.O

3500

OIRIGA D.M.A

2689

OMOLE H.

3427

MWANGI F.K

2919

OUNDO S.W

3565

OMONDI G.O

3826

BAARIU P.K

2383

NJIRAINI M.M.

2942

WAITITU L.M

3759

OSORO D.O

2916

CHONGA O.C

2937

ABUNGE O.O

3112

SEBORU M.A

3177

DAVID E.L

3740

GITAU D.K

2925

AGWARO K.O

3615

SIBOE I.

2805

KIMEU M.

3762

GITHINJI B.W

2922

AKATCH S.O

3179

KOIGI G.K

2800

MATOLE D.K.

3842

KAMWERU G.N

3813

GITURA C.

3193

MUTAKAA J.

2799

MWEU J. M.

3856

KIMANI S.N

2928

EBOLE A.

3241

AKATSA ANZAYA

3111

OLAWO G.G

2898

KORIR P.M

2921

HONGO J.V

3242

OSIDIANA D.N

2796

SAIVA D.M

3785

MARIECH M.A

3240

KIBOWEN K.C.

3616

WAIHARO M.K.

2793

MWANGI W.N

2498

M'IKIUGU M.M.

2940

KINYUA E.G

3515

MACHARIA J.M

2792

NYIKA DAVID

2772

OCHANDO S.O

3394

M'ITHAI C.K

3636

WEKESA M.S.

2791

PROF. AKATCH S.O

2770

ODHIAMBO L.P

3862

MAYAVI P.M

3611

KANALO J.A.

2790

NJUE P.N

2756

OFAFA A.O

2926

MBINDA J.J.M

3424

AYUYA A.A

2789

EBRAHIM Y.H

3205

OWUOR M.O

3757

MBUGUA L.M

3566

BIWOTT J.K

3208

NZIOKI N.M

2294

MARWA S.M

2930

MOHAMMED K.M

3783

KAIRU P.K

3356

MAINA S.K

3191

MOCHAMA E.M

2927

MUMO MUSEMBI

3758

KAMOTHO J.M

3178

KIAMBA L.N

2745

NAMUSONGE M.M

3355

MWAURA A.N

3828

KARICHU J.Z.M

2839

ABUJE J.S

2757

WANZA N.C

LIST OF FIRM MEMBERS IN GOOD STANDING Tectonics International Liberty Plaza 4Th Fl. P. O. Box 38552-00623 Nairobi Tel: 825133 825134 info@tectonics.co.ke Oje Associates Office Park P. O. Box 74060-00200 Nairobi Tel: 4454384 ejumaoino@hotmail.com DMJ Architects East Church Road Off Rhapta Road Westlands P. O. Box 42878-00100 Nairobi Tel. No. 254 20 4454396/7 Telkom Wireless 254 20 3599980/81 Fax No. 254 20 4454398 dmj@daginternational.com Symbion Kenya Limited P. O. Box 24002-00502 Nairobi Tel: 8833412/3/5 symbionkenya@symbion.int.com Kenmt Bill Engineers & Planners Whitecourt Block No.S Kilimani P. O. Box 15692-00100 Nairobi Tel: 2717533/3873366 mairurao@yahoo.com Armstrong & Duncan Adak House, Milimani Rd P. O. Box 40426-00100 Nairobi Tel: 2717497/2722766 info@adak.co.ke Mathu & Gichuiri Associates Ltd Mga House P. O. Box 14372-00800 Nairobi Tel: 3748934/6/8/ info@mathuandgichuiri.com Harold R. Fenwick & Associates Sri Sathya Sai Centre Waiyaki Way P. O. Box 14994-00800 Nairobi Tel: 4443131/2 fenwick@fenwick.co.ke Ooro & Sanya Associates Ltd. Marcus Garvey Rd. P. O. Box 55123 – 00200 Nairobi                                                                                          Tel: 0710207064/0736900420 Batiment Group Limited Visions Plaza, 4Th Floor 3A P. O. Box 23717 -00100 Nairobi Tel: 828303/828304 info@batiment.co.ke.

