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SOUTHEAST

Frank Chisholm

Connie Connell

Palmetto Arabians • Timmonsville, SC

Burnt Hickory Arabians • Acworth, GA

What is the main focus of your farm or breeding operation? Beautiful and athletic performance horses, specializing in western and hunter disciplines.

What is the main focus of your farm or breeding operation? It has always been to produce halter quality performance horses with good minds and correct conformation.

Why do you think the Southeast is such a strong territory for the Arabian horse? Region 12 has the largest geographical area of any region. We have a wide variety of farms that cover all the disciplines and this in turn, translates into Region 12 showing very well at Scottsdale and in National shows.

Why do you think the Southeast is such a strong territory for the Arabian horse? I first got involved with showing and breeding horses in the early 70’s. At that time, there were several large breeding and/or training facilities throughout the Southeast that had a mixture of quality bloodlines that offered a wide range of performance possibilities, as well as halter. Arabian classes were frequently offered at open shows for amateur owners. As more and more people were attracted to and purchased Arabian horses for show, breeding, endurance or pleasure riding, the reputation of the Arabian horse spread. Some specialty groups split off, i.e., straight Egyptian, Crabbet, Russian, etc. However, by and large, there was and still are a broad variety of top bloodlines available at a full range of prices. Also, we’ve been blessed with stellar trainers who have longevity and who are very supportive of amateur owners and newcomers to the breed.

How important are futurity programs, and particularly, the Spotlight Futurity program? They are the most important programs in our breed. The Spotlight program in Region 12 has had a great impact on our regional show. It brings in strong numbers and additional farms from outside our region to compete for the attractive Spotlight money classes. How do you promote new people into the Arabian horse industry? We have an uphill battle in South Carollina, as Tennessee Walkers and Quarter Horses are the dominate breeds in our area. However, we have numerous tours of school and civic groups. The media in our area follows our show successes each year and this has helped with our exposure. We always try to have a presence at Scottsdale and U.S. Nationals and be accessible at those shows. In 2016, what has been your proudest moment with the Arabian horse? PA Kid Khan winning the Open Western Pleasure class at Region 12 against a strong field—he looked great. I was so proud of him and Rob Bick.

arabians of the southeast

How important are futurity programs, and particularly, the Spotlight Futurity program? Not being in the Spotlight Futurity wouldn’t be a deal breaker for me if I wanted to purchase or breed to an exceptional individual. That being said, nearly every stallion I’ve bred to over the past several years is in the program. All of the Arabian futurity programs are good marketing tools, because new owners have the chance to get rewarded monetarily. How do you promote new people into the Arabian horse industry? I moved to a more rural area about 10 years ago, so the opportunity to promote the breed is considerably more challenging than it used to be. I’ve held trail rides for local clubs at our farm, which enables me to have some of our horses in the ride and show off the variety of beautiful, intelligent and friendly individuals we have at our farm. The farm is available for 4-H, FFA and other

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Arabian Horse Times - Vol47 No2 - Issue #7  
Arabian Horse Times - Vol47 No2 - Issue #7