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WA$TED MARKET YEAR II

CHICAGO, IL


WA$TED MARKET YEAR II

CHICAGO, IL


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WA$TED MARKET YEAR II

WITH GENEROUS SUPPORT FROM

THE WA$TED MARKET PROJECT

THE WA$TED MARKET PROJECT

SPONSORS & PARTNERS

PARTNERS & SPONSORS

PARTNERS & SPONSORS

IN DIALOGUE WITH

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CHICAGO, IL

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WA$TED MARKET : IN SUMMARY The goal of the second year of Wasted Market was to “catalyze a robust reuse economy in south suburban Cook County, revitalizing disinvested communities and reducing environmental impact from the building material waste stream”. Archeworks initially proposed a two pronged approach to achieve this goal: (1) create an actionable guide for building capacity of the reuse market in four South Suburban municipalities and (2) identify and target deconstruction job training in disinvested communities. After further research into the existing workforce development landscape on Chicago’s Southside, it became apparent that creating additional deconstruction job training programs in order to scale up the deconstruction workforce was premature without a sustainable end market for reused materials. Although the Southside and South Suburban Cook County are rife with vacant homes and commercial buildings slated for demolition and the economic opportunities through jobs in deconstruction are badly needed, the demand for reused building materials needs to scale up in order to create a viable/robust reuse industry. With this knowledge, Archeworks, in collaboration with reuse experts Bryant Williams and Nicolette Stosur–Basset, focused efforts away from job training to building capacity of the existing Southside and South Suburban reuse economy. Archeworks developed a series of participatory events with the goal of strengthening existing reuse businesses by bringing business leaders together with industry experts and innovators to generate actionable solutions to the complex challenge of waste. The Wasted Market Convenings connected diverse audiences and created cross-sector synergies, which sparked fresh conversation, thoughts and dialogue around building material reuse. Three panelist-style public events convened leaders with diverse professional perspectives in a moderated discussion exploring the topics of Ownership, Scale, and Vision. Ownership explored the economic realities that govern the salvage industry. Scale brought together entrepreneurs of existing reuse businesses in Chicago, from boutique to industrial scales. Vision inspired discussions on the local and regional future of building materials reuse by inviting dialogue on the topics of labor and workforce development; adaptive reuse and community resilience; industry accreditation; and policy advancement and implementation. The accessible and engaging conversations were recorded for future use and shared on the Wasted Market website (www.wastedmarket.org).


WA$TED MARKET : IN REFLECTION & RECOMMENDATION

IN REFLECTION I first learned about WA$TED MARKET in the fall of 2015 and was immediately enthusiastic. As someone who has spent the bulk of her professional life pursuing materials reuse as an academic topic, business model, and tool for social change, I was beyond excited to discover that a visionary organization like Archeworks had the opportunity to explore this subject in-depth. The result of these past two years of research, inquiry, and implementation is WA$TED MARKET, a robust examination of the building materials reuse (BMR) sector in Chicago and Cook County, IL. Driven by Archeworks’ deep commitment to public interest design, the WA$TED MARKET initiative has included observation of existing patterns, habits, and trends in waste management; analysis of systemic structures and impediments; and direct engagement with an incredibly broad base of stakeholders: local government, policy-makers, architects and designers, BMR professionals, and students. The success of this initiative could only have been made possible by an organization like Archeworks: a connector, a facilitator, a thought leader, a catalyst. Archeworks provides the space for big questions to be asked, and answered, through community engagement. I was fortunate enough to be a student in the WA$TED MARKET Certificate Program. I was also involved as the project lead for WA$TED MARKET: Convenings, a three-part event series hosted in November 2017. I am proud to share that the community connections and conversations inspired by these events were incredibly warm, generative, and absolutely necessary. I cannot count the number of times I was told: “This is great, thank you for getting everyone together.” Operating as solo or small business enterprises, BMR professionals tend to connect with each other through high-touch, in-person engagement and professional collaboration. Oftentimes, development activities outside of regular business operations are overlooked. What was successful about the Convenings series was the strength of the professional connections gained through attendance. Many in our audience joined us for multiple series events and 100% of panelists surveyed said that they plan to collaborate professionally with Convenings connections in the next 12 months. In short, the events were successful because those who attended felt an economic value in the connections they forged; they felt like the time spent was a good investment for their business. And it has already paid off; since Convenings, several of the series’ panelists have started working together and sharing industry contacts. With Convenings, Archeworks served a critical role as an organizing body, providing the framework for BMR professionals and industry stakeholders to network and support each other. This is how industries scale: when buyers and suppliers connect. Reused building materials are plentiful, however support for building materials reuse is incredibly limited. BMR professionals are entrepreneurs who think creatively about logistics, inventory management, and added value. Similar to any other business sector, BMR would benefit from the shared knowledge of industry groups and professional organizations, yet no such bodies exist for Chicago’s BMR community.


RECOMMENDATION Through WA$TED MARKET, I have come to believe that the first step in scaling the county’s building materials reuse sector is to establish an organizing body that can continue facilitating industry connections for entrepreneurs through consistent, scheduled programming and networking opportunities. As shared by Convenings panelists and attendees, these activities provide the highest value to the BMR community and stimulate local economic development. Second, I believe a reuse business incubator, featuring mentorship and training opportunities, would develop a hub for further connection and collaboration. An incubator/ accelerator model would change the public perception of reuse businesses, inspire and educate a new generation of local entrepreneurs, and make use of a wasted regional asset that has the potential for incredible economic growth. The ecological impact of building materials reuse will be fully realized when no reuseable materials are wasted. To achieve this goal, we must support existing reuse efforts by helping to build and strengthen their operations. This was successfully accomplished in New York City through ReuseNYC, a city-sponsored reuse network. Locally in Chicago, incubators like The Hatchery and ICNC are stimulating economic growth through sector-specific development. Building materials reuse is no different and BMR entrepreneurs require similar access to resources, professional development services, and opportunities to connect for the true potential of the sector to be expressed - ecologically and economically. Everyone who inhabits the built environment of our great city and its surrounding region has a stake in this conversation, and can benefit, if we work together to build the structures and systems that transform latent material value into local wealth. If successful, this approach might then be replicated to support BMR ecosystems across the Midwest, in cities like Detroit, Gary, and St. Louis, to name a few. In Cook County, one structure is permitted for demolition every other day. Sometimes this is the best choice and is often necessary. Preservation aside, we cannot stop the majority of demolitions from occurring, but we can control how we manage those materials. We can continue to follow the status quo, where reusable lumber, fixtures, and furnishings end up in the landfill, contributing disproportionately to methane generation, a potent greenhouse gas. Or we can carry on the vision of WA$TED MARKET, choosing to support and inspire entrepreneurship in building materials reuse. This keeps materials out of the trash, puts them back into circulation, creates local jobs, and saves municipalities money and landfill capacity in the process. I aspire to the latter and I hope you will too.

