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P O R TFOLI O

DING YU ARCHITECTURAL GRADUATE 2008 - 2018


PORTFOLIO ARCHITECTURAL GRADUATE

DING YU

30/07/1989 81 CURZON STREET, NORTH MELBOURNE VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA,3053 +61 422 660 652 YUDING9891@GMAIL.COM


CONTENTS

2016

RESUME

2

NEVERLAND

4

Rethink Paediatric Hospital Design by Combining with Fairgrounds 2015

TORIA

26

New Urban Complex Design 2015

PUDDING CITY

36

Computer Simulated Intelligent City Design 2013

SUPER READING HUB

50

New Library of Guangxi University & Reading Zone Design 2009

IN THE NAME OF NATURE

62

Nature-symbiotic Kindergarten Design 2016

POBBLEBONK HOUSE

68

Eco-friendly Frog Habitat Design

OTHER WORKS

74

Sketches, Watercolour Painting and Photography

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ARCHITECTURAL GRADUATE

D IN G Y U PERSONAL PROFILE • Highly creative with strong abilities of aesthetic and design • Rich and diverse experience in handling various 3d modelling software and Adobe applications. E.g. Rhino, Grasshopper, SketchUp, Revit, PhotoShop, InDesign, Illustrator, etc.

INFORMATION 81 CURZON STREET, NORTH MELBOURNE, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA, 3051

• Interested in parametrical techniques, adept at architectural form-finding and form-optimizing by applying parametrical methods • Australian permanent resident with one and a half years‘ local company professional experience, understanding architectural work flow in every stage of design • Highly motivated self-starter with a passion and desire for achieving high level results

YUDING9891@GMAIL.COM AUS: +61 422 660 652 CHN: +86 135 5771 0280 30 JUL. 1989 AUSTRALIAN PERMANENT RESIDENT

SOFTWARE SKILLS RHINOCEROS GRASSHOPPER REVIT ARCHITECTURE SKETCHUP AUTOCAD PHOTOSHOP INDESIGN ILLUSTRATOR VRAY

EDUCATION 2014 Jul. - 2016 Aug. THE UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE - (MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA) Major: Architecture Degree: Master of Architecture Studio Average Score: 83 (Top ranked results in studios for three out of four semesters) 2008 Aug. - 2013 Jul. GUANGXI UNIVERSITY - (NANNING, CHINA) Major: Architecture Degree: Bachelor of Architecture

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2016 Jul. - 2017 Dec. HIMMELZIMMER (STUDIO 505) - (MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA) Position: Architectural Graduate Responsibilities: controlling projects’ digital models; assisting senior architects in project form findings; optimizing projects by applying parametrical methods; making relative analysis diagrams and renders; producing architectural and detailed drawings. 2013 Aug. - 2014 Apr. ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN & RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF GUANGDONG PROVINCE (GUANGZHOU, CHINA) Position: Architectural Assistant Responsibilities: developing project’s Revit models; cooperating with piping engineers in optimizing project’s structural and piping drawings; producing architectural and detailed drawings. 2017 Aug. - Current UNIDESIGNLAB - (HTTP://UNIDESIGNLAB.COM/) Position: Private Tutor (Part-time) Responsibilities: instructing undergraduate students in improving and perfecting design portfolios; teaching student architectural design relative programs.

MICROSOFT OFFICE

AWARDS & HONOURS

LANGUAGE SKILLS

2016 Dulux Colour Awards

ENGLISH

2016 Australian Institute of Architects (AIA) Graduate Prize Nominated by MSD

MANDARIN CANTONESE

INTERESTS PHOTOGRAPHY SWIMMING 2

2016 Exemplar Thesis Design of Melbourne School of Design (MSD) 2013 Excellent Undergraduate Award of Guangxi University 2016 Thesis Design Selected to ‘2017 Global Excellent Graduate Design Exhibition’ by UnidesignLab 2017 Invited as a Guest Speaker Making Presentation in MSD Design Studio 2018 Thesis Design Quoted in Article ‘Parallel Practices’ and Published by <Architect Victoria>, Authors: Rebecca McLaughlan, Alan Pert 2018 Thesis Design Quoted in Article ‘Evidence and Speculation: Reimagining Approaches to Architecture and Research within the Paediatric Hospital’ and Published by <Med Humanities >, Authors: Rebecca McLaughlan 2017 Thesis Design Introduced in Article ‘Transdisciplinary Dreaming in the Design Studio: Architectural Education Meets the Affordances of a Modern University Campus’ as an Educational Exemplar and Published by <MSD School Magazine>, Authors: Rebecca Mclaughlan, Alan Pert


â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anything worth doing deserves to be pushed to the extreme.â&#x20AC;?

