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2016

the judges C A N A D I A N N AT I O N A L S perspective

Bruce Bates

Bruce Bates Years as a judge: 29 Years in Arabian industry: 45 What disciplines are you judging at Canadian Nationals? Western division. What advice would you give to someone showing at Canadian Nationals? Each time the gate opens, it’s a different day, so you have to show the horse as he is that day.  What is your opinion on the recent rule changes on shanking and your role as a judge? My opinion on the shanking rule is irrelevant, I have to follow the rules.  From a judge’s standpoint, what would you say when you hear, “How did that horse win when it blew a lead or broke?” As a judge, you can only judge what you see, so maybe the mistake wasn’t seen.  In a large class, what advice would you give to be seen? Try to stay out of crowds of horses and if you make a mistake, keep showing, maybe the mistake wasn’t seen by any or all of the judges.

Elizabeth Bentley

What is your biggest pet peeve you see in show ring attire? I don’t pay that much attention to show ring attire. I judge the performance, not the wardrobe.  When you are judging a halter class, how important is the loose lead walk to you? It gives me a chance to see the horse in a relaxed state before it is stood up. There is also nothing on the score sheet that ranks a horse on the loose lead walk.  Elizabeth Bentley Years as a judge: 26 Years in Arabian industry: 48 What disciplines are you judging at Canadian Nationals? Western. What advice would you give to someone showing at Canadian Nationals? After having several wonderful people die recently, my best advice to everyone is: be kind and have fun.  What is your opinion on the recent rule changes on shanking and your role as a judge? I believe the shanking rule will be present in the

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Duane Esser

mind of all in the ring and will be a reminder to not overdue the handling of the horses. From a judge’s standpoint, what would you say when you hear, “How did that horse win when it blew a lead or broke?” When someone outside the ring asks how a horse could win a class with a wrong lead or mistake, either a judge missed it or, the quality of the performance exceeded the class so much, that a mistake didn’t make a difference. In a large class, what advice would you give to be seen? Stay in the same lane consistently. Be the same steady picture in every pass. Have a clean, steady go. What is your biggest pet peeve you see in show ring attire? I don’t like attire pushing the class specs, especially in hunter. Hunter pleasure is specifically traditional and uncomplicated; I prefer it be kept like that. When you are judging a halter class, how important is the loose lead walk to you? The walk on a loose lead is where you can see the quality, balance and type of the horse. Honestly,

Arabian Horse Times - Vol47 No2 - Issue #7  
Arabian Horse Times - Vol47 No2 - Issue #7