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Ansata Halim Shah

VOLUME 47, NO. 5A $22.50

Rik Van Lent Jr. photo

F E A T U R I N G


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Ar abian Horse Times | 2 | Volume 47, No. 5A


Greg & Julie Farrell | Jane Farrell | Berrilee, Sydney, Australia | +614.125.17188 | info@mulawaarabians.com.au • U.S. Representation by Argent Farms | Andrew Sellman 715.760.2466 Ar abian Horse Times | 3 | Volume 47, No. 5A


Contents Issue 10 • Volume 47, No. 5A 1A l ShAqAb

Cover Story: Ansata Halim Shah—Leader Of The Great Migration by Judith Forbis

100

57

Celebrating Great Moments Of U.S. Nationals, Part III

70

A Judge’s Perspective: Grace Greenlee

74

A Judge’s Perspective: Dana Gardner

94

A Judge’s Perspective: Rick Maxson

98

A Judge’s Perspective: Jeremy Harper

100

2016 Canadian Nationals—A Gathering Place For Everything Good by Mary Mag Wilson

111 116

2016 Arabian Sport Horse Nationals—The Partner Of Choice Magic In Manhattan: The 2nd Arabian U.S. Open by Theresa Cardamone

116

126

A Judge’s Perspective: Cathy Murphy Economy

130

A Close-Up Look At U.S. Nationals: Owner/Trainer/Caretaker Profiles, Part III

144

A Judge’s Perspective: Pamela Zimmerman

5

Comments From The Publisher

154

Looking Ahead

155

Index Of Advertisers

Ansata Halim Shah F E A T U R I N G

Rik Van Lent Jr. photo

VOLUME 47, NO. 5A $22.50

On The Cover:

Anasata Halim Shah

(Ansata Ibn Halima x Ansata Rosetta) Al Shaqab.

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Comments From The Publisher Publisher Lara Ames Managing Editor Charlene Deyle Advertising Account Executive Tony Bergren Multimedia Director and Photojournalist Riyan Rivero Creative Director Jeff Wallace Contributing Writer Anne Stratton Production Manager Jody Thompson Senior Designer Marketing Director Wayne Anderson Art Director IT Support Specialist Tony Ferguson Print & Web Design/Support Melissa Pasicznyk Sales Assistant Rachel Ginter Maria Burger AHT Abroad Representative Mieke Opsteyn Office Manager/ Accounts Payable Sara Thomas Accounts Receivable Deb Trebesch

© Copyright AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Articles or opinions published by the AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times are not necessarily the expressed views of the AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times. AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times is not responsible for the accuracy of advertising content or manipulation of images that are provided by the advertiser. ARABIAN HORSE TIMES (ISSN 0279-8125) Volume 47, No. 5, October 2016, is published monthly by AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times, 20276 Delaware Avenue, Jordan, Minnesota 55352. Periodical postage paid at Jordan, Minnesota 55352 and at additional entry offices. Single copies in U.S. and Canada $22.50. Subscription in U.S. $80 per year, $140 two years, $200 three years. Canada $130 one year, $250 two years, $340 three years, U.S. funds. Foreign Subscriptions: $190 one year, $320 two years, $380 three years, payable in advance, U.S. funds. Sorry, no refunds on subscription orders. For subscription and change of address, please send old address as printed on last label. Please allow four to six weeks for your first subscription to be shipped. Occasionally ARABIAN HORSE TIMES makes its mailing list available to other organizations. If you prefer not to receive these mailings, please write to ARABIAN HORSE TIMES, Editorial Offices, 20276 Delaware Avenue, Jordan, MN 55352. The publisher is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographic materials. Printed in U.S.A. • POSTMASTER: Please send returns to Arabian Horse Times, 20276 Delaware Avenue, Jordan, MN 55352; and address changes to Arabian Horse Times, P.O. Box 15816, North Hollywood, CA 91615-5816. For subscription information, call 1-855-240-4637 (in the U.S.A.) or 952-492-3213 (for outside of the U.S.A.) Arabian Horse Times • P.O. Box 15816, North Hollywood, CA 91615-5816 • Tel: 952-492-3213 • Fax: 952-492-3228 1-800-AHTIMES • www.ahtimes.com

It’s A Big, Wide, Wonderful World Of Arabian Horses For so many years, I felt so let down when the U.S. Nationals ended. All year, from Scottsdale on, I’d been working toward Nationals, and all of my horse friends had too. We’d see each other off and on all year, watching and discussing horses, and then in late October, we enjoyed all the exciting performances and saw the champions crowned—the horses that were considered the best in our breed. The ones we all considered if we were breeders. And then it was over. The Sunday after Nationals was the biggest letdown! I’m so happy to say that now, the close of Nationals is just a time to catch our breath. The show season is nowhere near over, and there are thrills to come. We’ve all known that there were still horse shows going on around the world, but the truth is, only a relative few of us attended them, and they seemed kind of far-off and exotic. That’s too bad because we all know that the love for Arabian horses is shared around the world. Wouldn’t it be fun if we all could go to other countries’ season-closing shows? See more horses from other countries, meet more people? This year, once again, Arabian Horse Times will be bringing these important, season-ending shows to you. After our Nationals, I’m off to São Paulo for the Brazilian Nationals, and following a brief stop at home for Thanksgiving, it will be on to Paris for the Salon du Cheval for the World Championships. I’ve attended both before, but this year, I think they’ll be even more special than ever. In the Arabian horse industry, we may all come from different countries, but when we get together, we talk the universal language of Arabian horses. The winners in one country mean something to us all. I hope you enjoy AHT’s coverage of these events, from our National Championships through the World Championships. We’ll be bringing you the stars at home and abroad, because the schedule doesn’t end with our finals—there are still two to go. You’re invited to come with me on this journey through the world of the Arabian horse.