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NEVERLAND Rethink Paediatric Hospital Design by Combining with Fairgrounds Thesis Studio Design 2016, Semester 1 The University of Melbourne Tutors: Alan Pert & Rebecca McLaughlan Individual Work

Contemporary approaches to paediatric hospital design are aiming at mitigating the emotion of fear through distraction. This project is trying to produce a different approach to this problem by exploring the possibility of combining a paediatric hospital with the fairground. Project also provokes architects to consider a more engaging process of arrival and waiting within the paediatric hospital. But it also considers a more serious question that whether we can redress the social isolation of children during a period of illness by bringing healthy children into the hospital via a shared interest in the environment itself. Instead of beginning with a hospital and inserting distractions, such as playgrounds, movie theatres or fish tanks, Neverland draws on the infrastructure of fairground to reimagine the functions of hospital. There are four key hospital spaces being regenerated: Carousel Entrance & Waiting Rooms, Ferris Wheel Consultation Rooms, Tunnel Corridors and Spaceship-like Diagnostic Imaging Space.

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BACKGROUND RESEARCH

19%

of total population aged under 15 years in Australia in June 2006.

5.2Million

children is predicted to increase to by 2038. The number of children has increased over the past four decades.

24%

of Australian children lived in Victoria in 2011.

147Billion

dollars spent on health care, which take up 10% of Australia’s GDP in 2012.

261,930

times in 2013 children between the ages of 5 -14 around Australia were admitted to hospital.

41%

HIGHE

of children aged under 15 years had a long- RCH deserves the h term health condition in 2004. the existing syste Healthcare Stan

466,379 Asthma

days for all the children spent in hospital totally.

18%

of children had visited a doctor in the two weeks prior to interview, compared with 25% of the adult population.

is the most commonly reported medical condition, which effecting 16% of all children.

0.53%

of infant mortality shown a continuing and appreciable decline during this century.

52%

of children had used medication during this period, compared to 75% of adults.

1106

children aged 1-17 died, with half attributable to accidents, poisoning’s or violence.

36,

children stayed at t and about 200 rec 2

240

of children attend Specialist

83

of the RCH satisfac 2013

There are some researches have been undertaken about the current health condition of children in Melbourne and even the whole Australia, from which shows “this generation of people should be the healthiest ever” and “Australian children are the healthiest group in the population overall”. Moreover, Royal Children Hospital (RCH) in Melbourne is one of the best paediatric hospital in Australia in terms of medical facilities, hospital environment, patient experience. Etc. Therefore, the attention of research shifts from “what makes patients happy” to “what makes patients not happy”. According to the research:

479 complaints

Received in 2013, which arrange from access and administration to environment and atmosphere.

Complaints Received July 2012-June 2013

Complaints Received July 2013-June 2014 6


CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT Normally...

EST level

highest awarded under em according to the ndards accreditation.

,000

the hospital overnight, ceived care in RCH in 2012.

0,000

ded appointments at Clinics 2013.

Architects would insert several attractions into hospitals to make they looks more “interesting”.

3%

ction rating in the 20123 period.

How about to make it CONVERSE!

Complaints Received July 2011-June 2012

Let’s insert functions of hospital into a REAL theme park. Current research suggests that a fear of procedures ranks most highly among the concerns of children in hospital. So mitigating the emotion of fear or shifting children’s attentions is becoming a primary solution for the hospital designers and administrators. A normal way to complete a paediatric hospital design is to insert several attractions into hospital space after designing all other hospital functions. However, is it possible to do it differently? How about to make it converse? How about to insert functions of hospital into a playgrounds. Let’s combine a paediatric hospital with a real fairgrounds. 7


CAROUSEL Entrance & Waiting Room

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CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT Carousel is a traditional ride in the theme park. In the project, carousel is designed as the entrance of hospital, which allows sick and healthy children to get in. Stepping in it, patient will not have a feeling of fear, being treated discriminatory or socially isolated any more, as it just like a normal theme park without any difference. There are four stories in the carousel. The first three stories are traditional rides in theme park that everyone is allowed to take part in. The fourth floor is actually a cable car station, in which patients can take their own â&#x20AC;&#x153;gondolaâ&#x20AC;? to other destination facilities to receive check and diagnosis. Each cable car is like a waiting room with one distinguished carousel. Children can take this carousel to other unexpected destinations like a fantastic dream. From the very beginning of their journey in this carousel, children will have a totally evolutionary, fearless and interesting medical experience.

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Ground Floor: Entrance

First Floor: Entertainment Area 1

Third Floor: Entertainment Area 2

Fourth Floor: Cable Car Station

Sub-station in Corridor Area

Central Station in the Carousel

Patients entering this four-story carousel, which is like a central station, are delivered to their appointments. There are other sub-stations in other places such as Ferris Wheel and corridor area.

