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Elishahh F E A T U R I N G

VOLUME 47, NO. 5AA $22.50

AAS


U.S. National Champion Yearling Filly U.S. National Champion Futurit y Filly A r a b i a n B r e e d e r s Wo r l d C u p G o l d Supreme Champion Yearling Filly

Marciena RD

Since the first moment I laid eyes on this beautiful mare as a yearling, she has had me completely captivated. It is with absolute pride and joy that I am able to represent her on behalf of her new owners, Cindy McGown and Mark Davis. This mare is larger than life and will no doubt make your heart skip a beat. I am looking forward to being able to share her with you all. — Rodolfo Guzzo

QR Marc x NW Siena Psyche Owned by Royal Arabians, Cindy McGown & Mark Davis

WORLDWIDE LLC

Cindy McGown & Mark Davis Mesa & Scottsdale, Arizona | info@RoyalArabians.com | 480.220.1108 Rodolfo Guzzo: Halter Trainer | guzzoworldwidellc@gmail.com | 480.361.6926 Travis Rice: Sales & Marketing | trice@royalarabians.com | 614.315.3682 WWW.ROYALANDGUZZO.COM


There are moments of beauty so intense that they will touch you for life. —Dr. SunWolf

U.S. National Contender 6-8 Year Old Arabian Mare s with Rodolfo Guzzo


Be ready to

TAKE ON THE WORLD

Innovative equine supplements created by a veterinarian

depaoloequineconcepts.com Ar abian Horse Times | 2 | Volume 47, No. 5A A


IMPULSEPHOTOGRAPHYMB.COM


Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 Half-Arabian Show Hack AAOTR with Laurie Ames-Husband Half-Arabian Show Hack Open with Shannon Beethe

HF Mister Chips+ x Jamaican Jewel

Owned by Laurie Ames-Husband & Sharon Ames | Scottsdale, AZ Beethe Arabians | Cave Creek, AZ | 480.203.1394 | www.BeetheArabians.com Ar abian Horse Times | 5 | Volume 47, No. 5A A


GSF MAGNANIMOUS

A HEART THROB MTA+//

SOMETHING BLUE

VCP Magnifire x GSF Alinah 2010 PB Bay Gelding

Take Heart x Always MTA 2002 HA Black Gelding

Bellagio PR x The Small Town Blues 2008 HA Bay Mare

U.S. National Top Ten Country Futurity Scottsdale Top Ten Country Open Regional Champion Country Open & AAOTR

Youth National Champion Country JTR U.S. National Top Ten Country AAOTR & Driving Scottsdale Res Champion Country AAOTR Multiple National & Scottsdale titles

Scottsdale Champion Country JTR Scottsdale Top Ten Country AATR Regional Champion Country ATR

SA MAMAXIMUS

JMJ GOLD N FIZZ

VJ TICKETMASTER

Mamage x TAF Madonna 2008 PB Bay Gelding

Scrimmage x Nonchalant 2004 HA Chestnut Gelding

Triften+/ x KAZ Baskteena 2006 PB Grey Gelding

Regional Champion Country Open Regional Champion Country AAOTR

Scottsdale Champion Country AAOTR U.S. National Top Ten Country AAOTR Regional Champion Country AAOTR & Open

Canadian National Res Champion Country ATR Youth National Top Ten Country Walk-Trot & English JTR Scottsdale 1st Pl & Top Ten Show Hack JTR

Contact Beethe Arabians | 480.203.1394 | Cave Creek, AZ www.BeetheArabians.com Ar abian Horse Times | 6 | Volume 47, No. 5A A


HHF VUDOU

CL SHAMPAGNE WISHES

MAGNETIC EFFECT

Ronde Vu x Showtimes Raggity Anne 2011 HA Chestnut Gelding

SF Specs Shocwave x Contessa’s Wine 2009 HA Chestnut Mare

VCP Magnifire x Coyote Ugly 2009 HA Bay Gelding

Regional Top Five Hunter Junior Horse

U.S. National Champion English Pleasure Futurity Regional Top Five Country Open

Youth National Top Ten Hunter JTR Regional Champion Hunter Open Regional Res Champion Hunter JTR

HOLLY WOULD LOA

BAZINGA

DOCK OF THE BAY

Millennium LOA+ x Haunting Passion 2006 HA Bay Mare

Baske Afire x Tori Rain 2010 PB Chestnut Gelding

Man Of The Ring x JJ Aaria 2008 HA Black-Bay Gelding

Scottsdale Top Ten Country Select Scottsdale Champion Mare Halter U.S. National Top Ten Mare Halter

Scottsdale Reserve Champion SSS English Maturity Scottsdale Top Ten Country JTR Regional Top Five Country JTR

U.S. National Top Ten Country Futurity Regional Top Five Country Select Buckeye Reserve Champion Country AAOTR

Contact Beethe Arabians | 480.203.1394 | Cave Creek, AZ www.BeetheArabians.com Ar abian Horse Times | 7 | Volume 47, No. 5A A


See You In Tulsa!

2012 uNited states N atioNa l c haMPioN Wester N P leasur e o PeN 2015 uNited states N atioNa l toP teN Wester N P leasur e o PeN 2016 r egioN e lev eN c haMPioN Wester N P leasur e o PeN 2015 r egioN e lev eN c haMPioN Wester N P leasur e o PeN 2012 r egioN e lev eN c haMPioN Wester N P leasur e o PeN

K h a dr aj Na

x

r a K el a,

by

M agN u M P s y c h e

CA CLEAR | SCID CLEAR Proudly Owned By: BOB & NANCY RISEN

Standing At: IIB FARMS

40075 Via Caballos, Murrieta, CA 92562

Cell: 417.825.0178 | Office: 417.642.5450

Cell: 818.416.4877 | nancyrisen@gmail.com

IIBfarms@ckt.net

W W W. K H A BE R E T PG A .C OM

Ar abian Horse Times | 8 | Volume 47, No. 5A A


WESTERN PLEASURE AATR SELECT WITH EMILY ANNETT

Bentlee x Aramissa Proudly owned by Kevin Janette and Camryn Martens

Ar abian Horse Times | 10 | Volume 47, No. 5A A

AKS Farms AKS LLCFarms LLC 8984 Blue8984 Street Blue Street Norwalk, IA Norwalk, 50211 IA 50211 Alexis Scott: Alexis 515-371-5073 Scott: 515-371-5073 www.aksfarmsllc.com www.aksfarmsllc.com


The Nobelest x FA Eternal Affair

ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 19-39 WITH EMILY ANNETT

Proudly owned by Emily Annett

A Noble Cause x MHF Appoljaks

COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AATR SELECT WITH EMILY ANNETT OPEN WITH ALEXIS SCOTT Proudly owned by Camryn Martens

AKS Farms LLC 8984 Blue Street Norwalk, IA 50211 Alexis Scott: 515-371-5073 www.aksfarmsllc.com


HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 55 & OVER WITH DR. ROBERT BROWN

Millennium LOA x Caramac’s First Lady Proudly owned by Dr. Robert Brown

Ar abian Horse Times | 12 | Volume 47, No. 5A A

AKS Farms AKS LLCFarms LLC 8984 Blue8984 Street Blue Street Norwalk, IA Norwalk, 50211 IA 50211 Alexis Scott: Alexis 515-371-5073 Scott: 515-371-5073 www.aksfarmsllc.com www.aksfarmsllc.com


HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AATR SELECT WITH ANGELA BALDUCHI OPEN WITH ALEXIS SCOTT Available for Purchase

The Hurricane x I’m Miss New York Proudly owned by Lisa & Angela Balduchi

Ar abian Horse Times | 13 | Volume 47, No. 5A A

AKS Farms LLC 8984 Blue Street Norwalk, IA 50211 Alexis Scott: 515-371-5073 www.aksfarmsllc.com


LIBERTY MEADOWS TRAINING CENTER Ryan & Elise Strand | Bucyrus, Kansas 816.651.7424 | info@liberty-meadows.com


by KARA LARSON

In the eyes of some, success means you can afford the best. However, when it comes to the Arabian horse business, there are far more variables between emptying your figurative pockets for an elite equine athlete and the lofty goal of a big prize, preferably one with roses.

Ryan and Elise Strand, the trainers behind Liberty Meadows Training Center out of Bucyrus, Kans., make a point to tell their clients early on that the pillars of success in the Arabian world aren’t built overnight. The process of finding the right horse for each rider, crafting that bond, and striving for the ideal, faultless ride is at the center of their mission. Because in their point of view, the Arabian horse business in all of its rogue complexities and tiny victories can be boiled down to a glaringly simple, yet poignant training philosophy where process is vital—one where the journey of gratifying connection and patient progress is king.


Liberty Meadows | 2 | Ar abian Horse Times


T

he basics aren’t tired—they’re clean, straightforward, respected. Since Ryan started Liberty Meadows in 2000, lots of aspects of the horse business have evolved; however, his training philosophy has remained constant. “We’re pretty basic. We take these horses and we get them broke and try to teach them to do their job and do it happily. In my 22 years as a horse trainer, I’ve learned that a horse will tell you to a point the speed at which they can be trained. From there, I stay open-minded and I don’t work them all the same way.” He adds, “It’s not like I haven’t picked up things along the way and have a few tricks up my sleeve, but at the end of the day, it’s usually the best trained horse that wins.”

The advantage of having two perspectives is one that greatly impacts the way Ryan and Elise train the horses and instruct the people. As Ryan’s day is filled with working and finishing all of the young horses, Elise works a smaller number of horses and gives a majority of the lessons. Ryan says, “I’m doing about 75% of the horse training and she’s doing about 75% of the lessons, whether it be new people or really finished amateurs. She’s got a great feel for it. When she’s in the middle instructing, she’s watching intently and proves to be an invaluable asset day after day. She is able to watch me work the horse as well as the amateur, which is really helpful in connecting horse to rider.”

For Ryan and Elise, constant growth persists as a defining aspect of their program and helps them to continue to improve as trainers, instructors, and people. Ryan offers, “I think the day you’re unwilling to listen to someone about a different idea on how to train is the day you stop advancing. Period. I don’t have any problem asking questions and opinions. If I see something interesting or wonder how something works, I’m asking about it.”

Liberty Meadows | 3 | Ar abian Horse Times


Liberty Meadows is a primarily amateur driven business, and as such, Ryan and Elise take a great deal of pride in the challenge of finding the right horse for the right person. Coupled with this challenge is an equally tough undertaking—explaining to people that what they want is not always what they are ready for or what they need.

Liberty Meadows | 4 | Ar abian Horse Times


A

s one might assume, this is not an easy thing to explain to new people. Ryan elaborates, “In life, if you want the nicest car made, you can just go buy it. And you

probably already know how to drive a car, so you can drive it, too. If you want the nicest boat, you can buy it. And you can probably learn to drive it over a weekend.” He adds, “But in the Arabian performance world, if you don’t enjoy the process, then this might not be for you. And lots of people really enjoy learning about what makes a horse good, but if your only concern is winning in the beginning, man, this is a hard thing to do. People have to enjoy the journey… Or, buy a boat.”

Ryan and Elise make a point to explain the power of process and patience in their training program. They are also sure to explain where the ultimate goal resides. At Liberty Meadows, the goal is first in the ride, followed by the ribbon. Ryan begins, “I tell people that there’s a ride you’re looking for. We aim to get that ride and the chips will fall where they may. When you have a plan and that plan works, and then that results in a win or a great ribbon, that’s the pinnacle of it. I think that’s why we do this. I just also think that a person has to be cautious to understand that there are different pinnacles.”

This method of training and teaching has proven successful in the show ring as Elise and Ryan have watched their clients continue to aim for and achieve that sought after ride. As their riders gain experience and knowledge, they have enjoyed momentous wins and heartwarming happiness in the saddle. “Patience and persistence is proving to pay off in a big way,” begins Elise. “Once people realize that it is such a process, that’s when they really start to see show ring success. We definitely saw our whole training process come into fruition this past year at Region 11, where we came home with nine Regional Championships, and again at Youth Nationals, where our riders won two unanimous National Championships, a Reserve, and 10 Top Tens.”

Liberty Meadows | 5 | Ar abian Horse Times


“Careers in this business are built over 30-40 years. I think you have to be in it for the long haul,” begins Ryan. “Not that you don’t seize every opportunity given to you, whether it be a great horse or a great customer, but at the end of the day, once you plant your feet, which is what we’ve done here, it’s real.”

After leasing for 12 years, Ryan and Elise decided to establish roots and buy a beautiful farm in the rolling hills of Eastern Kansas. Resting on 40 acres of scenic pasture and turnout paddocks, their farm consists of 64 stalls in a heated, modern facility with a 70’ x 200’ indoor riding arena. This part of the structure boasts modern conveniences and space; however, there is much more to it, which also includes an original, custom-built barn with tons of character.

An Arabian facility from day one, the barn was built as a place for a smaller, high-end breeding program. Because of this original intent, Ryan describes the barn as, “a really neat structure that has a lot of brick and character—it’s not the kind of barn a horse trainer would build—which is what I loved about it. It’s really cool and a lot of thought was put into it. All the stalls have Dutch doors and there’s a lot of natural light.” Ryan adds, “So there’s that part of our setup, and then we added basically another half to the existing structure that is modernized. We made the arena longer, insulated it, heated it, and added 40 stalls in a climate-controlled barn—you know, like a horse trainer would do.”

Beyond the pride of ownership, Ryan and Elise consider the switch from leasing to owning to be a big moment in their commitment to their business. Ryan shares, “The longer you do it and when you put your name on the dotted line to buy a place, you are reminded that there’s a lot to this. But that’s been motivating for us. When you buy a facility and have a child in a five-year period, it will really get you up in the morning.”

Liberty Meadows | 6 | Ar abian Horse Times


Liberty Meadows | 7 | Ar abian Horse Times


Liberty Meadows isn’t in Kansas—the heart of the Midwest—by chance. Ryan believes in building quality horses, trainers, and businesses in the middle of America. “I was raised in Iowa, and I’ve lived other places, but it is important to me that our Midwestern businesses do well.” He adds, “I’m a big fan of the Midwest. I like to see horses from this part of the country do well. I always have. I think there are a lot of very capable people who run very good businesses in the Midwestern United States. We have a solid group of people in this part of the country and as it goes, I think they are getting stronger and stronger.”

Describing themselves as a sort of, “Midwestern blue collar training facility,” Ryan and Elise were elated to establish roots where they did. And now, three years later, their roots have deepened, and above ground, the fruits of their hard work are flourishing. With more clients, wins, a refreshing honesty, and more perspective than ever, this is a training team with longevity. Ryan and Elise aim to enrich the place in which they live, work, and raise their new son, Ethan. They are exactly where they need to be—in the heart of America sharing the Arabian horse with their patented process-driven training philosophy.

Liberty Meadows | 8 | Ar abian Horse Times


We are excited to welcome the addition of Wyatt Budd as assistant trainer at Liberty Meadows. We are happy to have him on our team and look forward to our bright future together.

