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Table of contents

Introduction

p. 5

Literature Review

p. 6

Potential Subheadings

p. 7

Mechanisms, Forces and Pedagogy

p. 8

Bibliography

p. 14


Introduction

5


Literature Review

6


Potential Subheadings

         

7


Mechanisms, Forces and Pedagogy

GROUP SUPPORT DECISION-MAKING SYSTEMS AND INSTRUMENTS 

work or strategic plans that articulate intended outputs and outcomes

8


COMMUNICATION PLAN  

is public (more likely to achieve goals when they are public) is results focussed

COMMITTED AND SKILLED LEADERS AND INSTRUCTORS WHO COOPERATE 

trained in CLIL programme management and/or pedagogy appropriate for CLIL

REPORTING INSTRUMENTS   

are results and/or effects-based refer to measurable outputs and outcomes from plans support taking an iterative approach during course/programme development

VISIBLE SHORT-TERM WINS  

are drawn out during CLIL programme development key stakeholders discuss and recognise achievements

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR KEY STAKEHOLDERS  

includes CLIL course/programme management training includes training for content instructors in pedagogy appropriate for CLIL

RESULTS OR EFFECTS-BASED PLANS  

include measurable outputs and outcomes are used to assess progress throughout

A KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM   

identifies what knowledge is to be captured articulates how knowledge will be captured articulates how knowledge will be stored, shared and acted upon

CURRICULA  

draw out both intended learning outcomes for content and language tie assessment to intended learning outcomes

MANAGEMENT STRUCTURES  

includes a working group or a steering committee meetings for honing course/programme as one moves forward

EQUIPMENT, SOFTWARE, APPLICATIONS, TOOLS AND CONNECTIVITY   

instructors are supported by IT specialists connectivity is reliable equipment, software, applications and tools are fully operational

LEARNING MATERIALS  

integrate both content and language foster best practices reflected in section on CLIL-related pedagogy

OPPORTUNITIES FOR JOINT STAKEHOLDER LEARNING AND DISCUSSION 

key stakeholders are identified and take part in programme development

9


key stakeholders are engaged about learning how to implement CLIL

LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS 

are rich fostering student engagement and critical thinking

STAKEHOLDER INCLUSION 

stakeholders are identified and engaged in development

SENSE OF MISSION & HARD WORK  

willingness for course/programme developers to put in extra time willingness to do more than the minimum

LEARNING FOR ALL 

all stakeholders seek to learn more about quality CLIL

HIGH EXPECTATIONS FOR ALL STAKEHOLDERS 

instructors and managers/leaders all set and work toward high expectations for themselves and each other

STUDENT LEARNING AND VOICE 

student input is sought throughout CLIL courses/programmes and not simply at the end (e.g. mid-term evaluation, not just final evaluation)

A BELIEF IN CLIL 

key stakeholders need to believe CLIL is possible and act accordingly

the perceived status of CLIL courses is managed knowledgeably

intended outcomes are clear, as are plans, assessment criteria, etc.

STATUS

CLARITY

CONTINUITY 

continuity exists across documents, practices and communication

AUTONOMY 

students and other stakeholders are supported in taking charge of their own learning.

10


ASSESSMENT SUPPORTS LEARNING Instructors e.g.:  

tie assessment to planned outcomes use assessment results to improve on an ongoing basis plans and practices

Students e.g.:  

use assessment results to plan learning and improve practices participate in assessing their own and peers’ work

RICH & DETAILED SCAFFOLDING MAINTAINS STUDENTS IN THEIR ZONE OF PROXIMAL DEVELOPMENT Instructors e.g.:  

provide scaffolding that helps students to reach beyond what they could do on their own provide scaffolding for content and language

Students e.g.:   

are fully engaged in intellectually challenging, goals/outcomesoriented activities learn to specify the support they need learn to self-scaffold

INSTRUCTORS, ADMINISTRATORS & STUDENTS ARE PART OF A PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY Instructors, administrators, and students:     

see themselves as learners and act accordingly investigate their own practices articulate ‘rules of the game’ such as principles guiding co-operation collaborate constructively create a common vision of rich CLIL learning environments

Students e.g.:  

are given a voice in what they want to learn and how they wish to do this investigate the teaching and learning process

HIGH EXPECTATIONS FOR ALL Instructors and administrators e.g.:      

foster a ‘can-do’ growth mindset in students make visible learning expectations provide rich scaffolding, and learning environments do not label students do not label each other have high expectations for each other and support each other’s learning

11


Students e.g.:   

develop learning skills to deal with challenging content and learning through the CLIL language are in the habit of developing meta-affective, meta-linguistic, metasocial and meta-cognitive awareness and skills set personal goals and measure progress in achieving these

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES ARE EXPLICIT & MADE VISIBLE Instructors e.g.:  

display and discus with students intended learner outcomes for content and language measure and discuss progress in achieving intended outcomes

Students e.g.:  

plan based on discussed intended learning outcomes self-assess progress in achieving goals/outcomes and decide what to change in their work and study processes

CONTENT INSTRUCTORS SUPPORT LANGUAGE LEARNING Instructors e.g.:  

content instructors make the component parts of the language of their subject visible content instructors support and assess ongoing language learning

LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS ARE JOINTLY CONSTRUCTED & PSYCHOLOGICALLY SAFE Instructors e.g.:   

engage students in decision making do not use ridicule or sarcasm have a strong sense of affiliation with students

Students e.g.:   

help set rules, and learning outcomes have as strong sense of affiliation with classmates assess the learning process and have a say in shaping it

LANGUAGE INSTRUCTORS SUPPORT CONTENT LEARNING 

language instructors use content-based instruction

MAKING LEARNING MEANINGFUL Instructors e.g.:   

create opportunities for contact and communication with speaks of CLIL language build on student interests and prior knowledge make connections with students’ main academic interests, their lives and communities

LEARNER AUTONOMY & RESPONSIBILITY ARE PROMOTED Instructors e.g.: 

negotiate activities, plans, goals and co-operation with students

12


  

promote student self-awareness and self-discovery (meta-affective, meta-social, meta-cognitive and meta-linguistic skills) promote group work, social and self-management skills promote self and peer assessment

Students e.g.:   

build a rich repertoire of learning skills develop the habit of goal-setting and planning lead and co-operate

CREATIVE & CRITICAL THINKING PERMEATE ACTIVITIES & DRIVE LEARNING Instructors e.g.:   

model creativity, criticality, rigour in thought, healthy scepticism, respect, and care in inquiry provide students with rich opportunities for well structured exploratory talk where lines of reasoning are developed provide rich opportunities for students to appraise, argue/debate/defend a point, assess, classify, compare, conclude, contrast, create, design, examine, evaluate, experiment, hypothesise, inquire, research, provide evidence, etc. provide rich scaffolds for critical thinking about content and language

Students e.g.:     

are involved in active inquiry and research demonstrating rigour, thoroughness, scepticism and care demonstrate humility with respect to their opinions combined with the courage and skill to defend them constructively weigh diverse opinions identify problems, develop lines of reasoning, solve problems, and apply newly learned knowledge and skills in creating something meaningful use information technology critically and appropriatel

13


Bibliography

14



A Framework for Developing CLIL Programming at the Tertiary Level & for Writing Up Case Studies