Lara Ames Lara Ames Publisher

Ar abian Horse Times | 5 | Volume 47, No. 5A


Stop by the Trowbridge’s Ltd. stalls during the show to see H Mobility H and receive his special U.S. National Show Breeding Incentive.

*Elimar MHR Nobility

RY Fire Ghazi

HAR Nahra *El Ghazi RL Rah Fire

Celebes Eliza *Bask *Portulaka Aloes Elektra Le Fire Raha Melima

Ar abian Horse Times | 6 | Volume 47, No. 5A


Ar abian Horse Times | 7 | Volume 47, No. 5A


Majestico is proof that small breeders can succeed in the national halter arena. We believed in him and set out with the goal of earning the 2016 Canadian National Champion Stallion title, after a f ive-year show ring hiatus. Thank you to everyone who participated in making this dream a reality:

“Looking forward to the future ... the future is ours!” — Jerry Schall

“ ... no matter how he is viewed, he is a picture of quality and balance, possessing both type and beauty. Majestico is a powerful and athletic moving stallion— the image of a great show horse.” —Peter Cameron

• The judging panel for selecting him as their champion from a class of beautiful stallions. • Jeff and Jerry Schall and Team Shada, for his meticulous care, preparation, and presentation. • The many equine professionals for contributing their respective talents and expertise. • My family, friends, and Majestico’s admirers; for their advice, support and encouragement, with special thanks to Peter Cameron and Dorothy Zielske. • My late husband, Doug Seward, who lost his seven-year battle with cancer in 2015. He had an incredible eye for a horse, and was Majestico’s greatest fan from the day he was foaled. • Majestico, for truly exemplifying his name in every way. • And most of all, thank you to God, for creating this beautiful stallion and for allowing this to happen. Nancy Cowette Seward Hobnail Farm

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2 0 1 6 C A N A D I A N N A T I O N A L C H A M P I O N H A LT E R S TA L L I O N PRESENTED BY JEFF SCHALL

Marwan Al Shaqab x La Vida Lloca

2 X N AT I O N A L C H A M P I O N Elk River, MN 763-441-5849 sshadainc@aol.com www.ShadaInc.com

2008 stallion, ca & scid clear Standing at Shada, Inc. Nominated Sire: AHA Breeders Sweepstakes Minnesota Medallion Stallion Ar abian Horse Times | 9 | Volume 47, No. 5A

Bred and owned by Hobnail Farm The Seward Family Greenfield, MN


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BENI HASHIM ARABIANS ... The Seal of Nobility

Amelia B and her daughter by Marwan Al Shaqab

Beni Hashim Arabians is the culmination of a lifelong passion and love for the finest Arabian horses and the desire to preserve and promote our noble Arabian heritage.

We are an emerging breeding program in Scottsdale, Arizona that relentlessly pursues excellence and perfection. We strive to collect and breed world-class horses with exquisite type, sound conformation, and stunning beauty.

P.O. Box 28451 | Scottsdale, Arizona 85255, USA Tel: 480.442.2207 | Email: info@benihashim.com | www.benihashim.com

Ar abian Horse Times | 14 | Volume 47, No. 5A


Introducing our leading mare . . . AMELIA B

Magnum Psyche x Amety B

U.S. National Champion | Canadian National Reserve Champion Dam of 4 National Champions

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ANSATA HALIM SHAH

Rik Van Lent Jr. photo.

Leader of the Great Migration


Ansata Halim Shah as a young colt. The dryness and refinement of his head were just beginning to show. Forbis photo.


ANSATA HALIM SHAH Leader of the Great Migration

By Judith Forbis Š (Portions of this story are condensed from Authentic Arabian Bloodstock II)

ONCE IN A LIFETIME If you were visiting Ansata Arabian Stud on April 28, 1980, you would have felt excitement pulsating throughout our farm deep in the piney woods of Lufkin, Texas. The broodmares were happily grazing the tender spring grass. The staff were tending their daily chores, lunging show horses, putting them on the walker, grooming Ansata Ibn Halima, Ansata Ibn Sudan, Ansata Shah Zaman and various horses in the show barn. Some of the top ten songs of the day were playing as everyone went about their work: Shining Star, Fame, Celebration, Once in a Lifetime, among them. Meanwhile our very special mare, Ansata Rosetta, in foal to Ansata Ibn Halima, was about to give birth in the mare barn. Was she listening to the music too? Were the titles of these songs prophesizing the future of the foal about to be born? After keeping all of us waiting and wondering, Rosetta presented us with a healthy capricious grey colt. From day one he was his very own self. It wasn't long before we could see in him the qualities we hoped he would inherit from his outstanding parents and four grandparents: balance, beauty and the gentility of his sire, Ansata Ibn Halima; the elegance, grace and spirit of his dam, Ansata Rosetta; the exceptional overall refinement and fine bone structure of his grand dam, Ansata Bint Bukra; and the extreme pride and individuality of his dam's sire, the inbred Ansata Shah Zaman who resulted from breeding Morafic to his full sister, Ansata Bint Mabrouka. The fact that he was intensely bred to Nazeer added that indefinable quality and nobility that Nazeer imparted to his get.

Ansata Halim Shah’s home in the Ansata Arabian Stud show barn in Mena, Arkansas. Sparagowski photo. AL SH AQAB | 1 | Ar abian Horse Times


From top left: Ansata Halim Shah after arriving at the airport enroute to the Salon du Cheval in Paris. Count William DeChoisey, manager of the show, obtained the photo, signed, and sent it to Judith Forbis as a memento of this auspicious occasion. Ansata Halim Shah with Dr. Nagel's farm manager Johann, in 1984. Van Lent Photo. Richard Sanders presenting Ansata Halim Shah to the judges at the 1983 Salon Du Cheval where he was Reserve Junior World Champion Stallion. Forbis photo. Ansata Halim Shah and Martin Nagel at a place near Dr, Nagel's Katharinenhof Stud near Bremen, Germany, where Ansata Halim Shah stood at stud in 1984. Van Lent photo.

