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“This year’s Tevis was an incredible experience and probably the most fun and amazing race of my life.”

Tevis cup

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100-mile Endurance Race

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story by Genie Stewart-Spears photos by Lynne Glazer, Ron Osborn, and Bill Gore

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he 64th Western States 100-Mile Trail Ride, aka Tevis Cup or simply Tevis, started 184 competitors at 5:15 a.m. on August 17. The trail begins at Robie Equestrian Park, near Truckee, California, and takes riders over, around and down many mountains, along narrow trails, in and out of canyons, through rivers, and across bridges in the infamous Sierra Nevada Mountains. It is a challenge for riders and their horses to reach the finish line in Auburn, California, within 24 hours. The competition is just as much, if not more, against the elements as each other. The predawn start is staggered into two groups, or pens as they are called, with the more competitive, faster horses in the first pen. “It allows us to put the faster horses up front because there’s little opportunity to pass in the first 12 miles,” says Ride Director Chuck Stalley.

Since it is based on the horse, not the rider, this means, for example, veteran competitor Heather Reynolds was in the second pen even though she is a highly competitive rider. But being in the second pen didn’t slow her down. Husband and wife endurance riders and trainers, Jeremy and Heather, were both competing. Heather has completed seven times with three wins and two Haggin Cups (best condition); Jeremy has had six completions (all in top ten) with three wins and two Haggin Cups. Heather, who has over 22,000 career miles, was riding ASuddenGift MHF (Sudden Mischief [By Golly] x AER Wiqueen [*Wiking]). Jeremy has over 14,000 miles and was riding RTR Rimfires Etta (RTR Rimfire x PS Sierra Sage) owned by Dublin Hart. But it was Californian Karen Donley and Royal Patron (Monarch AH [*Wiking] x Pink Beaches), the 2016 Tevis Cup

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Top right and bottom: Tevis Cup winner, 18-year-old Sanoma Blakeley, said, “I am just so proud to have been able to ride this amazing athlete, RA Ares Bay, aka Goober, and that he finished so strongly and finally got his moment to shine. He has a hundred percent career completion rate, including four Tevis finishes, a 16th, 5th, and 3rd place, and this year he brought it home with the win. Thanks for everybody who supported us, all the volunteers, everyone who made this ride possible and everybody who sent us positive comments!” Jeremy Reynolds, top left, riding RTR Rimfires Etta (RTR Rimfire x PS Sierra Sage).“I thought I had a really good chance of winning,” said Jeremy, who conceded to second place after a six-mile battle against Sanoma Blakeley. “For the first 10 miles, the mare, owned by Dublin Hart, wasn’t trotting like I thought she should. At that point, I thought we only had a wing and a prayer to top ten. I continued with my normal game plan, running (on foot) in the canyons. Then she pretty much turned it on after Foresthill when we were 45 minutes behind the frontrunners. We started picking some of the riders off. “Then those last six miles Sanoma and I switched the lead back and forth three or four times. My horse didn’t have much left and so when Sanoma asked for trail again, I stayed with her just in case we might have a run off. I got up to the hip of her horse at the finish line but she definitely had the better horse that day.” winners, who took the lead at about 28 miles. Donley was closely challenged by a pack of riders, including siblings Barrak and Sanoma Blakeley, along with Gwen Hall and Lindsay Fisher, to name a few. Donley, on her 17-year-old mare, said later, “We had a great day. I train all year for this ride and to ride the trail at a certain pace. I knew she could repeat her performance of 2016. Given a few changes to the course, we were slightly ahead of pace.” A H W > 25 < 1 0 . 1 9

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At 9:27 pm, after 100 miles of rugged trail, Sanoma Blakeley, right, on RA Ares Bay (Must Bey Dreamin x RBS Aalani Mist) edged Jeremy Reynolds on RTR Rimfires Etta (RTR Rimfire x PS Sierra Sage) at the finish line of the Western States 100-Mile Trail Ride. Blakeley’s course time was 14 hours 12 minutes, and one second later for Reynolds.