Sincerely, Nicolette Stosur-Bassett


“We need to create a community around the building materials reuse industry in Chicago — an effort that is funded to meet the needs of the existing community members, whether they are for profit businesses, non-profit organizations, or a hybrid of both, working at the city level, all of the various stakeholders who have an investment in this industry succeeding. There needs to be some sort of structure and framework for them to engage regularly and feel supported in the work that they do. The Wasted Market Convenes are proof of concept that this would work, at scale.”

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WHAT TO DO NOW ? WA$TED MARKET PROJECT IN REVIEW

In January of 2018, David Dewane, Editor in Chief of Impact Design Hub, interviewed Nicolette Stosur-Bassett — a Chicagobased consultant who uses human-centered design to create business solutions for startups, nonprofits, and social ventures and also the leader of the WASTED MARKET Convenes. DAVID DEWANE (DD)

Can you put into perspective of me from your point of view, like, the short history up until today of the Wasted Market project? NICOLETTE STOSUR-BASSETT (NSB)

Wasted Market initially began as an exploration into the building materials reuse economy in the Chicago area and kind of the Midwest in a broader category. And the reason for this is because our national waste averages are much, much higher than a lot of other major cities in the country, so there is a reason to look into our waste generation in this particular category specifically. Wasted Market was unique in that it engaged individuals and professionals outside of the waste hauling industry to explore this topic. So I have done personally a lot of work with waste and, always, you get the same types of people, the people who are physically handling the waste materials exploring the projects, or, I’m sorry, exploring the scope of what’s included and why we’re creating waste and how it happens and tracking it. And those people who are dealing with it, they have incredible insight and information, but Wasted Market was unique in that it engaged the architecture and design community, which is upstream from the waste even being generated. So that in itself made the project unique, and that starting point created an amazing opportunity for exploratory practice around why we’re creating waste. So it’s more of an ontological question around why is this waste being generated in the first place and what can the design community, a community that might be overlooked in the aftermath of demolition debris, how can that community take a more active role or a more educated approach to dealing with the waste that’s created as a result of their professional practice. So through the last couple years, Archeworks and it’s many partners has explored Wasted Market by looking at the systemic landscape that is existing that accounts for, or rather, creates the circumstances in which these materials are often wasted and explore different opportunities for their reuse specifically. So focusing less on recycling, but their reuse specifically and different areas where economic development could become a catalyst for keeping these materials out of landfills. And that exploration has taken many forms — engaging students, engaging urban design planning teams in a systemic analysis, creating dialogue and conversation around the topic through hosting lectures. This exploration essentially has explored all of the, or rather traversed, all of the territories that typical waste management professionals don’t. So most recently, in the fall of 2017, the project explored how to scale building materials reuse in the regional area, more specifically

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Chicago than it’s surrounding suburbs, which had been the focus in prior years, and through, I am sorry, through convening stakeholders and leaders in the industry who have kind of a voice or an opinion about how architecture and design and business practice can play a role in reusing more of these materials than is currently happening. DD

In terms of the work that’s been done up until now, what stands out to you as two or three of the highlights that you feel energized around? NSB

I think that the PORT Urbanism primer was an incredibly successful exploration, if only because it shows tangibly in a graphic sense what’s happening when a building comes down. So pretty much that information doesn’t exist anywhere, and there are organizations wholly dedicated to this particular topic, like the building materials reuse association, and they have manuals that are available if you are a member or you want to pay some sort of fee. But the PORT Urbanism primer really puts in graphic detailed terms what’s happening when these buildings come down, and that’s 100% necessary for the public to understand the value of the materials, and also how the process is convoluted and complex. I think that representing something in such an accessible format also makes it more appealing for city planners and city or governmental stakeholders to grasp the idea more easily as opposed to thinking that it’s just very complex and should be left alone, that the waste management people can deal with that, because it’s a problem that really affects everyone that lives in an area, everyone that lives in a building. DD

How much is rooted in Chicago versus how much is it a universal? NSB

Wasted is necessarily regional because every city, every system that waste is generated as an offset from or an output from is going to be different. So there is no kind of guidebook to combating waste. You know, even Blue Island, which is one of our suburbs. I mean, people often don’t realize that in Cook County, which was initially the scope of Wasted Market, there are over 130 municipalities and each one of them do garbage differently. The reason that waste is so fascinating and interesting and complex is because everyone has their own unique take on it and it’s this beautiful nexus between public kind of responsibility and private ownership. And so there’s no one who’s necessarily responsible for waste, and yet, it is an industry that makes a lot of money for all of the haulers who are involved. And so if you were able to take that kind of graphic approach and explain how each waste system operates differently, I think it would do wonders for engaging the public on a topic that they literally never think about. DD

So there’s a potential for taking a graphic language approach to waste as a topic that every community has to deal with, but every community has to deal with it its own way. NSB Correct.

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DD

And applying that language to allowing people from a place to apply that language to their place. NSB

Absolutely. And if there were, for instance, a symbolic language that was unique, that could be drawn from, for instance, so if there were a symbolic, a language of symbols that each community could kind of borrow from to create their own visualizations around this process, but if those symbols were standardized but each community kind of create their own process around that, I think that it would also be empowering because people right now just don’t understand how it works. There is, even with recycling, which has been around for a long time as an industry, there is confusion still around should the recycling green be, bin, sorry, should the recycling bin be blue, should it be green, should it be black, what happens when it’s a different color, and that visual language around waste is a huge detriment to scaling up waste management practices in a way that doesn’t send things to landfills. So being able to take that and have some sort of standardized language that people could access and kind of build their own comprehension around I think would be incredibly beneficial. DD

One of the best definitions I ever heard of community is a group of people that have shared interests and shared responsibility. Which, what’s interesting about waste, is that it’s shared responsibility, but very few people are interested in it. Everybody’s disinterested in it, but you can’t ... Like we’re in a period already where we can’t afford to be disinterested, like, you got to be interested. But now that that’s a requirement rather than an option, okay, how, what’s my end road? And so, it sounds like one of the things you’re suggesting is this graphic language, which makes sense to me. NSB

I think that borrowing from other movements, sustainability movements, that have seen success in recent years, like the organic food movement, the healthy food movement, or energy efficiency, both of those have leaned on standardization and using design as a tool for creating a greater public awareness for the need to take action and why these issues are important. So it would be borrowing from things that we know that already work. DD

Okay, so a tangent on this, and then I want to come back to the certificate program. We’ve been talking about a graphic language, how important is language, like the words that you use to describe this? Or, like, is there emerging terminology that we need to develop? NSB

A huge challenge in the reuse sector in particular is identifying the difference between reuse and recycling and what reuse is in general. It is a very simple term to understand. Reuse, you are using something again, but the simplicity of the term does not encompass the cultural, the lack of cultural awareness of this practice, which has been in existence since the beginning of time. I mean, humans have reused things since. You know? But the language that we use to describe it ... Recycling, there was a lot of money put

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into popularizing recycling starting in the 1970s, specifically the terminology that we use around recycling, and recycling actually makes from kind of a like a public perception. If you weren’t familiar with the word, recycling makes less sense than reuse. You know, what are you recycling? You’re technically recycling materials through a manufacturing process. That’s what recycling. But reuse is, you’re really, just using something again, and anyone can do that without a lot of money, without any ... There are no barriers to access for reuse. DD

Much less in body and energy.