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WHAT'S IN A NAME What to name this new colt? A potentially great horse should have a memorable and meaningful name. He had already developed a certain attitude of royal reserve and his regal bearing was enhanced by a high-borne silken tail. He was refined and elegant at this early age. His big black expressive eyes were constantly alert to his surroundings. Nothing escaped them! He was extremely intelligent, kind, yet somewhat haughty, down-to-earth but a mischief-maker with a twinkle in his eye. He'd nip at you to attract attention, but he never bit hard or intentionally tried to hurt. It was his way of saying, “Look at me, I'm special!" We decided to name him Ansata Halim Shah: Halim (kind) after his sire, Ansata Ibn Halima, and Shah (ruler) after his dam's sire, Ansata Shah Zaman. It fitted him perfectly. When he tried to self-destruct, we knew he would become something special. These "accidents" often occur only to the best ones. I can remember it to this day. When we walked into the barn, there he was with his foot jammed through the bars of his stall door. How he did it remained a puzzle, but fortunately he understood his precarious situation and remained quiet. We finally cut him free and luckily the injury to his pastern was minor and left it unscarred. Was this a sign of fame to come? His stable mate, Ansata Ibn Sudan, had also done likewise, and he had become a U.S. National Champion.

AT HOME IN ARKANSAS - THE NATURAL STATE In 1981 we sold the Texas farm and began the migration to our new ranch in Mena, Arkansas. Nestled in the foothills of the Ouachita Mountains, it was a haven of natural beauty. Several friends including Lisa Lacy and her father, Jarrell McCracken of Bentwood Farms, were on hand to meet the caravans and record the arrival of Ansata Ibn Halima and his family. Lisa vividly recalls that historical day, “My strongest memory of this regal heir to the Ansata throne is when he was a brash young colt leaping off of the van. He exuded quality and he knew it. He was comfortable in his own skin. He was a classic whose bearing and attitude reflected the ethereal beauty now well known to the whole world.” Soon after we made several trips abroad, including a stop at our friend Dr. Nagel's Katharinenhof Stud near Bremen, Germany, to see his handsome white stallion, Jamil. Short wedgy head, big black expressive eyes, tiny ears, long neck, well-balanced with clean bone and good straight legs, Jamil was an elegant refined individual. Also bearing in mind his excellent parents, grandparents, and their pedigrees, he seemed a perfect match to add to the Ansata program. Not long afterwards, Nagel came to visit us. This meeting turned out to be what I often refer to as one of those "divine appointments." “It was my first visit to Ansata in the early eighties, after Don and Judi had moved to Arkansas,” Dr. Nagel recalls. “I had the opportunity to see most of the horses at that time, especially the colts and the stallions. Admiring Ansata’s special look and quality, I was busy in my mind with the question, which horse might improve some features of our Arabians in Germany, and

naturally, also in my own farm. My face apparently changed expression drastically when I saw the young Ansata Halim Shah coming out, and Judi apparently noticed this fact.” He went on to reflect, “She asked me later about my impression of her horses, and my answer was like many of them, ‘It is difficult to tell which is the one.’ And Judi remarked, ‘I can tell you which is the one, because I saw your reaction when Halim Shah appeared’.” A cooperative agreement was then struck whereby Jamil would come to America to be shown and stand at Ansata, and Halim Shah would go to Europe after the U.S. Nationals, compete at the Salon du Cheval in Paris, and then stand at Nagel’s farm in Germany.

SHINING STAR Jamil (registered in America as *Jamilll) arrived at Ansata in time to be exhibited together with Halim Shah at the Pyramid Society's 1983 Egyptian Event in Lexington, Kentucky. Together, the two stunning white stallions made a memorable impact on breeders and spectators who came from around the world to attend the annual gathering of straight Egyptian Arabian horses. Other prestigious shows were soon to follow. Halim Shah, now age three, was already eligible for the Stallion Futurity Class at the U.S. National Arabian Horse Show to be held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, that year. Jamilll went about qualifying for the U.S. National Champion Stallion class by winning several Class A championships and gaining popularity along the way. “The Egyptian Event had been very exciting that year, especially with *Jamilll’s debut in this country. Even with the hoopla about *Jamilll, Halim Shah held his own and seemed to affect people with his impish regal air,” Richard Sanders, Ansata's resident trainer reminisces. "We arrived at U.S. Nationals on quite a high note, having had a very successful summer of showing a group of straight Egyptian stallions that turned everybody’s heads. Through all of this, Halim Shah seemed to know he was on a mission. Showing never seemed to stress him. Although he was a nipper, most of his energy came across as impish and playful. It looked good in the ring.” In those days, classes were huge and highly competitive. Richard recalls, “If I remember correctly, we had to compete against as many as 60 stallions, and as many as three cuts of 20 just to reach the top ten. The competition was exceptionally tough, but *Jamilll was chosen as a U.S. Top Ten Stallion, and Ansata Halim Shah was chosen a U.S. National Top Ten Futurity Stallion. By this time, he was getting considerable notice from breeders and Arabian enthusiasts worldwide.” Jody Cruz of Rancho Bulakenyo and his dad, Dr. Felino Cruz, were devoted fans of Ansata Ibn Halima. Jody fondly recollects, “My favorite memory of Ansata Halim Shah was at the 1983 U.S. National Championship Show when he and our own El Halimaar were crowned U.S. National Top Ten Futurity Colts. The two brothers [by Ansata Ibn Halima] made their sire proud that day.” In speaking of Ansata Halim Shah, Jody reflects, “Anyone who saw him even once, remembers him forever.