Africost Kenya Consulting Quantity Surveyors Utumishi Co-Op House 4Th Fl. P.o. Box 2132-00100 Nairobi Tel: 2730882 info@africostkenya.co.ke

Arprim Consultants Karen Professional Centre 2Nd Floor, F10 Karen, Karen Road P. O. Box 12969-00400 Nairobi Tel: 884312/8 info@arprimconsultants.com

Triad Architects (017)                        Triad House, 83 Muthaiga Rd. P. O. Box 30725-00100 Nairobi                            Tel: +254 (020) 4049651/4 +254 (020) 4049644 Wireless: +254 (020)2320146 +254 (020)8091114/5 Mob: +254 (0)722 708632 +254 (0)733 220539 Fax: +254 (0)20 2603699 +254 (0) 4040721 E-Mail: info@triad.co.ke Website: www.triad.co.ke

Tectura International Ltd. Tectura Studio 2727 The Cresent P.o. Box 54634-00200 Nairobi Tel; 3751680/3751443 info@tetura-Int.co.ke

Getso Consultants Ltd. Mucai Drive Off Mucai Road P. O. Box 52979-00200 Nairobi 2711400/2710823 info@getso.co.ke SK Archplans Menelik Lane Off Ngong Rd P.o. Box 50725-00200 Nairobi Tel: 3874171 sk@skarchplans.co.ke APT Design Solutions      Visions Plaza.ground Floor.suite G3. P.o. Box 32190-00600 Nairobi Tel: 828246 info@aptdesignsolutions.com Morphosis Limited Katani Road, Syokimau P. O. Box 2682-00202 Nairobi. 0707-675661 / 020- 2023511 info@morphosis.co.ke

Gakuya & Associates Kaputei Gardens P. O.box 74250-00200 Nairobi Tel: 3875293 Laurez & Associates Venice Court – Kilimani Along Menelik Road, P. O. Box 2439-00200 Nairobi Tel: 0735-675374/0713-896280 Muambi Associates Yaya Centre 3Rd Centre P. O. Box 44142-00100 Nairobi Tel: 3869638 muambi@swiftkenya.com

Synthesis Limited Karen Hardy, Off Ushirika Rd P. O. Box 15266-00509 Nairobi Tel: 890031/3 info@synthesis.co.ke

North Wind Consulting Ltd.        03 Mogotio Road, Off Parklands Road P. O. Box 13050-00200 Nairobi Tel: 020 251 8312, 0729 407 094 info@northwindkenya.com

Abbey Architects (K) Ltd Kaunda Street Town House P. O. Box 20917-00100 Nairobi Tel: 310853 abbeyarch_inc@yahoo.com Adventis Inhouse Africa Ltd. Kaputei Gardens Off Othaya Rd P. O. Box 13310-00100 Nairobi Tel: 3870953 info@adventis-africa.com

Otto Mruttu & Partners No. 7 On 2Nd Floor, Kedong House Corner Of Lenana & Ralph Bunche Roads P. O.box 76382-00508 Nairobi Tel: 020 2722410 / 020 2134392 info@ottomruttu.com otto.mruttu@Ottomruttu.com

Align Architects Woodley Annex No. 12 P. O. Box 64348-00620 Nairobi Tel: 2113626 kigondus@ymail.com

Scope Design Systems Hurlingham Plaza P. O. Box 10591-00100 Nairobi Tel: 2612299 info@scope-designs.com

Architronic Palli House Nyerere Avenue P. O. Box 99350-80107 Mombasa Tel: 041 2315036 mail@architronic-ke.com

Skair Associates Ltd, Matumbato Road, House No. 32, Upperhill Nairobi Tel: 2738106, 0721241331 info@skairassociates.com

TEJ Architects P.C.E.A Jitegemea Flats F1 P.o. Box 27644-00506 Nairobi Tel: 2719086 tej@capstoneonline.co.ke

Consting Consult Ltd 51 Lenana Road/Wood Avenue Junction, Block B, First Floor Office Suite #B3, P. O. Box 51509 – 00200. Tel: 3860640, 0728-891 924 Wireless: 2650954 consult@costingconsult.co.ke

Axis Architects Wood Avenue, Kilimani P. O. Box 76635-00508 Nairobi Tel: 3870290/3870963/0208019181 info@axis.co.ke

Construction Cost Consultancy Ltd. The Office Park Riverside Drive P. O. Box 76532-00508 Nairobi Tel: 4448831/2 ccc@tpo.co.ke

Davson and Ward Davard House, Cedar Rd P. O. Box 46611-00100 Nairobi Tel: 4440318 davard@africaonline.co.ke

Frame Consultants Ltd. Civil Structural & Geotechnical Engineers   Pension Towers, 3Rd Floor P. O. Box 58624-00200 Nairobi Tel: 2213744/2251505 info@frameconsultants.com

U-Design Architects & Interior Designs Lavington Shopping Centre P. O. Box 74801-00200 Nairobi Tel: 4348697 info@udesign.co.ke Uniconsult Engineering Consultants Ltd. Chester House 2Nd Fl. P. O. Box 1955-00100 Nairobi 310790/310648 Uniconsult@Swiftkenya.com Gitutho Associates Consulting Architect S Mei Place 1St Avenue New Nyali P. O. Box 82853-80100 Mombasa 020-2327662 info@gitutho.co.ke