NSB

Yeah. And I think that if I were to talk about the need to brand reuse and make it, like you said, organic has become emblematic of this movement, like, is there something that could be applied to reuse specifically? I think that it needs a new word. There are a lot of terminologies evolving, particularly in Europe, around the circular economy, which reuse is a really big part of. That terminology, often times the industry or the movement is damaged by the conflicting terms that exist, and a lot of organizations who are actually doing reuse do recycling ... Or, I’m sorry who are doing reuse call it recycling, and so the strength of the community or the strength of the practice is really undermined by the terminology that’s used to describe it. DD

Well there’s also something about the idea that, what I find really compelling, is the connection between waste that some people think about as garbage, which is something you want to stay away from, instead of, it’s a resource or a marketplace or an economy, which is something that you’re drawn to. You know? And so I think that the, one of the things that’s compelling for me personally about the project is the idea of creating economic, like, tying waste to an economy that other people than garbage men and people who run a dump can participate in. NSB

But the distinction that you’re drawing is between waste and resources, and most people think of things as waste when they’re no longer in use. That’s so many things, like, that’s so ... Anything you’re not using, if that’s a waste item, like, that’s so many, so many things. There has to be some sort of gray area in there, and if you were to be pushed to create a dichotomy strictly between black and white, waste and what else is it, I think resources is a wonderful term. So one of the things that stuck out to me as someone who is engaged in Archeworks Certificate Program, as someone who went through it, I’m really interested in changing public perception of waste. It’s something that fascinates me endlessly. And in my certificate project program with my group, we were really able to explore how to change public perception of waste materials simply by changing their context and presentation. So, of all of the things that have stuck out to me about this project, that experience is very much front and center, simply because it, we kind of set out, and I can explain a little bit the project too, my certificate program group, five of us, looked at how do we change public perception about what waste materials are. And so, in order to figure out what really has no value specifically

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related to building materials, we went to the local building materials reuse warehouses, which is kind of where all the secondhand materials that have value will end up. And we went and asked them, what do you have that even has no value to you? You know, what is completely valueless even at the reuse center? And so a lot of that was tiles, a lot of ceramic tiles, broken pieces of marble, just a lot of odds and ends. And what we ended up doing was taking those items that were given to us for free, they literally had no value and upcycling them into quote-unquote products. We called them remnants, and we went and put them into stores, retail consumer stores. And just by changing the context that these items appeared in and changing their presentation to the consumer by presenting them in a consumer context, if you are a consumer and you’re drawn to an item on a shelf, and you go to pick it up and look at the price, the assumption is that you want to purchase it. You assume that it has a value and that you might be willing to exchange some sort of your, or some of your economic income for that item. The items that we ended up placing into stores were engaged with with consumers or by consumers, and one person even ended up paying $10 for a pair of book ends that I have made that he found in World Market. So he ended up paying the store for an item that literally had no value elsewhere. So it was really interesting to me to engage in that project simply because it proved, we kind of set out with this challenge of how do we change public perception, and through the project, we proved that you can change public perception of these materials specifically by changing their context and presentation. And I think that there’s a lot of applicable lessons from that that could be used by secondhand materials retailers. DD

But if you expand, if you take the same inventory and you expand it to lots of different commercial contexts, then you give a much broader market or consumer base access to things that still have value. NSB

Well, and almost even more value because producers are now creating things with forced patina. Right? I mean, a lot of materials that are popular right now have a vintage look or feel. I mean, they’re materials that have been created to simply look old, when these old things actually exist and you can buy them. The old thing into an environment where you might expect to find that new trendy item. DD

And trends are set, and consumers are sort of conditioned to develop a framework of expectations, and there’s no reason why this could, what you’re describing, couldn’t be applied in a much, much broader swath of the economy. NSB

Okay. One of the projects proposed in the certificate program that I was a part of was about creating a space in home depots, so all of them, to house reused materials. So what happens when you integrate? That’s essentially what it is. It’s integrating

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things that are second hand into spaces that are reserved for new commercial items. And this is happening within brands already. So, for instance, Urban Outfitters years ago launched their own line of secondhand upcycled clothing that they sold in store, so it’s not a new concept. It’s just that the two worlds don’t often collide. So if that idea doesn’t come from a corporation internally, you won’t know that the item is a reused item. You just assume that ... Or, I’m sorry, if the idea doesn’t come from corporation internally, it might not get to market, but these things are already happening. DD

We’ve already got one foot in the sustainability sphere, but let’s just go to that directly. How do you think the Wasted Market research fits into or adds value to the broader conversation about sustainability right now within the built environment? NSB

A lot of efforts around sustainability in the built environment in particular are around energy efficiency and materials efficiency. I think Wasted Market, the body of work created through Wasted Market is unique in that it offers commentary on the existing building stock that we have and how it can be better managed. And that is, again, kind of an upstream conversation. So a lot of what’s happening around new construction is, like I said, around energy efficiency, materials efficiency, how can we create this in design, but there isn’t a lot of conversation around what do we do with the buildings that already exist, outside of trying to make them more energy efficient or replacing the interiors with more sustainable materials. I think what is unique about what wasted market offers is, like I said, commentary on what to do with what we already have because that commentary just doesn’t exist, and it doesn’t often find it’s way to building managers or stakeholders within large property holding groups that have the authority to make decisions about how to manage a large portfolio of properties. So I feel like it offers an opportunity to start that dialogue with that particular audience, again, through the accessibility of the content that’s been explored. Plugging in strongly to the energy conversation. You know, and so like energy in particular is so important because there’s been so much work on the quantification, you know, that could be taken over to quantifying embodying energy and waste and safe energy and waste. But energy is just a conversation people want to have because there are, clients I mean specifically, because they’re so in tuned to the financial implications of that. And it can be translated so easily into carbon, which is another thing more and more people care about. DD

And so making the waste conversation basically like one step removed from the energy conversation makes it two steps removed from the carbon conversation. You know? NSB

It’s difficult to calculate how much carbon you save just by leaving things where they are. It’s difficult to calculate that. So if we didn’t tear down buildings, how much carbon would we theoretically be saving by not constructing something new. I mean, that’s kind of how the waste conversation should pivot because using the materials that we have is going to be more resource and energy efficient no

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matter what, hands down, any day, than something that’s new. So no matter how sustainable or economically accessible these new options in the kind of greening of our building marketplace are, leaving things as is will always be a more sustainable option. Which isn’t often talked about in terms of building in particular. DD