Gabriela Blakeley, who was unable to start this year, talked about her Oregon family’s ride plans. “We had really high hopes for Barrak and Sanoma’s horses. They were planning on riding together and competitively. At 55 miles Sanoma’s horse was stronger than Barrak’s so she decided to leave him and go on alone. Wasch’s horse was inexperienced and had never done a race longer than 50 miles so he was just trying to finish this year.” Eighteen-year-old Sanoma, who has 3,555 career miles since 2008, was


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“Ogee was capable of winning the ride,” stated Haley Moquin who completed in third place on Ogee (Okba x Gollys GiGi [By Golly]) in 14 hours 21 minutes. “But,” she admitted, “my lack of experience on the Tevis Trail would be a big factor in whether or not that was possible. “Ogee was being a powerhouse through the canyons,” continued Moquin, who calls Texas home. “She naturally trots at 11 mph and is always asking to go faster. She was a beast as we cantered on ledges and up the hills alongside Jeremy, Heather, Sanoma, and Richard. Those last 15 miles seemed like the fastest pace in the entire race. Everyone was flying down the trails. I never have to ask her to go faster or check her so that she doesn’t go too fast. This made for an easy hundred!” And, Moquin added, “I am forever grateful to the Lemmons family for providing me with a horse that was more than ready and being there with me every step of the race. They made my first hundred-miler one to remember and treated me as a part of their own family. I can’t thank them enough for this experience. I am officially hooked on Tevis and hope to be there in 2020!”

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riding RA Ares Bey (Must Bey Dreamin x RBS Aalani Mist). Her brother, 20-year-old Barrak, with 4,275 miles since 2007, was on OMR Quicksan (OMR John Henry [RD Five Star] x Sansational Lady [Sanskrit]). (Last year, Wasch rode RA Ares Bey to third place and Barrak rode OMR Quicksan to fifth place.) This year Wasch, with 5,690 miles since 2004, was on up and coming Skywalker SF (*Sir Fames HBV x Pskyla). With 3,040 career miles, Gwen Hall, riding Sizedoesntmatter (Line Dancer

[Burning Sand] x Contemporary You [*Wiking]), better known as Dakar, says, “We started our training for this year’s Tevis last winter and felt we could go for a shot at the win this year.” Hall, from Colorado, and Dakar finished in fourth place in 2014 and second place in 2015. She and Dakar had 2,150 miles together coming into this event and make a formable team. There are a number of places along the course where horses are viewed by veterinarians, besides the two vet checks with one-hour mandatory holds, either as they

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trotted by or at a Gate & Go checkpoint. A Gate & Go is where they are briefly examined, trotted out in-hand and their pulse checked before they can continue down the trail if they pass the exam. Red Star, at 28 miles, is the first Gate & Go. Karen Donley was leading by two minutes at that point. Robinson Flat, 36 miles into the course, is the first vet check with an hour hold. Donley was first in and out of this vet check too. However, Gwen Hall was only one minute behind Donley. The young Blakeleys were only four minutes


behind and the Reynoldses were nearly 30 minutes behind. Gwen Hall said, “I rode much of the first half of the ride with Karen Donley. She is a wonderful lady, and her mare and Dakar seemed to get along well. Let me tell you, that lady can fly on foot running down the canyons!” At Last Chance, the 50-milepoint Gate & Go, Donley, Hall and the two young Blakeleys arrived at the same time. But, again, Donley’s horse vetted through quickly, getting a two-minute lead over Hall. Barrak and Sanoma took eight minutes longer getting through the vet check. Lindsay Fisher and Monk, an unregistered Arabian gelding, along with three

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Richard George and his Anglo-Arabian MF Amir Al Rasool (Akdar Brins x May Go North) completed in fourth place with a ride time of 14 hours 22 minutes. George and his horse shared 500 career miles coming into this ride.

other riders, leaped out ahead of the Blakeleys. This was Californian Lindsay Fisher, D.V.M., and Monk’s fifth Tevis, always having finished in the top ten. Fisher has completed a total of seven times and six of those were in the top ten. Although Christopher Martin owns Monk, Fisher and Monk have about 1,500

career miles together, including seven 100-miler rides. “I just tried to cruise along easy, wanting to Top Ten. I was riding fourth place, nice and steady, at about 75 miles, when six horses riding together passed me. I went from fourth to tenth in 30 seconds! That’s nuts!” she said in disbelief. After the treacherous canyons is

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“I am so happy that Goobs is a surefooted horse, knowing where the trail was because we were booking it in the dark.”