THE ARCHITECT • ISSUE 10 • Q1 2016

43


MEMBERSHIP Jawkim Architects 1/634 George Padmore Ridge P. O. Box 60300-00200 Nairobi Tel: 020 275104/5, 020 2010348 jawkim@africaonline.co.ke

Aaki Consultants Dale House, Rhapta Rd P. O. Box 66091-00800 Nairobi 4443997/4448126 info@aaki.co.ke

Octa Architects Limited Design Centre Tausi Rd P. O. Box 16270-00100 Nairobi Tel: 3753306 octaarchitects@gmail.com

Cadplan Architects Limited Theta Lane, Off Lenana Rd P. O. Box 4475-00506 Nairobi 2710130/113 cadplanarch@gmail.com

Waweru & Associates, Architects Futuretech House   No. 10 Chiromo Lane P. O. Box 43642 00100 Nairobi Tel: +254-20-3740535/6/7 waweru@waweru.com www.waweru.com

Tecta Consultants Whitecourt Galana Rd P. O. Box 3347-00100 Nairobi 3873366/3546265 tectacon@yahoo.co.uk

Gitau Associates Nairobi South B South Gate Centre Building P. O. Box 75493-00200 Nairobi Tel: 0722 812563 Email: gibgid@yahoo.com Arplad Architects Ltd.     No. 1 Pitaway Flats P. O. Box 54777-00200 Nairobi Tel: 020 2324368/9; 0737 811 502 Email: arplad@arplad.com Lexicon Plus Ion Limited Hurlingham Park Apartment 4 P. O. Box 2772-00200 Nairobi Tel: 020-2730762 info@lexicondesigns.co.ke Miradi Consultants Fatima Flats, Suite 37 (N) P. O. Box 29700-00202 KNH Nairobi Tel: 0722 307 741 aluvaala@miradoconsultants.com Aegis Development Solutions Ltd Kedong House 2Nd Fl. Suite 16 P. O. Box 2861-00100 Nairobi Tel: 020-2730961 aegis@aegisdevelopment.co.ke Shaque Associates Ltd New Waumini House 3Rd Floor P. O. Box 14856-00800 Nairobi Tel: 4444026/020 2042955 info@shaqueassociates.com Ultimate Design Limited Norfolk Towers, Block G. 2Nd Fl P. O. Box 27090-00100 Nairobi Tel: 020-3572724 ultimate@tms-Cgroup.com Kanjumba Consultants Westlands Arcade Building 2nd Floor. Suite 210 P. O. Box 14781-00800 Nairobi Tel: 4443591 info@kanjumba.com M & M Construction Consultants Brunei House 2Nd Floor P. O. Box 4677-00506 Nairobi Tel: 550188/550208 info@m-mconsultants.com Interbill Consultants Embassy House 2Nd Floor P. O. Box 17054-00100 Nairobi Tel: 020-2251103/223889 info@interbillkenya.com Mak Consultants Maendeleo House 3Rd Floor P. O. Box 41355-00100 Nairobi Tel: 2229529 info@makconsultants.co.ke Integrated YMR Partnership Dale House Rhapta Rd.                   P. O. Box 69641-00400 Nairobi                                             Tel: +254 20 2610742/+254 20 4445380/1 nairobi@ymr.co.ke Point Consultants Matumbato Rd. P. O. Box 27600-00506 Nairobi Tel: 020-2510212 info@point-consult.org Bunei, Maungu And Associates Ltd. NHC Langata Court Phase 1 Block B1 - Flat No.2 Southern By Pass Off Langata Road P.o. Box 58978-00200, Nairobi - Kenya. Tel +254 -020-2010797 +254-020261315 Cell + 254 722 613 796 + 254 722 216 829 - Director buneimaungu@yahoo.com