AL SH AQAB | 3 | Ar abian Horse Times


Mansour Nazeer

Ansata Ibn Halima

ANSATA HALIM SHAH

Nafaa El Saghira

Kazmeen Bint Samiha Samiha

Mansour Sheikh El Arab Bint Sabah Halima Ibn Rabdan Ragia Farida

Morafic

Ansata Rosetta

Gamil Manial

Nazeer

Mabrouka Ansata Shah Zaman Nazeer Ansata Bint Mabrouka Mabrouka Nazeer

Mansour

Bint Samiha Ansata Bint Bukra Shahloul Bukra Bint Sabah

AL SH AQAB | 4 | Ar abian Horse Times


His beauty was unmistakably ‘Ansata’ and his classic type unforgettable. What attracted me most was his exquisite, finely chiseled head, beautiful black eyes, and his memorable expression. Of course, one would expect such beauty from his pedigree."

CELEBRATION After Nationals, we decided to "take on the world" and prepared to ship Halim Shah to Paris for the Salon du Cheval World Championships. Halim Shah was in peak show condition for the trip, and Richard recalls that exciting day, “We left Arkansas for Europe, flying from Houston to New York and then on to Paris after spending eight hours on the J.F.K. tarmac due to mechanical problems. However, Halim Shah did not seem to mind the delay. He sensed he was on a mission and it seemed to help keep him out of trouble. We traveled well." Halim Shah’s fame and U.S. National win preceded him to Europe. Richard was unprepared for the reception committee of newspaper reporters and press that greeted them when they landed, or for the anxious moments that followed. “Somehow, the arrangements to move Halim Shah from the plane across town to the Longchamp race track, where he would stay temporarily, were overlooked," Richard remembers. "My French, being very poor, forced me to draw pictures indicating the need for a ride. It was a bit traumatic, but we finally got transportation and, with a strange mare riding beside us, traveled across Paris in an open-topped two-horse trailer. When we arrived at Port du Versailles, where the historical Salon du Cheval takes place, Mizan Taj Halim, a beautiful black-bay Ansata Ibn Halima son from America, was there with Midwest Training Stables. It was an exciting show with much class and an enthusiastic French crowd, as well as spectators from around the world. When the cheering was over and the show had concluded, two Ansata Ibn Halima sons stood out from the rest, Mizan Taj Halim was World Champion Stallion, and Ansata Halim Shah was Reserve World Junior Champion Stallion, and the only horse to receive a perfect 20 in type. It was an unforgettable event."

SINGING HIS PRAISES After the show, Halim Shah was vanned to Dr. Nagel’s farm in Bremen. “He remained for 18 months only, and any Egyptian horse, since that time, that does not carry his blood, ranks on a lower level,” Dr. Nagel vividly recalls. “This stallion had such a positive influence, that even those breeders who were at first very skeptical about him, nearly all changed their minds, and until now, Halim Shah is still the top name in all the breeding farms concentrating on Egyptian blood.” With a practiced eye for classic beauty, Nagel carefully selected the mares to be bred to Halim Shah, not only his own, but those from the Babolna State Stud of Hungary, the Marbach State Stud of Germany, and from other private breeding farms.

From top: Ansata Ibn Halima (Sparagowski) Ansata Shah Zaman (Sparagowski) Ansata Rosetta (Sparagowski) Ansata Bint Mabrouka (left) and Ansata Bint Bukra (right) (Polly Knoll)

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From top: Judith and Don Forbis with Ansata Halima Shah Judith Forbis and Ansata Halima Shah as a seven-year old in Mena, Arkansas. Sparagowski photo. Ansata Halim Shah growing up at Ansata Arabian Stud before he went to Europe as a three year old. Sparagowski photo. Ansata Halim Shah back home in Mena, Arkansas, enjoys a run in his paddock. Forbis archives.

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In Europe, horse breeding is a serious, honorable profession, and much attention is paid to breeding horses who have excellent conformation, are sound and athletic, and have good character which allows them to be happy in performing their allotted tasks. Classic type in Arabian horses encompasses all these attributes, including the unique beauty characteristic of this breed. At that time, German breeders were still compelled to obtain official approval for their stallions when they wanted to use a horse for breeding. It is therefore, significant that at the very strict German stallion licensing tests, Ansata Halim Shah was the only horse to receive a perfect 20 in type. A letter from Stefan Walterman of the Maiworm Stud, who bred the celebrated Ansata Halim Shah son, Maysoun, explains how Ansata Halim Shah came to be even more appreciated by German breeders as time progressed:

“Dear Don, dear Judith, Something unsurpassed happened during the 1987 German stallion licensing: 29 stallions out of 62 were licensed 4 were by Ansata Halim Shah 9 were rated “PREMIUM” (Same as ‘Elite’ in Tersk) 3 are by ANSATA HALIM SHAH. The success of your stallion as a breeding horse is absolutely unique for the breeding of Arabian horses in Germany. In his article in the Arabisch Pferde, Dr. Wolfgang Cranz, the director of Marbach, mentioned that the four Halim Shah sons had been noticed as ‘superior in type, ideal neck, fine in the throatlatch, flowing movement with an extreme elasticity of the body.’ We all would like to thank you for sending Halim Shah to Europe and we all congratulate you for the phenomenal success.” Dr. Nagel further commented at that time regarding the German licensing system and Ansata Halim Shah’s total record, “According to statistical figures covering 20 years of licensing, an Arabian stallion produces in all his life only one or two licensed sons. Ansata Halim Shah instead produced, in only 18 months during his short time in Germany, nine stallions who were all approved by the governmentally guided committee.” Concluded Nagel, “His unprecedented success was definitely based on his own high breeding potential, but also on the careful selection of mares that might fit to such a horse. His striking appearance as a most classical Arabian and the quality of his ancestors listed in his pedigree, together made him a unique horse. He was also endowed with the rare ability to produce excellent sons and daughters as well.” Halim Shah sired for Nagel a group of beautiful grey mares and the very influential grey stallion Salaa El Dine. In fact, Halim Shah changed the look of the Katherinenhof program, from colored horses to greys, and marked it with a new look. Many stallions sire good quality in only one sex; Halim Shah sired equally good colts and fillies, and his sons and daughters were soon winning national and international championships.