In 14 hours 39 minutes, Suzanne Huff and her homebred SD Expressa (Expressive LP x Barbarella FF [*Barbaados]) finished in fifth place. “Prior to Francisco’s,” she said, “the ‘pack’ (of frontrunners) was even larger – there were eight in the pack. For me the California Loop was crazy scary as I didn’t like going faster than a trot along those ledge trails. But when whatever horse was in front of me took off, Sessa would also. Since she is more competitive than I am, I didn’t have much say in the matter. I knew, though, once it got dark I would be able to slow her down. I had no idea where we were leaving Lower Quarry because it was dark and with a big group there... but I knew I would Top Ten so was very happy.”

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Although Gwen Hall, left, and Karen Donley appear to be on a casual trail ride in this photo, they both had high hopes of winning the Tevis Cup. Donley completed in sixth place and Hall finished in eighth place. Hall, who’s been competing since 2011, now has three Tevis completions in 2nd, 4th and this year 8th place, on Sizedoesntmatter (Line Dancer [Burning Sand] x Contemporary You [*Wiking]), better known as Dakar. “The start this year was a little nerve wracking for me,” she shared. “Because the ride was postponed a month due to snowpack, we started in the dark. Usually there is twilight at the start, enough to see. With the dark and dust, plus 180-plus amped up horses and riders, I went out a little faster than I planned for safety concerns. Dakar was strong and didn’t miss a step. The sunrise was very welcome, and I was a bit surprised to find us out front. But we were hitting our time goals and so I didn’t worry. “The six miles from Lower Quarry to the finish line I got motion sickness riding in the dark. The moon hadn’t come up yet and under the tree canopy it was very dark. No roller coasters for this gal!” she laughed. “So, at three miles out on the twisty single track heading up to the finish line, I started vomiting. A lot. I thought I would fall out of the saddle. But Dakar worked to stay under me; he is so amazing! We walked at least four of the last six miles in, all because of my vertigo. I was astonished to find out we still placed eighth!” A H W > 28 < 1 0 . 1 9

another Gate & Go. At that check, Deadwood, 55 miles into the course, Gwen Hall had taken the lead by one minute over Lindsay Fisher. The three Blakeleys, followed by Karen Donley arrived at the checkpoint. Horses had to meet a 64 heart rate before continuing. Donley and Hall were out on the same minute. Meanwhile, Heather and Jeremy Reynolds were still lagging behind by about 25 minutes. Foresthill vet check, at 68 miles, is the second and last one-hour mandatory hold after passing the veterinary exam. It is a busy place. Residents and sightseers mingle with crews, and riders calculate and recalculate their goals. Karen Donley was first to arrive, followed by Lindsay Fisher and Haley Moquin seven minutes later. Twenty-year-old Haley Moquin, not mentioned earlier, had been in the top ten mix. From Texas, this young lady was riding smart on a 15-year-old mare Ogee (*Okba x Gollys GiGi [By Golly]). This was Haley’s first hundredmile competition. Ogee, owned by Erin Lemmons, also of Texas, had one previous hundred-miler that she won and earned the Best Condition Award. Gwen Hall and Dakar had slipped back 30 minutes behind the leader along with Suzanne Huff and Nicki Meuten. Jeremy and Heather Reynolds had moved up to eighth and ninth place. Suzanne Huff has completed the Tevis in 1996 (16th place), 2000 (8th place), 2007 (3rd place) and 2017 (26th place). Huff, from Nevada, has accumulated 21,000 career miles. This year she was riding SD Expressa (Expressive LP x Barbarella FF [*Barbaados]) “This was Sessa’s first Tevis and ninth one-day 100-mile finish. I bred, raised, trained, and have competed both her and my 2017 26th-place finisher SD SzZaphira (Gardjan x Rawena),” she said. “My goal,” she continued, “was to get across the river before dark and to Top Ten. It’s this mare’s type of ride — mountains, technical, with lots of downhill. She has excellent recoveries.