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Paul K. Ngugi Associates Aacc Building Waiyaki Way P. O. Box 62351-00200 Nairobi 8044806/0722 505501 qspkna@gmail.com Studio Infinity Architects Sarit Centre 2Nd Floor P. O. Box 421-00606 Sarit Centre Nairobi 4442310/4442330 info@studioinfinity.net Radius Architects 3Rd Floor Ojijo Plaza Plums Lane P. O.box 61039-00200 Nairobi 3751830 3751831 Nairobi ddmaina@yahoo.com Sketch Studio The Attic, Oak Suite, Riverside Green Suites, Riverside Drive P. O. Box 1297-00606 Nairobi 3520715 sketchstudio.ke@gmail.com Peter Thomas Associates Ltd. No. 258 Dagoretti Rd P. O. Box 24421-00502 Nairobi 020-3884900 0727 933 454 / 0733 419 446 pdt@pta.co.ke Domus Architects H7 Showbe Plaza Muranga Road P. O. Box 16459-00100 Nairobi 3577167 domusarchitects@yahoo.com Miguna Consultants Ngong Rd Opp. Rugby Foot Ball Union P. O. Box 47850-00100 Nairobi 3875096/3867754 miguna@miguna.com Masterbill Integrated Projects Trv Plaza 7Th Floor P. O. Box 22905-00400 Nairobi 3743344,3743346, 3749409, 3744719 info@miprojects.co.ke Edon Consultants Int. Ltd. Timau Plaza Argwings Kodhek P. O. Box 19684-00202 Nairobi 3878345 info@edoninternational.com Archgrid Systems Old Waumini House P. O. Box 13725-00800 Nairobi 0727 508812 lnfo@archgridsystems.co.ke Ngasi Consulting Engineers Ole Odume/Muringa Rd, Kilimani P. O. Box 2680-00202, Nairobi Tel: +254-20-3860246, 2719364, 2016972/3 Fax: +254-20-2730884 Mobile: +254-722-520722 Email: Info@Ngasi.org Feradon Associates Ltd. P. O. Box 7375-00300 Nairobi 0722 723304,2716143 Gumbo@Feradon.com consult@feradon.com K & M Archplans Lenana Road/Wood Avenue P. O. Box 76240-00508 Nairobi 2723298/2720964 consult@kmarchplans.com Archten Architects Tectura Studio The Cresent Rd P. O. Box 66358-00800 Nairobi 3742841 info@archten.co.ke Space and Systems Dik Dik Gardens Lr. No 209/8699 Mandera Lane Off Gatundu Road P.o. Box 54560-00200 Nairobi 0722775430 spaceandsystems@jambo.co.ke Intershelter Sullivan Architects Mucai Drive Off Ngong Rd, Lr Plt No 7735 P. O. Box 51884-00200 Nairobi 2712090 info@intershelterarchitects.com

THE ARCHITECT • ISSUE 10 • Q1 2016

Arcs Africa Utumishi Co-Op House Mamlaka Rd Off Nyerere Rd. P. O. Box 28542-00100 Nairobi 2727517 info@arcsafrica.com Log Associates Nichalson Drive P.O. Box 10677-00100 Nairobi 2712156 info@logassociates.com Professional Consultants Limited Dennis Pritt Rd Kilimani Professsional House P. O. Box 45792-00100 Nairobi 020-2016322 020 4764565 info@professionalconsultants.co.ke Nderitu Consultants Waumini House P. O. Box 62405-00200 Nairobi 4450061/0722 334175 nderituconsultants@yahoo.com   Mutiso Menezes International Mmid Studio, Westlands Road, 5Th Floor P. O. Box 44934-00100 Nairobi 3742710/1/2 Mmi@Mmiarch.com Planning Systems Services Ltd. Lower Kabete Road P. O. Box 188-00606 Nairobi 4180650/1/2/ 0733 555001/0724 255088 info@planning-kenya.com Mruttu Salmann and Associates Kindaruma Line Off Ngong Road P. O. Box 12986-00400 Nairobi 020-3588294/020-2673331/0725-543061 msa@mruttusalmann.co.ke

Mandhry Associates Manda House Twiga Villas Twiga Rd Off Links Rd P. O. Box 34154-80118 Mombasa Tel: 0711 711377/0738 842880 ali@mandhryassociates.com Icon Concepts Ltd. Enterprise Rd Kcb Building 8Th Floor P. O. Box 17948-00500 Nairobi 020-2333111/0722 723231 info@iconconsortium.com Tarakibu Architects Limited Lower Ground Floor, Consummate Court Apartments, Block B,Ole Odume Rd Off Ngong Rd P. O. Box 15462-00100 Nairobi 020 3862213 info@tarakibu.co.ke Gibb Architects Office Of The Prime Ministers Bld. P. O. Box 30020-00100 Nairobi 3245000 mgitahi@gibbinternational.com Sycum Solutions Co. Ltd. P. O. Box 11954-00100 Nairobi 2715146/0722 798098 Info@Sycum-Solutions.com Quantech Consultancy, Mmid Studio,1St Floor, No 1D, Westlands Road, Westlands, P. O. Box 44660-00100, Nairobi 020-3746947/8 & 0721-52 69 31 info@quantech.co.ke Quanti Bill Consults Company Limited KP Flats Suite No. 9. P. O. Box 34360-00100 Nairobi quantibillconsult@gmail.com