Wyatt pictured riding Lah Ti Da (above) and Tryst CCF (right)

LIBERTY MEADOWS TRAINING CENTER Ryan & Elise Strand | Bucyrus, Kansas 816.651.7424 | info@liberty-meadows.com Liberty Meadows | 9 | Ar abian Horse Times


(Baske Afire x Kelly Le Brock)

ABS HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE AAOTR JACKPOT & HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE SELECT AATR WITH AMBER STEARNS Owned by Amber Stearns Springfield | Missouri

Ryan & Elise Strand 816.651.7424 Liberty Meadows | 10 | Ar abian Horse Times


(Vegaz x River Dance NA)

ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE AAOTR MATURITY & ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE SELECT AATR WITH JANNA ONEILL Owned by Janna Oneill Mission Hills | Kansas

Bucyrus, Kansas info@liberty-meadows.com Liberty Meadows | 11 | Ar abian Horse Times


(Undulata’s Nutcraker x VTM Pistachia)

HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE FUTURITY WITH RYAN STRAND Ryan & Elise Strand 816.651.7424

Owned by Ralph & Linda Hackett Holt | Missouri Liberty Meadows | 12 | Ar abian Horse Times


(Candeman x Xquisite W)

AEPA $100,000 ARABIAN ENGLISH PERFORMANCE FUTURITY WITH RYAN STRAND Owned by Salt Creek Arabians, LLC Channahon | Illinois Liberty Meadows | 13 | Ar abian Horse Times

Bucyrus, Kansas info@liberty-meadows.com


(VCP Magnifire x Ames Jlo)

ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE DRIVING WITH RYAN STRAND ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE SELECT AATR WITH CHARITY DAVIS Ryan & Elise Strand 816.651.7424

Owned by Allison & Charity Davis Leawood | Kansas Liberty Meadows | 14 | Ar abian Horse Times


(Baske Afire x Musical Gala)

HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE WITH LIBERTY MEADOWS HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE SELECT AATR WITH TAMMY MCELLIOTT Owned by Russ & Tammy McElliott Leawood | Kansas

Liberty Meadows | 15 | Ar abian Horse Times

Bucyrus, Kansas info@liberty-meadows.com


(Majesteit x MF Afires Joy)

ABS HALF-ARABIAN HUNTER PLEASURE AAOTR JACKPOT & HALF-ARABIAN HUNTER PLEASURE AAOTR 55 & OVER WITH ROBIN MANFIELD Ryan & Elise Strand 816.651.7424

Owned by Michael & Robin Manfield Eudora | Kansas Liberty Meadows | 16 | Ar abian Horse Times


(Afire Bey V x Thalia Bey)

ABS ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE AAOTR JACKPOT & ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE AAOTR 55 & OVER WITH ROBIN MANFIELD Owned by Michael & Robin Manfield Eudora | Kansas Liberty Meadows | 17 | Ar abian Horse Times

Bucyrus, Kansas info@liberty-meadows.com


(ML Afire Dream x BA Miss Magic)

ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE WITH ELISE STRAND ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE AAOTR 19-35 WITH ALEXUS MATTINGLY Ryan & Elise Strand 816.651.7424

Owned by Charles & Alexus Mattingly Lawrence | Kansas

Liberty Meadows | 18 | Ar abian Horse Times


(Hucks Connection V+ x Only Girl In Town)

HALF-ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR MATURITY & HALF-ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 19-39 WITH ALEXUS MATTINGLY Owned by Charles & Alexus Mattingly Lawrence | Kansas

Liberty Meadows | 19 | Ar abian Horse Times

Bucyrus, Kansas info@liberty-meadows.com


(The Renaissance x CP Tatiana)

ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE FUTURITY WITH RYAN STRAND James & Laura Fitzsimmons Lake Lotawana | Missouri

Ryan & Elise Strand 816.651.7424 Liberty Meadows | 20 | Ar abian Horse Times


(Candeman x VPA Miss Mollie)

ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE FUTURITY WITH WYATT BUDD Owned by Strawberry Fields Stables Springfield | Missouri Liberty Meadows | 21 | Ar abian Horse Times

Bucyrus, Kansas info@liberty-meadows.com


(SF Specs Shocwave x Hollyluya)

ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 19-39 WITH HANNAH SARTORI Owned by Hannah Sartori Lake Lotawana | Kansas

(Baske Afire x MZ Kitty)

ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE WITH WYATT BUDD Owned by Zachary White Woodstock | Illinois

Ryan & Elise Strand | Bucyrus, Kansas 816.651.7424 | info@liberty-meadows.com Liberty Meadows | 22 | Ar abian Horse Times


RED NECK CUTIE

2009 HA Chestnut Mare | A Noble Cause x Sue Ebony Multiple top ten in country driving and amateur country. She is a proven performer. At U.S. Nationls in HA Country Pl Driving AATD

MOTOR CITY SHAKEDOWN

2006 HA Chestnut Stallion | Majesteit x MF Afires Joy U.S. National Reserve Champion HA/AA Hunter Pl AAOTR Multiple regional winner in hunter. Finished show horse. At U.S. Nationls in ABS HA Hunter Pl AAOTR Jackpot & HA Hunter Pleasure AAOTR 55 & Over

Red Neck Cutie

Motor City Shakedown

Volume Control

TCF Beyonce

TL Magic Prancer

Dirty Dancer RTA

JF Optimus Prime

Double or Nothin HF

VOLUME CONTROL

2009 HA Bay Gelding | Turn It Up x My Santana’s Valentine Canadian National Champion HA English Pl JOTR Canadian National Reserve Champion HA English Pl AAOTR Ready for any level rider. Great minded. At U.S. Nationls in HA English Pl Open

TCF BEYONCE

2013 HA Bay Mare | Tryst CCF x Airvana Just started under saddle, shows super star potential.

TL MAGIC PRANCER

2003 HA Grey Stallion | Majesteit x Elucktra Canadian National Champion HA Country Pl JOTR & Reserve Champion HA Country Pl JTR, Youth Reserve National Champion. Great minded, future National Champion Equitation mount. At U.S. Nationls in HA Country Pl Select AATR

DIRTY DANCER RTA

2011 HA Chestnut Mare | Majesteit x Flame Dance 16 Hand mare that shows national potential as an amateur or junior hunter. At U.S. Nationls in HA Hunter Pl Junior Horse

JF OPTIMUS PRIME

2013 HA Bay Gelding | VCP Magnifire x Along Comes Mary 2016 U.S. National Country Pleasure Futurity contender.

DOUBLE OR NOTHIN HF

2012 HA Chestnut Mare | Vegaz x Doubletrees Kaleidoscope Extreme necked and great motion. Will make a national level Junior Country horse in 2017.

Ryan & Elise Strand | Bucyrus, Kansas 816.651.7424 | info@liberty-meadows.com Liberty Meadows | 23 | Ar abian Horse Times


TRIBUTE THYME SA

2007 PB Bay Gelding | Pryme Thyme x Diamond Tribute Canadian National Champion Stallion | U.S. National Champion Stallion AAOTH Just started hunter career. First at every show he has shown at this year. At U.S. Nationals in Hunter Pl Select AATR

PEZ RTA

2012 PB Bay Gelding | Candeman x Haute Little Number 15.1 Hand extremely talented gelding. Will be ready for English Jr Horse at Scottsdale. Tribute Thyme SA

TROPICANA ROSE SRY

2011 PB Chestnut Mare | Vegaz x Phoebes Asensation Ready to start an English show career. Dam is out of the great Phoebe Afire.

LAH TI DA

2007 PB Chestnut Mare | Afire Bey V x Lah Lah+/ Already a proven producer, she has just been shown for the first time. She is a National Champion-level kids English horse.

CP INCOGNITO Pez RTA

2013 PB Bay Gelding | The Renaissance x CP Tatiana 2016 Country Futurity contender, Amateur friendly. At U.S. Nationals in PB Country Pl Futurity

MIDNIGHT MOVES WA

2011 PB Bay Gelding | Black Daniels x The Way She Moves Just started country pleasure gelding. Extreme quality and great pedigree. Winner first time out.

TRYST CCF

2008 PB Bay Gelding | Baske Afire x Mz Kitty Regional winner in Country Pleasure, Tryst has extreme talent and quality. At U.S. Nationals in PB Country Pl Open Tropicana Rose SRY

Lah Ti Da

CP Incognito

Midnight Moves WA

Tryst CCF

LIBERTY MEADOWS TRAINING CENTER Ryan & Elise Strand | Bucyrus, Kansas 816.651.7424 | info@liberty-meadows.com


LLC CIRCUS CIRCUS

2009 PB Bay Gelding | A Temptation x LLC Morfire Tall and handsome national level amateur country horse. At U.S. Nationals in Country Pl AAOTR 19-35

SHOCKED

2007 PB Bay Gelding | SF Specs Shocwave x Hollyluya U.S. National Reserve Champion Country English Pleasure Jr. Horse, Scottsdale Champion and U.S. Reserve National Champion. At U.S. Nationals in PB English Pl AAOTR 19-39

GOOD GOLLIE RS

LLC Circus Circus

2013 PB Bay Mare | Candeman x VPA Miss Mollie National Country Futurity contender with a great attitude. At U.S. Nationals in PB Country Pl Futurity

SNICKERS RTA

2011 PB Bay Gelding | Candeman x Xquisite W Just started performance career. Will be a high level amateur country horse.

AMES DISTINGUISHED

2008 PB Bay Gelding | A Noble Cause x G Kallora Scottsdale Reserve Champion and regional winner. Youth ready.

Shocked

EF JUST PEARLS

2013 PB Grey Mare | Candeman x JKF Tempting Rose Scottsdale bound in country English junior horse, extreme quality with talent to match.

NIGHT OF AFIRE

2009 PB Bay Gelding | Afire Bey V x HER Nobility Proven winner, ready to be a National Champion Amateur horse. Good Gollie RS

Reference Sire Photo - Candeman

Night of Afire

CONTACT US at the U.S. National Championships for detailed information, videos & more...

EF Just Pearls

Ames Distinguished

Snickers RTA


LIBERTY MEADOWS TRAINING CENTER

Ryan & Elise Strand | Bucyrus, Kansas | 816.651.7424 | info@liberty-meadows.com


ONE SHINING MOMENT

CELEBRATING GREAT MOMENTS OF U.S. NATIONALS Arabian Horse Times celebrates the 50th anniversary of U.S. Nationals with favorite moments from those in our social network community. … continued from October A, page 69.

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ORANS ADAGIO

1986 National Champion Park Horse

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ONE SHINING MOMENT

NH LOVE POTION

1985 National Champion Mare

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HUCKLEBEY BERRY

3x National Champion English Pleasure

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ONE SHINING MOMENT

NDL PERICLES

5x National Champion Hunter Pleasure

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MAMAGE

1995 National Champion English Pleasure

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ONE SHINING MOMENT

KHEMOSABI

1976 National Champion Western Pleasure

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LBC ISABEAUX

6x National Champion and Reserve Half-Arabian Park Horse

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ONE SHINING MOMENT

BASKABELLA

1992 National Champion H/A English Pleasure

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GOOD THUNDER

4x National Champion Native Costume AAOTR

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ONE SHINING MOMENT

ERRICA

1995 National Champion Mare

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GTF BEETLEJUICE

7x National Champion Half-Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR

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ONE SHINING MOMENT

AUTHENTICITY

with Jack Teague up, 1989

Looking Forward To Many More Memorable Moments At This Years’ U.S. Nationals Arabian Horse Show! Ar abian Horse Times | 57 | Volume 47, No. 5A A


A JUDGE’S PERSPECTIVE Christine Johnston

Christine and Rasels Storm Warning, 2009 U.S. National Champion H/A Ladies side Saddle English for owner Lisa Shumate.

Ar abian Horse Times | 58 | Volume 47, No. 5A A


CHRISTINE JOHNSTON

Years as a judge: 7 Why did you decide to become a judge? I became a judge for a couple reasons: another source of income to help support my family and when I retire from training, and a way to contribute to our breed. What are you most looking forward to at this year’s 50th Nationals? I’m very excited to witness Nationals from center ring. Although it’s a disappointment to not be showing, being a part of the mechanics of operating the show is an extreme honor!

periods of time can be hard on your back and a bit mentally draining, and I always want each exhibitor to have the attention they deserve. I try to be rested and in shape to do my job. It also doesn’t hurt to have Advil at hand for the sore back and a nutrition bar in my bag for short breaks. What do you do at the show when not judging? I enjoy watching classes! Never does it get old. I’ve learned a lot from watching and I’ve witnessed some amazing rides from center ring!

What do you do to prepare for Nationals? Preparing to judge is a process important to me. Going over rules and specs never gets old, I want to remain sharp. Exhibitors put a lot of time, effort and money into their horses, I always want to give my best effort. Judging U.S. Nationals makes for long work days. What is the biggest obstacle for you to overcome? Judging is more physically demanding than I ever thought it would be. Judging for long

Top, clockwise: Christine aboard Mounbeam, going Top Ten at Scottsdale in 2011; Margaux’s Catching Fire (Maci); Revvolution, 2015 Region 12 Champion.

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Christine aboard Long Over Due, her U.S. National Champion H/A Hunter Over Fences horse, 1987.

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CHRISTINE JOHNSTON

In less than ten words, can you tell exhibitors the key to show ring success? Preparation … Dedication … Faith … Quality … Skill … Family … Support … Appreciation … Kassie (my right hand). What do you feel is the biggest misconception about judges? The political aspect of judging. When showing myself, I’ve often heard exhibitors say that a horse made a big mistake and was pinned because of who the rider is. My response, is that a judge can only form an opinion from what they actually see. I’ve personally judged and have been unaware of the horse behind my back that picked up the wrong lead in an equitation class or bucked at the hand gallop. I give my best and fairest effort when judging as I believe most judges do.

Christine with BL Heir Supreme, 2010 U.S. National Top Ten Arabian English Pleasure Jr. Horse and Top Ten Open the following year.

Do you have a favorite ‘memorable moment’ from past U.S. Nationals? My favorite memory from past nationals was my first National Championship in 1987. Long Over Due was a Half-Arabian that my mom and I bought out of a rental horse string in Los Angeles for $900. We couldn’t afford to put him in training so we did it all ourselves. We slept that night with the trophy between our beds and each with a hand on it. I’ll never forget that incredible day! What would you say to encourage others to become a judge? Our judging pool is small, we need more judges. I can say that judging has been an amazing experience, going places I would never have gone, seeing amazing horses and riders, and the friends I’ve met that would never have been in my life otherwise. My own training horses are better for it, I have such a different perspective and definitely have adjusted my training and presentation. What is on your “bucket list” of to-dos? I’d love to take a vacation, hah! As far as judging is concerned, I would love to judge in Africa, Australia, and Europe, just to name a few! n

Christine with client and bestie, Lynda Burdett, after both finishing the evening with top tens at Tulsa.

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Nationals

2016 U N ITED STATES

Blake and Genna Krohn, Owners Jason Krohn, Lauren Grabski and Cassie Banks, Trainers Farm 903-882-5205 • genna@oakhavenarabians.com Jason Krohn 903-539-3812

W W W. OA K H AV E N A R A B I A N S . C O M Ar abian Horse Times | 62 | Volume 47, No. 5A A


Un ited

States

Nationals

Con ten der

2 X NAT IONA L C H A M PION

Special Thyme (P r yme T hyme x C h anc e To D az z l e)

Arabian Countr y English Pleasure A AOTR 55 & Over with Martha McCollough

Owned by: OAK HAVEN SOUTH ARABIANS LLC

F O R B R E E D I N G I N F O C O N TAC T: Jason Krohn 903-539-3812 • Farm 903-882-5205 • genna@oak havenarabians.com

W W W. OA K H AV E N A R A B I A N S . C O M Ar abian Horse Times | 63 | Volume 47, No. 5A A


Un ited

States

Nationals

Con ten der

2 X U NA N I MOU S NAT IO NA L C H A M PIO N

OH

Dancing On Heir (Af ire s He ir x DD My D anc e)

Arabian Countr y English Pleasure A AOTR 36 -54 with Lindsay O’Reilly French

Arabian Countr y English Pleasure Junior Horse with Jason Krohn

2016 & 2015 CANADIAN NATIONAL CHAMPION COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE JUNIOR HORSE Owned by: LINDSAY O’REILLY FRENCH

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Un ited

States

Nationals

Con ten der

NAT IO NA L C H A M PION

RGT

The Boss

(Af ire s He ir x St yling Time)

Half-Arabian English Pleasure with Jason Krohn

2016 CANADIAN NATIONAL CHAMPION HALF-ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE JUNIOR HORSE REGION 9 AND 12 CHAMPION HALF-ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE JUNIOR HORSE Owned by: OAK HAVEN SOUTH ARABIANS LLC

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Un ited

States

Nationals

Con ten der

7 X NAT IONA L C H A M PION

James Brown (Mam age x Wat c h My Su c c e s s)

Half-Arabian Countr y English Pleasure A AOTR 36 -54 with Lindsay O’Reilly French

2014 & 2015 U.S. NATIONAL CHAMPION HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 19-35 2015 CANADIAN NATIONAL CHAMPION HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE OPEN Owned by: LINDSAY O’REILLY FRENCH

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Un ited

States

Nationals

Con ten der

NAT IONA L C H A M PION

SD

Graceland

( Ve gaz x Empre s s O f B a sk)

Arabian English Pleasure A AOTR 19-39 with Lindsay O’Reilly French Arabian Pleasure Driving with Jason Krohn 2015 U.S. NATIONAL UNANIMOUS CHAMPION ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR MATURITY 2016 UNANIMOUS SCOTTSDALE CHAMPION ARABIAN PLEASURE DRIVING 2016 REGION 12 CHAMPION ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 2016 REGION 12 CHAMPION ARABIAN PLEASURE DRIVING Owned by: LINDSAY O’REILLY FRENCH

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Un ited

States

Nationals

Con ten der

NAT IONA L C H A M PION

Swing Town SOA (CH Harl e m Town x T R Fait Ac c ompli)

Half-Arabian Countr y English Pleasure A AOTR 55 & Over with Stacy McCrary 

2016 CANADIAN NATIONAL CHAMPION HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AATR 40 & OVER 2016 CANADIAN NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & OVER Owned by: STACY MCCRARY

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Un ited

States

Nationals

Con ten der

AVA ILA BLE FOR PU RCH ASE NAT IONA L C H A M PION

Wave On

(Mam age x C all away’s Se c on d D at e)

Half-Arabian English Pleasure A AOTR 19-39 Half-Arabian Park A AOTR with Lindsay O’Reilly French

Half-Arabian Pleasure Driving with Jason Krohn

AVA ILA BLE FOR PU RCH ASE

CF

3X NAT IONA L C H A M PION

Badras Symphony (B a ske Af ire x Swe e t D ay D re am)

Half-Arabian Hunter Pleasure Select A ATR with Lindsay O’Reilly French

Owned by: LINDSAY O’REILLY FRENCH

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Sara Thomas | 952-292-8212 info@ahtboutique.com

www.ahtboutique.com Ar abian Horse Times | 70 | Volume 47, No. 5A A


Jennifer and Josh Quintus  FM  E, Pilot Point, TX  -- colonialwood@gmail.com www.colonialwood.com

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ARABIAN WESTERN PLEASURE AAOTR 36-54 ABS ARABIAN WESTERN PLEASURE AAOTR JACKPOT presented by Robin Porter

HALF-ARABIAN HUNTER PLEASURE AAOTR 36-54 presented by Robin Porter HALF-ARABIAN HUNTER PLEASURE SELECT AATR presented by Alex Holloway Available for purchase

Owned by Maudi Fleming Fort Worth, TX

Jennifer and Josh Quintus -- www.colonialwood.com

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HALF-ARABIAN WESTERN PLEASURE AAOTR 36-54 ABS HALF-ARABIAN WESTERN PLEASURE AAOTR JACKPOT presented by Robin Porter

18x National and Reserve National Champion 22x Regional Champion and Reserve Champion Owned by Robin and Mike Porter Weatherford, TX

Jennifer and Josh Quintus -- www.colonialwood.com

www.crescentcreekfarms.com

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ARABIAN WESTERN PLEASURE AAOTR 19-35 ABS WESTERN PLEASURE AAOTR JACKPOT presented by Anne Whitaker-Keller ARABIAN WESTERN PLEASURE OPEN presented by Josh Quintus Sundance Kid V x Aliage SSA

6x National Champion 3x Reserve National Champion 2x Scottsdale Champion

Owned by Richard & Gail Whitaker and Anne Keller, Vacaville, CA For breeding info contact J.T. Keller (715) 928-2813 www.jtkellertraining.com

Jennifer and Josh Quintus -- www.colonialwood.com

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HALF-ARABIAN WESTERN PLEASURE SELECT AATR presented by Kelli Aguirre

Region 9 Champion HA Western Pleasure Select AATR Scottsdale Champion HA Western Pleasure U.S. National Reserve Champion HA Western Pleasure Owned by Kelli Aguirre Jupiter, FL

Jennifer and Josh Quintus -- www.colonialwood.com

www.southernoaksfarmllc.com

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HALF-ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR HALF-ARABIAN PARK AAOTR HALF-ARABIAN NATIVE COSTUME AAOTR presented by Stephanie Downing

Scottsdale Champion HA Native Costume ATR Region 9 Champion HA English Pleasure AAOTR Region 9 Reserve Champion HA Park ATR Multi-National Top Ten English Pleasure, Costume and Park Owned by Stephanie Downing Mt Enterprise, TX

Jennifer and Josh Quintus -- www.colonialwood.com

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Introducing to the Russka Farms Collection...