But I, along with two other riders, made an error after Robinson Flat at a three-way intersection with a big pine tree blocking the view of one single ribbon way down the trail. We lost 20-30 minutes regaining the route and this dropped me down to 14th place at that time.” Donley was first out of Foresthill with a 10-minute lead over Sanoma Blakely and 13 minutes ahead of Haley Moquin. Suzanne Huff was in sixth place. Virginian Nicki Meuten and Jeremy Reynolds left Foresthill with Huff. Heather Reynolds was out three minutes later, and Richard George, on his third try to complete the course, was also in the top ten. George, who lives in the Tevis area, was riding his Anglo-Arabian, MF Amir Al Rasool (Akdar Brins x May Go North). George and his horse shared 500 career miles coming into this ride. Nicki Meuten, who had completed the ride in 2007, was riding FYF Dutch (LS Zane Grey x Lateef Zeda). “Dutch was on his game,” said Meuten, a veterinarian from Virginia, about her homebred 15-year-old gelding. “When he was a young colt, I told told my husband Don I want to keep this one – let’s not sell him. It was a

good decision; he is now at 3,700 miles and 11 for 12 in 100s. We hauled him from Virginia to California for this ride. There were no issues with horse, trailer, or truck for 3,000 miles! Dutch and his trailer buddy did terrific over our five-day trip with a three-day hold over in Ft Collins. “On race day I had to ask Dutch to slow down all day. He wanted to go faster, but we were traveling as fast as I wanted to over those trails! Dutch is not a great eater and does not take care of himself, but still I could not believe it when he turned his nose up at the gorgeous California alfalfa hay. And he did not like the mash that was prepared for him. He wanted to eat but not what was being offered. Then we found plain old grass hay at about mile 50 — he dove into it,” she laughed.

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“I don’t start a ride with a plan on how I will try to finish. I ride the horse I am on and make decisions as I go, depending on the day my horse is having,” stated Nicki Meuten, D.V.M., who completed in seventh place on FYF Dutch (LS Zane Grey x Lateef Zeda). “We started in pen 1, maybe 50th or so going out and were 30ish at Robinson Flat. Dutch was strong and sensible, and we kept moving up. At Foresthill we were going out with the frontrunners. I wanted to stay strong, but knew I did not know the trail well enough to risk racing once it got dark. All light was gone when I left Lower Quarry. With just six miles to go, I backed off and rode to make it in safely.”

“Although Dutch eats meagerly, spooks and stumbles a lot — not a good thing for a Tevis mount — he was almost perfect.”

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“Although Dutch eats meagerly, spooks and stumbles a lot — not a good thing for a Tevis mount — he was almost perfect. I say sorry to Heather (Reynolds) as Dutch did try to bite her good horse at a water tub. Other than that poor citizenship grade, he was a gentleman.” With 15 miles to go out of Francisco’s Gate & Go, Karen Donley was still in the lead. Seven riders were within 16 minutes behind her. Donley said, “I had a ten-minute lead out of Francisco. I planned to keep a steady pace to the finish line. But about three miles before Lower Quarry, a group of six riders zipped past me. I had no intention of racing after them.” The six riders who passed Donley at about 91 miles were Sanoma Blakeley, Heather and Jeremy Reynolds, Richard George, Haley Moquin and Suzanne Huff. Six miles from the finish line was the last on-trail vet check at Lower Quarry. It is a Gate & Go where the horses must meet the 64-pulse rate before they can continue. Jeremy Reynolds said, “It was a really crazy pace there towards the finish. We flew in a big group, cantering most of the way, and then caught and passed Karen at


