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Course Catalog

2014-2015

11725 Sunset Boulevard Los Angeles, CA 90049 www.archer.org • 310-873-7000


Middle School Course Grid 2014-2015 Subjects

th

6 Grade

th

7 Grade

th

8 Grade

ENGLISH

English 6: The Journey of Me

English 7: Exploring Relationships

English 8: Coming of Age

HISTORY

History 6: Time Travelers

History 7: World Cultures

History 8: US History

MATH

Math 6 Intro to Integrated Math

Intro to Integrated Math Integrated Math I

Integrated Math I Integrated Math II

SCIENCE

Science 6: Earth Science

Science 7: Life Science

Science 8: Physical Science

WORLD LANGUAGES

Language Foundations Spanish, French, Chinese, Coding

French 1A Spanish 1A Chinese 1A

French 1B Spanish 1B

FITNESS & WELLNESS

Fitness & Wellness 6

Fitness & Wellness 7

Fitness & Wellness 8

ARTS

Arts 6 (quarter rotations) -Visual Art -Vocal and String - Music -Theater

Arts 7 (semesters) -Visual Art -Musical Theater -Strings -Dance -Integrated Arts -Acting & Improv

Arts 8 (semesters) -Photography -Mixed Media -Ceramics & Sculpture -Film & TV -Web & App Design -Dance Performance (by audition)

CO-CURRICULAR ARTS (x-block and after school)

Middle School Choir Middle School Orchestra MS Play MS Musical

Middle School Choir Middle School Orchestra MS Play MS Musical

Middle School Choir Middle School Orchestra MS Play MS Musical

COMMUNITY SERVICE

Theme: Clean Water & Global Hunger

Theme: Making a Difference

Theme: Social Justice

*Unless otherwise noted, all courses are a full year and do not have a pre-requisite


ENGLISH English 6: The Journey of Me With literature as a guide, students begin to question and explore the big ideas of who they want to be, what they believe in, and how their values shape their actions. We embark on this journey of selfreflection and creative risk-taking alongside the dynamic characters in Walk Two Moons, Wonder, and Antigone. Units are aligned to their exploration of ancient civilizations in History, so students have a coherent humanities base. They practice clear and effective communication through engaging in the writing process, practicing public speaking, and collaborating with their peers. Class activities channel curiosity into a strong foundation for abstract thinking and analysis. Ultimately, students demonstrate their understanding by writing expository paragraphs, engaging in mock trials, participating in Socratic Seminars, creating academic blogs, composing original poetry, performing skits, and creating digital portfolios. Grade Level: 6 English 7: Exploring Relationships This course embraces the middle school mindset, by focusing on the power of relationships with self and others. Students explore the way in which relationships can alter, enrich and influence their lives through the lens of short stories, poems, novels such as The Outsiders and The House on Mango Street, and the Shakespearean comedy A Midsummer Night’s Dream. In addition to practicing active readership by analyzing plot structure and characterization, students engage in the writing process by honing audience and purpose in their own writing and public speaking. With a firm belief that words hold power, this class aims to engender a love of language and an understanding of the messages that shape our relationship with self and others. Grade Level: 7 English 8: Coming of Age This course embraces students’ burgeoning sense of independence by examining questions like: How do external forces shape our internal worlds? How do we interpret the gray area between black and white? What drives individuals to rebel from the norm? What does it mean to “come of age” in our society? Students explore these big ideas through a variety of American texts that involve challenge and change, including A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, A Raisin in the Sun, To Kill a Mockingbird, The Joy Luck Club, and an assortment of short stories and poetry. Throughout the course, there is a strong emphasis on writing analytically and decoding the structures behind messages. We also actively wrestle with our ideas via debates, digital projects, literature circles, and Socratic Seminars. Digital tools allow students to collaborate, connect their ideas, and extend their learning beyond the classroom. Grade Level: 8

 


HISTORY History 6: Time Travelers Sixth grade historians journey from prehistoric times into the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia, Africa, China, and Greece to explore what makes a civilization great and how they change over time. During their time travels, students consider the effect of bias on historical “fact” and uncover how new discoveries change interpretations of the past. Students also examine the impact of geography on the development of civilizations and explore how maps shape and reflect our understanding of the world. In alignment with their English curriculum, students learn to distinguish observation from inference, analyze sources credibility, and build stronger communication skills. Highlights of the year include tracking a hominid, birthing a new civilization, learning the science of mummification, trading along China’s Silk Road, and putting Sophocles’ Antigone on trial. Grade Level: 6 History 7: World Cultures In World Cultures, students explore the rich traditions of the Middle East, Asia, Central and South America, Africa, and Europe to analyze the influences of geography, natural resources, religion, and politics on the development of medieval cultures. Cross-curricular exploration emphasizes critical thinking and encourages students to interpret the past from a variety of perspectives. Seventh grade historians hone their skills in reading comprehension and analytical writing as they learn note taking techniques and basic research methods. Current events are emphasized as a means of better connecting the past with the present. Grade Level: 7 History 8: U.S. History Eighth grade U.S. History examines the expanding frontier and the incredible journey that was the formation of the first 48 states. The class considers major themes of gender, ethnicity, race, and class in seeking to understand the new republic. Our exploration follows American history from the Age of Exploration through the Reconstruction of the South, with references to modern America through the 1960s. Students uncover American colonial roots, discerning how and why the original colonies were formed and investigating the tenets of the Bill of Rights and the Constitution. Finally, students study in detail the causes of the American Civil War and the reconstruction of the Union that followed. Students utilize reading and writing skills through a variety of historical methodologies in preparation for Upper School and more advanced courses of study. Grade Level: 8

 


MATHEMATICS Math 6 Sixth grade mathematics strengthens and expands students’ basic problem-solving skills so they can fearlessly tackle more complex mathematical challenges. Learning is active and includes hands-on manipulatives, group collaboration, online resources, and real-world problem solving. Students learn to speak and think like mathematicians through exploring the following: number sense, ratios and rates, measurement and two-dimensional geometry, designing and analyzing data investigations, and examining linear patterns and relationships. Grade Level: 6 Introduction to Integrated Math This introductory math course provides an integrated exploration of major topics in Algebra, Geometry, and Statistics. The core learning goals for this course include developing understanding of and applying proportional relationships; developing understanding of operations with rational numbers and working with expressions and linear equations; and solving problems involving geometric constructions. The curriculum is structured to prepare students with a strong foundation in problem solving for higher level mathematics. Grade Level: 6 & 7 Prerequisites: Department approval for 6th graders Integrated Math I In this first level of the integrated math series, students explore the connections between algebraicnumerical and geometric-spatial relationships using real-world applications whenever possible. Students learn to: ● Identify, interpret and solve mathematical and real-world situations represented by linear functions ● Represent and analyze linear patterns using equations and inequalities ● Investigate polynomials functions and expressions. ● Employ tables, graphs, and symbols to identify and classify exponential and quadratic relationships ● Analyze relationships and representations of geometric objects through the use of coordinate geometry, algebraic drawings, charts, models, and technology ● Develop and apply methods of proving or disproving conjectures about lines, angles and figures ● Collect, organize and analyze data using statistical measures ● Interpret and communicate mathematical results through a variety of media Integrated Math II This course advances students’ understanding of functions, translations, structures, and statistical models. During this course students will: ● Structure and solve linear systems involving multi-variable equations ● Develop and apply mathematical methods of proof to problems involving congruence, similarity and transformations ● Justify and apply measurement formulas for two-dimensional geometric figures ● Explore and perform operations with radical expressions. ● Factor quadratic expressions and solve quadratic equations by completing the square ● Develop understanding of trigonometric ratios through exploration of right triangle trigonometry and apply this knowledge to real-world measurements ● Analyze data to solve real-world probability problems ● Explore experimental and theoretical probability

 


SCIENCE Science 6: Earth Science Students in Earth Science embark on a voyage from the clouds to the center of the Earth. They begin their journey by exploring the unique properties of water, discovering how it is distributed around our planet and investigating the water cycle to understand cloud formation and heat transfer on Earth. Next, students complete a hands-on exploration of our world’s oceans and its environmental threats. They close the semester by learning how to map the Earth’s surface using GPS. The second semester journeys deeper into the various layers of our planet and the changing nature of its surface. Students study plate tectonics and the formation of land mass through volcanic activity, earthquakes, fault lines, and tsunamis. The year ends with a study of weather and its economic impact, especially on food production. Grade Level: 6 Science 7: Life Science This course examines life from the microscopic level (cells) to the macroscopic level (the human body). Students begin with the nature of scientific inquiry: they develop, test, and analyze their own hypotheses through a variety of laboratory experiments. Beginning with the structure of cells, they continue on with the processes that occur in them, until ultimately exploring whole body systems. Finally, the course culminates with a study of genetics and reproduction. In all aspects of the curriculum, students are asked to critically evaluate common theories of science, articulate arguments in agreement or opposition to these scientific principles, perform laboratory experiments to test commonly held biological theories, and develop a logical approach to problem solving. Grade Level: 7 Science 8: Physical Science This course introduces physical and chemical processes through scientific investigation and inquiry. Students explore atomic theory and structure, decode the periodic table, and investigate chemical interactions. During the second semester, students investigate motion through an in-depth exploration of the relationship between distance, velocity, acceleration, forces, and Newton’s laws of motion. Throughout the year, emphasis is placed on learning how to design experiments, collect and organize data, analyze and evaluate information, and draw formal conclusions from experimental results. Grade Level: 8

 