Among the enthusiastic Straight Egyptian Arabian horse breeders in Germany at that time, as well as now, was Cornelia Tauschke of El Thayeba Arabians. She remembers, “When I saw Ansata Halim Shah the first time, he was three years old and had just arrived at Dr. Nagel’s Katharinenhof. His exotic head and balanced body impressed me very much. We were happy to have the chance to breed some mares with him. Today when you see the group of El Thayeba horses, you can see Ansata Halim Shah in every horse.”

HOME SWEET HOME When Halim Shah returned to America, he was quarantined for a month in Kentucky before traveling back to Arkansas. Not long after his arrival in Mena, he appeared colicky. Don rushed him to a vet clinic in Oklahoma where exploratory surgery was performed. No problems were found, and he came through the operation with his usual aplomb and serenity, surprising the vets with his rapid recovery and playful demeanor. Ansata Halim Shah matured into a majestic silvery-white stallion and made an indelible impression on breeders and judges, including Peter Pond of Forest Hill Arabian Stud in Australia, who has known the Ansata horses since 1971. “I marveled at how successful a sire Halim Shah was when used in many of the Egyptian breeding programs in Europe and the Middle East,” remarks Peter. “Ansata Halim Shah was truly one of the great Arabian sires of our time.” Similar thoughts were echoed by two American breeder judges, Bill Trapp and Jim Panek, who were dedicated to rewarding classic type in the show ring. “Recollections of Ansata Halim Shah for me are of an exceptional individual with that elusive quality many good horses lack, a ‘presence’ about him, coupled with a lot of vitality,” remarked Trapp. “He was the epitome of Arabian type, and, of course, had the bloodlines to ‘breed on.’” Panek’s appraisal is similar, “If there is any one Arabian stallion that has re-awakened the world of Arabian horses to the classic Arabian, it is Ansata Halim Shah. He has perpetuated his likeness in the United States, Europe, and the Middle East. Through his offspring in each of these geographical areas, Ansata Halim Shah has become the epitome to which breeders strive. There is no doubt that as the history of the Arabian horse progresses world-wide, Ansata Halim Shah will be recognized as the standard bearer of the breed.”

STAR QUALITY Writers were captivated by Halim Shah's extreme beauty, pride and nobility. Respected author Cynthia Culbertson was one of many who fell prey to his charms, “Ansata Halim Shah, much like his legendary father, Ansata Ibn Halima, seemed to have an inner sense of self,” she muses. “In his presence, one sensed a sublime serenity and harmony. He could stand quietly, a certain stillness in his faraway gaze, and project his greatness without unnecessary fuss.

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From left: Sculptor Karen Kasper portrayed Ansata Halim Shah in bronze by choosing a similar playful rearing pose that mirrored that of his sire. Forbis archives. Ansata Ibn Halima (shown at the Ansata ranch in Chickasha, Oklahoma as a young stallion). Forbis photo. Artists loved to portray Halim Shah’s extreme refinement. Pencil drawing when he was seven years old by Barbara Lewis. AL SH AQAB | 8 | Ar abian Horse Times


He was exquisitely beautiful... Ansata Halim Shah, like many of the greatest Arabian stallions, wasn’t a tall horse, but he had extraordinary balance, and in motion could be bigger than life. He was the essence of Arabian type." Joe Ferriss, former editor of The Khamsat magazine, knows Ansata horses well. Reflecting on when he first saw Halim Shah in the early 90’s, he wrote, “As I walked around him looking over his pearl-like surface, the experience was like that of viewing an Auguste Rodin sculpture. He was continuously harmonious when viewed from every angle. Knowing his pedigree, I was aware that he represented an amalgam of the key ingredients that embody the Ansata vision and type. Yet, he was not a horse that one could accurately say, ‘he reminds me of... .' As I looked into his deep lustrous eyes, I felt an immediate sense of quiet dignity conveying with certainty that this was a horse unto himself, a soul like no other." Breeders loved Halim Shah, who was in his element whether holding audience at home, or at the Pyramid Society’s annual Egyptian Event where he was exhibited in the 80’s and early 90’s on the Hall of Stallions. Karen Henwood, successful breeder and owner of Sandybrook Farm in Fla., remarked after she first saw him in the Big Barn at the Egyptian Event. "I was stopped dead in my tracks. Before me was a vision I thought only possible in ancient paintings. I had never seen anything like this in the flesh." She further noted, "There was no other horse in that barn that gave me the feeling that Halim Shah did.” Long-time breeders Joan Skeels and Sue Burnham of Hope Farm in Ark., remembered, “At first we saw him in his huge double stall, his coat opalescent as if he were cast from fine bone china; huge dark eyes glanced briefly then he returned to the order of his day. Regal, a king in his demeanor, were our thoughts of him. Once on a lead shank, he became animated; his tail a plume over his back claiming full attention from those observing him, yet reflecting kindness and docility. Standing there, each point of his construction fluidly created a model of perfection.”

Internationally famous equine photographer, the late Erwin Escher of Germany, became an enthusiastic fan of Ansata Halim Shah when he and his wife, Annette, came to America in 1993. “We first visited Ansata Arabians, and this has had much influence on our future breeding program,” Erwin remembered. “The first horse we saw there was Ansata Halim Shah! Don showed him to us outside his barn, and we were totally impressed by his incomparable Arabian beauty and charisma... white, dry in type, elegant—simply a real ARABIAN HORSE. We never before saw a beauty like him!" Gigi Grasso of Italy also needs no introduction as a worldfamous photographer. He too, began his career at Ansata. “Ansata Halim Shah will always be a special horse to me because he was the very first Arabian that I had the chance to photograph,” Gigi fondly recalls. “Even after I have had the privilege of photographing many of the world’s most beautiful and famous Arabians, I still cannot forget Ansata Halim Shah. After I had seen several of his offspring, I said to myself, ‘Just once in my life, I would like to have a horse of this blood!’ His charisma, his eyes, his fine skin, his splendid quality—all of this made Ansata Halim Shah simply spectacular.”