And it’s primed or teed up to be talked about in those terms because we’ve spent so much time talking about energy. You know? That’s interesting. What do you think about, if you were to imagine ... Well I don’t want to stray too far away from the sustainability conversation. NSB Okay. DD

Is there anything else that immediately comes to mind where the broader conversation around waste could start to energize or catalyze or be really impactful of the broader conversation around sustainability? I just view it as we’re talking ... It’s interesting, because there’s a sort of a well known and its like well worn, almost, tracks through the sustainability conversation or dialogue or whatever you want to say. It seems like waste is almost like that dark matter of that conversation. NSB

It is 100%.

very complex, networked system, and so we can’t quantify it easily. Another reason is because we don’t see it, because people want to just get rid of it. It smells bad; it’s stinky. So I think that one way to kind of bring the conversation into the fore, which was the first part of your question, is around making waste visible. And then if you were to do that, make the waste that we have visible, think about other ways of turning that waste into an economic opportunity or a potential profit. And there are a lot of businesses that do this already. They just don’t call it reuse. They think it makes good business sense, because it does. If we, like you and I were talking about early, had kind of a unified vocabulary for identifying, like, oh, that’s reuse, that’s a real practice that makes money. Then we would start to see some traction around people’s behavior change, I believe. But, for instance, a couple different examples come to mind. Once I did a map in the neighborhood of Park Slope in New York about all the reuse. I made a map tracking all of the different reuse businesses up and down the street, and within a half mile stretch, I think there are about 15 different businesses in Park Slope, which is a very affluent community because they were vintage stores, there were antique stores, they were furniture reupholstering places. All of those are technically reuse businesses, but there’s no way to categorize or capture what they’re doing. So if there were a way to talk more cohesively about this practice, I think that it would have more traction in the public sense. And then once you did, once you found that way to talk about this public activity, then people would start to see the economic benefits of it. And some other countries have started doing that, we just haven’t paid much attention to it here.

DD

It’s got so many implications. So like if it becomes sort of a shadowy element of the conversation to a more visual element to the conversation and it’s such a large element, then what?

DD

NSB

NSB

Well, sure. The project Wasted Market appealed to me because it ... Waste is a sustainability issue. It also as, when considering a lot of the waste materials that we’re throwing away, as resources, it has incredible economic potential. And so one of the things that excites me the most about it is that potential for new businesses, for new products, for new opportunities in workforce development that aren’t available in other industries in the same way. So I first got started with waste and working with waste when I was living in New York City, and a big part of the reason why is because you see everyone’s garbage. In Chicago, we don’t see our waste. It goes into the alleyway, someone comes and picks it up, it’s gone forever. You just don’t see it. But in New York, when you’re literally confronted with your refuse, and not only yours, but that of your neighbors, and your neighbor’s neighbors, and the people up the street, you start to think more critically about what exactly it is that you’re doing when you toss something in the garbage can. And so the reason that we aren’t having conversations about waste in the way that we are about energy or organic food is because it, number one, is very difficult to quantify because it is a privatized industry because each municipality does it differently because there isn’t exemplary tracking around where the waste goes. It is a

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Okay. So let’s talk about possibilities. Let’s talk about what’s next or what would be possible. What do you think would be a logical application in education? In education, I feel like reuse could be incorporated into curriculum, so into ... We’ve largely strayed away kind of interactive types of engagement in our public schools, but incorporating reuse as a curriculum tool, so using materials or kind of creating constraints, whether in a science context around, you know, build X, Y, Z using only these materials. That’s one way to do it, in a historical context, really looking at how this has played a role in the history of not only our country, but others throughout time. DD

So you’re talking about education right now for all citizens?

NSB

Yeah. Because this actually used to be a part of our education. We didn’t receive it at school, but we received it at home, and it was how do you use materials. Quilting, for instance, is a form of reuse that is very embedded in, kind of, the American history. You used to take scraps from your clothing and quilt, you know, sew them into quilts. Quilts are essentially just big reuse projects. Rug, what do you call them, like, hooked rugs, fabric rugs, that’s also a reuse project. So in our national history, there’s this beautiful narrative reuse.

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DD

Very pragmatic.

Yeah. It’s very pragmatic. And in this national history, we have this beautiful story of reuse that just kind of went out the window with consumer.

have a basic, I don’t want to say a basic understanding, but didn’t have a thorough understanding of the materials that were being used. And I have been told that this is all covered in architecture and design curriculums, but I feel like more physical engagement with, not only the materials themselves, but the sites of construction.

DD

... the consumer culture.

DD

NSB

With the consumer culture.

DD

So there’s a way to pull that back into, like, to...

NSB

Materials education. Yeah.

DD

Explicitly ... Yeah. Materials education.

NSB

NSB Yes. DD

NSB Okay. DD

You know, that’s relegated to a very one dimensional conversation. NSB

But we have way more current materials than we do future.

DD

As a sort of a domestic science angle.

NSB

Absolutely. Well, and I think that beyond just kind of like the home-ec classes you might expect to find that in, there are, like I said, applications in hard science or in history or in social science where you could weave that into an existing curriculum very easily. But in terms of materials education, there just aren’t a lot of opportunities because it’s not included in what people might learn at school today. So you’d have to look elsewhere outside of kind of the places that you go or where you’re being educated and instructed to find that information, and there are certainly many places in Chicago where you can do that. I’m on the board of a nonprofit called The WasteShed, and they have materials education classes that basically teach you like what is this thing and what do you do with it. How do you use a needle and thread? How do you mend pants that are ripped? And that extends the lifecycle of materials to a great extent so that people don’t have to go buy a new one. There’s another group called Community Glue that teaches people how to repair things. It’s a community fix-it café, and, again, it creates just the knowledge that people are lacking at this point in time, having been two generations removed from the necessity to do that to just kind of reinspire people to engage with their materials in a new way. DD

What about inspiring the next generation of people trained to construct and build environment. NSB

It was really interesting to me to be a part of the certificate program with many professionals in the architecture and design industries that had very little knowledge of the materials of the built environment that they were designing or working with, less so even than I, who is not trained with that background at all, and it was very shocking and alarming to me to collaborate with people who did not

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As an architect, I can tell you this. The literacy that you’re expected to have over the coming materials, like the next wave of materials, is 95% as opposed to what to do with current materials.