ARTS Arts 6: Introduction to the Arts Sixth grade artists have an opportunity to explore art, music and theater in quarter rotations. This gives students a chance to embrace different creative challenges. In studio art, students apply their imagination to drawing, painting, collage, weaving, and bookmaking. In music, students play string instruments and sing in choir to gain an ear for music while gaining an introduction to music theory, pitch recognition, intonation, rhythmic reading and notation. In theater, students develop performance skills through improvisation and organized play. Activities build self-confidence, foster collaboration, and improve public speaking skills. Arts 7: Art, Music, and Performance Students choose two semester-long courses: ● Visual Arts: explore a variety of media and techniques including drawing, painting, collage, printmaking and digital art. ● Musical Theater: develop voice as an instrument with an emphasis on musical theater and performance ● Dance: create, perform, and appreciate dance as an art form. Students learn the fundamentals of dance technique, performance and choreography through experiencing ballet, jazz, modern, hip hop and contemporary dance ● Strings: learn to play an instrument and make music together in this hands-on, collaborative class ● Integrated Arts: tackle engineering and design challenges with a dash of computer science to bring creativity into the 21st century. Projects include: designing a light-up sculpture, creating an electronic board game, and inventing a new kind of wearable technology. ● Acting & Improv: Find your voice by creating characters, exploring scenes, and bringing stories to life. Improve your teamwork and communication skills through theater games, improv skits, and collaborative projects. Arts 8: Exploring the Arts Students choose two semester-long courses: ● Mixed Media: explore a wide range of mediums including painting, drawing, printmaking, photography, digital imaging, and collage. Projects foster creative experimentation and challenge students to further their own unique vision and style. ● Ceramics & Sculpture: create a variety of sculpture projects using basic hand building techniques, such as slabs, coiling and modeling. Explore positive and negative space, additive and subtractive techniques, and narrative and abstract sculpture. Students will have many options, including stoneware and high fire glazes, to express their creative vision. ● Film & TV: learn the fundamental skills and techniques needed to create and produce high quality, original hi-def videos. Students learn advanced camera, sound editing, lighting, and oncamera acting techniques that they apply to class projects including music videos, news clips, experimental movies, and short films. ● Photography: appreciate the difference between catching a photographic moment and creating one through planning, staging and digital enhancement. Throughout the course, students complete assignments designed to improve their photographic eye and are taught how to properly present their images for exhibition. Dark room experience and digital tools provide a strong foundation for understanding the magic of capturing images on film. ● Web and App Design: learn computer programming and design to create websites or mobile apps that address real-world challenges. ● Middle School Dance Performance Company: (year long course) designed for students with previous dance training who desire to continue improving their creative and technical skills in ballet, jazz and contemporary dance. As a dance company, students choreograph, perform, and produce works for competitions, assemblies, and special events. Visiting choreographers and outside professionals will polish students’ skills and stretch their talents. Pre-requisite: Audition


Middle School Choir MS Choir is a group of young performers with a passion for music and singing. Students perform popular music with choreographed dances moves to musical arrangements at competitions and school events. MS Choir meets on a designated day after school for rehearsals and during x block. Grade Level: 6 - 8 Prerequisite: None Middle School Orchestra The MS Orchestra musicians explore the language of music while building their playing technique in orchestral arrangements and excerpts from symphonic repertoires. Rehearsals culminate in performances at the Winter Concert, the Spring Concert, assemblies, and the “Music In The Parks” competition. The Middle School Orchestra meets on a designated day after school and during x block. Grade Level: 6 - 8 Prerequisite: by Audition

 


World Languages Language Foundations The Language Foundations course provides a rich opportunity for students to explore 3 modern languages (Spanish, French, and Chinese) and learn the basics of coding, the 21st century language of technology. Students rotate each quarter through all 4 offerings with an eye to seeing how people communicate in different cultures and through the digital realm. This course also serves as an introduction to the languages they will choose to study in 7th and 8th grade. Grade Level: 6 French 1A This course introduces the fundamentals of French through oral communication, listening comprehension, and the acquisition of vocabulary necessary for basic conversation. Students practice speaking, listening, reading and writing to communicate in meaningful real-world situations. By the end of the course, students can communicate about themselves, their families and communities, daily routines and preferred activities. Students learn to answer basic questions, tell time, talk about the weather, and engage in language by writing situational dialogues, listening to popular music, and reading short extracts from novels, magazines, and newspapers. Grade Level: 7 French 1B Students continue their study of French through oral communication, listening comprehension, and the acquisition of vocabulary. In class, students and challenged to speak, listen, read, and write in the target language. By the end of the course, students are able to effectively communicate about the activities and routines of daily life. They are further able to narrate in the past and future using simple and compound tenses. Students contextualize the language by writing situational dialogues, listening to popular music, and reading short excerpts from novels, magazines, and newspapers. As a culminating event, students will compose and perform an original adaptation of a fairy tale. Grade Level: 8 Prerequisite: French 1A Spanish 1A Students in Spanish A build the skills to communicate in a variety of real-world situations. By the end of the course, they will be able to convey detailed information about themselves and their routines. They can also engage in basic conversations about daily activities. Students contextualize the language by writing situational dialogues and reading advertisements along with other cultural artifacts. The class through explores Hispanic culture through festivals, skits, field trips, and storytelling. Grade Level: 7 Spanish 1B In this second-level language course, students expand their ability to communicate effectively and confidently in Spanish. They learn more sophisticated vocabulary and grammar, including narrating in the past and future using multiple tenses. To contextualize their skills, students write situational dialogues, listen to popular music, and read short extracts from novels, magazines, and newspapers. As a culminating event, students compose and perform an original adaptation of a fairy tale. Grade Level: 8 Prerequisite: Spanish 1A Chinese 1A This course introduces students to the Pinyin system to build a phonetic foundation for their listening, reading, speaking, and writing. Students will also learn simple radicals of Chinese characters, including how the radicals symbolize meaning and why they look like they do. By the end of the course, students will be able to introduce themselves and carry on a basic conversation about their family, daily lives and hobbies. We will also explore the culture of China through music, field trips, stories, and current events.


FITNESS & WELLNESS Fitness and Wellness 6 In sixth grade fitness, students participate in team sports such as volleyball, basketball, softball, soccer, and track and field. Students also play non-traditional sports including ultimate Frisbee, lacrosse, flag football, and floor hockey. Sportsmanship, teamwork, and leadership are key elements of the class. Throughout the course students also gain an understanding of cardiovascular health, and muscular strength, and physical endurance. Human Development 6 Sixth grade Human Development provides space for students to explore their relationships with self and others, examine developmental changes, and build healthy habits of mind and body. Class activities include group discussions, council, games, journal writing, and mindfulness practices. Grade Level: 6 Fitness and Wellness 7 & 8 The seventh and eighth grade fitness classes focus primarily on team sports with an emphasis on skill development. Students participate in team sports such as volleyball, basketball, softball, and soccer, which are aligned with the after school athletic program. Students also enjoy non-traditional activities including ultimate Frisbee, lacrosse, flag football, and floor hockey. Sportsmanship, teamwork, and leadership are key elements of the class. A portion of each fitness class is designated to help students improve their cardiovascular levels and core strength. Students also learn to evaluate the elements of an efficient and effective workout. Grade Level: 7 & 8 Human Development 7 Seventh grade is a year of dynamic physical, emotional, social, and intellectual change. The Human Development curriculum explores some of the challenges that are part of this developmental stage. Discussions, role plays, and council encourage students to examine their values as they pertain to peers, family and self. Additional topics of discussion include reproduction, body image, puberty, social pressures, self-defense, and cyber safety. Grade Level: 7 Human Development 8 Eighth grade is a year of increasing autonomy, leadership opportunity, and rites of passage. The Human Development curriculum continues to examine issues of physical, emotional, social and intellectual growth. Students learn about nutrition, environmental responsibility, financial literacy, conflict resolution, cyber safety, and the dangers of drugs and alcohol. Class activities build skills necessary for healthy decision-making. Grade Level: 8


GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS To graduate, all students in grades 9-12 must satisfactorily complete at least the minimum number of courses indicated below. While in the Upper School, each student is strongly encouraged to take full advantage of the curriculum and challenge herself academically by going beyond the stated minimums. All students must be enrolled in a minimum of five courses each semester. • • • • • • • • •

English - 4 years History / Social Sciences - 3 years, including US History or AP US History Language - 3 years Mathematics - 3 years Science - 3 years, Physics, Chemistry, and Biology Elective Courses - 4 year-long courses including one year-long arts course Fitness - 2 years Human Development - 2.5 years: Grade 9 - full year, Grade 10 – full year Grade 12second semester Community Service - 4 years: 75 total hours (9th Grade: 15 hours, 10th Grade: 20 hours, 11th Grade: 20 hours, 12th Grade: 20 hours)

2014-2015 UPPER SCHOOL COURSE OF STUDY Subjects and Years Required

9th Grade

10th Grade

11th Grade

ENGLISH 4 years

English 9

English 10

Junior English Seminar: Literature of the American Self

English 10 Honors

AP English Language & Composition

12th Grade

Senior English Seminars (& Honors): Literature of Fantasy and Fairy Tale Novels to Film Postmodern American Literature AP English Literature: Great Books

HISTORY / SOCIAL SCIENCES 3 years

Understanding the Contemporary World

Questioning the West

U.S. History AP U.S. History Topics in History Semester Seminars (& Honors): The Voice of Democracy Economics

Fitness & Wellness 9

Fitness & Wellness 10

Ethics Economics Gender Studies

Ethics

AP Art History

Gender Studies

AP Human Geography

AP Art History

Fitness & Wellness

Topics in History Semester Seminars (& Honors): The Voice of Democracy


MATH 3 years (typical grade level shown, although all are available 9-12 if prerequisite met)

Integrated Math II (& Honors) Integrated Math III (& Honors)

Integrated Math III (& Honors)

Integrated Math III (& Honors)

Pre-Calculus (& Honors)

Pre-Calculus (& Honors)

Pre-Calculus (& Honors)

Calculus AP Calculus AB

Calculus AP Calculus BC AP Calculus AB

SCIENCE 3 years

Conceptual Physics

Chemistry

Biology

Systems Biology and Disease

Chemistry Honors

Biology Honors

Environmental Science

Systems Biology and Disease

Advanced Topics in Physics

Environmental Science

Advanced Topics in Engineering Physics

Research in Science Honors I

Research in Science Honors I

Physics Honors

Research in Science Honors II

THE WORLD LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT 3 years (typical grade level shown, although all are available 9 -12 if prerequisite met)

Spanish 1 Spanish 2 (& Honors)

Spanish 2 (& Honors)

Spanish 3 (& Honors)

Spanish 3 (& Honors)

Spanish 4(& Honors)

French 3 (& Honors)

French 4 (& Honors)

Spanish 4 (& Honors) AP Spanish Language

French 1

Senior Seminar in Spanish: Culture (spring)

French 2 Chinese 4 Chinese 1

Senior Seminar in Spanish: Conversation (fall) French 4 (& Honors) AP French Language Senior Seminar in French Senior Seminar in Chinese

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 2 ½ years

COLLEGE GUIDANCE 1 ½ years

Human Development 9

1

Human Development 10

1

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Human Development 12 (semester 2)

College Guidance 11

College Guidance 12 (semester 1)


ELECTIVE COURSES Subjects

ENGLISH

SCIENCE

PERFORMING ARTS

9

10 (if prerequisite met)

11 (if prerequisite met)

12 (if prerequisite met)