ARABIAN HUNTER PLEASURE JR HORSE presented by Jennifer Quintus ARABIAN HUNTER PLEASURE 55 & OVER AAOTR presented by Kathy Cranford

HALF-ARABIAN HUNTER PLEASURE 55 & OVER AAOTR presented by Kathy Cranford Available for purchase

Multi-National Top Ten HA Hunter Pleasure 55 & Over Scottsdale Top Ten HA Hunter Pleasure 40 & Over

Owned by Russka Farms, LLC Little Rock, AR

Jennifer and Josh Quintus -- www.colonialwood.com

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photos by Morgan Moore

AWPA ARABIAN HORSE WORLD $100,000 ARABIAN WESTERN PLEASURE FUTURITY presented by Josh Quintus

Owned by Abby Routledge Newalla, OK Friday Harbor Farm

Jennifer and Josh Quintus -- www.colonialwood.com

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National Show Horse Finals The Past, Present and Future Story and photos by Mary Mag Wilson

“Small but mighty” is what one might consider the National Show Horse (NSH) Finals in Springf ield, Ill., but to those that have been, an intricate part in the evolution of the show has not only seen its peak, but has the tools to grasp the show’s fullest potential.

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With the founding of the National Show Horse Registry in 1981 by Gene LaCroix, the crossing of Arabians and Saddlebreds was beginning to become popular, and Finals was considered “the” show to attend. Within this addition to the show horse world, it was a way to create change in the Arabian and Half-Arabian arena, by providing a registry that had their own shoeing rules, created valued prize money programs, and lastly, changed the way horse shows were run. Currently, the National Show Horse Registry’s current shoeing rules and regulations are limitless to ensure the soundness of the horse. Notably, the competitors at the National Show Horse Finals are always square and happy. The intentions of their shoeing regulations is to realize that more is not always better, the suitability for a happy big trotting horse is always the end-goal. Considered the best of both breeds, NSH exemplifies the beauty, power, and presence of both the Arabian and Saddlebred combined. From the very beginning, Robert Peebles was quickly hired to run and facilitate the organization, as he performed successfully for numerous years. Peebles, Karl Hart and Bruce Milligan solidified the standard of NSH being an instrumental force in the breed’s acceptance into the United States Equestrian Federation. With the show’s initiation into the yearly show schedule, Finals was first held in conjunction with the U.S. National Championship Horse Show. Containing NSH classes, the entries in these particular classes received prize money from the registry. Soon after, Finals became its own show, moving to a show facility in Rock Creek, Ky., but quickly moved to Broadbent Arena in Louisville, in response to the high-demand and central location. A trial location in Nebraska was worth a shot, but soon after, Finals found its present home in Springfield, Ill. The feel of the facility with its historic buildings, fall trees, overall cleanliness, big and safe stalls, the footing, arena, and central location, made this a top notch show facility. The choice of relocating to Springfield has remained steadfast, as this location continues to bring the people and add memories, which cannot be replicated anywhere else. It has also faced ‘national’ level challenges. After settling into their facility in 2001, the NSH Finals was in preparation for their show. Robert Peebles re-told the story of the September 11th terrorist attack that forever changed the Finals’ community and show. Robert remembers, “Back then, we had golf outings the day before the show.” Before they

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could even start, while in the clubhouse, Robert witnessed news of the first plane hitting the first tower. Immediately leaving the course, he called a meeting of all exhibitors and proposed three options: 1.) Cancel the 2001 NSH Finals, 2.) Fit the show into one day, or 3.) Go on with the show. A unanimous decision was made by all in attendance that the show would go on (to accommodate all participants yet to arrive). Competitor and avid NSH Finals supporter, Brooksley Sheehe of Tshampagne Arabians, also remembers September 11th vividly. During the attack of the Twin Towers, Brooksley, a youth rider at the time and joined by her mother and father, were in Miami boarding their flight to Springfield. Brooksley explains, “All of us were in line watching the televisions in the airport and we all witnessed the airplane hit the second tower. At that point, Miami International shut down completely. Every person was deplaned and every plane was grounded.� Brooksley and her family went straight to a car rental company and drove from Miami to Springfield. The love and support for Finals was apparent by all who found themselves in similar situations, finding a way and allowing the show to go on during this most difficult time. The NSH registry was originally created as a way to breed National Show Horses to each other, but unfortunately, it did not receive as much participation as anticipated. In 2009, the blood requirement was changed in order to accommodate and allow for all horses that

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contained at least 50% Arabian in their genes. This implementation welcomed all involved in the show horse world, including Saddlebreds, Dutch Harness Horses, Arabians, Friesians, and Hackneys. In order to accommodate this, the Show Horse Alliance, better known as SHA, was created. All saddle seat disciplined horses were able to be eligible for this division by paying a one-time fee of one hundred and fifty dollars. This has allowed Martha Rattner to show her Hackney Pony, Clarke Vesty a Friesian, and Gayle Lampe, her World Champion Saddlebred gelding. Bringing us to present day, where Dalton Budd presented a Saddlebred at the 2016 Finals. Purebred Arabian classes have also contributed to its success, with the 2016 Finals’ largest classes being the purebred divisions, with an average of twenty horses per class. Cindy Clinton is always looking to improve the show, whether in entries or the ability to grow the show horse industry, and the most recent positive addition was Academy classes, full of new exhibitors to the show arena varying from young riders to adults. It is a friendly environment that gives each exhibitor the feel of competing at Finals while spectators crowd the arena to deliver support. Brooksley Sheehe affirms the commitment Cindy Clinton makes to the registry, “Cindy has and will go above and beyond to accommodate exhibitors while gaining numbers for the show. A huge accommodation was changing the rule to any horse that is Half-Arabian. I think some people are still not aware of this change. Cindy has also lowered the registration fees of horses, added Arabian classes that qualify exhibitors for U.S. Nationals, and she has added parties to make the show fun.� Evident in her passion for the industry, Cindy gives what is asked of her and then some, to provide for her fellow horsemen.

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The 2016 NSH Finals entries climbed in numbers as the show has grown from the last few years. And continuous supporters of the show remain, who have never left Cindy’s side, including Empress Arabians, Chrishan Park, John Rannenberg, Tshampagne Arabians, Libby Ferguson, Lisa Jo White, Bob Gordon, Richard Wright, Duane Esser, Roger Odegard, their farm families, and more. “NSH would like to thank our supporters,” Cindy relays. “These people have attended Finals every year as long as I can remember. And what is really cool, is that I have watched the likes of Leah Beth Golladay, Jessica Clinton DeSoto, Alexis Scott, Dalton and Kellie Budd, and Wyatt Budd, grow up and now bring their own training barns.” The Sheehes can also attest to the show’s success as they continue to be exhibitors of the show. Brooksley explains, “The show has always had a different feel to it from the minute you arrive on the fairgrounds, and it truly stands by the phrase, “Take your friendship rings off when you enter the ring, but don’t forget to pick them up on the way out the gate.” Brooksley can proudly say, “Everyone always remembers to pick up their friendship rings. I have seen so many amazing classes and ride-offs at the show between gifted horses and talented equitation riders. The facility has an old-world charm to it, with its beauty and history, and it creates a wonderful environment for horses that I really believe helps horses perform better while they are there.” This year’s Finals provided the best of the best in competition, by portraying “quality and not quantity.” Along with its whole-family feel, it proves to be a show that can be the beginning of a wonderful equestrian career for exhibitors, such as Brittney Berget, Leah Beth Golladay, Dalton Budd and others who started out garnering youth career wins at this event. The exciting performances provided by Dalton Budd of Select Show Horses was a tribute to his youth success, and now his success as a professional, passing on Kellie and Dalton’s past experiences at this facility to their exhibitors this year. Leaving this stellar year behind and buffeted by its unwavering support, Cindy’s future goal of growing the show—but not too much—should easily be accomplished. NSH Finals’ plan is to stay very special. Near and dear to every exhibitors’ heart, those who have had the opportunity to compete at this show, know that the simplicity, beauty and quality competition that is provided will make their respected Grand Champion victory pass a memory that lasts a lifetime. NSH Finals invites you, your family and horses to experience that moment for yourself, by joining in 2017. n

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Matoi x Betty | 2011 Half-Arabian Bay Mare 2016 NSH FINALS CHAMPION CLASSIC COUNTRY ATR owned by Mary Mag Wilson Excellent Country Pleasure Horse | Great Amateur Mount

Contact John Golladay 847.668.3538 | john@cedarridgearabians.com

Contact Leah Golladay 515.520.7604 | leah@cedarridgearabians.com Ar abian Horse Times | 84 | Volume 47, No. 5A A


U .S .

N

A T I O N A L

Contenders

ARABELLA ORA (*Hariry al Shaqab x Star of Gaishea) Felix Cantu

ROYAL AURORA (Excalibur EA x Cinderella WC) Cindy McGown & Mark Davis

ARIA MAGNETIC (*Hariry al Shaqab x Star of Gaishea) Randy & Dottie Forrester

ROYAL DYANA (RD Dynamo x Veronica GA) Cindy McGown & Mark Davis

BASILIO CS (JJ Bellagio x Goddess of Da Vinci) Jack & Elizabeth Milam

ROYAL EMANUEL (Eden C x Emandoria) Cindy McGown & Mark Davis

LADY VITORIO ORA (Vitorio TO x TM Mona Lisa) Pam Halbrook

ROYAL KAVANT (Kavalle MI x Royal Samara H) Cindy McGown & Mark Davis

NARADAA (Hariry al Shaqab x RD Alotta Ambition) Regan & Renae Rohl

SULTAN ORA (Vegas DPA x Raherra) Carlos & Christiane Roizner

NW SIENSATIONAL (Afire Bey V x NW Siena Psyche) Cindy McGown & Mark Davis

DAVINCIS EBONY GA (Da Vinci FM x Ebony by Valentino) Perry & Suzanne Perkins

RD MARCIENA (QR Marc x NW Siena Psyche) Cindy McGown & Mark Davis

SHE BE ROYAL (Royal Invictus x Shes Still Jammin) Cindy McGown & Mark Davis

RHAVENNA (*Magnum Chall HVP x Rachael Ann) Tony Shooshani

THREE TIMES ALADY FF (Aria Impresario x PF Just Peachy Keen) Perry & Suzanne Perkins

WORLDWIDE LLC

w w w . R o y a l A n d G u z z o . c o m

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P

Leaders Of The Times:

score

by Theresa Cardamone

Joyfully romping through his grassy paddock, Pscore’s burnished mahogany coat glistens warmly in the sun. His majestic presence, abundance of type, and natural athleticism are evident as he trots effortlessly through the grass, knees breaking even. He exudes confidence and character, additional attributes of his stellar pedigree. Pscore is the premier stallion at Haras JM, which is among Brazil’s leading breeders under the guidance of owners José Alves Filho and Maisa Tucci Alves, proven by a ten-year stretch as Brazil’s Breeder of the Year. All told, they have been creating magnificent Arabian horses for over 27 years.

José was immediately fascinated by the horse that would come to play such a significant role in the Haras JM breeding program. “The first time I laid eyes on Pscore as a youngster, I knew he was so special,” José recalled. “What stood out to me was his natural charisma, super attitude, correct conformation, and of course, classic Arabian type.” Those characteristics had already combined to earn Pscore a Scottsdale championship and top ten futurity honors, but it was his potential as a breeding stallion that drove José and Maisa to pursue ownership. Their faith has been rewarded many times over. “Pscore is an incredible sire,” comments José. “He has

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Facing Page:

*PSCORE (Padrons Psyche x Bey Shahs Lady) This Page: Top:

VENITTIA D’PSCORE JM

(Pscore x Michelle Carol) Middle:

XAKLINNA D'PSCORE JM

(Pscore x Shaklina El Jahd HEC) Bottom:

VEGAS DI PSCORE JM

(Pscore x Tamara HVP)

enhanced my breeding program with his amazingly beautiful daughters. He is also a very sweet and kind horse. Pscore just loves to be around people!” Pscore possesses an enviable pedigree, being sired by the living legend and United States Reserve National Champion Stallion, Padrons Psyche, and out of one of the greatest producing mares of all time, double nationals top ten filly, Bey Shahs Lady. A proven dam line is a hallmark of a successful sire and generates keen interest in educated breeders. Through his incredible mother, Pscore is half-brother to Bey Ambition, a U.S. National Champion Futurity Colt and Canadian National Champion Stallion, and to a string of other United States or Canadian National Top Ten champions that includes Bey Jullyen, LC Arlington, Pstrategy, Artisann, Psax, RD Lady Magnum, and RD Alayna. This consistency of superior quality indicates that a blueprint for success has been drawn which provides perfect balance for the influences of the Padrons Psyche sire line. A glance at the daughters and sons that Pscore has sired for Haras JM is all it takes to impress even the most casual observer. They are uniformly upright and elegant, with long legs and necks, beautiful heads, boatloads of type, and exceptionally lofty and powerful motion. José Alves Filho is well aware of the prepotency that his stallion possesses. “Another thing that I find impressive about Pscore,” he said, “is his ability to consistently pass on the characteristics of himself and Padrons Psyche to his progeny. They are all super, and all winners.”  Among the most decorated of his get is Sherrize D’ Pscore JM, a stunningly elegant bay who was named Brazilian National Champion Filly and twice won the National Champion Mare title in Uruguay. She is almost deer-like in her grace and refinement, with tons of motion. Pscore has also sired Brazilian Reserve National Champion Vadishaah Pscore JM, and the ethereally beautiful Brazilian Reserve National Champion Venittia Di Pscore JM among many other domestic and international champions. From the looks of the recent foal crops at Haras JM, that roster of winners will continue to grow with each successive year as Pscore’s get and grand get continue to score championships of their own. n Ar abian Horse Times | 91 | Volume 47, No. 5A A


FACES & PLACES T h i s Ye a r’s Bre e der s For u m … was held at Peregrine Bloodstock in Lexington, Kentucky. Responsible for maintaining the integrity of the Purebred, Half-Arabian and Anglo-Arabian horse, as well as making the rules and regulations pertaining to registration, the Registration Commission of the Arabian Horse Association travels to different farms across the country each year to give breeders a forum for discussion. The Saturday Open House hosted by Quentin Naylor and Mark Wharton of Peregrine Bloodstock was outstanding. Around 65 people gathered to see a wonderful representation of what a consistent breeding program can do over generations. Guests were treated to a variety of broodmares, stallions and young stock, all based on Peregrine’s foundation Australian and U.S. National Champion Stallion, *Fairview Klassique. They have crossed the resulting mares with modern superstars such as Gazal Al Shaqab, Marwan Al Shaqab and Hariry Al Shaqab. Following the presentation of horses and a delicious local barbecue for lunch, the Breeders Forum was a wonderful exchange of ideas and dialogue between members, the Commission, as well as the many local breeders, owners and exhibitors who attended. The next meeting of the Registration Commission will be at the AHA Convention in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and all that are attending are invited to visit with them. n