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Imagine creating that curriculum, you know, like creating a class. Take this certificate program class that Archeworks is engaged in, and what do you think would happen if you ran that course at half the universities in America, the design colleges or business schools, you know, or collaborations between those two. You know? What would that yield one, two, three, five years down the line? NSB

Yes. I think it would yield entrepreneurship. I think that it would yield radical changes in the way that people think about the materials that surround them every day. But also, reuse is just a smarter way to do business, and people don’t often think about it that way. They think it’s thrifty. They think that it’s something that you do if maybe you don’t have a lot of money, but it’s actually and incredible business model because you’re taking something that was essentially garbage that had no value. In fact, you had to pay for it to be taken away, and then you’re turning that into an economic engine. And if business schools had any idea that you could do that, that you could essentially capture a material input for little to no money, and then turn that around through labor and effort, but turn that around into something that was a viable product, I think that there would be incredible interest in using that as a business model moving forward. DD

I mean, if you think about taking away even for a moment the resource stream that’s highly specialized for the building industry, like curtain walls, or something like that. Let’s just look at the kind of things you get at Home Depot versus the restore. Home Depot, you get, you’re offered a variety of choices that have incredible efficiencies behind them but very little soul. And so the economics argument is clear and credible, but the actual, the feeling or the soul of it, let’s just say, is left wanting. If you look at the other side, if you look at the resource side, the soul is all there, the economics seems disastrous, you know, to invest in that in a large way. So, you know, I think the overlap between those two or the median between those two is actually pretty interesting. And imagine if you applied great economic thinking to something that actually had a lot of something

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WA$TED MARKET PROJECT IN REVIEW

that humans respond to at a very core level. You know? These things that you’re talking about, these things that have patina, that have aged, that have life, yeah, if you could get the best of both worlds. NSB

It also just takes someone to make a decision to say these are the parameters. We don’t buy only new things, and that’s a parameter, and that’s a decision that you’ve made, and then you work around it. Right now, we say we use whatever resources we want or need. We can no longer say that with consideration of our climate crisis that we’re facing. So we need to be able to start to put parameters around what’s available for use as resources. But I think that what you’re describing is almost like a fusion or some sort of happy medium between new commercial purchasing and, you know, retail purchasing from some sort of restore nonprofit. The restore nonprofit model is incredibly challenging. It’s incredibly challenging to fund. It will only ever bring in about 70-80% of its revenue, its operating budget through earned income, so it will always have to rely on some element of grant funding. There is incredible things that you can do through that model around workforce training, but, for instance, if you were to sell the new components of things that people who came to that restore or reuse center looking for lumber and needed, for instance, new door knobs or new screws, or there would be ways to incorporate both old and new together that might be beneficial economically for both. Well, if you are finding out what your customers are buying from Home Depot ... so, for instance, right now I’m building a kitchen table out of an old barn door I bought at ReBuilding Exchange. I’m also building a kitchen island out of some lumber that I built there as well, that I bought there as well. There are some material components that I need for my projects that aren’t sold at ReBuilding Exchange, and so I’m going to go to Home Depot or Lowe’s to buy them. So if, as an organization, you decided to think more critically, or ask questions of your customers around what types of materials to supplement your projects that you’re doing with the materials you’re finding here what other types of materials do you need, and started selling those new, that’s another way to make money where you’re kind of capturing that revenue that might then be spent elsewhere. So I think that if we thought more creatively about the model, it wouldn’t require as big a mutation as it might seem. DD

Yeah. So we’ve talked about a graphic language. We talked about language language. We’ve talked about education. We talked about business models. What other potentials do you see for this research to become actionable? NSB

Sure. What I would like to see, and this was always kind of the hope that grew and was nourished as I’ve been participating in Wasted Market as a reuse business incubator. I think that would be incredible for Chicago. DD

Draw all these things together.

NSB

To draw all of these things together to prove that it’s an

16

economically viable model. I think the sustainability argument is less necessary because we know we need to do something about waste. I feel the best way to do something about it is to prove that there are economic alternatives outside of throwing something away. That’s difficult right now because tipping fees are so much less expensive here in the Midwest than they are elsewhere, but if we can also prove at the same time that, yes, tipping fees are less expensive, but you can also build a business using this model, that that would really create a new generation of entrepreneurs who think about materials different, who think about their city’s resources differently, and who think about collaboration between each other in a new and interesting way. DD

from?

Where would the funding for something like that come

NSB

That’s something that, you know, and organization like the Chicago Community Trust could fund — especially since they seem to be, from the sustainability lense, dedicated to keeping waste as a focus. That’s something that they could fund in partnership with the city or the county. When you look at how an incubator like 1871 got funding, there wouldn’t really have to be too many differences in terms of how that funding gets started. There are many ... You know, we talked about the kind of larger scope of Wasted Market, but most recently, this most recent iteration really focused on reuse entrepreneurs and business owners who are already working in this space. And they do exist, and there’s many of them, and they are networked amongst each other, but a lot of what they’re missing are business skills, just basic like how do I make a website is engaging, how do I market my products online, how do I create a system where people can look at my inventory, those are basic kind of business questions that any entrepreneur faces. And so if these entrepreneurs who are already running successful businesses in the city had access to some of that learning or skills or knowledge that was tailored specifically to their needs, I think that that could do a lot to grow the industry. DD

Let me restate that back to you. A relatively small amount of energy invested in the people that are already moving in this direction could unlock a lot of activity. NSB 100%. DD

What kind of activity would you imagine would be triggered?

NSB

If people know that they can make money from materials, they will go and find them. You don’t even have to try to keep them out of the landfill because they won’t even get there in the first place. So that’s exactly the activity I believe we are talking about when we talk about waste reduction is just less to landfill. And if you create, for instance, a good example is bottle deposits on soda cans or glass bottles. In New York City, there, or in New York State, rather, there is a bottle deposit that you can get, and you will never see, it’s

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WA$TED MARKET PROJECT IN REVIEW

very rare that you’ll see an aluminum can going in the garbage can, because someone else will come and take it out because that’s money. And if we had that same type of incentive around different types of material streams, none of that stuff would ever get to the landfill in the first place. Entrepreneurs are known for their ingenuity, for their creativity, and for finding what they need in the places where they can be found. And so if you created some sort of incentive structure around keeping these materials out of the landfill, and there was an economically viably way of turning a profit, people would take care of it for you. It’s not something that the city or the government would necessarily have to create a large structure around. Does that answer your question? DD

If such an incubator was to exist, who are the first two or three people you would call to participate in it by name? NSB

Yes. I would call Anne Nicklin formerly of the Building Materials Reuse Association. She was their executive director for years. She is now staring her own practice called Reuse Studio. DD

She’d be an administrator, or she’d be a user?

NSB

She would be an administrator.

DD

Who would you call at the user level?