Creative Writing

Creative Writing

Creative Writing

Creative Writing

The 21st Century Journalist

Creative Writing: Advanced

Creative Writing: Advanced

Creative Writing: Advanced

The 21st Century Journalist

The 21st Century Journalist

The 21st Century Journalist

The 21st Century Journalist: Advanced

The 21st Century Journalist: Advanced

The 21st Century Journalist: Advanced

Engineering and Design

Engineering and Design

Engineering and Design

Engineering and Design

Introduction to Computer Science (meets 5 periods per rotation)

Introduction to Computer Science (meets 5 periods per rotation)

Introduction to Computer Science (meets 5 periods per rotation)

Introduction to Computer Science (meets 5 periods per rotation)

Dance Performance Company I*

Dance Performance Company I *

Dance Performance Company I *

Dance Performance Company I *

Contemporary Dance

Dance Performance Company II*

Dance Performance Company II*

Dance Performance Company II*

Contemporary Dance

Contemporary Dance

Contemporary Dance

Improvisation, Acting, and Performance

Improvisation, Acting, and Performance

Improvisation, Acting, and Performance

Advanced Acting Technique

Advanced Acting Technique

Advanced Acting Technique

Directing for Stage

Directing for Stage

Directing for Stage

Theatre Introduction: Improvisation, Acting, and Performance

VISUAL AND MEDIA ARTS

Ceramics: Introduction

Ceramics: Introduction

Ceramics: Introduction

Ceramics: Introduction

Photography: Introduction

Ceramics: Advanced

Ceramics: Advanced

Ceramics: Advanced

Studio Art

Photography: Introduction

Photography: Introduction

Photography: Introduction

Gallery Management and Design

Contemporary Photography

Contemporary Photography

Contemporary Photography

Filmmaking: Introduction

Photography: Advanced

Photography: Advanced

Photography: Advanced

Art and Technology

Studio Art

Studio Art

Studio Art

The Master Print

Intermediate Art

Intermediate Art

Intermediate Art

Media Tech: Yearbook

Portfolio: Advanced Art

Portfolio: Advanced Art

Portfolio: Advanced Art


Graphic Design

AP Studio Art

AP Studio Art

AP Studio Art

Gallery Management and Design

Gallery Management and Design

Gallery Management and Design

Filmmaking: Introduction

Filmmaking: Introduction

Filmmaking: Introduction

Filmmaking: Advanced

Filmmaking: Advanced

Filmmaking: Advanced

Media Tech: Yearbook

Advanced Study in Art

Advanced Study in Art

Advanced Media Tech: Yearbook Editing

Media Tech: Yearbook

Graphic Design

Advanced Media Tech: Yearbook Editing Graphic Design

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Independent Study

Independent Study

* An Upper School Dance Company Class satisfies the requirement for one fitness class.

Media Tech: Yearbook Advanced Media Tech: Yearbook Editing Graphic Design

Independent Study


Online School for Girls Course Information and Tuition Policy Archer is proud of its recent affiliation with the Online School for Girls (OSG), a consortium of outstanding girls’ schools that have joined together to offer exemplary online courses. Using the research on how girls learn best, OSG offers small classes that allow their students an opportunity to connect and collaborate in order to solve problems creatively. The partnership with OSG will allow Archer students to have access to an expansive curriculum, exposure to blended learning, and the chance to connect with students from around the country. Before registering for an OSG course, you should be aware of the following information: -­‐ OSG courses have twenty or fewer students in them, and thus have space limitations. -­‐ Students are not assigned a class period in their schedule when they register for an OSG class. Instead, students will have to independently schedule and manage their coursework. -­‐ OSG courses follow a slightly different calendar than Archer courses. The fall term begins after Labor Day and ends before winter break. The spring term begins mid-January and is completed before the AP exams begin in May. -­‐ These courses are best suited for students who are good self-motivators, self-advocates, and work well independently. Any student interested in taking an OSG course must complete an application; current teachers will be asked to comment on a student’s initiative, motivation, and work habits. -­‐ Admittance to OSG courses will be determined by the US Director based upon the student’s application, work habits, and feedback from current faculty. -­‐ Archer students may take OSG courses in one of two ways: 1. With Archer approval – tuition covered • Seniors who apply to take an OSG class as part of their standard five core classes and are accepted will be able to take the course covered through their Archer tuition. • Seniors who are unable to take a required course due to scheduling conflicts will be able to take the course covered through their Archer tuition. • In both cases the grade will be marked on the student’s transcript as an OSG course. 2. With Archer approval – tuition not covered th th • 10 , and 11 grade students who apply to take an OSG class and are accepted may take the course and have the grade marked on Archer’s transcript as an OSG course. th • 12 grade students who apply to take an OSG course as a sixth core class and are approved may take the course and have the grade marked on the student’s transcript as an OSG course. A separate course enrollment sheet should be submitted with a student’s course of study in order to enroll in an OSG course. This is available both online and in the Upper School Office. A full listing of all classes available through OSG can be found on the following website: http://www.onlineschoolforgirls.org/

ENGLISH English 9 - Literature in a Changing World How do budding literary scholars cultivate understandings, identities, and affiliations that foster active participation in contemporary global society? Closely aligned with “Understanding the Contemporary World,” this course asks students to contextualize various works and explore how historical and cultural transitions, ideologies, and modes of thought shape an author’s portrayal of his or her world. The syllabus is expansive, ranging from Shakespeare to popular television shows, promoting the understanding of classical archetypes and themes and how they have progressed over time. Socratic-based discussions and group projects reinforce skills necessary for successful communication, and students are encouraged to voice and develop strong opinions, take risks, offer insightful commentary, and construct thought-provoking analyses. Daily class work incorporates close reading and writing into discussions that build understanding of literary technique. Vocabulary gleaned from the reading is used in class conversation and in context so that students' understanding goes beyond memorizing the definitions. In addition, students receive intensive writing instruction, practice revision, conference individually with the instructor, and review grammar and mechanics to hone their writing. Primarily, though, “Literature in a Changing World” is intended to cultivate


global perspectives to help students become more empathetic citizens of the world. Grade Level: 9 English 10: Exploring Western Identity How does our understanding of class, race, and gender enhance our critical evaluation of literature? Paired with the tenth grade History course “Questioning the West,” we will see how Western thinking resonates within literary texts, and then flip that figurative coin to also examine the effects of Western ideologies themselves, both on members of Western cultures and on those considered “other,” or “foreign,” to a Western perspective. These explorations will lead to thought-provoking questions: How do systems beyond our control determine our actions? How does the potential reality of socially constructed identity affect our ethical beliefs? How do various cultures reply to the terms and expectations of Western social structures? Such questions will shed light on our own individual identities and how they are shaped by class, race, and gender. To assist with such complex, critical thinking, students will undertake various writing assignments that will require them to explicate plays, poetry, and novels with close attention to diction, syntax, and thematic patterns. The course also challenges students to implement their critical understanding of technological resources, including how to locate effective online source material, how to use creative platforms to express their analytical perspectives, and how to collaborate well through a variety of digital tools. Potential texts include Wuthering Heights, The Odyssey, and The Stranger, among others. Grade Level: 10 English 10 Honors: Exploring Western Identity The Honors level comparative literature course parallels the English 10 curriculum, but asks students to read more widely and at an accelerated pace, taking on an additional major text and accompanying project per term. Added texts have included Voltaire’s Candide, Woolf's Between the Acts and a film and media studies unit. Honors students also complement their study of core texts with supplemental readings of concurrent philosophy, poetry, criticism, sociology, and political science. Analytical writing remains the focus of the course, and students are challenged to develop original and arguable analyses that synthesize disparate materials, thus deliberately exercising rhetorical skills that prepare them for the AP Language course during the following year. Grade Level: 10 Prerequisite: Placement Test, Writing Sample, and Department Approval Junior Seminar: Literature of the American Self Walt Whitman’s 1860 joyful poem celebrates the hardworking voices of the young country, saying, “I hear America singing.” But whose songs are truly heard? In 1925, Langston Hughes replied, “I, too, sing America. // I am the darker brother.” This English seminar introduces students to key authors, poets, and playwrights whose works capture the American experience. Texts reflect distinct eras and genres that overlap with the cultural studies of the U.S. History course and explore the American mythos—what it means to be “American” and how that definition has changed over time. Students build on their reading and writing skills to develop confident and insightful voices. Besides copious analytical writing and continued vocabulary building, major projects may include crafting a poem in the style of a great American poet, visualizing concepts of beauty and racial identity in a digital Bluest Eye project, and writing a personal essay about the “Things I Carry” in the style of Tim O’Brien. The course challenges students to construct their own understandings of American perspectives in consideration of social and historical contexts. Texts may include The Awakening, The Great Gatsby, The Bluest Eye, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, A Streetcar Named Desire, and short story, poetry, and nonfiction essay selections. Grade Level: 11 AP English Language and Composition While preparing students to take the AP test in English Language and Composition, this course, centered on the American literary tradition, offers training in prose analysis as well as creative and argumentative writing. The crux of the course is an exploration of the relationship between the writer and the reader, considering those basic human desires to express, connect, and persuade. To do so, students look closely at varied writing styles and rhetorical choices. Central questions for exploration include: how do we ask dynamic questions and follow original paths of inquiry? What choices do writers make as they seek to construct meaning and influence audience? And, how can we hone our personal voice and adjust our prose for varied purposes? Some of the writers covered include Thomas Jefferson, Mark Twain, Walt Whitman, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ralph Ellison, Tennessee Williams, Margaret Atwood, W.E.B. Du Bois, Mary Oliver, Susan Sontag, Meena Alexander, Toni Morrison and Jonathan Safran Foer. Reading assignments are substantial, as are written assignments, and lively student discussions further understanding and creative interpretation. Students enrolled in the class are required to take the AP exam. Grade Level: 11