➔➔ For latest news and events visit www.ahtimes.com Ar abian Horse Times | 92 | Volume 47, No. 5A A


Photos by Debbie Fuentes and Lisa Abraham. Ar abian Horse Times | 93 | Volume 47, No. 5A A


CF Mamie’s ’’s s Night Out The Sable Matriarch Who Founded An Ever Growing Village Of Human Fans and Half-Arabian Superstars by Catherine Cole Ferandelli

S

mall breeder and owner Melissa Subjeck’s viewpoint is vigorously succinct, “Every breeder dreams of breeding a national champion. Despite the twists and turns along the way, CF Mamie’s Night Out (“Night”) made that dream come true for me. Of course, it takes a village, and my village happens to be Night and Team Midwest.” Melissa continues, “I guess our story is how Night and I found one another, stayed together and ultimately changed my life.” A horse lover since childhood (she and her sister started with pony rides at camp), Melissa grew up in the show pen, starting with 4-H and “A” rated shows, to regional competitions and on to a couple reserve national championships, mostly in Amateur Hunter Pleasure. While starting college, Melissa’s parents moved to Elma, NY (upstate), and built a beautiful horse property including barn and arena. “This was an incredibly generous gesture, as my parents are not horse people,” maintains Melissa. As the farm developed and Melissa’s academic ambitions grew to law school, she realized the need to ‘get serious’ about her legal career. Facing a demanding legal career with Buffalo’s largest law firm, Melissa decided to sell her show string and acquire one nice mare for breeding. “I figured my career would be established when the babies were old enough to show.” Melissa continues, “My parents and I purchased a very nice Saddlebred mare in 2006. While researching this mare’s offspring, I came across Amy Glick’s Zamira Arabians web-page. Scrolling Amy’s website revealed a stunning black Saddlebred mare, CF Mamie’s Night Out. Of course, I wanted her, but we had already purchased the other mare. For weeks afterward, I would wander back to see if she was still available. I finally called Amy, cleaned out my bank account (I didn’t dare tell my parents!) and bought Night.” Night’s and Melissa’s first breeding venture together was with DA Valentino. Melissa recollects, “At the time, DA Valentino was beginning his entry into the history books. I thought he was perfect for Night, but he seemed a world away. I mentioned my plan to Amy Glick who kindly made my introduction to David Boggs and Team Midwest. We bred that spring and in 2009 an elegant ebony filly was born at Edwin and Corky Sutton’s.” Edwin took a look at the filly and stated, “I don’t say this often, but this filly is going to wear roses; mark my words, she will.” Perfectly named Ebony by Valentino (“Ebony”), she was the first offspring of Night’s and Melissa’s village of future superstars.

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Ebony quickly drew more fans. Jim Stachowski states, “I took one look and said, send that one to David.” Brian Murch shares, “I too, recommended Melissa send Ebony to David, and later, Remember The Nyte RMA (“Henry,” named after my gramps), a 2013 chestnut Vitorio TO gelding, and Endless Summer Nyte (“Eve”), a 2015 Baahir El Marwan grey filly, to Midwest as well.” Ebony won her first regional in the Half-Arabian Yearling Filly class at Region 14. And then Melissa received the call … David had a buyer for Ebony. Melissa struggled, “The decision was tough, but at the time, I was traveling frequently for work and I didn’t think I could give Ebony the spotlight she deserved. David promised that, as her breeder, I would stay involved. Gemini Arabians acquired Ebony and she went on to win multiple championships at Scottsdale, Iowa, NSH Finals and U.S. Nationals. David kept his promise, sending photos and emails of Ebony with the subject line Go Team! It felt bittersweet.” Still balancing career, a barn and show horses, Melissa decided to sell Night to a ‘real’ breeding facility. Arrangements were made with Night to be sold in foal to DA Valentino. And then, tragically, he was gone. Melissa looks back, “We tried frozen semen, but Night wouldn’t take. We then bred to Vitorio TO and as luck would have it, Night slipped. I brought her back to our farm and bred back to Vitorio the following spring, with Remember The Nyte RMA, our chestnut gelding, arriving in early 2013.” Melissa continues, “Same as Ebony in 2010, we sent him to Midwest in 2014 as a yearling for an evaluation, but this time we were not selling. Our whole family was at Tulsa later that year to cheer when he won U.S. National Champion Half-Arabian Yearling Gelding—I finally got my first set of red roses!” U.S. Nationals 2015, too, was a big year for the midnight colored matriarch, CF Mamies’ Night Out. Remember The Nyte RMA was Reserve National Champion Half-Arabian 2-Year-Old Gelding and Ebony by Valentino won the in-hand Saddle/Pleasure Half-Arabian Mare class. Night also, made her big debut as a “grandma,” with Ebony’s yearling filly Davincis Ebony GA, named National Champion Half-Arabian Yearling Filly and her three year old filly earning National Champion Half-Arabian Stock/Hunter Mare AAOTH. Melissa smiles with pride, “With those wins, I was ranked second place in number for breeders in my category at U.S. Nationals. All this with my one mare, CF Mamie’s Night Out!” 2016 has been a standout year too. Melissa’s debut with Remember The Nyte RMA resulted in championships at Scottsdale and Region 7. “I cannot tell you how good it felt,” Melissa shares, “to finally be at my horses’ lead!” Henry was also unanimous in his open class with Alcides Rodrigues.

Top right: Remember The Nyte RMA. Bottom left: Ebony By Valentino.

Though Ebony didn’t show at 2016 Scottsdale, she still earned the honor of Arabian Horse Times Readers’ Choice Half-Arabian Halter Horse of the Year for the third time. Now owned by Stella Bella Arabians, Ebony was 2016 Youth National Champion Half-Arabian Mare Saddle/Pleasure JTR with Sara Bassichis. Today as a partner in a busy law firm, Melissa looks to her Night-created village for camaraderie, competition and fun, “U.S. Nationals 2016 will see me at the lead with Night’s son, three year old Remember The Nyte RMA and her grey yearling filly, Endless Summer Nyte. Never could I have imagined that this now 22 year old mare would bring such joy and passion into my life. Every decision in the building of Night’s village was made with the kind tutelage of top notch individuals. I will be forever grateful to so many folks, including David Boggs, Alcides Rodrigues, Amy Glick, Maureen Quillin, Edwin and Corky Sutton, Brian Murch, our vet Dr. Kim Anderson, and most of all, my incredibly supportive parents. Yes, I attest to this, one can be a small breeder in the wonderful world of Arabian horse breeding and build their own village of success.” n

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A JUDGE’S PERSPECTIVE B r i a n Fe r g u s on

Brian aboard the home-bred VF Fires Alarm, a Reserve National Champion and multi-Regional winner in English Pleasure.

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BRIAN FERGUSON

Brian aboard Jamin’s Golden Boy.

Years as a judge: 34 years This is not your first year judging a nationals show. How many times have you judged U.S Nationals and when? This year will be my fourth time judging U.S. Nationals. I have also judged U.S. in 1992, 1998 and 2010. You have also judged national shows in different countries. What are some differences vs. similarities? The other foreign nationals that I have been honored to judge have all been more concentrated on halter, whereas the U.S. and Canadian Nationals showcase all of the attributes of the Arabian horse with extensive performance divisions. Why did you decide to become a judge? Years ago I was taking saddle seat lessons from an American Saddlebred trainer, Carl Leigh. He encouraged me to try my hand at judging, as hehad always enjoyed it. What are you most looking forward to at this year’s 50th Nationals? I love everything about the Nationals. It is such a great showcase for the Arabian breed. The Arabian horse industry has some of the greatest trainers and exhibitors ~ I love when everyone

“shows up” to give it their best. I know the 50th US Nationals will again provide some great performances that everyone will be talking about for years to come! What do you do to prepare for Nationals? I usually go through the time schedule and highlight all the classes that my team will be officiating. To get myself mentally ready, I review the class specs for the specific classes within the divisions I will be judging. Tell us about your experience judging the national shows abroad. I have been very fortunate to be asked to judge abroad a few times. Aside from judging the outstanding entries, I have always enjoyed traveling to breeders farms after the show to witness their programs and discuss breeding. It has been a tremendous education for me. Are there unique things done at other national shows such as the Brazilian or Ecuadorian Nationals that you wish other countries would incorporate into theirs? There is an electric feeling in the air at some of the other nationals with loud demonstrations for favorite horses. While these were often exciting to witness, I am not sure that U.S. Nationals needs the same types of demonstrations. I do feel the halter

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scoring system has taken away some of the excitement and anticipation that used to exist in the halter rings in this country. Judging a Nationals show makes for long workdays. What is the biggest obstacle for you to overcome? I have never felt that National shows are a long assignment. In fact, it has usually been just the opposite. I am usually so exhilarated, that calming down afterward is the most difficult part. I will all of a sudden realize that it’s almost over, and we only have a few more days. What do you do at the show when not judging? I usually watch the other divisions when not judging. In particular, I really like seeing the halter division to see what people are breeding. For someone who is competing at this year’s nationals for the first time, what advice could you give them in regards to show ring presence? If this is someone’s first nationals, I would tell them to relax and concentrate on what they have been working on all along. Also, enjoy the moment, don’t get so nervous that the presentation is all a blur, but ride with confidence. You have put a great deal into preparation, now savor the whole experience while connecting with friends. What do you feel is the biggest misconception about judges? I hope there aren’t any misconceptions about judges. The judges I have had the pleasure of working with are

Brian with ASB World Champion Get Crackin'.

dedicated and passionate about doing their best for the Arabian breed. I will add that the education givento judges by AHA is second to none. Are there classes you look most forward to while judging nationals? I am looking forward to all the classes, however, I especially like the young horse classes and being able to see new rising stars. Do you have a favorite ‘memorable moment’ from past U.S. Nationals? One of my favorite memories from a U.S. Nationals was being the call judge for the work off between Afires Heir and Vegas. I felt those two magnificent athletes and their trainers put on an exemplary demonstration of the Arabian English pleasure horse for the horse world to see. I was so pleased for their owners and their breeders, and that everything came together that evening in Tulsa. It was magical! Brian’s parents, Tom and Betty Ferguson.

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BRIAN FERGUSON

Brian with wife Dianne and daughter Taylor on Cohiba Baby at the 2004 Youth Nationals.

Please share with us a memorable moment during your career as a judge. One that comes to mind happened quite a few years ago. I was judging a Class “A” show in Indiana and towards the end of the morning session on the second day, it was announced that there would be an additional class added to the morning session just before lunch. This was before TBA classes, so it was something foreign to me. I couldn’t understand what it might be. The gate opened and Tim Shea drove in with Hucklebey Berry and put on an absolute demonstration of the perfect harness horse. It was a pleasure to witness. What would you say to encourage others to become a judge? I would give the same advice that was given to me. Try it! I know it has enriched my life beyond anything I ever imagined it could be. What are your interests outside of judging within the Arabian horse industry? My wife, Dianne, and I have a small breeding farm in Upstate New York and we are eagerly awaiting next year’s foals. What is on your “bucket list” of to-dos? I have been honored to officiate at all but two Regional Championships in the U.S. I would like to judge in those regions as well. I would also like to continue judging abroad now that I have the time to travel. n

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2016 UPCOMING EVENT COVERAGE FROM AROUND THE GLOBE ... 20-22 October Rabab Int. Show - Egypt 21-30 October U.S. National Arabian & Half-Arabian Championships (USA) 29-30 October European Championships 4-5 November The 6th National Palestinian Pure Breed Show 11-12 November Kuwait National Championships 18-19 November Kuwait National Egyptian Event 25-27 November World Arabian Horse Championships Salon du Cheval, Paris *Coverage level varies and show schedule is subject to change

Lara Ames +1 612 210 1592 lara@ahtimes.com MichaĂŤl Steurs +32 (0) 497 54 99 44 | michael@arabianhorseresults.com Ar abian Horse Times | 100 | Volume 47, No. 5A A


the time has come

photo by Riyan/Kira


Midwest Station I | 2 | Ar abian Horse Times


truse 2016 us national contenders presented by Midwest Station I 2016 Region 10 Unanimous Champion TREATY (TRUSE x R O FAMES VANITY) top photo Half Arabian Yearling Sweepstakes Colts/Geldings 2016 Region 7 Unanimous Champion IM THE TRU DIVA (TRUSE x IM ADIVA TOO ora) top left photo Half Arabian Yearling Sweepstakes Fillies 2016 Iowa Gold Star Champion Yearling Gelding

CRIMSON CROSSFIRE LRA (TRUSE x SERENATA ELJAMAL) bottom left photo Purebred Yearling Sweepstakes Geldings

Midwest Station I | 3 | Ar abian Horse Times


tenkenva arabians Wendell and Cynthia Petty

TRUTHE

(TRUSE x PARYMISSCUOUS GIRL) 2016 region 11 champion non-sweepstakes yearling colt www.tenkenva.com | cynthia@tenkenva.com

Midwest Station I | 4 | Ar abian Horse Times


Midwest Station I | 5 | Ar abian Horse Times


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Midwest Station I | 6 | Ar abian Horse Times


Midwest Station I | 7 | Ar abian Horse Times


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Midwest Station I | 8 | Ar abian Horse Times


Midwest Station I | 9 | Ar abian Horse Times


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Midwest Station I | 10 | Ar abian Horse Times


Midwest Station I | 11 | Ar abian Horse Times


famkah Owned by Marin Broucek

(FAUSTO CRH x ELJOMAR RISSLA)

REGION 11 CHAMPION MARE aoth AVAILABLE IN FOAL TO ctj KUDURO

Midwest Station I | 12 | Ar abian Horse Times


Midwest Station I | 13 | Ar abian Horse Times


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Midwest Station I | 14 | Ar abian Horse Times


Congratulations

caden cruise congratulations, caden, on your incredible achievements at youth nationals! A dream come true! unanimous national champion half arabian mare s/h – IM ADIVA TOO ORA+// unanimous national champion gelding TAKE MI WORD top ten purebred mare – TAMAR VALENTINA your hard work, dedication and commitment paid off!

Special thanks to Austin, for all your guidance and support!

love, Mom, Dad and Lacie Midwest Station I | 15 | Ar abian Horse Times


TRUSE NATIONAL CHAMPION AND SIRE OF MULTIPLE REGIONAL CHAMPION YEARLINGS IN 2016

midwest station i Bob, Janene, Austin and Olivia Boggs

www.bobboggs.com | austin.boggs10@yahoo.com or jnrboggs@aol.com

Midwest Station I | 16 | Ar abian Horse Times


By MARIO BRAGA

It is said that lightning never strikes twice in the same spot. If that is a fact, we have no other choice but to appeal to ancient mythology in order to explain the series of unparalleled show ring success achieved by Criadero Medrano, owned by Manuel Durini, in recent times.

Gold. Victory. Success. Words to describe the amazing work developed at Medrano. Indeed, hard work developed for over three decades that, combined with wise breeding choices, led to the creation of the incomparable National Champion Mare of Ecuador and the USA, MD Hibat Allah by DA Valentino, who is truly one of the most exquisite mares alive.

Above: MD Hibat Allah. U.S. and Ecuadorian National Champion Mare. Bred by Criadero Medrano and owned by the Aria Patners LLC.


Left: Mike Wilson and Epiic (by AJ Thee Luca), Scottsdale International Gold Champion Junior Colt bred by Criadero Medrano, and his dam, 2016 Ecuadorian National Champion Mare, Anastasiaa, below with Lucho Guimarães.

Somewhere between the tales of the lost city of Eldorado in the Amazon and the golden touch of Frisian King Midas, we shall find our link to the extraordinary: the initials MD.

Golden is also the color of Hibat’s mother ‘Anastasiaa’ (ATA Bey Starr X Showgirl SP by Shaklans Padron NA), a mare worth her own weight in gold. An undisputed world aristocrat in the making, I must admit that this story was not intended to specifically praise this lovely mare. But after some preliminary research, one can’t help but to realize that her story and the very story of Criadero Medrano are deeply entangled. To start with, before Anastasiaa was brought back to the show ring to claim her 2016 Ecuadorian National Champion mare title, she had already produced two Ecuadorian National Champion mares: MD Psylk in 2011 and MD Hibat Allah in 2015. Very seldom in history does the dam of a national champion mare

become herself a national champion. To be able to do it twice, as far as I know, is unheard of.

The golden touch of Midas did not stop there, nevertheless. Manuel Durini did it once again when he added the sensational bay stallion AJ Thee Luca to his breeding program. Bred by Ajman Stud of the UAE and born in the USA at Wilson Bloodstock, AJ Thee Luca displays a pedigree with the best bloodlines from several countries. He is an unusual non-straight Egyptian stallion (since most of his paternal siblings are straight Egyptians) and yet proof of the value of outcrossing successfully to these ancient lines. He is by the extraordinary straight Egyptian sire Thee Desperado, a Scottsdale Grand Champion and U.S. Reserve National Champion stallion. His mother is the legendary Argentinian import and National Champion HED Caramba, by the great Magnum Psyche out of HED Cajun Queen, a daughter of Cajun Prince HCF, bred in Brazil.