Sub-station in Ferris Wheel 11


SKY-DREAM FERRIS WHEEL Consultation Rooms

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DESIGN CONCEPT Ferris Wheel carriages stay high in the sky which is clean and fresh without much noises. As it is relatively separated from the other rides in the theme park, it can avoid crossinfections between patients and healthy children. Also because it stays high in the sky, children would have a good view to surroundings that will play as interesting distractions so that childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s panic could be relieved.

3-DIMENSIONAL TRACK Different from traditional Ferris Wheels, it has a 3-dimensional track, which is actually continuous all the way around. 24 carriages move along the track. The consultation time is flexible that changes normally from about 5mins to 15mins. But the time that a Ferris Wheel rotates around is fixed normally in 20mins, which is inflexible. Constructing a 3-dimensional track will maintain carriages to go pass one platform in every 5mins, which decreases interval time and increases efficiency significantly.

5mins 5mins

5mins

5mins

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Travel all around in 60mins


CENTRAL STATION

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TUNNEL WORLD Corridors

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Lifts

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CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT Choosing 1.5m as a typical size to create cube frames and tunnels as it is a proper children scale, which is averagely a bit higher than a 12 year-old childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s height but lower than a normal adultâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s height. So children can get in and out of tunnels handily, and feel easy to touch walls or even ceilings of tunnels. Adults need to bend down a little to get in those tunnels. So psychologically this tunnel walk ways are corridors only served to children. Children can play and explore the tunnel corridors like taking adventures.

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TUNNEL WORLD DECOMPOSITION

Typical Corridors Tunnel Walkways Surprising Spots

When children are exploring Tunnel World, at the end of some tunnels, there are some surprising spots. At those spots, they would have unexpected encounters, like they could find an interesting sculpture, a swing, or even get free candies and balloons from hospital stuffs.

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SPACE FORCE Diagnostic Imaging Space

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CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT The concept is to replace X-Ray machines and MRI machines which are normally fixed in diagnostic imaging rooms to a special â&#x20AC;&#x153;spaceshipâ&#x20AC;? as a ride. There are two types of spaceships: Space Force One and Two. The Space Force One is combined with X-Ray machines, the Space Force Two is combined with MRI machines. And near each space ship, there is a control centre that doctors can sit over there like the captains of spaceships. In this way, doing a diagnostic imaging scan is not boring any more but like taking a wonderful journey.

Space Force One (with X-Ray Machines)

ye, Aye A ! in a t p Ca

Space Force Two (with MRI Machines)

Are you ready to take an adventure with me?

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Space Force One

X-Ray Machine

Space Force Two

MRI Machine Glass Shelter

Spaceship

Glass Shelter

Spaceship Control Centre Control Centre

Space Force One - Front Space Force One - Top

Space Force Two - Top

Space Force Two - Front

Space Force One - Right

Space Force Two - Left

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24


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This is a clearing located in the west-north of Melbourne City, bordering Queen Victoria Market to the north-east, and Flagstaff Garden to the south-west. At the moment, there is a large car-parking space on site, so government wants to make the most of this site to construct a new attraction on site fulfilling the increasing requirements of people living or travelling here. As the special location of this site, the project aims to, not only create attraction in the middle of Victoria Market and Flagstaff Garden, but also build a link joints those two iconic places so that all these three icons can be connected as one producing a more significant influence on this area. According to the studio requirements, besides the essential functions like retails and restaurants, new building should also include some unusual functions, such as an indoor swimming pool, bicycle-running loop, rock-climbing walls, etc.

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TORIA New Urban Complex Design Studio Design Work 2015, Semester 2 The University of Melbourne Site: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Tutor: Dominik Holzer Individual Work


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SITE ANALYSIS Places Visited by International Visitors to the City of Melbourne

Modes of Travel Used to Get Around the City of Melbourne

Walking is the most preferred mode of travel to get around the city. According to the Central Melbourne Travel Survey 2014, a majority of 65.4% of people prefer to travel around the city on foot. Places Visited by Interstate Visitors to the City of Melbourne Victoria Market Site

State Library Mel Central

Flagstaff Garden

China Town

Town Hall

Federation Square Flinders St Station Melbourne Aquarium

According to the Surveys by City Council in 2014, Queen Victoria Market which is right adjacent to the site is one of the most favourite attractions in the City of Melbourne.

The orange path is a typical day tour routine of the City from official tour guide online. Following this route visitors will go though most of city icons in Melbourne City, which also includes the current site.

Victoria Market Mel Central

R= 5

00m

Flinders St Station

In the City, there are two popular areas which centre on the Melbourne Central and the Flinders St Station. However, for the area around the Victoria Market, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still too isolated to be activated enough.

Travelling on foot is the most preferred mode for people living in the City. Drawing a circle with 500m radius which means a proper walking distance that people could reach in 10 minutes.

Victoria Market Site Flagstaff Garden

Within this circle, the black areas represent residences. The site, Victoria Market and Flagstaff Garden is located in the centre.