Prerequisite: Placement Test, Writing Sample, and Department Approval AP English Literature: Great Books What makes a book “great”? The Great Books course is an advanced class in literary analysis that explores the Western Canon. The focus is on literary touchstones that resonate through each other; texts include Hamlet, Pride and Prejudice, Their Eyes Were Watching God, 1984, Wide Sargasso Sea, Bless Me, Ultima and a heavy dose of American and British poetry. The class is discussion-based and centers around the themes such as the fall from innocence, coming-of-age, guilt, forgiveness, and otherness. Through close readings of writers’ usage of diction, syntax, tone, figurative language and literary devices, the class also examines how meaning is crafted on a small scale. Throughout the year, students are given opportunities to respond creatively to literature, all the while developing their own voices and styles. In short, we will read Great Books, explore their place in the Western Canon, and write, write, write. As reading and writing assignments are longer and denser, students are expected to take an independent approach to their studies. Students enrolled in the class are required to take the AP exam. Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: Placement Test, Writing Sample, and Department Approval SENIOR ENGLISH SEMINAR – HONORS DESCRIPTION LITERARY RESEARCH Students taking one of the senior English seminars have the option to receive Honors credit for the course through participation in a self-directed independent study project (one per semester) expanding on the seminar’s texts and themes, which will be approved, monitored, and assessed by the teacher. This program involves extensive independent research, reading, writing, and presentation outside of regular course expectations; it allows students with a passion for literature to challenge themselves and explore their literary interests as English academics. Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: Reflective Letter/Proposal, Writing Sample, and Department Approval Literature of Fantasy and Fairy Tale Fairies, Dragons and Looking-Glass Worlds What happens to children when they read and immerse themselves in other worlds? How do fairy tales and the literature of fantasy convey truths about being human? This course will offer a rich environment to explore questions about adult and child psychology, the uses of story, and aspects of artistic and literary styles and traditions. An early focus will be on Victorian England and Victorian fairy tales. Other potential readings include Alice’ Adventures in Wonderland, analyses by Bruno Bettelheim and Jack Zipes, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, writings by Ursula Le Guin, J.M.Barrie, Salman Rushdie, Buddhist and Taoist parables, the Arabian Nights, and African American folklore. Lenses through which we will examine the texts include: psychoanalytical, feminist, stylistic, historical, and cultural. Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: English 11 Novels to Film How might we learn to “read” a film as though a novel? How does either medium add to our understanding of the other? In “Novels to Film,” students will examine and interpret literature that has been adapted to the screen to evaluate and study the process of transformation and reinterpretation between mediums. Using Giannetti’s Understanding Movies as a key reference source, students will gain an understanding of how to read a film via its methodological constructs. And, in consequence, students will learn how to translate their understandings of film criticism to the printed page and back again via comparative analyses. A central premise of the course will involve students driving a portion of the curriculum, selecting their own subject matter for their major projects from hundreds of comparative possibilities, and ultimately devising their own screen adaptation from a portion of one of the major works undertaken for the course. Required readings include, Rear Window, Hamlet, Heart of Darkness, The Virgin Suicides, and Oliver Twist, among others. Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: English 11 Postmodern American Literature (Post)Modern Los Angeles


How might we understand Los Angeles as a concept of a city? A postmodern realm? Students will assess literature, film, criticism, media, architecture, and literary theory to examine the ways in which fictional and social conceptions of Los Angeles have changed and are changing during the late 20th and early 21st centuries. The class will consider how the idea of L.A. was created and then recreated several times within the mythic context of the American Dream, and how the realistic consequences of that dream have been depicted by artists. We’ll explore current, complex, and controversial questions immediately applicable to students as residents of the city: What similarities and tensions arise from different perspectives of the city? What portions of the dream apply to various contingencies of the city’s population? What is a post-modern landscape? How has the city itself affected the form, function and style of artistic subject matter, including spatial relations, urban decay, post-industrialism, pastiche, and tensions both psychic and physical? Does Los Angeles remain an idea? Is it online? Following an array of both writing and project-based analyses, the class will involve students creating their own reactions to the city in a variety of experimental written forms. Texts include Farewell, The Big Sleep, The Crying of Lot 49, Day of the Locust, Fahrenheit 451, Play It As It Lays, The Revolt of the Cockroach People, Brothers and Sisters, Tropic of Orange, and numerous criticisms and abstracts of literary theory. Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: English 11 ELECTIVES The 21st Century Journalist This full-year elective is for students who love to explore the world around them, in school and in the larger global community. We will explore the history of journalism in America and discuss the evolution of journalism during the 20th and 21st centuries, including exploring questions about journalistic ethics and the role of social media in an increasingly digital world. Students will write articles, conduct interviews, take pictures, and chase down those elusive leads as they maintain Archer’s digital news site, The Oracle. They will hone their interviewing skills, learn how to write from an objective, unbiased perspective, and ultimately synthesize complicated subject-matter into an easy-to-read format. A variety of guest speakers and experts will work with us throughout the year, and students will have opportunities for video and photojournalism, working in conjunction with the film and photography classes. Students are challenged at their own level; as a result, those who have mastered basic skills have the opportunity to take on leadership editorial roles and increase their writing, photography, and editing. Grade Level: 9-12 The 21st Century Journalist: Advanced This advanced class is open to students who have taken the initial journalism course and are ready for more challenges and responsibilities as class leaders and editors of the online news site, the Oracle. Students will build on previous skills and knowledge to demonstrate mastery of a variety of journalist modes (news, features, opinion, sports, and entertainment writing, and basic photojournalism) and potentially attend an offcampus conference. As editors, students work with the instructor to lead activities, model journalistic writing, edit peers’ work, and take a leadership role on the paper. Grade Level: 10-12 Prerequisite: The 21st Century Journalist Creative Writing This class will explore poetry, fiction, playwriting, and screenwriting, with emphases on developing a personal process and voice. Close readings of seminal works will be featured and students will have an opportunity to apprentice their skills through imitation of masters. The cornerstone of the class is the workshop, where writers discuss, defend, and receive feedback on their creations; students become "editors" who sharpen their understandings of what constitutes good writing through their honest assessment of others' drafts. Revisions follow, and at the end of each unit students gather their best work for presentation and/or display. Twice a year, students also solicit and edit work by their peers for submission to Pillars of Salt, the Upper School literary magazine. Grade Level: 9-12 Creative Writing: Advanced This class is open to students who have taken the beginning Creative Writing class and are ready for more challenges and responsibilities as class leaders and editors of the literary magazine, Pillars of Salt. Students will complete additional readings and assignments as well as attend some off campus events and performances. As editors, students work with the instructor to lead activities, discussions, and workshops. Other duties include laying out and preparing the literary magazine. Grade Level: 11 & 12 Prerequisite: Creative Writing


HISTORY Understanding the Contemporary World How do budding scholars and citizens cultivate understandings, identities and affiliations that foster active participation in contemporary global society? The 9th grade “Understanding the Contemporary World” course trains students with the tools of the social sciences to answer questions facing the planet and its people today. Through political, social, economic and geographic analysis of contemporary problems, students develop the ability to contextualize, analyze and empathize. Emphasizing alignment with texts and themes studied in 9th grade English, students explore political philosophies, culture, religion, the environment, gender, media and globalization across countries and cultures. Students continue to hone reading comprehension, analytical, note-taking, source evaluation and critical media literacy skills. Special attention is given to cartographic skills at the beginning of each unit. The course marks students’ transition into the upper school by focusing on the skills and knowledge of the social sciences necessary to participate actively as scholars and citizens. Grade Level: 9 Questioning the West What are Western values, practices and identities and how did they take root? How are these challenged and modified across time and space? The 10th grade History course, “Questioning the West,” is a chronological survey of modern world history that focuses on the development of the West and its interaction with other actors, histories and ideologies. Beginning with Humanism and the Renaissance in Europe and continuing through the Protestant Reformation, Scientific Revolution, Enlightenment, national and industrial revolutions, World and Cold Wars, students explore religious, cultural, social and political systems that shaped the West. They dissect internal challenges to a unifying Western ideal as well as external influences such as conquest of the Americas, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, African colonization and contemporary trade with China. Students use primary and secondary sources to conduct and present research and they participate in debates, hands-on activities and reenactments to help them understand varied perspectives. Research and writing skills receive special emphasis, as do reading comprehension, note-taking, and critical thinking skills. Grade Level: 10 U.S. History Who are Americans? What do we believe and value? How do we govern ourselves? How do we sustain ourselves? How do we interact with the world? These five questions anchor 11th graders’ investigation of the roots, development, dynamic changes, and contemporary challenges of American society, with a focus on the diversity of American voices and experiences. Students begin the year with a study of the development of U.S. political foundations and national culture, and the divergence of these into the economic and cultural systems of the North and South. The class then turns to the shaping of modern America and the social impact of industrialization, immigration, and urbanization. Finally the emphasis shifts to the contemporary United States, a world power struggling with issues such as civil rights, the role of government, and the responsibilities of global leadership. The course emphasizes critical reading of both primary and secondary sources and encourages discussion, debate, role-playing, and the development of students’ own evidence-based interpretations of history. Students undertake one extensive research paper on a topic in 20th century U.S. history. Grade Level: 11 AP U.S. History This course examines the span of U.S. History from colonization to the present, with an emphasis on preparing for the Advanced Placement examination. Five key questions anchor the course-- Who are Americans? What do we believe and value? How do we govern ourselves? How do we sustain ourselves? How do we interact with the world?-- and students relate the considerable content they learn in the course to these major themes. Assessments simulate the AP testing format of timed, multiple-choice questions and inclass essays. After taking the AP examination, students end the year with an in-depth research project. Students enrolled in the class are required to take the AP exam. Grade Level: 11 Prerequisite: Placement Test, Department Approval, and Student Statement of Interest HISTORY SENIOR SEMINARS These focused classes are intended to serve as additions to our core History requirements or as a culmination of a students’ broader study of the discipline. Student interest often determines particular units of study within these courses. Assessments include hands-on projects, traditional assessments, researchand writing-based assignments, and non-traditional assignments to suit varied learning styles. Assignments also promote research, critical thinking, and writing skills that will prepare students to meet college expectations. Grade Level: 11-12