Top right: 2016 Scottsdale International Champion Junior Filly MD Mirka, bred and owned by Criadero Medrano, and her sire, AJ Thee Luca, above.

Further down in his dam line we find the Brazilian National Champion Mare NV Ali Bey and U.S. National Champion Mare Indian Genii. More so, AJ Thee Luca is a National Champion himself and also a winner at Scottsdale and the Egyptian Event.

Thee Luca is proving to be one of the top upcoming sires standing at public stud today. Though his progeny is still very young (his first foal crop was born in 2013), several of them gathered national titles in Ecuador. And since gold is the standard, two of Luca’s babies have already claimed the highest honors in the U.S., also by winning the gold medal at the prestigious Scottsdale International Arabian Horse Show: Epiic and MD Mirka.


Interestingly, both MD Mirka and Epiic also trace to Anastasiaa. Mirka is out of the above-mentioned National Champion MS Psylk (by Padrons Psyche out of Anastasiaa) whereas Epiic is her son. Along with MD Hibat Allah they created a dynasty for Criadero Medrano. Their mare family also traces to the aristocrat mare Klassic (Bask Classix X Khemogina by Khemosabi), who has produced nine champions including national champions Drama Qyeen and TF Queen Ahearts. But it was through Klassic’s other daughter, TF Khouros Girl, that the branch of Anastasiaa came to life.

Owner: MANUEL FRANCISCO DURINI TERAN Quito - Ecuador Telephones: +593 2677980 / +593 2677981 Cel phone: + 593 99737254 Email: endesa@endesabotrosa.com

May the golden glow of Criadero Medrano’s success shine even brighter in the future and draw Arabian horse aficionados from all over the world, to unfold the secrets of this Eldorado of beauty and quality in the country of Ecuador.

U.S.A representative Wilson Training Center, Inc. 22220 Wolf Branch Road Sorrento, Florida 32776 Mike Wilson Cell: 352-267-5550 Peri Wilson: 407-402-2116 Email: WilsonTrainingC@aol.com


n

ho e ss,

by

FACES & PLACES La Rura l E xpo … is one of South America’s greatest and largest livestock fairs in the beautiful city of Buenos Aires, Argentina, and this year it celebrated its 127th show. On July 18th and 19th, the Arabian horse breed took center stage on the unique show grounds of La Rural de Palermo. During these two special days, the best horses in Argentina were brought before Sandro Pinha from Brazil, who was assigned with judging the show. “For me it was a pleasure going back to Argentina after 10 years, this time to judge one of the most important shows in the country,” says Pinha. “The quality of the horses are world class, and the energy was amazing with the stands full of horse lovers. Congratulations to all involved!” Once again, several of the most traditional breeding farms of the country gathered and brought their finest representatives. The Grand Champion Stallion, Alfabia Sheib, is an Italian import by the renowned stallion WH Justice and out of Prishta SF, owned by Lady Gina Pelham’s Haras La Catalina. The Reserve Grand Champion Stallion was the U.S. import Auteur, by Arbiteur, owned by Haras Cuatro Estrellas of Claudio Cristiani. The Grand Champion Mare, HCE Terdrona, is a daughter of Auteur and HCE Magshadrona, bred and also owned by Haras Cuatro Estrellas. The Reserve Grand Champion title went to JJ Aphar Bella, bred and owned by Haras Mayed of the Santibanes family. Her father, JJ Aphar, is by the Marwan al Shaqab son Faraa al Shaqab, who was on lease to Haras Mayed some years ago. Special thanks to Sociedad Rural de Palermo, Jorge Concaro, Gaston Labadie and Santi Fornieles for their attention and help with the results. n

Grand Champion Stallion Alfabia Sheib

Grand Champion Mare HCE Terdrona

Story by Mario Braga, photos by Sociedad Rural Argentina, Daniel Sempé.

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Spain, The Yeguada Militar And The Legendary Duke Of Veragua (An excerpt from the book “The Arabian Horse in Brazil” by Mario Braga)

Veragua mares.

S

pain is an important reference in Arabian horse breeding around the world, notably since the introduction of the “Cría Caballar” and the founding of the Studbook, considered the oldest of its kind, in 1847, in Jerez de la Frontera. Later, in 1893, the “Yeguada Militar” was created by royal decree at Moratalla, in the region of Cordoba. Like in many other countries, the Spanish horse breeding in this period was initiated with the purpose of supplying horses with Arabian blood to improve the existing heavier cavalry horses. Later on, the main objective became the preservation of a gene pool of Spanish horses, either Arabians or the Andalusians, who also derived from them. By the middle of the 19th century, Queen Isabel II ordered an expedition to the east with the sole purpose of obtaining animals of Arabian blood to Spain. Her successor, King Alfonso XII, would timely follow that initiative, by importing animals from other European nations. However, it was only in the beginning of the 20th century, with Capitain Luiz de Azpeitia de Moro’s expedition to Mesopotamia, Syria and the Arabian Desert, in 1905, and to Poland in 1906, that the breeding of Arabian horses in Spain was formally established. In his travel diary, Captain Azpeitia relates that the main goal of the trip was to find horses that were suitable for good riding and that also had refinement, good stature and ages between eight

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and 10 years. 23 horses were brought from the east and a similar number came from Poland. Other expeditions were organized to these same places between 1908 and 1912, and that was when the three pillars from Spanish breeding, Ursus, Wan Dyck and Seanderich, were imported from Poland and from the Desert. Through them, many were the horses bred by the Yeguada Militar whose influence has crossed the years; especially the three notable stallions Galero, Garbo and Jacio.

The Duke of Veragua with Cadiz.

“My uncle watched the male horses every morning in Madrid, and then hired a car almost every afternoon to take him to Valjuanete,” says Piedad Colon de Carvajal, Marquesa de Avella, Duke de Veragua’s niece. “Sometimes we accompanied our uncle on these trips, and whenever we commented on the beauty of this horse or that, his immediate answer was, ‘God bless him!’ We teased him a lot about this, because he never blessed us!” Another invaluable legacy of Spanish breeding to the world was the stud of Valjuanete, founded by the Duke of Veragua in 1920. A direct descendent of Christopher Columbus and considered by Lady Wentworth to be one of the biggest authorities in the breed, the Duke of Veragua purchased stock from several origins, inside and outside of Spain, but the horses that he bought at Crabbet Park, specially the five daughters of Skowronek, were the ones that became immortalized in the pages of history. His stallion Razada, also from England, was the sire of Nana Sahib, another pillar of Spanish breeding. Despite the total destruction of the farm along with the Duke’s assassination during the Spanish civil war, the breeding of Valjuanete managed to survive due to some animals that were not found right away by General Francisco Franco, and thanks to that, some of the original lines are still found in the present day. Despite the fact that all of the horse records were burned, the V mark done with fire, carried by these surviving horses, served as a guarantee of their purity, and is accepted by the entire world. It is the case of the famous mare Estopa, the mother of El Shaklan, a direct descendant of one of the Duke de Veragua’s mares. n

The Duke’s stallion, Razada, 1930.

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From AmAteur to ProFessionAl ... Fred Kunze When in life did you know that you wanted a profession in the Arabian horse industry? I always enjoyed training and showing horses, but I did not have a lot of experience. Our family had good horses and offered me to show them in amateur classes so that I could gain experience and feel the excitement of it. The moment I set foot in the show ring and stood up a horse, I realized it was what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. At what age did you know you had the horse bug? I can’t assign a precise date since my family has been breeding horses for many years, even before I was born—I’ve been around horses literally, since I was born. When did you get involved with the Arabian horse? I started to get truly involved with the breed when I was 13 years old. That was when I went to my first Arabian horse show, the “Internacional de Avaré.” Before that, I had never attended a halter horse show. I fell in love immediately with the horses’ beauty and with the way that they were presented. After that, I couldn’t think of anything else. That was when I got really involved and started to dedicate my time to the horses at our farm.

What was your family’s response, when you told them you wanted to make your living in Arabian horses? Initially they thought it would be a temporary thing. Nevertheless, they always supported me and backed my decision. My involvement and dedication progressed so naturally that it became something that I just couldn’t be away from. I am totally in love with my profession and I wouldn’t be happier doing anything else. What is the biggest difference between competing in the junior/amateur ranks vs. the professional world? Though in the professional arena the competition is always harder,

When you were young, did you dream of becoming involved in the Arabian horse industry? The presence of the horses and their delicate traits caught my attention so much, that I started to study pedigrees through the internet and magazines, and I realized how great the Arabian horse industry was. My focus became learning how to turn a horse into a show horse. But back then, I didn’t realize that someday I would be a part of it so directly. Is there one horse that sticks out in your mind that impacts you still today? Through magazines, I always followed with enchantment the beautiful path of Bey Shah and his progeny. More recently, I was able to follow Magnum Psyche and his get. They had great attitudes and intelligence.

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with great horses and handlers, I feel that the overall desire to do things perfectly, have a great show and enjoy yourself, is present in both professional and amateur segments. What does a typical day consist of for you in the barn? A typical day in the barn for me consists of starting early, hearing the horses neighing, feeding them, working and training them, and watching how they develop and improve when it is all done, with dedication and love. What advice would you give someone who is thinking of following in the same path that you have? My advice is to never give up and to always have love for the horses. It is a journey that demands a lot of time, hard work and humility, to be able to learn new things everyday about the horses and about yourself. What is the biggest teaching method that you were taught as a kid, that you pass onto your students today? It happened when I had the chance to travel to the U.S.A. with Sandro Pinha and learn more about the horse industry and see up-close those horses that I had previously researched on the internet and magazines. To be able to work beside great handlers such as Sandro Pinha and Dejair Souza, is a great privilege.

What is the biggest difference that you see in the youth world now vs. when you were competing in it? The difference is in the improved quality of the halter horses and the great professionals that work in this area. I have to say, that it is not easy to compete with the stars of the halter world! Away from the barn, what is a perfect day for you? A perfect day for me away from the barn is to get out of the ordinary and visit new peaceful places. I live in SĂŁo Paulo, the largest city in Brazil, a place full of concrete and avenues. I love beaches and waterfalls. Whenever I can, I search for the abundant nature that we have in our country. Is there one show ring moment for you that stands out above the rest? It was last year, when I won my first national championship in Brazil (junior colts). I was competing with great professionals who were always my role models and who taught me a lot and continue to do so. n

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Elizabeth and Abrakadabra RH (ROL Intencyty x Miss Starrbuxx)

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WOMEN AROUND THE WORLD Elizabeth Kassis H A R A S SA N TA A NA

M EL I PI L L A , R EGIÓN M E T ROPI L I TA NA , CH I LE

Of all the different breeds of horses, what drew you to the Arabian? My dad bought a farm when I was little and he bought a pair of Chilean horses and a pair of Arabian horses to reflect our origins through the horses. We are Palestinian descendants living in Chile. What does your dream horse look like? I am the luckiest woman in the planet. I have my dream horse at home. He is my beautiful, big, gorgeous and beloved black stallion Abrakadabra RH. Who was the first Arabian horse you laid eyes on and what was the experience like? His name was Valdeosera El Mukhtar. He was our first stallion. His character and movements ... omg! I will never forget! 20 years after his death, I found a beautiful painting when I was window shopping and I can almost swear that was his portrait. Of course, now he is in a special place in my home.

How has the Arabian horse enriched your life? First of all, through the Arabian, I understood that I needed to follow my dreams and passions and that I would find happiness in working in what I really like! It took me a very long time to understand it and to make the “jump,” but I finally did and now I can say that even though it is extremely difficult, I found happiness racing horses, especially Arabians. They give me so much! They fill my heart. Tell us a little more about your beautiful country and the breeding of Arabian horses there. Chile is a beautifully long and narrow country. We have the desert, beautiful beaches, great valleys and impressive forests. We have the Andes Mountains and the southern glaciers; Easter Island and a part of

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Antarctica. We have an enormous diversity of animals and vegetation and great views and sceneries. The first Arabian horses arrived 150 years ago from Germany, but since the 70’s, breeding has been developing consistently, mixing the bloodlines bred here with imported horses from many different countries, resulting in very unique horses. Please describe to us briefly your own breeding program and your future plans as a breeder. We’ve been breeding horses for almost 40 years, but I started my new breeding program only 6 years ago when I went to Scottsdale and bought four broodmares and my stallion. With them and the horses I have here, I started breeding, and guided by a very shiny star, had wonderful babies, achieved a lot, and have had great success. That is the result of hard work, study, team work, travels, being humble, and thankful of all the people and situations that pass in my life, learning from each of them and always wanting to become better and better! Nowadays, I have taken a big step and sent two horses to Scottsdale to train and compete—I took them

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WOMEN AROUND THE WORLD

myself in the cargo plane! I’m sure they will have great performance careers and will open the path for me to always bring my horses to compete abroad and show the great quality of horses I am breeding. What is your favorite Arabian horse destination to travel to? Scottsdale, of course! Maybe because it was my first show and I have special feelings for it, or maybe because I love the desert or because I’ve made a lot of great friends through the years. Never the less, I love to travel and hope to go everywhere. I’m waiting for my twin boys to be a little older (they are just 4) so they can go with me all over the world to see horses! What makes you happy? The laughter of my children … looking into a horse’s eyes … stretching myself all over my horse, embracing him and the smell of his neck—heaven! I also love how a horse can change or heal the life of a human being. Outside of the Arabian horse community, what do you like to do to unwind from a busy workweek? Try to get some good sleep! I also like to go somewhere new, laugh with friends around a good wine, taste delicious food, and treat myself with a very good massage! n

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25

Things You Don’T Know AbouT … 1. The first horse I ever rode or handled was … when I

Laurelle Anderson

was still just a toddler, my great grandfather gave me his last carriage horse. I believe she was nearing 30 years of age and measured close to 16 hands or more to her withers. She was a gentle giant and very tolerant of a small child. Most importantly, she stirred a lifelong passion within me.

2. My happiest moment with a horse is … easily any and

all of the time I spent with the 1977 U.S. National Champion mare *Wizja, while I worked at Lasma Arabians. I had a unique bond with this mare and she was definitely my ‘once-in-a-lifetime’ mare. Not only was her beauty intoxicating, she was exquisitely refined and yet powerfully athletic. She stole my breath away when she floated into the Coliseum in 1977 for the U.S. National Champion Mare class. She wasn’t a pushover by any means, you had to earn her respect, and that just made the reward all the more valuable when I discovered how sensitive and responsive she was to all my TLC. It was pure pleasure to care for her and she definitely reciprocated my affection. By contrast, one of my saddest days was bidding farewell to her, knowing it was unlikely I would see her again.

3. The first ribbon I ever won was … I was fortunate

to spend my earliest years in a very close knit farming community where I participated in the local 4-H

community. In addition to learning basic horsemanship, we also participated in some fun classes. My favorite was ‘Musical Boxes,’ based on the concept of ‘musical chairs.’ It was a blast! While participating at the local summer fair, I recall winning my first ribbon in that class. It was a total thrill!

4. My first influence in the horse industry was … from

the very first Arabian horse show I attended, without a doubt, it was Lasma Arabians and the LaCroix family that commanded my attention. Shortly thereafter, working at Lasma became a goal and I am very grateful to have been a part of all the excitement during those historic days. They definitely did set new standards for the breed. It was a magical time, and safe to say, anyone who lived it, understands that this was true.

5. The first breed of horse involved with was … the American Quarter Horse.

6. The age I got involved with horses was … 5 or 6 years of age; maybe even younger.

7. The first thing I do when I get to the barn is … walk

through and check the horses. If I have them, I offer a few carrots… love the fragrance of fresh shavings, the hay, the horses … just breathe it all in. Heaven! Experiencing the horses is always a natural high for me … it just goes right to the core of who I am.

8. The last thing I do when I leave the barn is … start anticipating the next visit or the next horse show.

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9.

18. My top vacation spot is … definitely

The greatest horse I’ve ever ridden is … I would have to say perhaps, that *Rustann, a half brother to *Bask++ may have been as close as I came to riding one of the greatest horses.

Brazil …Tahiti is right up there, but so is Newport Beach … Even so, living in Scottsdale pretty much feels like a vacation spot all the time.

19. Few foods make me happier than …

10. The most gratifying part of

Pinot Grigio and chocolate brownie with raspberries … at the same time.

my job is … I absolutely love photographing the Arabian horse. I love the attitudes, the personalities … especially when you have a horse that will truly exemplify how strongly they believe in themselves. I love all the snort and blow! It’s a total rush for me, especially the performance divisions, particularly when they just pour themselves into their tasks.

20.Without horses, I would be … unable to imagine such an existence.

21. The piece of tack or equipment that I can’t live without is … my Nikon and lens.

22.My childhood dream job was …

to work at Lasma Arabians, and am grateful to have had that opportunity.

11. My favorite restaurant is … El Charro, in the heart of

Scottsdale. Resting at the base of Camelback Mountain and the Praying Monk, the views from the patio are nothing short of phenomenal. This historic gem has captured the essence of authentic Sonoran charm. Simply a great spot to relax, enjoy great food and breathe it all in all the nuances of the Arizona vibe.