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A ll C

onn

e c te

d

The new building set up on site should therefore also play as a link connects Flagstaff Garden and Victoria Market. When all connected together as one, they will have a more significant influence that activates the whole area.


CLIMATE ANALYSIS & FORM DEVELOPMENT

People will be attracted and get into the site from Victoria Market, Flagstaff Garden and other main streets. New building will be set up in the southwestern area of the site, which is the far end to the Victoria Market.

The new building on site is like powerful vortexes, in which more and more customer flows are attracted and swarming into. Those customer flows divide the clearing area of the site into many different sections, that becomes the original appearance of landscape.

Regarding the vortexes as contours and lifting them up. Under those ascended contours there creates a new space. Changing the profiles of each ascended contour and loft them together, buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original form emerges.

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CLIMATE ANALYSIS

There are mainly north wind and some south-eastern winds all year round. And the amount of wind is overall comfortable. As to humidity, it is at a high value on easily leads to a high temperature difference between days and nights. Especially at noon of Summer time, when sunshine is too strong, it would be necessary measures. Dry Bulb Temperature (C) - Hourly

Total Radiation(kWh/m2)

Diffuse Radiation(kWh/m2)

Direct Radiation(kWh/m2)

Dry Bulb Temperature (C) - Hourly

Dry Bulb Temperature (C) - Hourly

Dry Bulb Temperature

Wing-Rose Hourly Data: Wind Speed (m/s)

FACADE DEVELOPMENT

Fulfil Requirements of View by Adjusting Contour Distances

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n average every day, which to have some sun-shading

Aluminium Panels with Triangular Voids

Facade and Structure

Coating Glazings

Bicycle Track

3rd Floor

2nd Floor

Rock-Climbing Blocks

1st Floor

Ground Floor

Structural Colons

Landscape

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PERSPECTIVE SECTIONS

Retails

Bicycle Track

ROOF DECOMPOSITION

Aluminium

Retails

Coating Glass Retails Structure Shell

Ceiling Roof Surface Rock-Climbing Walls Swimming Pool

Lobby Multi-Function Room Lobby

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Spa

Toilet


East Elevation

North Elevation

South Elevation

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1 1 5

8 3

5 5 6

6 5

1

3

5

3

4

2 2 1

2

Ground Floor Plan Site Plan 0 10 20 30

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11

8

9

9 10

7

First Floor Plan

9

9

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Lobby Exhibition Office Swimming Pool Toilet Spa

7. Cafe 8. Rock-Climbing Walls 9. Retails 10. Bicycle Track 11. Multi-Function Room

9

Second Floor Plan

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Pudding City Computer-aided-design Simulated City Studio Design Work 2015, Semester 1 The University of Melbourne Site: Melbourne City, Victoria, Australia Tutor: Justyna Karakiewicz Group Work (Partner: Ye Yang)

This is a highly computer-assisted design project generated by computer codings. According to the requirements of course, we were asked to rethink dwelling as part of the urban ecological system by applying complex adaptive system and parametric techniques to explore the possibility of a brand-new city dwelling space. Different with traditional way that architects lead the project and decide what to design, at the beginning we aimed to let computer â&#x20AC;&#x153;informâ&#x20AC;? us what is actually the current situation of city and what should architects need to do next. Therefore, the work flow is a little different, which is we design and run a program by codings, and the program will decide what the best solution is. Then in the second stage, we pick a specific section of the whole result from the program to prodece a series of architectural spaces. The added building in-between the original buildings are the new spaces that a city really need.

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CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT Our city is made of different grids of communities and blocks, in which are filled with various types of buildings. Offices, supermarkets, retails, apartments, galleries, restaurants, etc., fulfilling different requirements of different people from different background. To some extent, it can be regarded as a huge table of dishes, people can grab the food they need from this ‘urban feast’. The chefs are urban designers and architects. It is impossible to please every single people as everyone has his own taste. So what we can do is to consider a majority of people and to fulfil as many demands as we can. Although we’ve always tried our best to produce gourmet ‘dishes’, as time goes on, some buildings don’t seem appropriate anymore as they cannot fulfil the latest flavour. When one specific ‘dish’ is turned out not to be delicious any more, what we normally do is to take it away and replaced by a new one demolishing the old building and setting up a new one. However, is it the only solution to fix this issue? Do we have to remove the old ‘dish’ anyway? Could we just add some additional ingredients to the current ‘dish’ making it yummy again instead of discarding it? In the early stage, we choose a coding platform called NetLogo to produce our program. About 5000 agents are created by coding that we endow them a certain intelligent and put them into simulated city. We hope these agents to some extent have feelings of “hungry” and “tired” and be able to wonder in the “city” to satisfy their basic desires. The program can also record and analyse the traces of agents so that we can understand the defects of current city. Then we aim to add some new rules into the program so some new additional function spaces are inserted into the current city to fulfil the urgent requirements that current buildings cannot provide. These new spaces will not change the current buildings and their functions, and the inserted functions are more like ingredients to optimize current city. A section of Melbourne City grids is selected and the site to insert new buildings is the gaps between city blocks, which is the space above streets and lanes. After adding new functions, our city will become a real huge tasty ‘dessert’, so it is called ‘Pudding City’!