THE PERFECT MODEL Photographers worldwide considered Halim Shah a perfect model. Because of his ideal fine bone structure, he was very photogenic, and every photo session produced excellent pictures. Jerry Sparagowski began his career in equine photography at Ansata in the early 70’s. He recorded Halim Shah's life in America and his famous “fountain” image of Halim Shah looking over his back at his high-plumed tail set a new benchmark in Arabian horse photography. Harking back to those formative days, Jerry remembers, “In the early seventies, Ansata Arabian Stud had three important stallions: Ansata Ibn Halima, Ansata Ibn Sudan and Ansata Shah Zaman. They were very different in style, and one could easily pick out which foals were by which stallion. As time moved on and Ansata’s breeding program continued to mature, a distinctive ‘look’ started to appear. In my eye, that ‘look’ was Ansata Halim Shah. He had Ansata Ibn Halima’s beauty, Ansata Ibn Sudan’s strength and elegance, and Ansata Shah Zaman’s flair for life... . To my mind, he had become the Ansata horse.”

AL SH AQAB | 9 | Ar abian Horse Times


From top left: The iconic Sparagowski "fountain photo" of Ansata Halim Shah that started a trend among Arabian horse photographers. Admirers of all ages enjoyed visiting with Halim Shah and he was always happy to receive them. This charming Sparagowski photo graced the cover of Arabian Horse World magazine. Ansata Halim Shah shows his ideal balance and overall classic type in 1990 as a mature stallion in this photo by Sparagowski. A foretaste of things to come. Sheikh Hamad bin Ali Al Thani and his friends from Qatar pay a visit to Ansata Arabian Stud in Arkansas where they met Ansata Halim Shah for the first time. Forbis photo. Bon Voyage! A going away party, complete with carrots and carrot cake, was held for Halim Shah by his many friends in Mena before his departure to Qatar. Forbis archives.

AL SH AQAB | 10 | Ar abian Horse Times


IN THE EYE OF THE BEHOLDER From time immemorial, artists have been inspired by the Arabian horse's classic beauty. When Halim Shah was seven years old, accomplished painter and sculptor Barbara Lewis of Baraka Farm and Studio in Mena, portrayed him in a charming pencil sketch entitled “Grey Monarch". She reminisces that, “On occasion, it would seem that God sends us an Arabian horse of such beauty and elegance that it becomes an ideal by which all others are to be measured. They remain a goal for breeders to accomplish, and for lovers of perfection to own." To her artist's eye, "Ansata Halim Shah was such an Arabian horse. He had that indefinable, ethereal quality. His demeanor made it known that he did not question his importance. If I were to compare him, it would have to be with the finest Meissen china... delicate, and refined, yet with a strength that is enduring... he was perfection in elegance. It is the hope of this achievement that drives us forward against all odds.” When we commissioned celebrated sculptor Karen Kasper to portray Halim Shah in bronze, she came to Ansata and spent several days in and out of his stall studying his structure, taking his conformation measurements, and observing his mischievous habits. She finally chose to depict him in a playful rearing position. At that time she didn’t realize this pose was also common to his sire, Ansata Ibn Halima. Speaking in retrospect about Halim Shah, she was reminded, “Although a stallion of exquisite refinement and beautiful type, I remember most his unique and expressive energy that projected a powerful charisma, attitude of superiority, and an inherent sense of mischief.” She further recalled, “I was among those who sensed that he was profoundly important in some way beyond our present understanding, and I felt that Halim Shah himself sensed this as well. I sculpted him rearing proudly, yet with a playful eye on his admirers, and this is how I will always remember him.”

majestically trot into the show ring and win the first Qatar National Junior Mare Championship will forever remember her. She was a true queen, and she lit the torch that carried Halim Shah's flame into the Arab world. “When I first saw Ansata Halim Shah in photographs, I had high expectations," remarked Sheikh Abdulaziz. "When a few months later visiting the Ansata Arabian Stud, I realized this stallion was still more special! Halim Shah made such an impression on me that from that day, I gladly dedicated my own breeding program towards him, hoping that one day I would be honored with a colt foal possessing his incomparable Arabian horse type, quality and charm.”

ANCESTRAL HOMELANDS BECKON Meanwhile, the hint of an Arabian horse renaissance was on the horizon in the Arab world. HH The Emir of the State of Qatar, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, sensed the time for the renaissance had come and he was determined to move it forward at a rapid pace. A life-long horseman, he enjoyed riding, but he was also particularly aware of his country's Arabian horse heritage and was determined to restore the cultural tradition of his ancestors in breeding superior bloodstock. That he would choose a stallion of the Dahman Shahwan lineage as a foundation sire was prophetic, for the founding father of the State of Qatar, Sheikh Jassim bin Mohammed Al Thani, (r. 1878-1913) also coveted this strain as did celebrated breeder Abbas Pasha I, Viceroy of Egypt (r. 1848-1854). It is noteworthy that the first Dahma Shahwania mare mentioned in the famous Abbas Pasha Manuscript was from Qatar.