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Finishing in 15 hours 13 minutes in 9th place was Lindsay Fisher, top left, and Monk (unregistered Arabian). Fisher says, “I like to come in humble and see how the day unfolds because it’s Tevis and you never know what can happen. You can have the best horse that has a bad day, or steady-eddy who trips and falls. You just never know. I think it’s important to ride your own ride no matter what, and that includes riding your horse to the best of its ability and not more. That’s how I have always ridden Monk. I know he gives me all he has and I listen to that.” Lindsay Fisher and Monk went on to earn the coveted Haggin Cup, top right. It is similar to earning Best Condition but much more. Chuck Stalley, Ride Director explained, “The Cup Committee observes the horses and riders throughout the event and (among other things) certifies the sportsmanship of the top ten finishing riders. If the Cup Committee finds no violations or concerns, those horses are eligible to show for this award. The Haggin Cup selection then falls to the veterinary team to determine the winner. Completion time and weight carried are not considered in the selection. This is unlike AERC best condition formulas commonly used in endurance events.”

the river crossing (88 miles). Then Heather and I and Sanoma took off at a hand gallop and left the group. The three of us arrived together at Lower Quarry.” George and Moquin arrived two minutes later and Donley and Huff were seven minutes behind. Anticipation and adrenalin had to be high for everyone as the ride could be won or lost at the checkpoint. Sanoma Blakeley was first to pulse down and leave, and wasted no time heading for the finish line. Two minutes later, Jeremy Reynolds went in hot pursuit. The next five riders went out five to nine minutes later. It was dark and the trail was narrow and dangerous in places. Jeremy Reynolds recalled, “I went out fast to the bridge and then across Highway 49, where there is a very technical, rocky section where trotting is the fastest you dare go. From the bridge, I was 45 seconds behind Sanoma and hammered along until I caught and passed her. We switched the lead back and forth three or four times. My horse didn’t have much left and so when Sanoma asked for trail again, I stayed with her just in case we might have a run off. I got up to the hip of her horse at the finish line but she definitely had the better horse that day,” declared Reynolds. Sanoma and Goober, as she calls RA Ares Bay, crossed the finish line with a course time of 14 hours 12 minutes. Jeremy and Rimfires completed on the same minute but mere seconds after. Victorious, Sanoma said, “This year’s Tevis was an incredible experience and probably the most fun and amazing race of my life. Goobs was so strong all day! He and I have always had a bond. I rode him on his first two

Sanoma Blakeley was first to pulse down and leave, and wasted no time heading for the finish line. Two minutes later, Jeremy Reynolds went in hot pursuit. The next five riders went out five to nine minutes later. It was dark and the trail was narrow and dangerous in places. A H W > 30 < 1 0 . 1 9


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100s and won multiple 50s and best conditions on him a few years ago. I knew I could have a chance at winning Tevis with him when my dad offered me to ride him. But I am not a huge fan of all the drop-offs at Tevis, so I was very hesitant at first. “But when race day came, he was a beast and felt absolutely amazing! Not much seemed to faze him, and when we came into Last Chance and Deadwood he pulsed in at 48 bpm. I have never ridden a horse that was so strong. After 90 miles I felt as though we had done maybe 20! The race to the finish with Jeremy Reynolds was pretty insane and I am so happy that Goobs is a sure-footed horse, knowing where the trail was because we were booking it in the dark. It came down to a sprint for the finish and Goobs gave me his whole heart. He won Tevis by a horse length,” Blakeley said. Nine minutes later, in third place, was college student Haley Moquin on Ogee. Amazingly, this was Haley’s first 100-mile event! “I left Lower Quarry in fourth place. With six miles to go, I really thought I was going to finish fourth. It is very difficult to make up time with so few miles. About two miles from the finish line, I caught up to Richard George. He was walking his horse up a hill. The trail was wide, I asked to pass, and on Ogee and I went.” Richard George completed one minute later in fourth place, and 17 minutes later Suzanne Huff, Heather Reynolds, and Karen Donley walked their horses across the finish line. Unfortunately, Heather’s horse was pulled at the final vet check because her mount trotted out lame. “It was a shoeing malfunction,” explained the disappointed but stoic Heather. About the ride, Huff says, “The California Loop was