These classes will generally be open to both juniors and seniors, but priority will be given to seniors. Honors credit will be available for qualified seniors on the basis of a student statement of interest, placement test, and Department approval. The Voice of Democracy: Elections in the U.S. (Fall) Does our electoral process represent the will of the people or the needs of special interests? Why hasn’t a multi-party system arisen in the U.S., and could one work? Is the Electoral College outdated, or is its protection of the voice of smaller states still important today? Who are the people behind the nominees of the two major parties and how much influence do they have on the candidates? What issues dominate elections, and who decides which issues receive the most attention? How do polling, free and paid media, and social media influence the political process? In this fall semester course, students will analyze the process, politics and outcomes of recent presidential election cycles. Students will review the U.S. Constitution and pivotal elections in our nation’s history to establish an historical framework for analysis. They will then investigate the impact of debates, campaign rallies, endorsements, money, and other factors as they dissect both historical and contemporary elections. Students will also analyze efforts at, and obstacles to, electoral reform, and will propose their own research-based reform programs that reflect students’ beliefs about the strengths, weaknesses, and potential of our system of democracy. Course materials will include readings from history and political science, and students will also be expected to read the newspaper and stay current with newspapers, blogs and social media sites. Assessments will take the form of traditional tests, quizzes and essays as well as presentations, formal debates, and research-based projects. Economics: Money Makes the World go ‘Round (Fall) They say that “money makes the world go ‘round,” but how does money make it around the world? This course begins with a fundamental understanding of key macro- and microeconomic concepts, from supply and demand, to inflation and exchange rates. We will also explore how governments affect domestic and international economies through fiscal policy, taxes and spending. Throughout the course we will stay on the pulse of financial news and discuss today’s pressing economic issues. What happens when the dollar weakens? How and why do businesses decide to cross borders? How do government incentives affect business practices? What is being done about income inequalities? Does gender determine one’s financial standing? The goal of this course will be to gain an understanding of the complexities of today’s global economy and how we as individuals work in tandem with corporations and governments to move money around the world. Gender Studies (Spring) This course will look at the broad concept of gender through varying disciplines including psychology, biology, politics, philosophy, history, and literature. Topics include the historically changing representations of women; the history of the women’s movement in the United States; the gender division of labor; globalization; contemporary feminism, sexualities, and the intersection of gender, race and class. A goal of the course is for each student to develop a critical perspective on the meaning and role of gender in our society. Ethics: Historical Traditions and Contemporary Challenges (Spring) This spring semester course will provide a historical framework for approaching the complex ethical issues of today. Drawing upon both Western and Eastern thought, students will examine the writings of philosophers whose ideas have consciously and unconsciously shaped our beliefs on contemporary issues. They will analyze core texts of Descartes, Kant, Mill, Confucius, and others, applying their perspectives to “real world” issues ranging from abortion to stem cell research, school reform to income inequality, campaign financing to capital punishment, the legalization of marijuana to Internet “piracy.” In our media-driven world, strident and polarized voices dominate the airwaves, the Internet, and consequently the ballot box. Aristotelian argumentation, with its focus on defending a single position and refuting all objections, is the dominant model of discourse. We hold that the complex issues of the 21st century require a more nuanced and open discourse reflective of the global and collaborative paradigm of our age; our discussions will therefore be guided by Rogerian principles emphasizing common ground and mutual respect. To foster critical thinking skills, students will learn how to analyze arguments in order to recognize underlying assumptions and logical fallacies. Student work will comprise a variety of projects including traditional assessments, essays, presentations, roundtable discussions, and Socratic Seminars. AP Art History Advanced Placement Art History is an intensive, yearlong course that prepares students for the AP examination. This is a fast-paced survey that begins with the art of the prehistoric era and concludes with the works of Post-Modernism. Students learn to distinguish the stylistic characteristics and analyze the unique historical factors that identify and differentiate the art and architecture of various periods.


Assessments include multiple-choice questions and essay tests, a format geared to AP testing. Students enrolled in the class are required to take the AP exam. Grade Level: 11-12 Prerequisite: Placement Test, Department Approval, and Student Statement of Interest AP Human Geography Offering a broad inquiry into the global condition, Advanced Placement Human Geography seeks to broaden students’ world-view and help them understand the diverse array of cultural, economic, and political spaces that comprise the contemporary world. Because the geographic perspective intersects a range of disciplines, the course includes elements of history, economics, politics, anthropology, demographics, public policy, urban planning, environmental studies, and architecture. As an introduction to the social sciences, human geography relies not only on broad empirical knowledge but also on theories and abstract concepts through which students analyze the world’s peoples, states, and cultures. As a culminating history course, human geography focuses on current events and also explores the trends and patterns that may shape the world of the future. Students enrolled in the class are required to take the AP exam. Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: Placement Test, Department Approval, and Student Statement of Interest


MATHEMATICS Honors Course of Study Honors mathematics courses are intended to provide students with a more challenging curriculum that advances at a faster pace than the standard course. While students are expected to take greater responsibility for their learning, they should also express an advanced level of interest in the subject matter. Placement into honors classes will be based upon student achievement, interest, and work habits, and will be determined by the math department. Integrated Math II: Standard and Honors Integrated Math II further advances student understanding of functions, translations, structures and statistical models. Students will solve linear systems involving multi-variable equations and develop mathematical methods of proof. Students will apply algebra and trigonometry to solve real world problems. In order to investigate current trends and predict future events, students will analyze scatter plots and compute probabilities. Prerequisite: Integrated Math I Integrated Math III: Standard and Honors Students will explore the behavior, connection and application of non-linear functions. With an emphasis on exploration and problem-solving, students will extend their understanding of polynomial functions and quadratic equations. Students will investigate real-world situations as they develop exponential and nonlinear functions to represent real-world scenarios. Students will apply geometric concepts and trigonometric ratios to analyze problems, and they will continue to be explore and expand upon statistics and probability. As students cultivate their understanding of mathematics, they also grow in their ability to use technological tools such as graphing calculators, spreadsheets, dynamic geometry software and presentation software. Prerequisite: Integrated Math II Pre-Calculus: Standard and Honors Pre-Calculus is the bridge between the study of algebra, geometry, and trigonometry to calculus. Students explore topics such as higher order polynomial, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions. Students learn to use the unit circle to see physical relationships in trigonometric functions. The graphing calculator is used regularly to investigate the graphical nature of functions. Concepts are studied through direct instruction as well as collaborative assignments. Real-life applications are incorporated to encourage students as life-long learners of mathematics. In the honors course, students are introduced to calculus concepts including limits, continuity, and derivatives. Prerequisite: Integrated Math III Calculus This course exposes students to the concepts and themes covered in a college calculus class. It covers many of the same material as the AP course at less-intensive pace. Calculus concepts are approached from a graphing, numerical and algebraic perspective to allow students to interpret and verify conclusions. Topics include a review of limits, continuity, derivatives, related rates, optimization, anti-derivatives and volumes of solids. Students develop the ability to create clear, succinct mathematical conclusions and to communicate their thinking. A main focus of the course is to expose students to real-world applications of calculus and its connections to other disciplines Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus Grades 11 and 12 AP Calculus AB This is a rigorous college-level course designed to prepare students for the AP Calculus AB Exam. The course emphasizes a multidimensional method of study with concepts expressed graphically, numerically, analytically and verbally. Topics include limits of functions, continuity as a property of functions, derivatives, techniques and application of anti-differentiation and integrals. Throughout the year students are exposed to a variety of real world applications and explore new concepts within that framework. Students enrolled in the class are required to take the AP exam. Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus Honors or Calculus, Qualifying Grades and Department Approval AP Calculus BC This course reviews and extends the topics that students first encountered in Calculus AB. Students learn advanced techniques and begin working with parametric, polar and vector functions. Applications of integrals are studied and used to model physical, biological, and economic real world scenarios. A significant portion of the course will consist of the study of sequences and series. As time allows, students may also be introduced to more advanced topics in 3-D geometry and multivariable calculus. Students enrolled in the class are expected to take the BC Calculus exam. Prerequisite: AP Calculus AB and Department Approval


SCIENCE Conceptual Physics Conceptual Physics focuses on physics without the higher-level math required of an advanced course. In their study of mechanics and energy, students explore how and why objects move through lab investigations, simulations, and mathematical problem solving. In the second semester, students explore electricity and magnetism as they investigate the attractive and repulsive forces between charged objects, construct simple circuits, and discover the relationship between electric current and magnetic fields. The year ends with an introduction to electromagnetic waves. Throughout the course, students learn and apply mathematical formulas to better understand the physical environment. Grade Level: 9 Physics Honors Physics Honors is an introductory course designed for students who have demonstrated a strong background in science and mathematics. Similar to Conceptual Physics, students study motion, energy, electricity, magnetism, waves, and optics. The course employs advanced mathematics in addition to handson activities, laboratory exercises, and projects to balance the conceptual understanding of common physics principles with a more rigorous analysis of the concepts. As an honors course, material will be covered at a faster pace and in greater depth than in Conceptual Physics. Grade Level: 9 Prerequisite: Algebra 1 or Integrated Math I, Placement Test, and Department Approval Chemistry Chemistry is a full-year, laboratory-based course in which students study the properties of matter using their prior knowledge of physics as a basis. Students also learn about the nature of the atom and how elements react and bond. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, conservation of matter, moles, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, gas laws, solutions, organic chemistry, and an introduction to biochemistry. Material covered in class is complemented with weekly laboratory experiments and lab reports that require analysis and critical thinking. Students also explore real-life applications of chemistry through various interdisciplinary projects. Grade Level: 10 Prerequisite: Conceptual Physics or Physics Honors Chemistry Honors Chemistry Honors is an in-depth, laboratory-based course in which students integrate their prior knowledge of physics in learning about atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, conservation of matter, moles, gases and their properties, acids and bases, solutions, and organic chemistry. The course focuses on developing problem-solving skills from both a quantitative and a qualitative perspective. Students complete weekly lab activities and learn to critically analyze data and communicate results in formal lab reports. This course moves at a faster pace, uses mathematics more extensively, and delves more deeply into each topic than regular Chemistry. Grade Level: 10 Prerequisite: Conceptual Physics or Physics Honors, Placement Test, and Department Approval Biology Biology is a laboratory-based science course that builds upon the foundation laid in chemistry and extends that understanding to the unique properties of all living organisms. Students learn about the cell and biochemical reactions occurring within it. Other topics include genetics and the processes leading to new life, the diversity of life and the processes that have caused all life forms to evolve over time. Human organ systems are also a feature of discussion. During laboratories, students are asked to solve problems utilizing technology, experimental design and critical thinking skills. Emphasis is placed on the students’ ability to develop their own methods for data collection and analysis in the process of scientific investigation. Grade Level: 11 & 12 Prerequisite: Chemistry or Chemistry Honors Biology Honors Biology Honors is an in-depth, systematic approach to the study of living organisms that applies students’ grasp of chemistry to this rapidly expanding field. As an honors level course, study is accelerated to address textual content along with current research and development. The major topics covered are biochemistry, dynamics of the cell, continuity of life (genetics and hereditary patterns), the history and biodiversity of life, classification, human biology, and ecology. In all areas of the course the students are challenged to question many of the theoretical aspects of biology and to critically argue their perspective with regard to topics such as stem cell research, eugenics, and other issues that bring science into the cultural and political arena. Grade Level: 11 & 12 Prerequisites: Chemistry or Chemistry Honors, Placement Test and Department Approval