12. My favorite non-horse hobby is … dancing. I taught at Arthur Murray Dance Studio for years, putting myself through Nursing School, though I rarely hit the dance floor anymore. Those were pretty fun times! Today, as a Realtor®, I really enjoy helping clients and friends find the perfect home for themselves.

13. My favorite genre of movie is … adventure dramas. 14. When someone asks me, why Arabians, I say… it is their inherent beauty, the way they hold and carry themselves, a sophisticated elegance, and perhaps most particularly, their animated presence. You have to earn their respect, it will be the Arabian who will decide if your possession will be allowed. Such a clever breed, and they will just not be ignored. Love that!

23. My favorite breeding bloodline is … the great Polish

breeders and their passion to breed truly great Arabians. I’m drawn most to individuals that possess bloodlines tracing back to *Bask++ somewhere in their pedigrees.

24. My biggest pet peeve is … negative, critical and/or judgmental people.

25. The most influential person in my life is … Without a

doubt, my father. Three words immediately come to mind when I think of my dad … faith, hope and love. He was steadfast, soulful and always a man of his word. He had a fantastic dry wit with a twinkle in his Paul Newman eyes. And in my world, he was my ‘strength’ during my weakest moments, my ‘hope’ when I could only feel despair, and the ‘light’ on my path with unconditional love when I was feeling a little lost. He taught me how to believe, how to be a survivor and to rise above the adversities that challenged my life. I doubt I would be the person I am today without this incredible man. He has made all the difference in in my life and I still miss him every day. n

15. My favorite division to show in is … initially, English and park. Then, definitely, the halter division. I love it all.

16. In my free time, I like to … process photos

taken of amazing horses and events associated with this community.

17. Horses have taught me … that despite everything else, the ups and downs, they are the constant, the light, the relentless energy that can pick me up and rock my endorphins to a guaranteed natural high. They just never disappoint. They are a true passion for sure.

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AmAteur Spotlight ... Josephine Graci

How long have you been involved with Arabian horses? Over 20 years, as I started breeding Arabians at the age of 14. You would typically find kids in the barn riding, but I spent my days in the broodmare barn and my nights researching pedigrees. I had dreams of breeding national winning performance and halter horses and luckily, was able to turn that into a reality while still a teenager. What disciplines have you and are you competing in? My heart holds a special place for both the halter and English divisions. There’s nothing more exciting than riding a great English pleasure horse. Therefore, I have focused my energies on producing typey saddle seat horses that can halter as babies and eventually win in the performance ring. That being said, I have produced national winners in various divisions besides halter and saddle seat and they include hunter, western, endurance, show hack and native costume. What is your favorite riding style? My favorite style is hands down, saddle seat. The horses are powerhouses filled with energy that when channeled correctly, give you the most thrilling and exhilarating ride. However, I must admit I love watching western pleasure junior horses in bosals, and wish I had the patience and great seat needed to ride in that class! If you come from a long line of family involved with the Arabian horse, what does it mean to carry this tradition on? I am a city slicker who does not come from a long line of horsemen. My dad loved horses and got me involved as a young girl. He has always been supportive and allowed me the liberties of pursuing my passion for horses. It’s a love we both share, and in that regard, is wonderful to be involved in this endeavor with him and his encouragement. Perhaps it is more meaningful in a sense, as he and I have created our own horse show traditions over the years. Hopefully, it will carry on to the next generation, as my niece seems very interested in pursuing horseback riding and showing.

Who is your favorite horse you have ever owned? Lily Marlaina, a feisty, petite mare with way too much charisma. She was the product of a risky breeding decision I made at a time when it was unpopular to mix certain lines. Her sire was a straight Egyptian stallion whose dam line is bar none, and her dam was a pure Polish powerhouse who was an aristocrat. Lily was born so premature that the vets only gave her a 9% chance of living … yes, less than 10% chance of surviving. But she was a fighter since day one. She was also stunning and exotic. I fell in love instantly, and it was completely one-sided, as she too, was in love with herself to pay me any mind. She was a peculiar mare and very finicky, but my best producing mare by far. She did not get along with everyone—two legged and four legged creatures alike. She would harass the stall cleaners, yet love on the 12-year-old girl with autism. She would beat up the old draft mix gelding and protect the mini donkeys. I have never seen a mare discipline her foals the way she does either, making sure they follow her lead, keep a clean stall and stand in the corner when she had enough of their shenanigans. She has produced national winners in halter and performance by so many different studs, and reached aristocrat status by the age of 8. Her foals

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in turn, have produced Scottsdale, regional, World Cup, national and international champions. She has greatly changed not only my breeding program, but the program of others who own her foals and grand foals. She’s one of a kind. If there was one horse you could have or own, whom would it be and why? Ericca, hands down. She was a national champion English and halter mare, a Polish mare with lines to Bask, and an ethereal creature that took your breath away. It has been a lifelong dream to breed a horse that could win a national championship in both halter and English, and it was wonderful to see a breeder I have admired make that feat happen. One day I’ll do the same. How many horse events do you attend a year? It varies on the year, but on an average, I would say five to six shows. What is your favorite horse event and why? U.S. Nationals, hands down, is my favorite show. It is where the best of the best come to compete. People can complain about the setting or fairgrounds, but at the end of the day, all that matters is the excitement of the chase for that national championship title. I get goosebumps thinking about it and how on edge I am waiting for them to call the national winner. I start to inch towards the end of my seat, hands ready to clap and voice geared up to cheer. And then it happens, the national champion is called and the celebration begins! There are so many great shows, but the culmination of each one is that grand finale, for the coveted title of being named the best in a class packed

with so much quality that on any given day any horse could be crowned national champion. Aside from horses, what is some of your favorite hobbies? Long walks on the beach … just kidding. I definitely am a literature buff and love reading. In college I took a few creative writing courses and love dabbling with my artistic side when time allows. Golfing is always fun even if my short game is my best game. They do say you drive for the show and putt for the dough. Lastly, whether it be discovering a hole in the wall trattoria with my loved ones or uncovering hiding spots at the park with my nieces and nephew, exploring all the world has to offer is always inspiring and opportunistic. What would be one thing our readers would be surprised to know about you? I’m not 100% Italian (ssshhhh!), but we don’t tell anyone about that other 25%! If there is one person you could thank in this world, who would it be and why? I would have to thank my father for introducing me to the horses and being adamant about my first horse being an Arabian. His love, support and encouragement throughout the years have been steadfast and unwavering. He helped me turn a dream, a passion, into reality—into an adventure, and the ride has been thrilling with every hoof beat along the way. How do you see your involvement in the Arabian horse business 10 years from now? Hopefully, I will be out of the select rider division and on a national champion Half-Arabian English horse that just lets me sit back and enjoy the ride. Other than that, I will still be involved breeding quality horses that can compete at all levels. n

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PRESENTING THE PERSONALITIES

Santiago Fornieles Al Rayyan Stud Farm Manager

Santiago with wife, Dr. Milagro Badaraco.

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SANTIAGO FORNIELES

T

ell us about the first time you were introduced to Arabian horses. My father was invited to the first Haras Mayed Auction in 1993. I was about 12 years old and we bought four mares and a stallion. We had no idea what we were doing! My father was so adventurous, that instead of hiring a truck to take them to the farm, we took them riding. It was about 60 miles beside a highway! Somehow from that day on, it was a crazy adventure that brought me here to Doha. Which Arabian horse have you found to be the most emotionally connected to? After 23 years, many Arabians come and go into your life, but my first mare, HM Raikah, was very special for me in those days. Although I also feel very much connected to HC Francisca, who I bred and is now owned by Albidayer Stud. I pushed so hard for my father to breed her dam to Legacy of Fame, drove 700km to pick up the semen and then went to work. Later when she was born, my wife and I did all the baby work. Last year I was able to see her again at Albidayer Stud and saw how Dawn treats her as a queen ... I am so happy she is with her! When/how did the Arabian horse business become a career in your life? Well, I used to work in advertising as a creative copywriter, and horses were my B-side of life; my hobby, my passion, but not my daily work. One day I was at work and saw Sh. Hamad had posted on Facebook that he was looking for a Farm Manager. Talking that day with Willy Oppen, I asked him if he would go, and he answered that his kids were too big and did not want to move. I decided my wife and I would go, and now almost two years later, here we are!

What issues do you think we should focus on as an industry to solve? Two things: embryos and education.I believe we need to have a discussion all over the world on embryo production. I think embryos are a great tool, but very badly used. It’s great, because some valuable mares with problems only have this as an option. But also, the lack of a defined limit is flooding the market of Arabian horses and killing the prices, thus making the business very difficult to sustain and killing the core: the small breeders.

Regarding my second point, I feel there is not enough education programs. We need to keep newcomers to the breed, by giving them the tools to survive in this business, and that is only through knowledge. We need to have small breeders who make as few mistakes as possible so as to keep them excited on what is coming. What is a typical day? Crazy. I always know at what time I start, but have no clue when it will finish. Plus, the adrenaline that Sh. Hamad has and his passion for doing things makes this work an exciting rollercoaster. Who has been a mentor for you? Jorge Concaro. He taught me all I know about judging and was the first one to push me to judge 12 years ago. Now, after judging many shows, I still remember his teachings. But more recently, I have been learning a great deal of new ideas and philosophy from Sh. Hamad; his approach to breeding is so unique, that it is an intellectual challenge every breeding conversation we have. What is it that you like and hate to see in a horse? I hate horses that can’t move or that are unbalanced. I can live with bad shoulders or even bad croups, because I have seen horses winning in 160km endurance races, and according to the books, they should have never even passed the gate of the farm. So, I can be more permissive with that, but never with an unbalanced horse. Where do you hope to see yourself in 10 years? Probably still running my own farm, but not from abroad like I do now. I miss my horses too much and even though Sh. Hamad is kind enough to let me go back home from time to time, I still miss them too much! What one thing would people be surprised to learn about you? I am a pretty good drummer and had a cool rock band when I was young. Plus, I acted in a couple of Adidas ads that I made while I worked in advertising. Also, I worked in a bike shop when I was 13 years old … I guess I always did what I like more, than what people expected me to do! n

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A Close-Up Look At U.S. Nationals ... cont. from Oct. A, page 130.

TRAINERS How do you mentally and physically prepare yourself and horses for U.S. Nationals? I mentally prepare by organizing as much as I can weeks before I go. That means meals, dry cleaning, pre-vet checks, etc. I’ve tried handing that stuff off to other people, but it just makes more stress. So of this year, furniture, pictures, decorations, braiders, etc., are all checked off the list in September, so now I don’t have to think about it and I can concentrate on the part I love, the horses. So I’m relaxed, just waiting to go to the horse show!

Jessica Bein

Bein Performance Horses

As for the horses, I like to add a few pounds to them. Everyone gets iced before and after they are ridden the month of big shows, and I try to create as many show ring experiences as I can for their owners (noise, obstacles, etc.). What do you do at your farm that relieves the stress of the show during the event? I try to get the horses out of their stalls as much as possible. At home … turn out on grass, and at the show … hand walk. # of horses competing: 8 How many years have you been attending U.S. Nationals? It sounds cool to say, “I’ve been to every Youth Nationals,” but saying I’ve gone to U.S. Nationals since before they invented 13 & Under makes me sound old! Honestly, I don’t remember the year, but it was Albuquerque and there were a lot of satin jackets with stallion names on them, if that helps the time line. What makes U.S. Nationals different from all the other events you attend in the year? U.S. Nationals is the culmination of peoples’ goals, dreams, and visions. I love the level of intensity and, of course, seeing everyone. I feel like the first day at a big show is more like a family reunion.

What makes your farm and clients special? We run a tight ship, so we really cater to a very specific clientele that appreciates organization and being hands on. It’s not for everyone. What makes our group of clients so special is that they make a priority of their horses’ well-being. They know their horses, and appreciate them and that makes my job more enjoyable. What do your clients do to get in the team spirit? I seriously have the most laid back group of clients you can imagine. They are more the strong, silent types. This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is your proudest moment to date, from previous U.S. Nationals? No question, best moment ever, was winning the open reining in freedom hall and sliding on the green shavings. It was so loud ... if I could relive one moment, it would be that!

cory Byrne Aff: Ted carson @ BuTler farms Training cenTer How many years have you been attending U.S. Nationals? This will be my 6th consecutive year at U.S. Nationals, all of them with Ted Carson. What makes U.S. Nationals different from all the other events you attend in the year? It is the culmination of an entire year of hard work. After months of training and preparation, and hauling horse all over the country to qualify, we get to pit ourselves against the best of the best in the nation. The quality and the training of the horses are at their peak and it makes for an energy that is nothing short of electric! How do you mentally and physically prepare yourself and horses for U.S. Nationals? Preparing our horses for nationals is a labor of love. After the countless hours of blankets and baths, clipping and schooling,

driving and building, all so we can strut our stuff and look so good doing it; for the smiles on the owners’ faces and the satisfaction of

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hard-earned money being well spent. All for the glory of the breed. As for me, I spend one evening throwing every kind of layer of clothing into a gigantic suitcase and I’m ready, mentally and physically! I love this job, so I’m always ready. What do you do at your farm that relieves the stress of the show during the event? I, for sure, would be lying if I said this show isn’t stressful. But, we all have a great system of communication between us, and when tensions get high, we just put it out on the table and together, decide on the most effective solutions. I suppose an ice cold beer at the end of the night doesn’t hurt either! What makes your farm and clients special? We are absolutely blessed at our farm. What makes it so special is our clients. We just have these amazing owners and breeders who constantly give their support to us and

to each other. Every show, to me, feels like some fantastic family reunion, but better, because we get to play with some seriously beautiful horses! What do your clients do to get in the team spirit? They just show up! We have a high energy crowd with an unprecedented love for the Arabian horse. All I have to do is poke my head through the curtains and say, “Horse going up in five minutes,” and the whole Ted Carson cheering section mobilizes! This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is your proudest moment to date, from previous U.S. Nationals? Oh, wow! I’m feeling the pressure of choosing just one favorite memory, but on a personal level, my proudest moment came last year. It was my first time actually showing at U.S. Nationals and it came by way of a yearling filly. I was trusted by John and Annette Graffeo to show their beautiful SF Veraz daughter, Bella Grigio.

What makes U.S. Nationals different from all the other events you attend in the year? It’s the most prestigious title to win!

Priscilla cluff Aff: grK farms

How do you mentally and physically prepare yourself and horses for U.S. Nationals? I video my rides and watch them. It helps me see if I’m on track. What do you do at your farm that relieves the stress of the show during the event? We are properly prepared for every ride. That gives us confidence. What makes your farm and clients special? Gary Kehl is breeding some of the best horses in halter and also in performance. We are successfully selling those horses to our clients and it’s a winning formula. What do your clients do to get in the team spirit? Lots of joking around and working hard together!

# of horses competing: 4 How many years have you been attending U.S. Nationals? 10 years.

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is your proudest moment to date, from previous U.S. Nationals? Winning Top Ten with Billie The Kid GRK in the Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Horse. She’s a horse that Gary bred and that I raised and trained.

BrooKe fucHs

Aff: Ted carson @ BuTler farms Training cenTer How many years have you been attending U.S. Nationals? Seven times since 2008, including this year. What makes U.S. Nationals different from all the other events you attend in the year? It is just that, a “National” event. The energy is higher, the competition is at its best, there is so much anticipation of what’s to come, and there is so much going on at all times. There are hardly any shows where you can watch working western, pleasure, and halter classes, all within half a day’s time.

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How do you mentally and physically prepare yourself and horses for U.S. Nationals? I feel as though I keep myself physically prepared for nationals on a regular basis. I work horses six days a week, walking to and from the arena all day. I am a very competitive person and tend to hold my composure well under pressure/stress. To ensure the horses are mentally and physically prepared for the show, is one of the best parts. They get daily work to keep them fit physically, and I like to change their workouts so that they stay interested and eager in their job. What do you do at your farm that relieves the stress of the show during the event? To relieve stress on the horses, we like to set up a huge curtain area in the front for our clients and guests. We follow that with tack and groom stalls, and then the horses. Keeping the horses further away from the groups of people enjoying the show in the front of the stalls seems to help them stay relaxed and rested. For me and the team, we try to push

VicKi HumPHrey

VicKi HumPHrey Training cenTer

hard through the day to get done all that we can by early evening, as we tend to have early mornings. What makes your farm and clients special? They are the best! My bosses are family oriented and our clients are such wonderful, caring people. And we all love the Arabian horse. What do your clients do to get in the team spirit? It doesn’t take much for our clients to get into the team spirit. If they hear one of our horses/clients is showing, they are on their way to the show arena to watch and support. This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is your proudest moment to date, from previous U.S. Nationals? In 2015, when I got a Top Ten in the H/A Hunter Pleasure Futurity with a horse I started under saddle.

How do you mentally and physically prepare yourself and horses for U.S. Nationals? Mental and physical preparation for U.S. starts the day the previous National show is over. For each horse, it is a year of balancing rest, with conditioning, planning to gear up for peak performances, maintaining their health, and thoughtfully training them to the next level. For us, we pack lots of wine. What do you do at your farm that relieves the stress of the show during the event? Then there’s the wine again … as a stress reliever. Seriously, the best stress reliever is having done everything possible to be fully prepared (like the farmer my dad used to tell me about who slept when the wind blew). Unforeseen issues always come up, but if all else is in order, there is energy enough to solve them. We also pack our Pac-Man game. What makes your farm and clients special? We have the best group of clients in the industry. They are enthusiastic, loyal and supportive, love their horses and work as hard learning, as we work teaching them to ride. Their enthusiasm and talent show when they trot through the gate. Those who don’t ride, are our greatest cheerleaders.