Rounding off the top ten finishers was Suzanne Hayes on her Anglo-Arabian Greenbriar Al Jabal (WW Sun Dancer x Go Tiger Go [Thoroughbred]), better known as Atlas. Their course time was 15 hours 14 minutes. Atlas, with Suzanne aboard, has finished the Tevis four times and Hayes has nine finishes, including the four on Atlas. “My plan for Tevis this year was as usual, go for a finish first, then do the best we can on that particular day,” explained Hayes. “Did I have any doubts of a finish? I think you always have that nasty thought in the back of your mind, but I am normally a very positive person so that’s what I focus my thoughts and energy on! “Already this year Atlas did the Fort Howes 100 (fourth place), five weeks later the Big Horn 100 (third place), then five weeks later, this Tevis Ride (10th place). He is an extremely good 100-mile horse so that’s what we’ve focused on,” she said with pride.

crazy scary as I didn’t like going faster than a trot along those ledge trails, but when whatever horse was in front of me took off, Sessa would also. I didn’t have much say in the matter. I had no idea where we were leaving Quarry because it was dark and with a big group there ... but I knew I would Top Ten so was very happy.” Donley, who finished in sixth place on the same minute as Huff said, “Knowing I would not win, I slowed down some,” says Donley after she was passed before Lower Quarry. “At Lower Quarry, my mare got all As for her vet score. We have seven for seven completions on the Tevis Trail!” Nicki Meuten and Dutch crossed the finish line with a ride time of 14 hours 51 minutes in 7th place. Gwen Hall and Dakar were next with 15 hours 5 minutes course time. Ninth place was Lindsay Fisher and Monk in 15 hours 13 minutes. And topping off the Top Ten was Suzanne Hayes, who has top tenned this ride eight times out of nine starts, completed in 15 hours 14 minutes on her Anglo-Arabian, Greenbriar Al Jabal (WW Sundancer x Go Tiger Go). Hayes, a veteran competitor from Montana, has over 24,000 miles. She said, “The ride this year was very competitive and fast. And as for Atlas (nickname for her horse) having only has 3,000 miles, it is because I have figured out over the years that less is more and to save your horse for the important rides. Plus, I happen to be blessed with another extremely talented Anglo-Arabian and two young Al-Marah horses that have started their endurance careers. “What about Tevis that keeps you coming back, you ask? Good question!” she said. “There’s just something about it that keeps calling me back; plus, it’s one of the last, at least in the West, big deal rides left.”

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Seventy-five-year-old Kathie Perry is one of the founding members of the American Endurance Ride Conference and has completed the Tevis Cup 24 times! “In 1972, a small group of endurance riders, mainly from Auburn, felt we needed some sort of uniformity to this fast growing sport and to offer more protection to the horse, thus the American Endurance Ride Conference was formed. By sanctioning only rides that met its criteria, the conference offered a central clearinghouse for ride dates, ride results, and a very simple point system. The record keeping became an important part of the conference along with the educational programs and establishing veterinarian guidelines,” she explained. Perry’s first Tevis was in 1975. This year she completed in 20 hours, 33rd place, on Cowbboy (HR Aflame x Isabel Star [RD Five Star]). When asked what makes a good Tevis horse she said, “I like Arabians and I like them to be well balanced, with good feet, shorter in the back and a good hip with a sound mind.” And when asked what draws her back every year to the Tevis she stated, “It is the Super Bowl of endurance rides and who wouldn’t want to compete in the Super every year! I come for the journey and the beauty of the trail, the experience it reveals, the challenging mountains, river crossing, rocks, bogs, canyons, extreme heat and the darkness. It is all wonderful!”