NSB

Sure. Pretty much, what I would love to see is a collaboration of mentors who are a little bit further along in the process. So at the Wasted Market panel for instance, we had a man named Rocky Levy from a business called Icon Modern who does a lot of storefronts with reclaimed materials in the Chicagoland area. I think he would be an incredible mentor for someone like Harbor Miles who has his own company around taking salvaged materials from the street, upcycling them, and then selling them to people as home furnishings. So I think that there would be this incredible kind of mentor mentee relationship between practiced and seasoned business owners with those who kind of just starting out and trying to find their niche. It’s an industry where there doesn’t need to be a lot of competition, because material abounds, and so it is actually very collaborative if you look into it. And by comparing people who have less information with people who are a little bit more mature in their practice, I think that you could generate a lot of really nice energy. DD

That comment points to something else even if you weren’t able to pull together something like an incubator, there’s no reason that you can’t find a way to regularly network these people. NSB

Sure. The problem with that, because I’ve done that, you need to be funded. DD

NSB

So years ago, I started, there was a national nonprofit called The Reuse Alliance. I started a statewide chapter called Reuse Alliance Illinois for the entirety of Illinois state. I went and spoke at conferences. I had to get buy in from stakeholder groups before I was allowed to start the chapter. We had to pay chapter and membership dues. We met monthly at the Cook County Department of Environmental Control. And as a volunteer coordinator, I put a lot of time into creating meaningful programming, and there was interest only from a small group of people, simply because I did not have the resources to expand beyond that. So if there is something like that, it would absolutely have to be funded at a meaningful living wage position. And there’s an example of what that looks like in New York City. And so, New York City, through the Department of Sanitation has a program called Reuse NYC that creates essentially the structure and framework for reuse organizations for all varieties and capacities to network with each other to build momentum behind the collective work that their doing to meet, and engage, and have regular checkins, and all the things that you need to really create an industry that is supported and flourishing. DD

Great. Final prompt... Just complete this phrase or this idea. “The logical next step for the Wasted Market research is ... NSB

To create a community around the building materials reuse industry in Chicago — an effort that is funded to meet the needs of the existing community members, whether they are for profit businesses, non-profit organizations, or a hybrid of both, working at the city level, all of the various stakeholders who have an investment in this industry succeeding. There needs to be some sort of structure and framework for them to engage regularly and feel supported in the work that they do. That could include quarterly meetings, quarterly programming that could include a monthly happy hour, that could include an online web group where people could engage through an app or a text message or something like that, that could include a jobs board where people who are looking for work in this particular industry whether it’s paid work or internships could engage, that would include some sort of marketing on behalf of the city’s part and dedication towards promoting the activities of these organizations. I would say that the next step of the Wasted Market research could really lead to something actionable, like Reuse NYC in New York City, because that’s been an overwhelming success. We need a version of this for Chicago if we are going to be serious about waste reduction and the reuse industry. <<< END >>>

You need to be funded.

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Photo Credit : Urban Remains

CONVENINGS THURS

NOV

1.Ownership Learn from exper ts. Innovate solutions. Scale an industr y.

Space is limited!

RSVP

online: wastedmarket.org

2.Scale 3.Vision

WA$TED MARKET CONVENINGS INTRODUCTION In November 2017, materials experts and design innovators

The convenings engaged thought leaders, community

across Chicago convened for three panel discussions on

stakeholders, and industry experts in disruptive dialogue

building materials reuse and the future of our city.

about the building materials reuse industry in Chicago and beyond. The event series tried to to shift participantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

WA$TED MARKET: Convenings took a participatory

perception of reused building materials from a liability to an

approach to market development by connecting downstream

asset, exploring throughout the opportunities (economic,

industry experts with upstream innovators and influencers

social, environmental) that might arise from more effective -

to generate actionable solutions for change. The panel

and localized - materials management.

discussion audio was recorded and is shared on the WA$TED MARKET website. By convening and connecting diverse and dispersed audiences, these events aimed to create cross-sector synergies and catalyze localized innovation from the bottom up. The waste industry is networked, distributed, and complex - and calls for similar solutions. Convenings sparked fresh conversation, thoughts, and dialogue around building materials reuse in an accessible and engaging format that is recorded for future reference.

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WA$TED MARKET CONVENINGS

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 1.

To engage cross-industry leaders from diverse personal and professional backgrounds in critical dialogue on building materials reuse, offering audience insight into industry challenges and potential opportunities.

2.

To provide rich, accessible event documentation (written, audio, video) through an online web portal (wastedmarket.org) and prepare to share this documentation widely with communities of interest across Chicagoland and beyond.

3.

To engage Chicagoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s South Side community directly and inspire understanding of the potential economic development opportunities and environmental benefits building materials reuse can provide at the local level.

LISTEN TO EVENT PODCASTS

WWW.WASTEDMARKET.ORG OWNERSHIP explored the economic realities that govern the salvage industry. Audience members were offered unique insight on mater, by tracing reused materials from their source, to local or regional end markets, ials ownership, community wealth, and private value. Diverse professionals - from real estate to waste hauling gathered to discuss the transfer of ownership in a buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lifecycle. SCALE brought together entrepreneurs of existing reuse businesses in Chicago, from boutique to industrial scales. Panelists shared successes and challenges of the salvage business model and shared ideas for increased adoption of reused building materials into new construction. Attendees learned first-hand about existing reuse operations and new models for future development. VISION inspired discussion on the local and regional future of building materials reuse in Chicago by inviting dialogue on the topics of: labor and workforce development; adaptive reuse and community resilience; industry accreditation; and policy advancement and implementation. Panelists envisioned a robust reuse marketplace in Chicago and discussed what it will take to get there.

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PARTICIPANTS

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OWNERSHIP NOV 2, 2017 6:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:00P @ STOCKYARDS BRICK

When a structure is vacant, foreclosed, or slated for demolition, who owns the materials inside? How can reuse of these materials catalyze local economic growth? Diverse professionals - from real estate to waste hauling - gathered to discuss the transfer of ownership in a buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lifecycle. By tracing reused materials from their source, to local or regional end markets, OWNERSHIP explored the economic realities that govern the salvage industry. Audience members were offered unique insight on materials ownership, community wealth, and private value.

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‘OWNERSHIP’ SPEAKERS

CARLA BRUNI HERITAGE CONSERVATION & SUSTAINABILITY CONSULTANT

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MODERATOR

DAN BROUGHTON

NICOLETTE STOSUR-BASSETT

VICE PRESIDENT, T2 PROPERTIES

REUSE EXPERT, DESIGN RESEARCH & BRAND STRATEGIST

MEAGAN RIDER

HARBOR MILES

PRINCIPAL DESIGNER, RIDER

OWNER & FOUNDING MEMBER,

DESIGN GROUP

CURBSIDE SALVAGE LLC

ROB ROSE

STEVE FIYLO

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, COOK

PRESIDENT, BLUE EARTH

COUNTY LAND BANK AUTHORITY

DECONSTRUCTION

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STOCKYARDS BRICK reclaims vintage brick, stone, granite, limestone, and architectural artifacts from structures scheduled for demolition throughout the Midwest. OWNERSHIP will be hosted at their Back of the Yards processing facility, which was recently a featured venue of Open House Chicago. From building procurement, to deconstruction, to materials recprocessing, Stockyards ensures that the â&#x20AC;&#x153;bonesâ&#x20AC;? of beautiful old buildings have an extended life.