Research in Science Honors I Students in this project-based course will have the opportunity to utilize cutting edge technology to design and implement an original scientific study with a focus on molecular biology, chemistry, or biochemistry. During the first semester, instruction will provide the background necessary to prepare students for their lab experiences; lab activities will teach students how to implement the technology; guest lectures from science professionals will give students perspectives on how and where the techniques and technologies can be applied in the field of science; and, students will learn to read scientific articles and conduct literature reviews. By the end of the first semester, students will formulate an original research proposal. During the second semester, students will utilize the learned skills to design and implement their original study, write a research paper describing their study, and present their findings to the community at the school-sponsored Independent Research Symposium. Grade Level: 11 & 12 Prerequisite: Department Approval Research in Science Honors II This course is a continuation of Honors Research in Science I and is designed for students who wish to continue work on their previous research project or design a new project for individual lab-based study in the areas of chemistry, biology, biochemistry, or engineering. Students will begin the year by creating a refined original research proposal. They will spend the remainder of the year working in the lab, collaborating with teachers and professional mentors, and presenting their work to a variety of audiences. Students will further develop their ability to analyze and critique scientific literature during periodic student-led literature discussions and showcase their findings to the community at the school sponsored Student STEM Symposium. Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: Department Approval Advanced Topics in Physics In this course students will explore advanced topics in physics from the perspectives of history, experimental technique, and theoretical and modern physics. First, students will look at physics through the lens of history, exploring the discovery of each subfield and contributions of famous physicists. In the laboratory, students will explore the experimental techniques used by those physicists at that point in time. The second perspective will focus on experimentation through inquiry and graphical, algebraic and statistical methods of data analysis. Lastly, students will investigate topics in theoretical and modern physics, including particle physics, quantum mechanics, relativity, and grand unifying theories, such as string theory. Grade Level: 11 & 12 Prerequisite: Precalculus (A- or above) or Honors Precalculus (B or above) AND Physics (A- or above) or Honors Physics (B or above) Advanced Topics in Engineering Physics In this project-based course, students will learn and apply physical principles to solve a variety of engineering problems. Topics include mechanisms and machines, sound and audio, energy, optics, flight, dynamic systems, pressure, heat and introductory thermodynamics. Possible project topics may include lasers, catapults, and aircraft wing design. In addition to assigned design challenges, students will have the opportunity to explore an in-depth project of their own choosing which they may present and showcase at the Student STEM Symposium in the Spring. Prerequisites: Precalculus (A- or above) or Honors Precalculus (B or above) AND Physics (A- or above) or Honors Physics (B or above) Environmental Science This project-based course integrates concepts from chemistry, biology, geology, sociology, political science, and geography to explore natural relationships and analyze environmental problems. Topics include environmental ethics and policy, human population dynamics, environmental systems and ecology, environmental quality, global changes and the impact on the environment. Students complete in-depth projects in which they design solutions for environmental problems, analyze their effectiveness, and may share their findings at the school-sponsored Student STEM Symposium in the Spring. Grade Level: 11 & 12 Prerequisites: Chemistry Systems Biology and Disease This year long course takes a systems-based approach to the study of anatomy and physiology of the human body. Disease states and homeostatic imbalance are investigated through laboratory activities, lecture, critical thinking exercises and discovery methods of learning. This course will include several technology-based independent projects as well as animal dissection as a means to learn body structure and function in health and disease states. Grade Level: 11 & 12 Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry


ELECTIVES Engineering and Design In this elective course students will explore the basic principles of engineering, design, and computer programming through a series of individual challenges and group projects. All students will learn general engineering methods including problem solving, design thinking, project management and design communication. Students will also learn prototyping techniques using machine tools, electronic circuits and physical computing. Hands-on projects may include wearable technology, interactive artwork, robots, computer applications, sustainability & efficiency and other challenges in the fields of engineering, design and technology. Students may have the opportunity to present and showcase their projects at the Student STEM Symposium in the Spring. Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisites: Algebra, curiosity, perseverance Introduction to Computer Science In this course students will explore the foundations of computer science and programming through formal instruction and a series of coding challenges culminating in a self-selected final project for a web site or handheld application. The first semester will focus on programming fundamentals, problem decomposition and understanding computer languages. The second semester will cover basic object-oriented concepts and practical applications. Students will deepen and demonstrate their skills through their final projects, which they may choose to share with the community as web sites or downloadable applications. Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisites: None


WORLD LANGUAGES CHINESE Chinese 1 Mandarin Chinese I is designed for students with no or little experience in Chinese language. The class will engage students with songs, videos, and cultural projects. It will provide a level of comfort in speaking, listening, reading and writing basic Chinese. Student will learn the basic communication skills necessary for everyday life in China. This course covers many topics including: self-introduction, family, sports, food and Chinese culture. Chinese I students will learn more than 300 characters along with basic vocabulary and essential grammar to help them to advance their reading and writing skills. Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: Departmental Approval Chinese 4 This class is designed to give students the tools necessary to function in a Mandarin language environment. While students will acquire knowledge and training in the 4 major areas of language learning (listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing), the course will pay particular attention to listening and speaking. The class assumes that enrolled students have familiarized themselves with introductory and intermediate levels of Mandarin and are ready to build upon this foundation with increasingly complex vocabulary and grammatical patterns. Students continue to deepen their understanding of the Mandarin Chinese sound system, character writing, and cultural aspects of various Chinese-speaking communities. Additionally, this course continues to develop students’ written expression and reading comprehension. Students will construct essays and other written work, allowing them to demonstrate their skills in both written and spoken communication. In addition, students will read essays, newspapers, and excerpts from Chinese texts to hone their analytical reading abilities. Grade Level: 11-12 Prerequisite: Advanced Chinese 2 Senior Seminar: Chinese Language and Culture This course is designed as the capstone course in a student’s linguistic and cultural training in Chinese. It is comprised of components that seek to maximize a student’s exposure to advanced linguistic elements and transmit an even deeper understanding of Chinese culture. Like the language training classes that students have taken previous to the senior seminar, students will continue their effort to acquire knowledge and skill in the 4 major areas of language learning: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. However, in addition to demanding students to develop an advanced ability in spoken Mandarin, this course will also teach many of the fundamental issues associated with written Chinese expression. The course will require students to acquire a high level of sophistication in written communication and fluency of reading comprehension. To this end, students will be exposed to reading essays and composing their own works, delving into current events through newspaper articles, and becoming familiar with major works of literature through short stories and other works, including poetry. In addition to the rigorous training that students will receive through their reading of literary works, students will also experience the rich cultural heritage of traditional and modern Chinese culture supplied through theses texts. Grade Level:12 Prerequisite: Advanced Chinese 3 FRENCH French 1 Students are introduced to the fundamentals of the French language by speaking, listening, reading, and writing within the context of meaningful real-life situations. By the end of the course, students are able to communicate about themselves, their families and communities, and preferred activities. Students can effectively pose and answer questions, tell time, talk about the weather, and engage in daily activities such as dining out, cooking, or completing a commercial transaction. They are further able to narrate in the past and near future using simple and compound tenses. A special unit on phonetics boosts their confidence with pronunciation. Students also write and perform in skits, listen to popular music, learn about French cuisine, and read short texts from contemporary Francophone cultures. Students may have the opportunity to have a French “pen pal.” Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: None French 2 Students in this course are challenged to move beyond the basics of the language and realize their potential for mature expression in a foreign language. Written and oral skills are significantly boosted this year. After a thorough review of basic language tools, the class introduces students to grammar required of the intermediate level of study, including the passé composé, imperfect tense, and the full suite of object


pronouns. Authentic cultural texts (poetry, music, film) and project-based assessments complement the curriculum. Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: Essentials of French (US) or Essentials of French A & B or Recommendation of Department French 3: Standard and Honors At this level, students continue to improve their oral and written skills and to deepen their knowledge of the French and francophone culture. Great emphasis is placed on building reading skills and expanding vocabulary by introducing a variety of linguistically appropriate pieces, including Le Petit Prince. In addition, the class focuses on developing longer, more complex conversational exchanges in French. Throughout the course, students are given the opportunity to significantly expand their grammatical knowledge, particularly in the areas of past, future, and hypothetical narration. Authentic cultural texts (readings, music, film) and project-based assessments complement the curriculum. In the honors course, students will learn the material at an accelerated pace and in greater depth of study. Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: Intermediate French and Recommendation of Department for Honors French 4: Standard and Honors Students deepen their linguistic competence by speaking and writing in multiple tenses and moods while exploring the diversity of the French-speaking world. Grammatical structures and functions are reviewed and practiced through a range of context-based activities. Students continue to improve their understanding and to respond to authentic contemporary texts and spoken language drawn from a variety of target-language sources, such as magazines, newspapers, film shorts, and novels, including the classic Le Petit Prince. Grade Level: 10-12 Prerequisite: Advanced French Composition and Conversation and Recommendation of Department for Honors AP French Language Mediated exclusively through authentic resources destined for native French speakers, this course covers the equivalent of a third-year college course in Advanced French. Organized around six major themes of contemporary society, including Global Challenges, Art and Aesthetics, and Family & Community, the course emphasizes the use of French for active communication by synthesizing authentic sources of different media. In so doing, students refine their comprehension when listening and reading, and practice writing and speaking in both formal and informal modes. Throughout the year, students are trained to engage in complex expression using a range of vocabulary, sophisticated language structures and multiple time references, and ultimately appreciate the nuances of French expression. Upon completion of this course, students are able to comprehend formal and informal spoken French, read French newspapers, magazines and modern literature with ease, compose coherently and accurately on a wide range of factual and imaginative topics and clearly and fluently express ideas. Students enrolled in this course are expected to participate entirely in French and are required to take the AP exam. Grade Level: 11 & 12 Prerequisite: Advanced French Language and Literature and Recommendation of Department Senior Seminar in French Designed as the culminating linguistic and cultural course in the French sequence, each semester the Senior Seminar in French will delve into a particular theme to be decided upon by the instructor in consultation with the students. Resources will include film and literature, while opportunities for extended conversation and research will be complemented by targeted review of grammar. Themes may range from French food in film to the impact of French colonialism to the subversive power of works by francophone women writers. Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: Advanced French Language and Literature; or Advanced French Composition and Conversation and Recommendation of Department SPANISH Spanish 1 Students develop the skills to communicate in various real-life situations in Spanish. By the end of the course, students convey detailed personal information including physical descriptions, daily routines, likes and dislikes, and genealogy. Students can effectively answer questions, tell time, talk about the weather, order a meal, and give directions. Students contextualize the language by writing situational dialogues and by reading advertisements and other realia. Students experience Mexican culture through their study of and contributions to the “Day of the Dead� altar. Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: None