# of horses competing: 42 How many years have you been attending U.S. Nationals? VHTC has been showing at the U.S. Nationals since 1989. I have personally attended the show annually since ‘72. What makes U.S. Nationals different from all the other events you attend in the year? The national show is different in several ways. As a farm that breeds and promotes our client/breeders, we show many Futurity babies and are excited to show them off for the first time. Also, it is the culmination of a year’s preparation, planning and work that goes into every horse, so the excitement levels and stress levels peak that week.

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is your proudest moment to date, from previous U.S. Nationals? As proud as I am of some of my personal wins, the proudest moments to date are a tie between watching my two daughters win at U.S. last year. Jess winning the English Pleasure Open last year on Heiristocracy and Lea, 6 months pregnant with my first grandson, winning the Half-Arabian English Maturity on Little Miss Strange, both trained by Jess.

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Jason KroHn

oaK HaVen araBians # of horses competing: 30 How many years have you been attending U.S. Nationals? 15 years. What makes U.S. Nationals different from all the other events you attend in the year? U.S National is “The Big Dance.” The level of competition is what separates this show from all the rest. At Oak Haven Arabians, this is the show we want our horses to be at their peak for the year. Young ones finished, our show string is at their highest level of fitness, training and physical capabilities. The stakes are at their highest and every single trainer is bringing the best they have to offer. The national title is the highest recognition of our breed! How do you mentally and physically prepare yourself and horses for U.S. Nationals? Practice makes perfect! Being diligent day in day out at this time of the year is a must. Each and every horse should be completely prepared. Not only with their training and stamina, but also their physical appearance, coats, weight, condition, etc. Horses must not

peak too early, and just like our staff, everyone including horses need that little breather right before leaving so they are fresh and ready to work upon arrival. What makes your farm and clients special? We are a family. Oak Haven has always been a family run farm and we want our customers to be able to have that same feeling and be able to call Oak Haven home.

alayna mala

AFF: adandy farm # of horses competing: 8 How many years have you been attending U.S. Nationals? 7 years. What makes U.S. Nationals different from all the other events you attend in the year? The competition level is at its all-time high! Some of the greatest horses in the United States are competing all on one show ground. There is no thrill better than being named a U.S. National Champion. How do you mentally and physically prepare yourself and horses for U.S. Nationals? It is not an easy task. Its long hours of hard work and dedication. It is not just us trainers that put in the hard work on the horses, it takes a team to get them ready: caretakers, grooms, veterinarians and farriers. We prepare for U.S. Nationals all year. Our horses are the number one focus to make sure they are happy and healthy to make the trip to the show and compete to the best of their ability. Mentally preparing ourselves is not an easy task either. When we get to the show, all of our homework has to be done at the farm; it is up to us to trust our training and make the best decisions possible for the horses’ benefit. What do you do at your farm that relieves the stress of the show during the event? We try and keep the atmosphere very light around the stall area. We have our own personal cook for two weeks, my mom Sheryl Mala, who takes care of feeding us three times a day, every day, during the whole show. It’s always relaxing to sit down for a few minutes during the day when you have the opportunity. Our set up is always very warm and cozy for the clients to enjoy.

What makes your farm and clients special? Between the entire staff of the farm and the clients, we all share a mutual passion for the Arabian horse. The farm is a very beautiful place that the clients enjoy visiting. Our operation is not huge, so therefore, we are able to pay attention to each and every horse on a daily basis. It is an honor to be able to be a part of Team Adandy and work with the wonderful group of clients that we have. What do your clients do to get in the team spirit? All of our clients are very close and very supportive of one another, as well as each other’s’ horses. Everyone makes sure they have a marked schedule so they don’t miss someone’s class. When you are in the ring, you know where our clients are because they have their own cheering section. This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is your proudest moment to date, from previous U.S. Nationals? There has been several moments I have been proud to be a part of while attending U.S. Nationals. We are proud of each and every win that we have achieved, from open wins for our owners, to watching our amateurs achieve a dream

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OWNERS Kelli aguirre

AFF: colonial Wood Training cenTer/ Kiesner Training # of horses competing: 3 with Colonial Wood and 4 with Kiesner Training How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? About 15 years, off and on, but have been around as a spectator my whole life, which is forever! What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? The year that my stallion, VJ Royal Heir, won the Open Arabian English Pleasure and my mare, KA Roundabout Midnite, was Reserve in the Open HalfArabian Western Pleasure. I felt very proud to own two of the top horses in two different Open divisions. It was a special show! What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? I have a lot to look forward to this year at U.S. Nationals. I have my purebred western junior horse, Bentley SF, showing at Nationals for the first time under saddle and I also have three that I love, that I am showing myself that are some of my favorites! If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? U.S. Nationals for the first time can be overwhelming, whether you are competing or spectating. I would say, have fun and enjoy every part of it! Make new friends, have fun with old friends, and enjoy the camaraderie of one of the best and biggest shows of the year! If you’re competing, it’s all about the ride, not the ribbon! Just have fun! What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? The people at Colonial Wood have to be some of the best

in the industry. They are always supportive of me and my horses! I will be at the Calcutta this year, of which they are huge supporters, and I plan to spend as much time as possible with them around their beautiful barn and set up. The Kiesners cater food so that we can all enjoy each other’s company and spend time together. This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? All of Afires Heir’s wins, which are an incredible feat, and the fact that he was always first on every judges card! What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? I love spending time with friends and people that I have known for so long that I consider them family … and making new friends! It’s great to hang out and enjoy something that we all love! What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? A quote by Bobby Knight that I saw last year and I have been trying to practice ever since, “The key is not the will to win. Everybody has that. It is the will to prepare to win that is important!” It’s all about the preparation. If you are properly prepared in every way, you can use that to really show your horse to its best ability.

emily anneTT AFF: aKs farms

# of horses competing: 3 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? This will be my first year! What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? Usually I’m a spectator, so I can’t wait to actually participate this year. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? Being a part of the 50th anniversary. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? I’d love any advice I can get!

What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? Ask me this question next year, I’m looking forward to finding out!

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This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? Zefyr … he puts on quite the show.

What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? It’s all about having fun! Go out and enjoy the ride with your horse, your best friend! Don’t forget to smile!

What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? Getting lots of laughs in with my barn family. We love being goofy! Ask my mom, and she’d tell you the shopping!

sHeila curley

AFF: THe Brass ring # of horses competing: 2 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? This will be my sixth year. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? Getting my first Top Ten and finishing 3rd overall in my class with my Half-Arabian, One Knight Stand. For personal reasons, winning it with her made it so much more special!  What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? The overall excitement of the show and being in that ring another year. It’s an honor just to ride in a class.

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? When Liz Bentley won the Arabian Western Pleasure Open.

If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Enjoy the moment and your horse. That’s what it is all about.

What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing? Shopping, of course!

What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? Support everyone above and beyond! 

What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Feel the fear and do it anyway.

asHlye daniel

AFF: Bein Performance Horses # of horses competing: 4 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? This will be my 2nd year competing. My first was in 2015. When I began taking lessons four years ago, I knew nothing about horses, riding, the Arabian world, the show world or the numerous riding disciplines. I never dreamed that I would own horses or compete at Nationals! What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? Winning a Top Ten in the Arabian English Trail AAOTR Championship last year on Tsimmer Down Now. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? Everything! If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? 1.) “Nerve-dump.” You will most likely have a “meltdown,” so use it to your advantage. I began competing

in November 2014, and was on the fence about entering the 2015 Nationals. My trainer, Jessica Bein, explained to me that one reason for going in 2015 was to have the inevitable initial “Nationals nerve dump,” which would happen regardless of when I first entered. I decided to go for it. During trail warm-ups I had my meltdown, dismounted, and cried for a good 30 minutes. I had never been in a small arena with so many horses and riders practicing at once – it was overwhelming, scary and extremely intimidating to be amongst more experienced riders. However,

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when my horse and I were alone competing in the trail arena, my nerves were more “in check.” When I competed in the Western Pleasure Select event in a very large class, I felt more comfortable maneuvering around the arena; it seemed less chaotic and more orderly. I had already experienced my meltdown ‘nerve dump!’ 2.) Have fun! If you are going to spend all the time, effort, practice and money that goes into entering Nationals, it isn’t worth it unless you truly enjoy it! And 3.) Go for your personal best, not the roses. Coming out of the arena knowing that you just had a great ride, regardless of placing, is exhilarating and exciting! What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? The friendships, camaraderie and support amongst the riders and the Bein Performance Horses trainers/team. We laugh a lot, encourage each other, and enjoy simply “hanging out” together. Having the chance to spend an entire week at U.S. Nationals together is a blast!

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? The double victory pass by Open Western Pleasure Champion Zefyr and Reserve Champion Onyx A, both sired by Sundance Kid V, stands out as most memorable. What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? Everything else … hanging out at the barn, watching the events, making new friends, learning about different riding disciplines, admiring all of the horses, learning about different lineages and shopping. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Go for your personal best and most of all, have fun!

cHariTy daVis

AFF: liBerTy meadoW Training cenTer # of horses competing: 3 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? For the past five years. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? The show itself. I enjoy getting ready to ride, the warm-up process and the competition. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? Showing in the Ford Arena. It is a fun place to show. I also enjoy watching the classes with friends and family and just hanging out with my barn family. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Just relax and enjoy the process. It’s advice my trainers give me all the time, but it is so true. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? We have a lot of fun eating and hanging out with each other. We support each at the show with lots of encouragement in and out of the arena.

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? There are so many great ones I could not say which one. What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? I love to just walk around and look at the vendors and go out to eat at the local restaurants. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Relax, don’t quit and never give up trying to do your best.

iona ferrero

AFF: loWe sHoW Horse cenTre How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? On and off for approximately 25 years. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? When I won my first Top Ten in Western and my first Reserve Championship in Hunter, on the same day and with the same horse, Huck’s Klassy Khat! What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? A clean ride. This is my first time in a show arena in over five years. I feel humbled and blessed to be here! Ar abian Horse Times | 142 | Volume 47, No. 5A A


If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? This is a marathon, not a sprint. Don’t put too much pressure on yourself; there will always be another horse show! Appreciate the opportunity, embrace the moment and most of all, have fun! What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? I’m in Jim Lowe’s barn! Every minute is full of laughs and entertainment. Jim truly wants his clients to have a memorable, positive experience. This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve

had no affiliation with? The retirement of NDL Pericles. To watch this icon take his final lap before having his show shoes removed was moving and memorable. There wasn’t a dry eye in the audience! What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? I love laughing and reminiscing. I look forward to making new memories with good friends.  What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? I’m not in competition with anybody but myself, so when I leave the arena, I want to be able to say that I gave it my all!  

lindsay o’reilly frencH AFF: oaK HaVen

# of horses competing: 5 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? Since I was 10, so 27 years. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? Definitely seeing all of my horse friends all in one place—nothing beats that! What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? Switching gears from English for one class and trying Hunter for the first time! If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Get to know everyone, it is so fun to have friends that live all over the country that share the same passion for the Arabian horse. Also, beware of the “horse-show bubble burst” at the end of the show; it’s a major letdown saying bye. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? Last year, Oak Haven had a nerf gun war which was so fun. We have a theme at nationals. Special notes and baskets are in our dressing rooms addressed to each of us individually. And, most importantly, our horses are 100% ready and well taken care of, allowing us to feel confident and relaxed, and able to enjoy ourselves.

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? Countess Vanessa and the flags everyone was waving in the stands was so memorable ... I had chills. Good Thunder and the umbrellas … great idea! Most memorable is watching my good friend Beth Harrison show Honey on green shavings … picture perfect! What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? Ha-ha, eating! Anyone who knows me knows I love to eat! What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? It’s one show, make the most of it, and most importantly, have fun and enjoy it!

KaTie HarVey

AFF: THe Brass ring/Tyson randle reining Horses # of horses competing: 5 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? The last 15 consecutively. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? The thrill of winning my first National Championship in 2009 unanimously with Afires Reign.

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What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? Spending time with friends, enjoying beautiful horses and being part of this great Arabian community. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Don’t forget to enjoy the moments. Sometimes I think we all get so wound up and nervous that we forget to take it all in. And it’s not just about the time in the ring, it’s the whole experience.  What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? We have dinner brought in on some evenings, we support each other in the warm up for classes and we always have a nice set up that gives us an opportunity to spend time together.

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? Watching Carmelle and Apollopalooza. They were breathtaking together. What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? Spending time with my friends. It’s so hard in our busy “real lives,” that being together at a show is our opportunity to get away and be in our “happy place.” What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Don’t forget they’re animals. They wake up in a different mood every day like we do. Sometimes it’s your day, and sometimes it’s not. 

maureen HorTon

AFF: KricHKe Training # of horses competing: 1 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? 25 years. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? My late husband winning U.S. National Champion Mare with Heat Maker. It made most of his dreams come true. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? The first to come to mind is “winning,” but I really look forward to catching up with friends from all over the world that I only see at major shows. Of course, I do enjoy watching the best in the world competing. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Enjoy the moment. These moments make your memories. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? We love to hang out at the stalls and the Krichkes always have good food. We like to go out together and share a meal. This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve

had no affiliation with? The great one, *Bask, imported by the LaCroix family and winning U.S. National Champion Stallion and U.S. National Champion Park Horse. Hard to top that achievement. His legacy continues … What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? Hanging out with friends and meeting new friends. If the show is located in a historical area, I want to check out the beginnings of this great nation and the people who made it great. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Enjoy, enjoy, enjoy!

roBerT JanecKi

AFF: cHesTnuTHill araBians # of horses competing: 2 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? This will be my 15th year competing at U.S. Natioanls. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? Watching a horse that I bred win 11 national championships.

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What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? Seeing everyone at one time. Friends don’t always live close, so it is nice once everyone is together. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Breathe and have fun! What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? Chestnuthill Arabians is like one big family; everyone is really supportive of each other. Chestnuthill likes to create a positive, comfortable atmosphere for everyone to enjoy their time at the shows.

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? Watching SA Sophisticated Lady, she is the best. I used to own a full brother to her, but he unfortunately passed away. Every time I would watch her, I would get excited and sad, too. What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? I love hanging out with friends from my barn. It is not often that we are all in one place at one time. It is nice to always learn more about friends. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Relax, breathe and remember this is FUN!

BeTH JuPP

AFF: loWe sHoW Horse cenTre # of horses competing: 1 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? On and off for the last 15 years. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? I have been incredibly fortunate to own and show two multi-national champions, Mamage and Papa Rhazi. It is very difficult to choose between highlights I had with each one, but I suppose winning Reserve National Champion in the Park AAOTR class with Mamage in 2003 was extra special, because I was still learning to ride him. He took such good care of me and gave it his all. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? The time I spend with my horses and friends is always incredible. I can never get enough of either. It is really good for the soul! If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? It is not easy to get a Top Ten or better. Everything really has to align in that one class and the competition is tough, but you are here for a reason, and have just as good a chance to win as anyone else. So enjoy the process of being a team with your horse and recognize your own personal accomplishments, regardless of the ribbon you may or may not get.

What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? Shawn Getty Lowe makes an appearance! This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? Watching Apollopalooza win the open Park class several years in a row was amazing! What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? Laughing, laughing, laughing and more laughing with my friends. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? I try not to get too worried about the outcome and instead try to enjoy every moment … and keep remembering to breathe!

gary KeHl grK farms

# of horses competing: 4 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? 10 years. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? OFW Rihanna, U.S. Reserve National Champion Mare. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? Watching my western horses that I bred and raised from babies compete, and Ar abian Horse Times | 145 | Volume 47, No. 5A A


also watching Izzabella Dona compete with Michael Byatt in the Futurity Fillies. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Take a deep breath, have fun, and enjoy the ride! What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? We like to go to dinner with the GRK crew to take the stress of the day away! This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve

had no affiliation with? Last year watching Michael Byatt show OFW Magic Wan and his son, Magic Mystery Z win, was over the top for me. We have several Magic Wan babies and hope we have the next superstar by Magic Wan! What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? Meeting up with old friends … talking and enjoying the good times. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? I’m nervous enough standing on the sidelines! I tell my trainer, Priscilla Cluff, “Just go have fun and ride like you do at the barn and you will be fine!” Easy for me to say!

anne WHiTaKer Keller

AFF: JT Keller Performance Horses/ colonial Wood Training cenTer # of horses competing: 4 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? 18 years. I haven’t shown every year, but we usually have had at least one horse showing each year since 1998. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? Winning the Western Pleasure AAOTR 19-35 class unanimously on Onyx A, a horse I bred and raised. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? I’m really excited for the AWPA classes this year. As a breeder of western pleasure Arabians, it’s a great opportunity to showcase our young western horses and I’m really looking forward to watching these new classes. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? First, have fun! That is what it’s really all about. Secondly, breathe! It’s tough to do when you hit the show arena for the first time. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? We have a family style dinner almost every evening of

the show. We each take turns cooking or ordering take out for the group. The days can get hectic and long, but at least we eat one good meal every day! What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? I love spending time with my family and friends. I’ve met so many incredible people through the Arabian horse industry and U.S. Nationals is the one of the only times when we’re all together. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Focus on your ride, not the prize. It’s easy to get caught up in the thrill or thought of a win, but it’s the ride that dictates the prize.

sHeryl mala

Aff: adandy farm # of horses competing: 1 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? About 5 years. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? Taking care of the crew and clients of Adandy Farm. One of my passions is cooking, so we have our little café where I provide three meals a day for everyone and snacks in between. It gives me such pleasure to take care of the hard working team and make the clients feel at home with home-cooked meals. Oh, and of course, watching these magnificent Arabians compete.