Initialization Variations

Pixel Initialization

Agents Initialization

Behaviours

Main

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Agent Wandering

CODES OF PUDDING CITY (Definitions of all the codes are explained in the next pages as diagrams)

Agent Home Setting

New Cubes Generation

Destination Setting

Obstacle Avoidance

Agent Value Recovering

Death of Agent

Agent Route Finding

Data-output

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CHARACTERISTICS OF AGENTS According to the codes, we give each agent some unique characteristics to make them ‘alive’ like real people: • Every agent contains five basic characteristic values, which are rest, entertainment, work, dining and energy. • Rest, entertainment, work, dining values will change between 0 to 100. Energy values will change between 0 to 300. • The lower whichever one value is, the more urgent that demand is required to fulfil. • The colours displayed by agents are the most urgent requirements. • The specific value will be recovered when agents stay in the same colour area. E.g.. when agent A stays in blue colour area, its ‘work’ value will recover. • Rest, entertainment, work and dining values are normal values, whose increase and decrease represent agents’ behaviours during ‘one day’. • The value of energy is a special. Any behaviour an agent does will consume Energy. When Energy is used up, agent needs to do a long-term rest, that means ‘one day ends’. • Energy value will be recovered when agents stay in Red area.

Agent No.

Agent Coodinate

078

(112,009)

Rest 54/100 Entertainment 93/100

Position RESTAURANT

Work 42/100

Desire

Dining

DINING

19/100

Display

Energy

GREEN

174/300

Agent No.

Agent Coodinate

125

(136,042)

Position

HOME Desire

REST Display

RED

Rest 42/100 Entertainment 72/100 Work 87/100 Dining 66/100 Energy 234/300

INTELLIGENT ROUTING OF AGENTS To simulate the real world that each agent can really ‘live’ in, we set up some codes to give agents some intelligence so that they can make decisions themselves such as going to their destinations and avoiding obstacles on the way.

Fixed ‘home’ and ‘office’: every agent has its specific working and resting place.

Auto-Route Finding: every agent will move towards its destination area based on its requirement and avoid obstacles on the way automatically.

Intelligent Judgement: Agents will seek for destinations automatically following their most urgent requirement in the least steps.

THE KEY RULE TO CREATE “PUDDING CITY” After endowing them with their unique characteristics and abilities of intelligent routing, agents are now able to “live” in the simulated world we create stably. However, it is not enough. Our aim is to create a better city by inserting some ingredients - new functional blocks - into the gap of existing city, which are the space above streets and lanes, so that the current city will be optimized and more efficient. Therefore, a new key rule is set, by which the new space agents require in a large amount will be generated in the place that agents passing. This rule is: New Cubes Generation: whenever any five agents go across a same pixel with the same requirements, one functional cube will be generated over that pixel automatically in order to fulfil the high-frequent requirement. 40


CONTEXT SET UP AND RUNNING RESULT RECORD

ixels

10 p 0m) (5

ixels

10 p 0m) (5

Selecting a grid area in Melbourne City as the context to produce the system. Dividing this area by 191*143 meshes. Regarding each mesh as one pixel, the size of each pixel is about 5m*5m.

Abstracting all existing buildings in this area and generalizing them into four main functions, which are rest, entertainment, working and dining.

Agent No.078 Agent No.125

There are totally about 3600 pixels in colour ‘red‘ which represents a area of ‘home’. Generating one digital agent out from every two red pixels, so there will be about 1800 digital agents totally.

Running this system following the rules of agents and routing.

According to the running result of system, some new functions emerge in-between the existing buildings.

Hiding all the background information and abstracting those generated new functions only.

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SYSTEM RUNNING RESULT

AGENTS MOVING-TRACK RECORDS

Current moving-track records from previous city 42

After applying the key rule of New Cube Generation in previous city, the moving-track records from Pudding City


SYSTEM SET UP AND UNNING RESULT RECORD This diagram records the total number of agents who are walking on the way to their destinations with certain requirements. According to the first chart, after the simulated city running stable, there are totally 1200 agents moving in every moment, which is quite inefficient as many agents waste their ‘life’ on their way rather than doing specific things. However, in the ‘Pudding City’, after inserting the new functional cubes, the number of agents who are moving in every moment decreases significantly as they can easier to find a place they are urgent to go to. Here in the Pudding City, life become more efficient and convenient.