Spanish 2: Standard and Honors Students in this course are challenged to move beyond the basics of the language and realize their potential for mature expression in a foreign language. Their written and oral skills are significantly boosted this year. After a thorough review of basic language tools, the class introduces students to grammar required of the intermediate level of study, including reflexive verbs, object pronouns as well as the preterite and imperfect tenses. Authentic materials and project-based assessments complement the curriculum. Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: Essentials of Spanish (US) or Essentials of Spanish A & B or Recommendation of Department Spanish 3: Standard and Honors Students in this course will continue to expand their grammatical knowledge of the language while improving their oral and written skills through regular practice. The introduction and integration of the subjunctive mood into students’ grammatical toolkit will enable them to handle increasingly challenging assignments. Additional emphasis is placed on students’ reading skills and expanding their vocabulary by introducing a variety of linguistically appropriate pieces, including at least one novella. Authentic cultural texts (readings, music, film) and project-based assessments complement the curriculum. Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: Intermediate Spanish or Recommendation of Department Spanish 4: Standard and Honors Students will continue to use language in a variety of situations with ever-increasing linguistic accuracy. Through literary readings, music, and film they will develop insights into their own language and culture as they make cultural comparisons with Spanish-speaking people and their culture. Students will be able to discuss a wide variety of cultural topics with a native speaker, discuss politics, and explore how they influence the larger community. They will continue to develop sensitivity to the cultural and linguistic heritage of other groups, to understand their influence on American culture, and to prepare oneself to participate in a society characterized by linguistic and cultural diversity. Grade Level: 10-12 Prerequisite: Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation or Recommendation of Department AP Spanish Language AP Spanish Language students, selected for their achievement in the prerequisite courses, work intensively on mastering the language. While an overall review of verb tenses and other grammatical nuances is interspersed throughout the course, entering students express themselves confidently in the past, present, future, and hypothetical. Literature and films increase exposure to colloquial usage and idioms to raise the level of sophistication of expression. Students respond to a variety of written cues in a range of formats including poetry, short original fiction, and the five paragraph expository essay. While the focus of the class is personal expression, special attention is paid to the format of the AP exam, including in-class writing, multiple choice, fill in the blank, and voice recordings. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP exam. Grade Level: 11 & 12 Prerequisite: Advanced Spanish Language and Literature, Placement Test, and Recommendation of Department SENIOR SEMINARS IN SPANISH – SEMESTER OFFERINGS Designed as the culminating linguistic and cultural course in the Spanish sequence, each semester the Senior Seminar in Spanish will delve into a particular theme to be decided upon by the instructor. Senior Seminar in Spanish: Culture in Context (Spring) This one-semester course will examine a selection of cultural topics that illuminate Hispanic and Latino life throughout the Spanish-speaking world. Through in depth analysis and research-based projects, students will explore and discuss representative aspects of the culture. Students’ understanding will be enhanced through a variety of interactive lessons relating to cultural traditions, entertainment, artistic expression, and current events. The course will be conducted primarily in Spanish. Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: Advanced Spanish Language and Literature and Recommendation of Department Senior Seminar in Spanish: Conversation (Fall) This one-semester conversation course will provide students diverse opportunities to improve their speaking skills, particularly for the purposes of travel and informal, everyday interaction with peers and community members. Students will improve their fluency and add colloquial expression to their vocabularies as they practice conversing in a variety of contexts. This course will also include several projects and opportunities


for community service and broader engagement in the Spanish-speaking communities of Los Angeles. The course will be conducted entirely in Spanish. Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: Advanced Spanish Language and Literature and Recommendation of Department


FITNESS & WELLNESS The Fitness & Wellness curriculum challenges students to pursue their personal fitness goals through physical activities and sports experiences. The emphasis in the Upper School program moves away from traditional sports and toward personal fitness for lifelong health and wellness. Students may be exempt from Fitness & Wellness class during their season of play on an Archer Junior Varsity or Varsity athletic team. Students may also receive fitness credit by participating in the Upper School Archer Dance classes (see the Dance section for course descriptions). th

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9 – 12 Grade Fitness Students in upper school Fitness choose between the following sections: Fitness Training, Sports & Games, and Strength & Stretch. Fitness Training: The students spend the majority of class time in the fitness room and are introduced to the basics of designing individual fitness plans. The girls will learn proper techniques and forms of free weight training, resistance training, and cardio machines (Treadmills, Elliptical machines, stationary bikes and Stairmasters). The skeletal and muscular systems are discussed as they relate to movement and exercise in both weight training and cardiovascular activities. In this course, the girls will also spend part of their time outside participating in general sports games as well as yoga. Sports and Games: In this section the students will spend the majority of their class time outside playing traditional and non-traditional games such as flag football, ultimate Frisbee, basketball, soccer, floor hockey, golf, softball, and volleyball. This class will be less focused on skill development than the middle school sports sections and more focused on playing actual games. During this section girls will also spend a portion of each class focusing on improving cardiovascular and muscular strength. Strength & Stretch: This section combines yoga, Pilates, and TRX suspension training. Students will learn breathing and relaxation techniques as well as body weight exercises to help calm and focus the mind. Students will enjoy a centered, strong, healthy body, and a quiet mind. Human Development 9 Ninth grade is a year of transition, emerging autonomy, and understanding of self. Students face challenges academically, socially, physically and emotionally. Students learn skills to help manage and reduce stress by learning and practicing various mindfulness techniques. Drug education is also a major focus which helps girls further understand the issues surrounding legal and illegal drugs, their affects on the body, and how to make informed decisions. Human sexuality and sex education are addressed in the context of personal hygiene, sexually transmitted infections and different forms of birth control. Discussions focus on emotional intimacy, gender identity, body image, healthy and unhealthy relationships, and informed decision making. Grade Level: 9 Human Development 10 Tenth grade is a year of increased autonomy and responsibility. This class will use Council as the primary method to explore topics of dealing with change and stressful situations, conflict resolution, friendship and love, sexuality and body image. Students will participate in a rape prevention workshop as well as a drug education seminar as it relates to strategies of care for self and for others. Grade Level: 10 Human Development 12 Twelfth grade marks the transition from high school to college, increased independence, rites of passage and the culmination of the girls’ education at Archer. Students will reflect back on the community in which they have evolved and grown over the past four years. They will revisit topics of human sexuality, healthy relationships and taking care of themselves physically and psychologically as they move into the college culture. Topics will include campus safety, roommates, stress management, money management, dating/party safety and dealing with transitions. Saying good-bye is an important rite of passage in the transition from the high school stage to the college years. Grade Level: 12 Semester Two


COLLEGE GUIDANCE College Guidance 11 The junior-year College Guidance course eases juniors into the college search process. The first part of the fall term is spent familiarizing students with college terms and terminology and standardized testing. During the fall, students are required to attend a minimum of three college representative visits at Archer. They use this experience along with research on college search engines to complete a research project, which culminates with a 5-7 minute presentation on one college or university. In the spring semester, students fill out sections of the Common Application, write their resumes, hear advice from seniors, learn what to do when visiting colleges, discuss application cases (in order to prepare for the Renegade Case Studies Program) and plan their summers. Grade Level: 11 College Guidance 12 The seniors’ College Guidance course is a semester-long class in which students participate in a case study exercise and discuss college essays, interviews, and applications. Students also develop a calendar for college application activities, work on their online college applications, and begin to prepare for their lives beyond high school. Grade Level: 12 Semester One

ARTS PERFORMING ARTS Upper School Dance Performance Company I Dance Performance Company I is designed for the dedicated dancer who is interested in continuing to develop performance and choreography skills in different dance styles. Visiting expert teachers will be invited to teach technique classes in ballet, contemporary and jazz. In class journal writing, videos, and dance articles are components for developing creative and critical thinking skills for exploring dance aesthetics, dance history, dance criticism and dance production. The students are expected to perform in the annual Night of Dance and various other dance presentations. Pre-requisite: By permission of instructor or audition. Enrollment limited to 16 Upper School Dance Performance Company II Only advanced dancers who are serious, motivated and committed to developing technical, performance and choreography skills are encouraged to enroll. Students are required to perform for various school events including the annual Night of dance. Faculty and guest choreographers will be invited to create repertoire for the company to perform at the annual Night of Dance. Prerequisite: By permission of instructor Enrollment limited to 16 Contemporary Dance Contemporary Dance is a year long elective for the upper school student with some prior dance training who has a desire to expand technical and performance dance skills in the contemporary styles of modern, jazz, and hip hop. This course will focus on the creative and independent development of the dancer. Students will explore dance terminology, history and aesthetics of the art of dance. Experiencing the elements of dance through improvisation, choreography and performance, the student can discover their unique creative and expressive voice. Visiting guest choreographers will create original dance repertoire for the Night of Dance, in which the student is required to participate. Prerequisite – None Maximum number of students: 14 Advanced Study in Dance This course allows a student to continue in dance company and expand their skill and performance level. Prerequisite: Dance Company 1 and 2 and permission of instructor Orchestra (after school) Musicians in the Upper School Orchestra gain experience in ensemble playing and performance. Students foster their musicianship as they explore a variety of orchestral repertoire. By working with other students in an ensemble setting, instrumentalists develop the language of music, work to build their playing technique (tone production, intonation, style, and ensemble blend), while sharing the same rewarding goal of preparing a performance. Students are required to perform in the annual Winter and Spring Concerts. Other performances include school events, including an open house performance, Night of the Arts and a spring


music festival. The Upper School Orchestra is offered after school once a week, plus extra rehearsals during tech weeks. Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: By Audition Choir (after school) The Upper School Choir is a talented group of chamber singers. Techniques studied include breathing, intonation, ensemble blend as well as vocal health and strength. Students are required to perform in the annual Winter and Spring concerts, as well as various school events, assemblies, music festivals and competitions and Night of the Arts. The Upper School Choir is offered after school twice a week, plus extra rehearsals during tech weeks. Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: None Enrollment limited to 12 Theatre Introduction: Improvisation, Acting and Performance This course will explore acting, improv comedy, makeup design, and stage combat. Students learn improvisation skills through ensemble theatre games. In acting, students learn basic scene and monologue technique, and practice audition techniques. The course will explore modern, classical, and film acting through scenes and camera work. They will apply straight, old age, and special effects theatrical makeup and create their own makeup design for a character. Students choreograph their own stage combat fights with a professional stage combat guest artist. Through this hands-on course, students experience and develop an interest in theatre arts and learn to work as a creative ensemble. Grade Level: 9-12 Enrollment limited to 16 Advanced Acting Technique In Advanced Acting, students explore acting styles, practice audition techniques and learn on camera acting technique for film. This class will begin with a series of Uta Hagen’s object exercises. Students will explore different acting techniques from sense memory to Meisner work with different guest artists. Students will also have the opportunity to work on a mock audition with a casting agent. Grade level: 10-12 Prerequisite: Previous Theatre class or by special permission from the instructor Enrollment limited to 16 Directing for Stage This course is designed for students with experience in drama or film that are interested in developing theatrical productions of their own. The course emphasizes the working relationship between actor, director, and playwright, and investigates the fundamental skills a director needs to work with actors and designers. The course is very active, allowing students to observe, direct, design and perform. Prerequisite: Previous Theatre or film class or by special permission from the instructor Enrollment limited to 16 Music Creation and Recording Lab The Music Lab nurtures students in the creation and development of their own musical style. This interactive class introduces students to the basic foundations of music and technology, including sound properties, synthesis, and recording and mixing techniques for both live and recorded applications. Students will also be given the chance to professionally record their music through the mentoring of industry professionals. Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: None Maximum number of students: 10 VISUAL AND MEDIA ARTS Introduction to Filmmaking This course is designed to provide an overview and introduction to the four most basic phases of filmmaking: development, pre-production, production, and post-production. Students will gain an introduction to film theory, editing techniques (Final Cut Pro), shot composition, and screenwriting. The curriculum is designed to direct the student through the film making process from the concept of the story line to exhibition of the final product. Projects include short films, music videos, commercials, public service announcements and broadcast segments. Prerequisite: None Enrollment limited to 12