FAME During the late 80’s and early 90’s, Ansata was continually receiving guests from around the world. One day Sheikh Abdulaziz Bin Khalid Al Thani, a young man in his early twenties from the ruling Al Thani family of the State of Qatar, paid us a visit. Arriving at Ansata with an entourage of friends, and minus their luggage, they uncomplainingly made themselves comfortable with clothes hastily purchased from Wal-Mart until their bags arrived two days later. Rain or shine, they walked through the pastures and studied every horse. The young sheikh had the keen eye of his beloved falcons, and nothing escaped his critical gaze. He knew exactly what he wanted—whether or not it was for sale made no difference. Mindful of Sheikh Abdulaziz's extreme enthusiasm, remarkable pedigree knowledge, and his potential to lead the Arab world to new heights in breeding Arabian horses, we agreed to sell him our stunning chestnut U.S. National Top Five Futurity Champion Mare Ansata Splendora (*Jamilll x Ansata Splendora), and the dynamic white Ansata Majesta (Ansata Halim Shah x Ansata Malika). Majesta promptly lived up to her name for her new owner. Those who saw her

One of Sparagowski's special photos showing the extreme beauty of Ansata Halim Shah's very refined head.

AL SH AQAB | 11 | Ar abian Horse Times


From top: Making friends! His Highness Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, soon thereafter to become The Emir of the State of Qatar, with Ansata Halim Shah at Al Shaqab in 1994. Van Lent Jr. photo. HH The Emir Sheikh Hamad and Halim Shah pose for photographer Rik Van Lent Jr. in 1994. The first Al Shaqab Stables in 1994. Rik Van Lent Jr. photo. A group of Arabian mares awaiting Halim Shah’s arrival at Al Shaqab. Rik Van Lent Jr. photo. A head study of Halim Shah at Al Shaqab. Irina Filsinger photo.

AL SH AQAB | 12 | Ar abian Horse Times


As a site for his exciting new project, HH The Emir chose the Al Shaqab region where Qatari blood had once been shed in the battle for Qatar’s independence. He meticulously began construction, naming his stud farm Al Shaqab in honor of the valiant horses and warriors who fought the Ottomans there in 1893 and paved the way for Qatar's future independence. His Highness's vision for the stud was three-fold: to preserve many of the breed’s ancient sire and dam lines, to perpetuate the native Qatari Arabians, and to elevate the standard in world-class Arabian show horses which would bring recognition to Qatar’s cultural heritage. His goal was to see the results of his Al Shaqab Stud’s breeding program become a valuable contributor to breeding herds around the world. To manage his breeding program, HH The Emir chose a very capable young horseman, Sheikh Hamad bin Ali Al Thani, whom he had known for years. Sheikh Hamad was a devout patriot, devoted to His Highness, and determined to make Al Shaqab world famous. Sheikh Hamad did his homework, studied pedigrees, and set forth on his quest to purchase world-class Arabian horses. He visited with Egyptian breeders from around the globe and attended the Pyramid Society's Egyptian Event in Lexington, Kentucky. After looking at many horses, he purchased the handsome straight Egyptian Arabian stallion Sabiell, who promptly won Supreme Champion Stallion of the show. This win further inspired Sheikh Hamad to boldly move Al Shaqab forward into the highly competitive international show ring. A few months later at the Salon du Cheval World Championships in Paris, Sabiell was crowned 1993 World Reserve Junior Champion Stallion, the first of many World Championship titles to be garnered by Al Shaqab in the future.

WHITE HORSES - SYMBOLIC OF VICTORY One day in 1993, an exquisite white mare pranced into the life of HH The Emir. Immediately he recognized in her something beyond beauty. It was Ansata Majesta! She had become the talk of the Arabian horse community since winning at the Qatar National show. Desirous of having horses of this unique quality and beauty, HH The Emir inquired of Sheikh Abdulaziz and his brother, Sheikh Abdullah Bin Khalid Al Thani, where he might obtain some like her. Thus he learned about Ansata Arabian Stud, including the farm’s remarkable stallion Ansata Halim Shah, and the Ansata breeding program. In the course of events, we were approached to sell Halim Shah and a group of mares that could help found a straight Egyptian Arabian breeding program for Al Shaqab. We gave much thought to the pros and cons of letting Halim Shah leave the States. It seemed a wonderful opportunity for him to become a “light on the hill” to further the Arabian horse renaissance in the Arab world. Therefore, after great deliberation, we made the decision to let him return to his ancestral homeland where the Dahman Shahwan strain had long been celebrated. Well-known breeder, Christie Metz, of Silver Maple Farm, remembers her visit to Ansata just before we made that fateful decision, “I saw Halim Shah, along with Ansata Omar Halim [Halim Shah's full brother], Ansata Manasseh and Prince Fa Moniet, the first time I visited your farm.

AL SH AQAB | 13 | Ar abian Horse Times


“Ansata Halim Shah was the best Egyptian horse; he comprised all the great things which all breeders love,� remarked Sheikh Hamad bin Ali Al Thani, shown here with Ansata Halim Shah in a memorable pose for Rik Van Lent Jr. Opposite page from top: Ansata Majesta, (Ansata Halim Shah x Ansata Malika) the most winning daughter of Halim Shah, won hearts in America and captivated HH The Emir of Qatar, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani after she was imported to Qatar and was a champion the first time shown there. Gigi Grasso photo. A conformation study of Halim Shah shows his maturity at age 14. Irina Filsinger photo. Don Forbis, Sheikh Hamad bin Ali Al Thani with Halim Shah soon after he arrived at Al Shaqab in 1994. Rik Van Lent Jr. photo.

AL SH AQAB | 14 | Ar abian Horse Times


I remember thinking how special it was to see these beautiful silver talismans of the breed and thinking that I wanted to breed Sahbine to Halim Shah. The next year you sold him and the rest is history. It was a lesson for me to follow your instincts immediately, do not wait.” Before Halim Shah was to make his fateful journey, we held a special farewell party in the show barn, complete with carrot cake, to wish him bon voyage. Soon thereafter, Don and Dr. Craig Bullock, D.V.M., were accompanying him on his flight to the faraway land of Qatar, jutting off the eastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula into the turquoise waters of the Arabian Gulf.