Earning the Haggin Cup, judged on the horse’s condition during and after the ride, as well as the rider’s sportsmanship, is a soughtafter honor. “The final judging of the horses is done at 10 a.m. on Sunday morning, five hours after the final hour to finish,” explained Chuck Stalley. “The Cup Committee observes the horses and riders throughout the event and (among other things) certifies the sportsmanship of the top ten

finishing riders. If the Cup Committee finds no violations or concerns, those horses are eligible to show for this award. The Haggin Cup selection then falls to the veterinary team to determine the winner. Completion time and weight carried are not considered in the selection. This is unlike AERC best condition formulas commonly used in endurance events. This year the honor went to Monk, ridden by Lindsay Fisher. “Monk didn’t have that extra go A H W > 32 < 1 0 . 1 9

Ninety-eight of the 184 starters completed this year. It was an unusually high completion rate due to several factors.“We had a very competitive field of riders up front this year,” stated Ride Director Chuck Stalley. “And we took out about a mile section at Pucker Point, the trail along the edge of a bluff, due to looseness of the ground resulting from a fire a few years ago as well as cows in that area contributing to the erosion. The re-route trail was on a twotrack trail, which was faster, and that made the ride maybe 20-25 minutes faster. “In addition,” he added, “the weather was clear and dry, no wind, maybe 90-93 degrees in the canyons that is typically 100 degrees other years. We also moved the ride from July 20th to August 17th because the snow wouldn’t melt by July 20th,” he stated. “The snow melted off the trail at the top of Squaw Valley 10 days before the race. With this later date, we had a half hour less of light but that is a half hour more of cooler temperature. All these factors that made the ride faster this year.”

that he normally does,” said Lindsay about their day on the trail. “I’d say he was having a bad day, but in the end, we had our best outcome to date!” The final rider crossed the finish line with a course time of 21 hours 47 minutes. Interestingly, 41 riders completed in the last 45 minutes time frame! That wrapped up another great event at 5:02 a.m. (5:15 a.m. was the cutoff time to complete) on August 18 with 98 successfully completing.


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Suzanne Solis, left, and Angie McGhee, bottom right, hauled Suzanneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s horse from Georgia to California to ride the Tevis Trail. Solis rode Thor (unregistered Arabian) and Angie was on Khorvet (TC Kharpe Diem x Jamahra). Angie said her goal was first to start, second to get a photo at Cougar Rock, and third to earn the Tevis belt buckle. She and Suzanne accomplished the goals! They both completed, in 89th and 90th place, with a course time of 21 hours 38 minutes.

2019 Tevis Top Ten Finishers

1.

Sanoma Blakeley

RA Ares Bey (Must Bey Dreamin x RBS Aalani Mist)

14:12

2.

Jeremy Renolds

RTR Rimfires Etta (RTR Rimfire x PS Sierra Sage)

14:12:01

3.

Haley Moquin

Ogee (*Okba x Gollys Gigi)

14:21

4.

Richard George

MF Amir Al Rasool (Akdar Brins x May Go North)

14:22

5.

Suzanne Huff

SD Expressa (Expressive LP x Barbarella FF)

14:39

6.

Karen Donley

Royal Patron (Monarch AH x Pink Beaches)

14:39

7.

Nicki Meuten

FYF Dutch (LS Zane Grey x Lateef Zeda)

14:51

8.

Gwen Hall

Sizedoesntmatter (Line Dancer x Contemporary You)

15:05

9.

Lindsay Fisher

Monk (unregistered Arabian)

15:13

10.

Suzanne Hayes

Greenbriar Al Jabal (WW Sun Dancer x Go Tiger Go [TB])

15:14

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Profile for Arabian Horse World

2019 Tevis Cup  

The drama of the Tevis, as expressed by Gwen Hall: “The six miles from Lower Quarry to the finish line I got motion sickness riding in the d...

2019 Tevis Cup  

The drama of the Tevis, as expressed by Gwen Hall: “The six miles from Lower Quarry to the finish line I got motion sickness riding in the d...