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SCALE NOV 9, 2017 6:00–8:00P @ GREAT LAKES YARD

What does it mean to “scale” reuse? What are the metrics for success? What are new types of business models that can help us achieve these goals? At SCALE, a panel of reclaimed building material innovators and entrepreneurs shared successes and challenges of the salvage business model and ideas for increased adoption of reused building materials into local construction projects. Attendees heard first-hand about existing reuse business operations across the city and discussed new models for future development.

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‘SCALE’ SPEAKERS

ELVIS ORTEGA

JOHN MULROW

RYAN NESTOR

CO-FOUNDER & DIRECTOR OF

PHD CANDIDATE: INDUSTRIAL

OWNER, BARKER/NESTOR ARCHITECTS

OPERATIONS, 1840 CREATIVE

ECOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

ARCHEWORKS BOARD OF DIRECTORS

AT CHICAGO

KELLY FARLEY

MARK AWTRY

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

PRESIDENT

REBUILDING EXCHANGE

RIGHTSIZE FACILITY

MODERATOR

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MEEGAN CZOP

ROCKY LEVY

NICOLETTE STOSUR-BASSETT

OWNER & OPERATOR

FOUNDER

REUSE EXPERT, DESIGN RESEARCH

GREAT LAKES YARD

ICON MODERN

& BRAND STRATEGIST

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GREAT LAKES YARD is a woman-owned reclaimed lumber and salvage business selling the highest quality heritage materials. All of Great Lakesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lumber has been sustainably harvested across the Midwest region through deconstruction and demolition as an innovative model towards sustainable reuse. SCALE will be hosted at the Great Lakes operational warehouse in East Garfield Park. This is a great opportunity to engage with salvaged lumber and historical decorative artifacts first-hand.

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WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO “SCALE” REUSE? WHAT ARE THE METRICS FOR SUCCESS?

1/16/2018

What Does it Mean to "Scale" Reuse? | Plant Chicago

FROM “THE PLANT CHICAGO” BLOG, JAN 6, 2018

These were two questions posed to a group of building material reuse experts as part of the Wa$ted Market Convenings, organized by non-profit Archeworks and circular economy organizer Nicolette Stosur-Bassett. The seminar on Scale was held at Great Lakes Yard (pictured above!). I sat on the panel, not as a reuse expert but as an academic thinking about how the reuse, recycling and circular economy efforts connect to the grander effort for global ecological balance.

article: learnings

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This question about scale is important because answering it requires consideration of the underlying priorities of the building material reuse effort. Most organizations involved in activating the Chicago reuse scene are likely to claim environmental concerns as a motivator. One of Cook County’s major environmental initiatives has been implementation of the Demolition Debris Diversion (3D) Ordinance, which requires 70% of demolition debris to be recycled and 5% of residential demolition debris to be reused. The ordinance has fueled a growth in reuse activity and attention to the topic. To highlight the many places for intervention and scale (up or down) in the building material system, I created a stocks and flows diagram. Each stock (boxes), process (diamonds) and the connections between them (arrows) represent an activity that might be scaled up, out or down. And there are plenty of ways to derive “success metrics” from these stocks and flows. See The Building Material Reuse Ecosystem [PDF] for more detail.

what does it mean to “scale” reuse? January 6, 2018   By John Mulrow

What does it mean to “scale” reuse? What are the metrics for success?

My answer to the scale question was thus a clarification of the reuse industry’s underlying goals: If the goal is global ecological sustainability, then not These were two questions posed to a group of building material reuse experts as part of the Wa$ted Market Convenings, organized by non-profit Archeworks and circular economy every version of scaling up reuse activity fulfills that goal. organizer Nicolette Stosur-Bassett. The seminar on Scale was held at Great Lakes

One obvious “metric of success” for the reuse industry is an increase in the volumeYard (pictured above!). I sat on the panel, not as a reuse expert but as an academic thinking of reusable material captured from demolition or remodeling projects about how the reuse, recycling and circular economy efforts connect to the grander effort for and then made available through reuse warehouses. A greater supply of reusables could be a good thing, driving down prices and ensuring reuseglobal ecological balance. conscious customers find what they’re looking for. http://plantchicago.org/2018/01/06/scale-reuse/

Now, imagine the ways in which this supply of reusables might be generated. It could be through greater diversion from the baseline wastestream – this is the goal of the 3D Ordinance: The material that was headed for a landfill can be salvaged for a second life. But consider the mechanisms that generate the wastestream in the first place: construction, demolition and remodeling activity. If these activities rise then the stock of reusables will rise in equal measure but would that be a win for the environment? Here is where we run into a clash between the act of scaling up and the ecological goals of reuse. If industrial building stock cannot find new tenants willing to creatively adapt for modern production activities, then more of those buildings will be torn down – a massive waste of embodied energy. If society demands greater and greater square footage per-person at home, older households will continue to be demolished rather than restored. And if home and business owners find it cheap, easy and fashionable to remodel their interiors every few years then the impact of their new purchases may outweigh the benefits of reusing their waste. All of these demolition and remodeling activities would increase the supply of reusables and reuse activity, but at great resource and energy opportunity cost. These examples illustrate how the goal of “increasing building material reuse” is not, by itself, a robust goal if we are also concerned with global ecology. An ecologically-concerned reuse industry must be aimed at capturing more reusables from the current wastestream and also ensuring that more materials are reused in-place. Here are some proposed metrics for success: LESS 1.

new construction

2.

needless demolition

3.

frequent remodeling activity

MORE 1.

reuse and restoration of existing structures

2.

reuse of existing structures for their highest and best use (ie. industrial properties for industrial activities)

3.

per-capita utilization of structures (ie. more people/users per square foot of space).

4.

This question of what it means to scale must be asked not just of the reuse industry but of every activity with a “green” tinge. The goal must be to scale up while also facilitating greater material longevity and lower resource demand.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;If industrial building stock cannot find new tenants willing to creatively adapt for modern production activities, then more of those buildings will be torn down â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a massive waste of embodied energy. If society demands greater and greater square footage per-person at home, older households will continue to be demolished rather than restored. And if home and business owners find it cheap, easy and fashionable to remodel their interiors every few years then the impact of their new purchases may outweigh the benefits of reusing their waste. All of these demolition and remodeling activities would increase the supply of reusables and reuse activity, but at great resource and energy opportunity cost.â&#x20AC;?


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VISION NOV 16, 2017 6:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:00P @ THE PLANT CHICAGO

What role can salvaged materials play in the Chicago regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sustainable growth and development? At VISION, panelists discussed the local and regional future of building materials reuse by inviting dialogue on the topics of: labor and workforce development; adaptive reuse and community resilience; industry accreditation; and policy advancement and implementation. Attendees were offered an opportunity to envision a robust reuse economy and what it might take to get there.

