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The Maiden's Tower (Turkish: K覺z Kulesi), also known in the ancient Greek and medieval Byzantine periods as Leander's Tower, sits on a small islet located at the southern entrance of Bosphorus strait 200 m off the coast of Uskudar in Istanbul, Turkey.Maiden's Tower was first built by the ancient Athenian general Alcibiades in 408 BC to control the movements of the Persian ships in the Bosphorus.Used as a lighthouse for centuries, the interior of the tower has been transformed into a popular caf矇 and restaurant, with an excellent view of the former Roman, Byzantine and Ottoman capital.

MOSQUE-CHURCH-SYNAGOGUE ...The city unites religions...


Topkap覺 Palace was built in 1478.It was used as a palace for Ottoman Empires for 380 years. Topkap覺 Palace is a world heritage on the UNESCO list. It was built as four pieces of central courtyards that include the other small buildings.


The Basilica Cistern is the largest of several hundred ancient cisterns that lie beneath the city of Istanbul (formerly Constantinople), stantinople), Turkey. Turkey. The cistern, located 500 feet southwest of the Hagia Sophia on the historical peninsula of Sarayburnu, Sarayburnu, was built in the 6th century during the reign of Byzantine Emperor Justinian I.


The Galata Tower is a very historical,famous tower in Istanbul.It was made by Byzantium emporer Anastasius in 507.The first name of the tower was ''Lighthouse Tower''. In 1348 The tower was rebuilt with the pile stone and named ''Christ Tower''. In 17 century Hezarfen Ahmet Çelebi put wooden wings to his arms and flew from Galata Tower to Galata province. If you view over the Galata Tower you can easily see the Golden Horn, the Marmara sea,Eminönü province and Üsküdar. Today the Galata Tower is used as a touristic place and restaurant.

It was built near the Hagia Sophia, over the site of the ancient hippodrome. Construction work began in 1609 and took seven years. The original mosque complex included a madrasa, a hospital, a han, a primary school, a market, an imaret and the tomb of the founder. One of the most notable features of the Blue Mosque is visible from far away. Inside, the high ceiling is lined with the 21,043 blue tiles that give the mosque its popular name. Fine examples of 16th-century Iznik design, the oldest tiles feature flowers, trees and abstract patterns. The overall effect is one of the most beautiful sights in Istanbul. The interior is lit with 260 windows, which were once filled with 17th-century stained glass.


Istanbul