Songa Ogoda & Associates 45 Amboseli Road, Lavington P. O. Box 54584-00200 Nairobi 020 8045668/3870563/0722 520631 info@songaogoda.co.ke

Geodev (K) Ltd. Hurlingham Plaza 2Nd Floor Room C3 P. O. Box 14066-00100 Nairobi 020-2721696 /0721 232708 goedevkenya@yahoo.com

Gem Archplans Waumini House West Wing 3Rd Floor Suite 10 P. O. Box 12182-00200Nairobi 020 3577634/0722 798382 gataim@yahoo.com

Heritage Associates Ltd. 16 Mucai Road, Off Mucai Drive,Off Ngong Rd. P O Box 56293-00200 Nairobi 2628077/ 0722413333 Studio@Heritageassociates.co.ke, heritageast@gmail.com

Designworth Architects Ltd Plot No 209/5566/2 Westlands P. O. Box 56940-00200 Nairobi +254202103648 info@designworth.net designworth@gmail.com

Whintto Architects (K) Ltd. Whintto House Opp. Mombasa Beach P.o. Box 89253 80100 Mombasa 0720 815944/0733 283274 Info@Whinttogroup.co.ke

Kenchuan Architects Limited Jameson Court Block A Off Ngong Rd. P. O. Box 19895-00202 Nairobi 3872137/020 2060805 info@kenchuanarchitects.com Inter Architects Bomas Of Kenya New Hall Suite No. 8 P. O. Box 5015-00506 Nairobi 0707970910,0722515475 info@interarchitectskenya.com interarchitects@Gmail.com Gachagua, Kahoro & Associates Hurlingam, Rose Avenue Nairobi P. O. Box 53094-00200 Nairobi 0722 306921/0721 617048 gka@zmail.co.ke Dimensions Architects & Interior Designers Ltd Mucai Drive Off Ngong Road P. O. Box 55459-00200 Nairobi 2728494 info@dimensionsarchitects.com Achera & Partners Architects & Urban Designers Riara Paddocks 1St Floor C2 Riara Rd. P. O. Box 10114-00400 Nairobi 8057743/0722 414645/0734 414645 acheraarch@hotmail.com acheraarch@gmail.com Blink Studio Limited Methodist Synod Hq Building 3Rd Flr Muthangari Rd Lavington P. O. Box 25269-00100 Nairobi Tel: 2070489/0722 262863/0733 241054 info@llinkstudio.co.ke Archetype Architects All Africa Conference Churches P. O. Box 58412-00200 Nairobi Tel: 4451008/0722 645200 admin@archetypearchitects.com Baseline Architects Ltd 47 Mucai Drive Off Ngong Road P. O. Box 39928-00623 Nairobi Tel: 2718353/2711873/2711876

Archscan Associates Limited Rose Avenue Off Ngong Rd P. O. Box 10958-00100 Nairobi 020-2574153,020 2618010 Archscan@Archscanassociates.com E.d.g. & Atelier Plot 21388 Kirichwa Gardens Road Off Elgeyo Marakwet North Road Kilimani P. O. Box 51676-00200 Nairobi 0722 522651/2034042/35 Office@Edgatelier.com Miwa Designs Limited Kenya Re Garden Estate Block 1 Door 6 Kenya Red Cross Road South C Nairobi P. O. Box 58634-00200 Nairobi 0733 748094 miwadesignskenya@gmail.co.ke Outsource Designs Milimani Apartments Milimani Rd P.o. Box 911-00502 Nairobi 020 2317299 info@outsource-designs.co.ke Tandem And Stark The Green House Off Ngong Rd 3Rd Floor East Wing Suite 15 P.o. Box 53328-00200 Nairobi 2055945/0724 655836 info@tandemandstark.com Arcscene Architects (K) Ltd. Vision Plaza Mombasa Road 5Th Floor Suite 11 P.o. Box 21845-00505 Nairobi 0722 962845 Arc@Arcscene.com Gitutho Architects And Planners Ltd P.o. Box 1634-00100 Nairobi Sukamba Court Unit No. 7 Ngong Rd 0771 275749/0702 940814 Info@Gitutho.co.ke Beglin Woods Architects Ltd. Chase Bank Wing Riversde Mews Riverside Drive P.o. Box 22759-00400 Nairobi Info@Beglinwoods.com 0722 201185


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The Architect Issue 10, 2016  

The Architect Magazine is an initiative of the AAK Architects' Chapter.

The Architect Issue 10, 2016  

The Architect Magazine is an initiative of the AAK Architects' Chapter.

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