(Agents) Agents Moving Track of the Original Imitated City 600 500 400 300 200 100 (Steps) 0

100

300

500

700

900

1100

1300

(Agents) Agents Moving Track after Applying New Syst em Rules 600 500 400 300 200 100 (Steps) 0

100

300

500

700

900

1100

1300

On the Way to... System Running Result Diagram shows the final result of the running of new system which are the new colour cubes in-between the existing context. The left bottom diagram records the trace of each agent, it’s obviously to notice that the tracks in the right diagram are significant less than those in the left diagram, which means, after applying new system rule and adding new function cubes in the original city, People don’t need to waste too much time on the way to their another destination. Now they only need to travel a shorter distance to find an ideal place to maintain the basic living requirements. Here in the pudding city, life become easier.

Entertain Work Rest Dine

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Entertainment Section Rest Section Work Section Dining Section

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IGN PROCESS OF SELECTED SECTION

In the second stage, the new functional cubes are imported from NetLogo to Rhino which becomes the initial appearance of Dessert City. Selecting one Specific Street as example to undertake a further architectural development. On the selected street, there are many functional cubes in different colours and in different density. Lofting them together according to different density of these cubes to generate a series of interior space covered by a new consistent architectural form. This additional new building is like a bit ‘ingredient’ grated on the original city, which supplement all the imperfections of current city without demolishing any current buildings. After adding this ‘ingredient’, city become ‘a yummy dessert’ -- a pudding city.

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DECOMPOSITION OF DESSERT CITY

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47


48


ADJUSTIVE FAÃ&#x2021;ADE

Moving Direction

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50


SUPER READING HUB The New Library of Guangxi University & Reading Zone Design Bachelor Graduation Design 2013, Semester 2 Guangxi University Site: Nanning, Guangxi, China Tutor: Jiang He Individual Work

The current library of Guangxi University has been put into use since 2003. It covers an area of 32338m2 and includes 3600 permanent seats. It was once the largest library with the most advanced facilities and the largest collections in Guangxi Province. With the extension of university, this library today is gradually not able to satisfy the increasing demands of teachers and students. Due to the limitation of space, the original library need more extensive space for storages and seats especially during the peak period of semesters. To solve those current issues alone with the potentially predictable issue in the next 20 years, university decides to build a new library right near the current one. Furthermore, there is a special requirement from university that it would be better to create a revolutionary study zone that is different with traditional ones. This new reading zone should be attractive and comfortable enough. More importantly, it should be flexible enough to fulfil the requirements especially during the finals.

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SECTION 1. NEW UNIVERSITY LIBRARY DESIGN

Green Area

Dormitories

The new library is adjacent to south side of the old library. The site is surrounded by existing library, student dormitories, teaching buildings and green area. Being far from main street and public square which is in front of the old library, it is a suitable place for the new library indeed. The location of both current library and new library is very unique. It sits right near Tonghe Road, which is the necessary link-way between the western campus and the eastern campus. Therefore, this distinguished location turns the library in Guangxi University into an very important landmark showing the spirits of school to the pedestrian.

DESIGN CONCEPT Some similar elements that the new libraries applied make it more harmonious with the current one. In appearance, the new library will have the granite wall which is same as the old one. The horizontal long window of the old library is also adopted in the new one. In terms of architectural structure, the old library uses terrace roof and each floor extends gradually outwards. This design is also applied in the new one.

The site of New library is located in the south side of the current library.

Rotating the office area to a certain angle. lowering the south part and lifting the east part to form an open garden in the centre of the new building. 52


School of Agriculture

Current Library

School of Life Science

Tonghe Road

In order to make the most of the site, it is better to connect the new library with current one. A traditional Box style is not the best solution which will lead to a lack of illumination inside.

Without changing the base, pushing the upper part of that box outwards producing a sunshine atrium .

Dividing the box into two sections. The section by the current library is reading area as it is convenient for the readers to approach to; the other section by street turns to office area.

Optimising the overall form of building, making sure it is located within the red property line. Making further adjustments to create a semi-open space.

Pushing one corner of the office area to guarantee the central yard and reading zone can receive sunshine for all year round.

Extending the building roof by pulling the other corner of the reading area to prevent the summer sunlight from overheating inside the library. 53


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1-1 Section

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SECTION 2. READING ZONE DESIGN

The Number of Master or Ph.D. Students in University The Number of Bachelor Students in University Average Amount of Readers Access to Library / Day

To those who often go to school library

To those who NOT often go to school library

According to the questionnaires result based on over 500 students surveyed randomly on campus, students would like to study in university library as it provides a comfortable reading environment. However, the main reason that stops them from going there is they feel it is too hard to get vacant seats. 56


DESIGN CONCEPT

This is a typical reading zone layout in a proper scale providing comfortable space which is not exciting enough though.

Taking a look at desks and corridors only, the width of them are actually similar as 1.5m, whose proportion is 1:1.

Making a further simplification and looking at the boundaries of desks and corridors only, now the whole pattern consists of several paralleled lines with a same distance of 1.5m.