Advanced Filmmaking This course is dedicated to developing and nurturing the voice and vision of the budding filmmaker. Students will learn advanced animation and editing techniques (Adobe After Effects and Flash), apply critical theory to film analysis, analyze and deconstruct film genres, and develop and produce independent film projects. The students in the advanced filmmaking class will also plan, produce, and serve as the executive producers of the Archer student film festival. Prerequisite: Introduction to Filmmaking Enrollment limited to 12 Introduction to Ceramics This class introduces students to the art of clay. It includes throwing on the wheel, hand-building and sculptural projects. Students master the basic cylinder form on the wheel and use their skills to create cups, vases, bowls and other functional forms. Sculptural projects are pursued with hand-building techniques such as slabs and modeling and combining them with wheel thrown forms. High fire clay and glazes allow the students to learn a variety of surface decoration techniques and glazing. The students learn to create personally expressive pieces and are encouraged to develop visual narratives both in the forms and surfaces of their projects. Grade Level: 9-12 Enrollment limited to 14 Advanced Ceramics This class builds on the throwing, hand-building and glazing skills previously introduced. The students learn advanced and compound forms, such as lidded jars, teapots and footed bowls, on the potter’s wheel. Working with stoneware clay and high fire glazes, students will experiment with advanced surface decoration and explore glazes in more depth. They will test and use their own glaze combinations. They will be challenged with visual problem solving and encouraged to develop independent projects of their own design, beginning with sketches and carrying them to completion through forming, glazing and firing. Grade Level: 10-12 Prerequisite: Ceramics: Introduction Enrollment limited to 14 Studio Art Students will be introduced to the visual arts through a variety of projects providing an overview of basic fine art practices. Drawing (landscape and figurative), sculpture, mono printing, collage, and fashion design will be incorporated and explored during this course. Students will keep a record of their individual ideas by keeping a sketchbook recording their skills and creations. Grade Level: 9-12 Enrollment limited to 16 Intermediate Studio Art Students will work in a multitude of mediums including: drawing, painting, printmaking, 3-D design, photography, video, collage, sculpture, and digital imaging and printing. Students will create multimedia projects utilizing multiple skills. The class will work on observational drawing including, still life, perspective, and from a live model. The class will study both historically important works and movements as well as contemporary work and trends. Students will learn the basic foundations of art while at the same time create personal work based on their lives. Grade Level: 10-12 Prerequisite: Intro to Studio Art or Departmental Approval Maximum number of students: 12 Portfolio: Advanced Art Portfolio expands upon the skills addressed in Studio Art. Students will be encouraged to investigate areas of drawing, painting, mixed media, collage and sculpture. For the student who would like to begin or continue developing a portfolio to be used as part of their college application, this class will individualize student art projects to match college requirements. Emphasis will be placed on individual needs. Grade Level: 10-12 Prerequisite Studio Art or Department Approval Enrollment limited to 16 AP Studio Art The AP Studio Art portfolios are designed for students who are interested in the practical experience of art. AP studio is not based on a written exam; instead, students submit portfolios for evaluation at the end of the school year. The AP studio program consists of 3 portfolios - 2-D design, 3-D design and drawing, corresponding to the most common college foundation courses. This College Board program provides the


only national standard for performance in the visual arts that allows students to earn college credit and/or advanced placement while still in high school. Prerequisite: Studio Art or Departmental Approval Enrollment limited to 16 Gallery Management and Design planning and preparation to docent education, students will learn all aspects of what it takes to run an art gallery. Specific topics will include: choosing the artist, documenting the process of each show, marketing, staffing, and docent training. Students in the class will interact with and learn from artists, gallery owners, and other art professionals. They will apply their learning by designing and managing each show at The Eastern Star Gallery. Grade Level: 9-12 Enrollment limited to 14 Photography: Introduction This course is the start of exploration into the world of image production using black and white film, paper, and the dark room. Students are instructed in how to use a 35mm single lens reflex camera, black and white condenser enlarger, and related darkroom equipment. Through a series of assignments, students become familiar with the technical aspects of photography as their artistic expression and sense of composition are discovered. As their confidence grows, students discover that their thoughts and ideas can be expressed with the medium of black and white photography. Grade Level: 9-12 Enrollment limited to 15 Contemporary Practices in Photography How can I make a sculpture made entirely of photographs? What would happen if I poured paint on my photograph? What if I wanted to make a drawing with chocolate sauce and then photograph it? How do I make a photograph that exerts noise? How does one go about making an interactive photograph? This course will be an intermediate/advanced course that will investigate and experiment with the multitude of practices employed by contemporary photographers. Students will question how photography connects to sculpture, painting, writing, film and new media. We will be studying current trends in contemporary photography and incorporate these trends into projects completed in class. Students will be have to think “outside the box� for this course- pushing the limit of what photography is capable of. Grade Level: 10-12 Prerequisite: Introduction to Photography or Departmental Approval Maximum Number of students: 15 Advanced Study in Ceramics, Photography, Drawing or Painting This course allows a student the opportunity to pursue advanced work in a media of their choice. The course is developed with the instructor and culminates in a show supported by a written artist’s statement. The student must have completed all the available options already offered in the media and have permission of the instructor. Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor Graphic Design The skills of a graphic designer are a highly prized asset in any enterprise, and these skills are readily applicable in just about any field. This course teaches students the core concepts of graphic design by developing their fluency in the language of design and their familiarity with the tools used in the latest design software (specifically Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign). Fun, challenging, and engaging projects (using imaginative prompts to design movie posters, album covers, book jackets, game boards & pieces, logos, web pages, products, etc.) will reinforce the fundamental ideas of design while fostering a new passion for design and greater confidence in the students' own abilities to create memorable art. Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: None Maximum number of students: 12 Advanced Study in Visual/Media Arts This course allows a student the opportunity to pursue advanced work in Visual art or film. The student must have completed all the available options already offered in the media and have permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: Advanced Photography and Contemporary Practices in Photography, or Advanced Film, or Advanced Ceramics, or AP Studio Art and Department approval Media Tech: Yearbook Curious, creative and dedicated students who are, or would like to be, intimately involved in their school community are perfect fits for this full-year elective. Staff members take and edit photographs, write text,


conduct interviews, and design page layouts to document student life in the annual yearbook. Two publishing programs: In Design and Photoshop are used to create the book, and Google docs are utilized to track pages, assignments and tribute contributions. Students will work both individually and as a team to meet deadlines and make sure that as much of the school culture as possible in depicted in the final product. Students are challenged at their own level; as a result, those who have mastered basic skills have the opportunity to take on leadership roles and increase their writing, design work, and editing. Grade Level: 9-12 Combined enrollment with the advanced course limited to 16 students. Media Tech Advanced: Yearbook This full-year elective is for committed, experienced Yearbook members The primary foci of this course are implementing the Yearbook’s theme, creating the book’s “ladder”, scheduling photo shoots and interviews, as well as directing and honing other members’ input. Working closely with the section editors and faculty advisors, the course requires editors to mentor new students, teaching them page design, manipulation of digital images, use of color and fonts, layouts, writing and creating and selling the ever important tributes section of the book. The course requires some Saturday meetings and attendance at a three to four-day summer camp. Grade Level: 11 & 12 Prerequisite: Yearbook and Department approval Combined enrollment with the introductory course limited to 16 students. ADDITIONAL ELECTIVE COURSES Independent Study The Independent Study Program provides motivated students in grades 11 and 12 the opportunity to pursue a course of study in addition to their required curricula and in accordance with their unique interests. Studies may involve a broad range of subject matter, and are purposefully open to a wide array of options. Primarily, interested students should expect to assume responsibility for organizing and completing material comparable in scope and depth to a single, year-long, core class. The Independent Study as an added requirement to a student’s schedule; it is not a substitute for a requirement, and students must plan their time accordingly throughout the year. To assist them, each Independent Study must involve a faculty advisor to guide the student in reaching her goals over the course of the year. All Independent Study courses must also involve research integrated into critical writing, though the length and scope of those requirements may vary. Grade Level: 11-12 Prerequisite: Application and Approval from Independent Study Coordinator and Upper School Director


OUTDOOR EDUCATION Archer’s Experiential Education Program supports the school’s mission by offering opportunities for students to embrace possibility, seek challenges, and take healthy risks. The essential components of the program are Fall Outing and Arrow Week. Arrow Week is an outdoor experience that promotes self-discovery and personal growth. Trips serve to enhance the curriculum by providing students with opportunities to learn valuable skills outside of the classroom. Through participation in outdoor education trips, students will: • • • • •

Learn how to assume leadership in cooperative group settings Discover personal strengths and overcome challenges Gain an appreciation and respect for the outdoors and natural environment Enhance their ability to reflect and grow as critical thinkers Apply knowledge and skills to real world situations

COMMUNITY SERVICE The mission of Archer's Community Service program is to inspire students to become involved, compassionate citizens. Students actively engage in community service to meet an annual requirement of hours. The number of hours is dependent on grade level. More than simply challenging students to get involved, Archer provides opportunities for students to perform community service through school wide projects and after school activities. They also may join the Community Service Board to take part in the planning and promotion of all-school service activities. Students are encouraged to explore the meaning of their service experiences during group discussions in advisory and class meetings. Along with providing documentation of the service hours they complete, students also submit a written reflection of the service they perform. These annual reflections become part of a portfolio collected for each student. Hours Required: 9th Grade – 15 hours 10th - 12th Grade – 20 hours each year


Archer Course Catalog (2014-2015)