What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? Cheering on all of the Adandy clients and especially, watch my daughter, Alayna

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Mala, blossom into a beautiful horsewoman, because of the amazing opportunity she’s had to be mentored by Cathy Vincent. I also look forward to helping provide a wonderful “home” for the team and clients for the week. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? The first time at Nationals can be an overwhelming experience. Go to the show and enjoy yourself. There is so much opportunity to be with this amazing “Arabian Family” and meet such wonderful people. I think the first time is a significant learning experience; take it all in and enjoy every moment. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? Adandy Farm is a well-oiled machine and the teamwork, dedication and care they provide to the horses and clients makes the whole experience very special. My hope is that I help to make the event even more special and memorable for the team and clients. I try to make each day special. I have a few new ideas up my sleeve for this year!

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? Watching Aequus retire. What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? One of our hobbies is collecting antiques; every horse item we come across, from artwork to statues to anything and everything with horses. My husband, Gary, and I own Sheryl and Gary’s Antiques “GSM Holdings” Collinsville Antiques, an antique mall in New Hartford, Connecticut. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? I would say, enter the ring with a “smile on your face and have a wonderful ride.” It doesn’t matter the outcome, as long as you give it your all. The color of the ribbon or lack thereof, doesn’t matter as long as you did your best. You are competing and controlling a 1,000 pound animal and one never knows what could happen. If the outcome was not what you wanted, you go out and work for it the next time, but no “tears.”

roBin manfield

Aff: liBerTy meadoWs Training cenTer # of horses competing: 2 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? 8. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? Winning a Reserve Championship in the Half-Arabian Hunter 55 & Over. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? Other than competing, seeing other competitors and friends I have made over the years, but haven’t seen since moving to Kansas. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Enjoy your accomplishment and just ride your horse. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? Everything is very organized and the horses are always turned out beautifully, which reduces the stress of the riders.

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? Beetlejuice. What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? Shopping and socializing, of course! What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Actually it is a prayer, “Lord please keep us safe and help me to ride smart.”

alexus maTTingly

Aff: liBerTy meadoWs Training cenTer # of horses competing: 3 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? This will be my 8th year competing. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? My first Top Ten. It was an amazing moment and I will always remember it.

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What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? Riding two amazing horses in several classes. Every part of Nationals is fun, but I like competing the most. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? I think the most important thing to remember for first time competitors is to relax and enjoy yourself. I know that everyone gets nervous, but it is also important to remember to have fun. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? Liberty Meadows makes sure that the competitors and their family members enjoy their time at the show. It is important to make the most of your time at every show, because before you know it, the show is over. We all have a great moments together and try to encourage everyone to have a good time.

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? I will never forget the work-off between Afires Heir and Vegaz in the Open English. It was an amazing moment to witness two beautiful and talented horses compete for the spotlight. What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? I always enjoy being around everyone who comes to the show for support. While we are there to show horses, it is also nice to see old friends and even make new ones. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Stay calm and ride your own ride.

sTacy mccrary

AFF: oaK HaVen araBians # of horses competing: 1 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? 10 years. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? My first Top Ten. I was riding my Half-Arabian, Caught Red Handed, and had finished the final. I was so excited, because I made it around the ring and accomplished all the goals I had set for the two of us for the show. I was off Red and hugging my trainers, family and Red, while already heading back to the stalls when they called my number. It’s a feeling you can’t describe! What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? I have made so many friends at Oak Haven, and through them, have made new friends at other barns. I look forward to spending time with all and cheering them on. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Breathe. It can be overwhelming if you don’t take the time to breathe. When my boys were in school, I would tell them, “Just do your personal best.” Now, one of my sons is an Olympic Athlete and I still tell him, “Just do your personal best.” If you keep that in mind, you will continue to learn until your personal best is the best and your dreams will come true. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? Last year was my first with Oak Haven and it was the best

time I have ever had. Genna Krohn sent Nerf guns for everybody and we had our own Wild West Shoot Out. Jason dressed up as “Super Trainer” and we all had a blast supporting each other throughout the week. This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? That is a hard question and I don’t have an answer for it. What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? Getting to meet new people and listening to their stories. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Same here … breathe, and do my personal best!

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HannaH messerli

Aff: liBerTy meadoWs Training cenTer # of horses competing: 2 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? 8 years. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? Two years ago when I was finally able to show CSP Hot Tamale. I have had many horses, but this horse is my horse of a lifetime. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? Seeing all of my friends and family that I only get to see at shows. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Whether it is their first time there or hundredth, I would tell anyone to live in the moment. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? We are all one giant family at Liberty Meadows.

What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? Catching up with everyone you only get to see at shows, and shopping. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? You know what you are doing, don’t beat yourself up, and enjoy the moment.

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? SA Sophisticated Lady.

Janna oneill

AFF: liBerTy meadoWs Training cenTer # of horses competing: 1 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? This is my 4th. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? After showing as a youth rider, I did not get on a horse for 17 years. When I came back in 2012, I’ll never forget the feeling of trotting into Ford Truck Arena for the first time. The passion for owning and showing an Arabian never went away, and I was so happy to be back competing at a national level. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? Showing my mare, Best Of My Love, at Nationals for the first time. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Try and take some time to visualize a great ride. I like to sit in the stands by myself to picture this happening. Know that things may not be absolutely perfect, and that’s okay. Each trip around the arena, especially at the national level, will feel better each time you do it. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? We have a truly special crew at Liberty Meadows. Each time we have someone showing, we are sure to go up together and support them. A great ride, or one that could use improvement, we are ready with a hug and cold beverage. Oh, and we have great dance parties.

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? Watching Zefyr. I get goosebumps watching him. What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? My dad and I share the love for horses. I enjoy spending time with him, strategizing and having fun. We don’t live near each other, so we treasure this time together. It is also a joy for me to watch my son enjoy the shows, making great friends, and being filthy when we get back to our hotel. We have made so many memories, and he can’t wait to get in the car with me and road trip to shows. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Nerves are a natural part of competing. I try and leave the nerves in the dressing room, and tell myself that I’m going to have a great ride. I also try to ignore things happening around me, so that I am doing my very best to communicate with my horse, and ride our ride.

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amBer sTearns

AFF: liBerTy meadoWs Training cenTer # of horses competing: 3 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? This is only my second year competing at Nationals. I spent most of my life showing American Saddlebreds. A few years ago I made the switch to Arabians and never looked back. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? A few years ago before I had really started showing Arabians, I got to see a work-off between two national champions Vegaz and Afires Heir. It was fantastic! The crowd was so into the class. It gives me goosebumps to think about. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? Without a doubt, I am most looking forward to a week with my barn girls. I live three hours from the barn, so I don’t get to see everyone as much as I would like. I can’t wait for an entire week together with 24/7 horse talk! If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Enjoy it! What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? Everything! We are a super close group, so it’s really fun and special. Ryan and Elise go out of their way to make sure that we are having the time of our life. It’s different for each one of us, but I love how they really let us participate. I love to follow them around like a puppy and watch them work horses. I’ve learned a lot about riding horses by watching them be trained.

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? Afires Heir having won four consecutive Unanimous U.S. National Championships. Sometimes we get blessed with a great one that makes us remember why we work so hard to do this! What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? Sleep! I love to take naps at shows. I work all the time when I’m not showing, so I never get to take a nap. It’s a special treat I only get at shows. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Carpe diem. I try to remember that this is my chance to seize the day. My saddle nameplate has this engraved on it. That way, when I get on for a class, I remember this is my chance to be all I can be.

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CARETAKERS emily JoHnson Aff: adandy farm

What is the favorite part of your job? The horses by far are my favorite part. Watching them grow and mature into show horses is great. How many years have you been in this profession? I have been a caretaker for about 4 or 5 years, but I have been in Arabians for about 9 years. What do you enjoy about horse shows the most? Seeing people I don’t get to see that often and, of course, all the great competition. Who is your favorite horse you have worked with and why? Gitar MF. He has such charisma and heart. He is such a great stallion and he shows it through his foals. What makes the people you work with so special? They all have such a passion for the breed it makes everything worth it. What do you always keep in your groom bag? Everything, lol! It always has a little bit of everything you might possibly need in it. n

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THE RETURN OF

HARIRY AL SHAQAB: BACK WITH BYATT IN AMERICA by Jeff Wallace and Theresa Cardamone

Hariry Al Shaqab is the ultimate ambassador for the mighty breeding program of Al Shaqab Stud, a member of the Qatar Foundation. Hariry came to the United States as a yearling and debuted in Scottsdale as a two-year old. In his inaugural American show, he was named Junior Champion Colt. He later won his first U.S. National Championship with Michael on the lead. After crossing the Atlantic several times while conquering the show rings of the world, Hariry Al Shaqab has returned to the USA to stand once again at Michael Byatt Arabians in Texas.

Champion Colt title two years in succession; in 2012 and 2013. As a four-year old in 2014, he garnered Arabian Breeders World Cup Gold Champion Stallion and Arabian National Breeders Finals Unanimous Gold Champion Stallion honors. In 2015, Hariry Al Shaqab continued on his path to glory as the unanimous Scottsdale Champion Stallion before he returned to Europe to take it by storm. Hariry emerged the Menton Gold Champion Stallion, once again by unanimous vote, before claiming the title of 2015 World Gold Champion Stallion in Paris.

The name Al Shaqab is synonymous with excellence and the expectations for every new generation of Al Shaqab breeding are high. When Hariry Al Shaqab was foaled, it was obvious that he is much more than the physical representation of a pedigree which boasts 15 national champions. He is the modern version of the horses painted by the old masters. He is near to perfection with his chiseled head and extravagant front end; even an inexperienced eye could not deny the great masculine beauty and powerful athleticism this stallion possesses. But it is his inner spark, his undeniable presence, that gives Hariry the power to take one’s breath away.

Trophies, ribbons, and medals are important, but the true measure of success for a stallion is in producing the next generation. Hariry Al Shaqab’s first foals show exceptional promise, and renowned breeders from around the world have chosen him to elevate their programs. In America, Oak Ridge Arabians selected Hariry to sire a foal from Michalowbred Wieza Mocy, one of the most popular and successful Arabian show mares alive. The exquisite grey filly Wieza Noor ORA is the stunning result. Al Nasser Stud in Egypt is delighted with a grey filly of their own by Hariry, out of their magnificent producer Ftoon Al Shaqab, by Al Adeed Al Shaqab. Al Shaqab Stud has welcomed one of the most beautiful Hariry Al Shaqab babies, the grey Um Graiba Al Shaqab. Her dam Amina Al Shaqab, is herself a daughter of Al Adeed Al Shaqab, making Um Graiba a prime example of the combination of two legendary sires of the farm. Equally exciting is another splendid grey filly, Bushra Al Shaqab, whose dam Victoria II HPS, is by the notable sire RSD Dark Victory.

Many horses are the sum of their parents, but Hariry Al Shaqab is one of those truly rare horses that equates to greater than that sum. He is a more than worthy representative of his great sire Marwan Al Shaqab. Legends flourish throughout Hariry’s lineage; his female lines carry the power of some of the most beautiful and important mares in the Arabian breed. From the silver grace of Sonoma Lady and the power of Kajora, to his marvelous dam, the Dakar El Jamaal daughter White Silkk, Hariry Al Shaqab is Arabian royalty. Al Shaqab has created a dynasty while breeding the world’s finest Arabian horses. Hariry Al Shaqab meets the highest criteria both within and outside of the Stud; he is among the most accomplished of all Al Shaqab stallions. Hariry Al Shaqab is the only stallion to win the United States National

Hariry Al Shaqab has already made his legacy a reality. Now he is back where his show career began, in the capable hands of Michael Byatt. Hariry Al Shaqab will not only be tending to the continuation of his dynasty at Michael Byatt Arabians, he will be preparing to explode into the arena to seek the final unclaimed jewel in his crown, the title of United States National Champion Stallion.n

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HARIRY AL SHAQAB

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LOOKING AHE AD D E C E M B E R 2016

Celebrate Your Winners! U.S. Nationals

2016 U.S. NATIONALS COVERAGE Advertise in the gorgeous, large format of AHT Magazine!

AEPA Futurities and Brochure Aaaaa Call today for more information on how to be included. 1-800-248-4637 or 952-492-3213

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Index Of Advertisers A

L

AKS Farms LLC ..........................................................................................10-13

Liberty Meadows Training Center................17, 18, 1-24LMA (19-44), 43, 44

Ames-Husband, Laurie ....................................................................................... 5 Arnette, Emily ................................................................................................... 11 Avonlea Arabians ............................................................................................... 74

B Balduchi, Lisa & Angela ................................................................................... 13

Beethe Arabians ................................................................................................5-7

Bein Performance Horses ............................................................................86, 87

Brown, Dr. Robert ............................................................................................. 12

M Manfield, Michael & Robin ...................................................16-17LM (34, 35)

Manuel Francisco Durini Teran ..............................................................117-120

Martens, Camryn ........................................................................................ 10, 11 Mattingley, Charles & Alexus ................................................ 18-19LM (36, 37)

McCrary, Stacy .................................................................................................. 68 McElliott, Russ and Tammy...............................................................15LM (33)

Michael Byatt Arabians................................................................................... BC

C

Midwest Station I .....................................................1-16 MWStation (101-116)

Colonial Wood Training Center .................................................................71-78

O

D

Oak Haven South Arabians LLC ..............................................................63, 65

Crescent Creek Farms ....................................................................................... 73 Davis, Allison & Charity ....................................................................14LM (32)

DePaulo Equine Concepts ..............................................................................2, 3

Downing, Stephanie .......................................................................................... 76

F Fazenda Floresta ...............................................................................................FC Fitzsimmons, James & Laura..............................................................20LM (38)

Oak Haven Arabians ................................................................................... 62-69

Oneill, Janna .........................................................................................11LM (29

R Risen, Bob & Nancy........................................................................................8, 9 Routledge, Abby ................................................................................................ 78

Royal Arabians ....................................................................IFC, 1, 85, 156, IBC

Russka Farms, LLC........................................................................................... 77

Fleming, Maudi ................................................................................................. 72

S

G

Sartori, Hannah .................................................................................. 22LM (40)

French, Lindsay O’Reilly ................................................................64, 66, 67, 69

Golladay Training.............................................................................................. 84

Guzzo Worldwide LLC .............................................................................IFC, 1

H Hackett, Ralph & Linda .................................................................... 12LM (30)

I IIB Farms .........................................................................................................8, 9

Salt Creek Arabians LLC ...................................................................13LM (31) SaulVance, LLC................................................................................................. 86 Smoky Mountain Park Arabians ................................................................88, 89

Southern Oaks Farm, LLC............................................................................... 75

Stearns, Amber ....................................................................................10LM (28)

Strawberry Fields Stables ....................................................................21LM (39)

W White, Zachary................................................................................... 22LM (40)

Wilson Training Center, Inc....................................................................117-120

J Janette, Kevin ..................................................................................................... 10

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U.S. National Contender Yearling Colts w ith Rodolfo Guzz o

“This is one of the most electrifying and special colts I have ever had the privilege of representing. I am proud to say this is my National Yearling Colt contender, and graciously accept the challenge of pursuing National Championship honors with this breathtaking individual.” —Roldolfo Guzzo

*Hariry Al Shaqab x Magneeka IA Owned by Randy and Dottie Forrester

WORLDWIDE LLC

Cindy McGown & Mark Davis Mesa & Scottsdale, Arizona | info@RoyalArabians.com | 480.220.1108 Rodolfo Guzzo: Halter Trainer | guzzoworldwidellc@gmail.com | 480.361.6926 Travis Rice: Sales & Marketing | trice@royalarabians.com | 614.315.3682 WWW.ROYALANDGUZZO.COM


The combination of Michael Byatt and the world class sires of Al Shaqab made history.

Hariry Al Shaqab photo by Gigi Grasso | Background image by Suzanne | Conformation unaltered

Here is the newest one in the making.

Hariry Al Shaqab

Michael Byatt Arabians is proud to welcome this incredible stallion, continuing the legendary journey with the sires of Al Shaqab. Contact Michael at 713.306.8345 for breeding to Hariry or any of the world-renowed Al Shaqab collection.

Arabian Horse Times - Volume 47 No5AA  
Arabian Horse Times - Volume 47 No5AA