As long as the distance between each line stays in 1.5m, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still possible to be turned back to a decent reading zone whatever they are straight or not. Now it becomes easier that only need to play with lines rather than a actual space.

TYPICAL MODULE GENERATION

An equilateral triangle is chosen as the basic module of the reading zone, The triangleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lengthen of each side is equally 6m. After being divided into four equal sections, every section is 1.5m.

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The divided sections can be regarded as corridors and tables. The grey sections represent corridors, while the black sections represent tables. Around each table, there always are 1.5m wide corridors. So all the modules are in proper scales which would be suitable for reading zone.

Selecting the following ones as basic modules.

Putting chairs back forming the modules with complete functions.

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PSYCHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS According to psychological research, when people study individually, they prefer to sit in a corner-like area where could provide a more silent and private space. For those who do not know each other, people always choose to sit with some vacant seats but not next to each others. Only when there are no other choices will the people who come later sit in those in-between seats. Furthermore, as the Behaviour Psychology says, there is an instinct of people which is called group psychology. That means when people study with acquaintances, they would like to sit together and are afraid of being isolated. Therefore, when several people come to read together in library, they will find a place spacious enough for all members. What is more, due to the privacy requirements of small group, they do not want to be disturbed by other strangers.

Reading is the main behaviour in this reading zone. In order to fulfil different psychological demands from different people, whatever in individuals or in groups, every seat is so unique that people can choose their favourite seats based on where they would like to sit and how many seats they actual need.

There are some sound insulating discussion areas inserted for people to discuss without bothering others. The voices inside can hardly be heard outside. The void modules allow natural sunlight to get in to the reading zone.

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HIGHLY FLEXIBLE LAYOUT The arrangement of triangle modules is staggered. In-between each module there is always a 1.5m wide corridor which finally generates the whole Reading Zone.

During the peak time, like before mid-terms or finals, students would always flood into library in a large amount. In the new reading zone, seats can be increased into double to satisfy the temporary but huge demand of seats from students. Due to the 1.5m width of corridors, the temporarily seats will not influence people on going through pathways.

The Number of Seats Previous (Old Library)

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In general, the new library has about 2800 permanent seats that can satisfy normal requirements. During the peak times, another 2500 temporary seats can be added further in, so that the total amount will reach 5300. As a result, both new and old libraries can provide about 9000 seats in total that can fully satisfy the all requirements all around the year. The Number of Seats Now (Old & New Library)

The Number of Seats Previous The Number of Seats Now Average Amount of People Coming to Library per day

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This project is located in the old town area of Nanning, the capital city of Guangxi province, China. There is currently a city reserve with some Hibiscus trees for over 100 years old. Hibiscus is a kind of subtropical plants, which is also a symbol of this City. In the new city planning, the site has been rezoned as a public area in which a new kindergarten will be constructed. According to the traditional method, local developers would demolish all the current landscape on site at first, then fill up with condensed soil, since it is the easiest way to maintain their construction development can be undertaken fast enough. Our idea is to keep as much original landscape as we can, replanting the Hibiscus trees into the central area. To do this, the old Hibiscus trees can be reserved, also children here can receive better educational opportunities to experience and understand these historical city symbols.

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IN THE NAME OF NATURE Nature-symbiotic Kindergarten Design Studio Design Work 2009, Semester 2 Guangxi Univeristy Site: Nanning, Guangxi, China Tutor: Hong Cao Individual Work


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CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT As the capital of Guangxi Province, Nanning has experienced a significant development during the last 10 years. However, the rapid expansion of city is obviously a double-edged sword. On one hand, city development has been providing lots of convenience indeed. On the other hand, under the economic boom property developers normally have no time to attend to the city history and culture properly. This project aims to touch this issue. Moreover, it provides an important educational meaning. The concept of this project comes from children’s instinct of curiosity of exploring unknowns. Touch is a very important lesson for them to experience and understand new things around. By physical touch, children can feel different temperature and textures of different things. Hibiscus, as a natural subtropical plant and city symbol of Nanning, is a perfect example for children to understand our culture and nature. So we replant those old Hibiscus into the central play yard which originally grow dispersedly on site and set up many open stairs with different scales and heights. Standing in these stairs, children can easily touch different parts of Hibiscus trees, like trunks, branches, leaves and buds. Some areas are normally even out of their reach. In fact, over-spacious area is actually not suitable for children to entertain and would make them get lost. Thus, we promote the concept “up&down”, by providing different scales of stairs for children in activity space in the kindergarten. The steps would divide the activity area into many separate spaces in which children can physically experience nature. Children can look for, stay and play in wherever they feel the most comfortable.

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TOUCH OF NATURE

Stairs lead to different heights, in which children will have a brand-new experience of doing activities and communication. Moreover, They will also have better opportunities to touch different areas of Hibiscus physically.