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‘VISION’ SPEAKERS

MODERATOR

ALICIA PONCE-NUÑEZ

ALEX ENARSON

NICOLETTE STOSUR-BASSETT

FOUNDER & PRINCIPAL

DESIGNER/BUILDER

REUSE EXPERT, DESIGN RESEARCH

AP MONARCH LLC

NEIGHBORSPACE, BUBBLY

& BRAND STRATEGIST

DYNAMICS

ANNE NICKLIN

CHAD SMITH

FOUNDER

ARCHITECT

REUSE STUDIO

ADRIAN SMITH + GORDON GILL ARCHITECTURE

DEON LUCAS

LOU DICKSON

PARTNER

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

HANNS & ERVING

EVANSTON REBUILDING WAREHOUSE

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PLANT CHICAGOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission is to develop circular economies of food production, energy conservation and material reuse, while empowering people of all backgrounds to make their cities healthier and more efficient. PC is hosted at The Plant, an innovative, industrial-scale adaptive reuse project in Back of the Yards. The Plant is an excellent example of reuse at work. VISION will be hosted in Plant Chicagoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s community room.

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tamp

WA$TED MARKET CONVENING SPEAKER SURVEY As a WA$TED MARKET What was special or unique panelist, what is/was valuable about this event series? to you about this experience?

On a scale of 1 to 5, how interested were you in the panel topic(s)?

On a scale of 1 to What organizational, individual, or 5, how engaging agency voices were missing from did you find the the conversation? How do we find event discussion? them?

1/17 12:17 Meeting fellow industry folks. I I liked traveling to other places made some great connections. and having discussions in unique environments, that effect our natural environment.

5

5

1/17 12:25 Great audience, great contacts Engaged audience 1/17 21:43 Absolutely - it was great to hear Reuse and sustainability are other perspectives and ideas important topics that need more from other panelists and support and adoption in our communities. participants. 27/17 7:25 The chance to check-in on the The short overview and latest happenings in reuse moderated panel was very unique businesses and policy thinkers. and the connection to a larger Also a public speaking, debating "series" of events was special. opportunity!

5 5

5 5

5

5

7/17 15:26 Connecting to new, likeminded people, expanding network towards a real sustainable market 8/17 14:21 I was pleased to meet other individuals just as passionate about reduce waste and transforming the lifecycle of building materials.

it was very closely aligned to my business model

5

5

The different sectors of working professionals and their contribution towards a waste free society. Their perspectives and activities challenged my own thinking towards how many methods are employed to reduce our impact on the environment.

5

8/17 15:12 Being an advocate for Meeting people for the first time. sustainability and meeting fellow advocates. 29/17 9:29 Reaffirmed the lack of a The attempt at consensus was centralized market or a nice regulatory body to establish market value of anything reclaimed. 29/17 9:44 Meeting and hearing the The venue stories of so many others interested in different avenues of this important topic. 9/17 10:11 Learning from all the other The subject matter and intimate panelists, and hearing what the discussion people want/envision for the future of reclaimed

1/17 12:31 Getting a chance to share our Super focused on our niche perspective, learn from peers industry, very conversational. and hear the questions folks may have. 3/17 11:00 The moderation was fantastic, It was geared toward action, not and it helped get all the diverse just study or discussion, and disciplines represented on the focused on the environment -and- economics. panel to contribute to the discussion 4/17 17:53 Yes, I was able to meet people The cross-section of expertise and outside of my field of expertise. experiences

Did you benefit from attending the Archeworks' WA$TED MARKET event(s)?

Did you lea something at the even you attend

Construction and Demolition. It seemed like everyone was already rather engaged and I think it would be valuable to have a good counter point of view. Maybe they could provide some insight on real challenges. None Local, state government perhaps. Waste management entities.

Yes

Yes

Yes Yes

Yes Yes

Between the three events I felt there were the expected voices as well as some new/unique ones. Perhaps someone from the County who could speak directly to 3D ordinance current status. Non-choir members, i.e. industry peers who aren't exposed to sustainable ideas on a daily basis

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

5

Large private developers that employ reuse or life cycle analysis within their development strategy

Yes

Yes

5

5

Contractors and waste haulers. I have some we can contact.

Yes

Yes

5

4

Theres many people missing... theres no directory of people who save things from jobs and hoard them in outbuildings for sale

Yes

Yes

4

4

A trade association or trade group

Yes

Yes

5

5

I think between the 3 events, there was a wide range of different backgrounds

Yes

Yes

5

5

I was happy with the diversity and number of women represented:)

Yes

Yes

5

5

n/a

Yes

Yes

5

5

City of Chicago - Dept of Buildings. I have contacts that I will share.

Yes

Yes


tional, individual, or Did you benefit from attending the were missing from on? How do we find Archeworks' WA$TED MARKET event(s)?

Did you learn something new at the event(s) you attended?

On a scale of 1 to 5, Did you make new How does your business to what extent was business connections or benefit by connecting your perspective or expand your with new contacts knowledge base professional network in/related to your broadened as a result through WA$TED industry? of participating in MARKET event(s)? WA$TED MARKET?

Do you anticipate that you will collaborate with the people/businesses you encountered at WA$TED MARKET in the future?

Yes

Yes

4

Yes

My business is all word of Yes, within 1-3 months mouth so events like this are a huge help.

Yes Yes

Yes Yes

5 4

Yes Yes

hree events I felt there cted voices as well as que ones. Perhaps the County who could o 3D ordinance

Yes

Yes

4

Yes

Directly Yes, within one year or more There is power in Yes, within one year or more connections - knowledge sharing; business development. Perspective on the real Yes, within 1-3 months material and financial numbers behind building material reuse!

mbers, i.e. industry n't exposed to as on a daily basis

Yes

Yes

4

Yes

new potential suppliers mostly

evelopers that or life cycle analysis velopment strategy

Yes

Yes

5

Yes

Our organization greatly Yes, within 3-6 months benefits from the knowledge of the resources available to us because of events such as this.

d waste haulers. I can contact.

Yes

Yes

3

Yes

Relationship building and Yes, within 3-6 months shared resources

eople missing... theres people who save s and hoard them in r sale

Yes

Yes

4

Yes

One never knows

tion or trade group

Yes

Yes

4

Yes

Exposure to other Yes, within one year or more seemingly unrelated business' ways of thinking

n the 3 events, there ge of different

Yes

Yes

4

Yes

th the diversity and men represented:)

Yes

Yes

4

Yes

Making quality, specific Yes, within 1-3 months connections was beneficial in that it broadened my outreach and general connections in the business I'm associated in New sources of materials, Yes, within 1-3 months new revenue, new donors, new collaborators

Yes

Yes

4

Yes

Greater sustainability impact

Yes, within 1-3 months

Yes

Yes

5

Yes

More business development opportunities

Yes, within one year or more

nd Demolition. It eryone was already and I think it would have a good counter Maybe they could nsight on real

vernment perhaps. ment entities.

- Dept of Buildings. I hat I will share.

Yes, within 6-9 months

Yes, within 3-6 months


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Wasted Market 2017 Convenes  
Wasted Market 2017 Convenes