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LOUVRE DIRECTIONS IN DIFFERENT TIME

9:00~12:00 & 15:00~17:00: During study and activity period, louvres stay in the horizontal direction, allowing sunshine to get in.

12:00~15:00: During lunch breaks, louvres will rotate downwards.

30° & 150mm: There are normal stairs for walking. 60° & 300mm: Unlike traditional stairs, this louvres can be adjusted to prevent direct sunlight, providing enough shadow for the indoors. 1. Playroom 4. Kitchen 7. Duty Room 10. Pool 13. Office

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2. Bedroom 5. Corridor 8. Music Room 11. Sand Pit 14. Meeting Room

3.Washroom 6. Storage 9. Recreation Area 12. Runway


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POBBLEBONK HOUSE Eco-friendly Frog Habitat Design Landscape Architecture Elective Work 2016, Semester 2 The University of Melbourne Site: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Tutor: Mark Gillingham Group Work (Partners: Chenyi Zhao, Wenxing Li)

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WHY POBBLEBONK? This is the final assignment of a Landscape Architectural Elective in the University of Melbourne, called Landscape Materialities. The requirement is to consider and optimise the micro-environment of Redmond Barry Courtyard Pond in the University by inserting some additional installations, so that it becomes more eco-friendly and liveable for creatures. Honestly, for university students, it just a normal pond that cannot attract them very much, but for the creatures living here, this pond is their whole world. Whatever it is added into the pond, it does not affect our everyday life. However, inserting anything will actually change their living mode. So, if we can think from an aspect of the creatures there, this project is not as simple as an installation design for a Pond, it is like designing ‘a whole world’. As architects, this time the clients we are facing are not humans. We aim to design ‘houses’ for the ‘residents’ living in the pond. However, who are the residents here? According to the research, there is a special type of residents in this pond. They are Eastern Banjo Frog, which is also known as the Pobblebonk, mainly living in the South of Australia. The reasons we design houses for them are: they are important link in the food chain of many ecosystem; they can help control insect pest populations; their tadpoles act as natural nutrient filters and help control levels of algae in the pond; they can act as indicators of overall health of both aquatic and terrestrial environments.

POBBLEBONK HABITAT The Pobblebonk frequents most habitats in woodlands, wet and dry forests, heathland, farmland and grasslands. This frog is commonly seen after rain near dams, ditches and other bodies of still or slowmoving water. An ideal frog pond should have deep water zone, shallow water bog zone and damp zone.

Deep Water Zone

Shallow Water Bog Zone

Damp Zone

Summer low water level Winter deep water level

Submerged logs and rocks for algal growth

Rocks and logs for shelter

Pond Liner

Sands

INITIAL CONCEPT This project aims to produce a friendly habitat with distinguished appearance for Pobblebonks. The idea of this project comes from the feature of spawn of Pobblebonks, it looks very much like a classic pattern called Voronoi, which is a partitioning of a plane into regions based on distance to points in a specific subset of the plane.

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PATTERN DEVELOPMENT • Placing several random points in a patter of rectangle • Generating a series of Voronoi patterns based on the position points • Offsetting Voronoi patterns towards their central points • Lofting each Voronoi pattern with its offsetting curve to create smooth surfaces • Getting rid of the patterns by left and right edges • Modifying Vironoi patterns by manipulating the position of central points to regenerate new Voronoi patterns which are duplicable. • New Voironoi patterns can perfectly match with each other via copy and shift

3D FORM GENERATION The overall concept is to apply a very simple but consistent form to create an ideal habitat for Pobblebonk that should include deep water, shallow water and damp zones.

Typical Duplicated Module

91 0m

m

Put this end on the bank of the pond above the water

3 Module 3 - With smallest and shallowest holes, imitates damp zone 2 ≈4

10

mm

1 ≈4

10

Put this end against the bottom of the pond

70

mm

75mm

Module 2 - With shallower but denser holes, imitates shallow water zone

Module 1 - With deep and large holes, imitates deep water zone


COMPONENT FABRICATION At the beginning, cutting out the required positive form modules by CNC machine, then casting plaster negative modules by using various of materials like silicon fibreglass and plaster. Pouring concrete into the negative modules that are reusable to cast the final concrete modules. 1

2

3

Positive Modules

Negative Modules

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BRICK COMPOSITION

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FINAL INSTALLATION

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OTHER WORKS Sketches, Watercolour Painting and Photography

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HAND-DRAWINGS

Yangmei Town, China (Pen Sketch, 2012)

Guzhuang Town, China (Pen Sketch, 2011)

Phoenix Town, China (Pen & Colourful Pencil Sketch, 2010)

Phoenix Town, China (Pen & Colourful Pencil Sketch, 2010) Photograph Copy (Watercolour Painting, 2009)

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PHOTOGRAPHY

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k Than

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you


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