THE GREAT MIGRATION BEGINS The trip was undertaken without mishap. Halim Shah deplaned into the blinding desert glare and was taken to his new home at Al Shaqab in Doha. A small but select group of straight Egyptian Arabian mares, as well as those of other international Arabian bloodlines, awaited his arrival and he promptly went about his mission of getting them in foal. The future looked bright. HH The Emir was very pleased with Halim Shah and always made it a point to see him when he came to visit the farm to take his daily walks. Eileen Verdieck, an advisor to Al Shaqab in its early years, remembers that after Ansata Halim Shah arrived, His Highness loved to stand at the fence and watch him running loose. “The stallion would gallop right up to him, snort, and whirl away again,” she recalls. “It was fun to watch him play and entertain HH The Emir.” Not long after Halim Shah arrived in Qatar, caravans of Ansata's choicest Dahmah Shahwanieh mares wended their way eastward to join him at Al Shaqab: Ansata Bint Halima, Ansata Sudarra, Ansata Aliha, Ansata Prima Rose (a maternal half-sister to Halim Shah) Ansata Malaha (a special Halim Shah daughter) and Ansata Deborah, as well as Ansata Narjisa of the Saklawiah Jedraniyah strain. Thus the foundation for a significant straight Egyptian Arabian program was in place and founded primarily on the Dahman strain valued by the Al Thani ancestors. The renaissance of the Arabian horse in the Arab world was beginning to blossom. In a few years it would be in full bloom, much to the credit and leadership of HH The Emir. What a fabulous opportunity it was for Qatar to carry on that time-honored strain. It seemed that Halim Shah and his harem might live together happily ever after. However, it was not to be. The “Hand of Fate” struck. Halim Shah suffered an irreparable accident and sadly passed away far too soon! His beautiful white light, however, did not diminish. It continues to shine in reflection through his magnificent descendants.

AL SH AQAB | 15 | Ar abian Horse Times


Ansata Halim Shah in the Qatari desert. Rik Van Lent Jr. photo.

AL SH AQAB | 16 | Ar abian Horse Times


Fortunately a few mares had gotten in foal during his short period at Al Shaqab and they delivered several fine daughters. Fate was also kind enough to provide a stunning, very impish, grey colt to carry on his father's legacy. Named Al Adeed Al Shaqab, he matured into a dynamic silvery-white stallion. A born show horse and big showoff, halter championships fell at his feet including multi-National Champion Stallion wins, Egyptian Event Supreme Champion in the U.S. and World Champion Stallion at the Salon du Cheval in Paris. Now his get and grandget are passing on many of his traits, and the influence of Halim Shah continues.

THE LAST MIGRATION After nearly fifty years of involvement with Arabian horses, in 2006 Don and I decided to phase out our breeding program – just two years before our Golden Anniversary. HH The Emir inadvertently heard the news from one of his friends, and he was determined to acquire the remaining Ansata herd which contained some of our choicest mares. We agreed to the purchase, and another migration of priceless Dahmah Shahwaniah mares wended its way eastward to Qatar, most of them carrying close-up breeding to Halim Shah and his relatives. Among them were: Ansata Nefri, Ansata Nefr, Ansata Bint Nefr, Ansata Nadra, Ansata Shahkira, VA Ahlam, Ansata Desert Star, Ansata Desert Sunrise and the double Halim Shah mare, Ansata Millennia. Accompanying the herd were two young Dahman Shahwan colts, Ansata Mabrouk and Ansata Ibn Sirius. Sheikh Hamad Bin Ali Al Thani, the current Breeding and Show Manager of Al Shaqab recalls, “From the beginning of the foundation of Al Shaqab Stud, we selected the best stallions which became the basis of our present elite horses. I am remindful that Ansata Halim Shah is one stallion that I chose and I have never forgotten; he was the main pillar at Al Shaqab Stud. "Ansata Halim Shah was the best Egyptian horse; he comprised all the great things which all breeders love,” Sheikh Hamad reminisced. “Although it is not difficult to find a beautiful stallion, it is very difficult to get one with the specifications of Ansata Halim Shah. He incarnates beauty, magnificence, elegance and endurance, and was much beloved. I have never seen any other like him nor one that had something of his fascination; he was a unique stallion that cannot come back." Sheikh Hamad continued, "I tried to find suitable words that can describe my lovely stallion, but I couldn’t. He is gone, though he lives in my heart and mind. All breeders around the world from the U.S. and Europe, to the Middle East, are missing him. I can say, Al Shaqab Stud is very lucky, because the blood of Ansata Halim Shah is running into new generations of stallions born here, and Al Aadeed Al Shaqab is one of them. He is not Ansata Halim Shah, but he takes most characteristics of his sire. Thus, I can say he is a unique stallion. I love him, just as I loved his sire.”

AL SH AQAB | 17 | Ar abian Horse Times


Ansata Halim Shah never died. He will always live on and his remarkable influence will always be there.� Rik van Lent Jr. photo

AL SH AQAB | 18 | Ar abian Horse Times


ONCE IN A LIFETIME "The moving finger having writ, moves on..." Over a quarter of a century has passed since the young Qataris first visited Ansata Arabian Stud in Mena, Arkansas. In 2008 we closed the farm and Don Forbis passed away at the close of our 50th anniversary year. Al Shaqab was gifted by HH The Emir to the Qatar Foundation for Education, Science, and Community Development located within Education City - “a city of knowledge built for the people." Twenty-one years after HH The Emir founded Al Shaqab, he abdicated the throne in favor of his son, HH Sheikh Tamim. Now beloved as HH The Father Emir, his foresight in bringing the Arabian breed to new heights is being enjoyed by Qataris and breeders worldwide. Furthermore, the bloodlines of Ansata Halim Shah are carrying forward at Al Shaqab, and other Qatari farms, through a host of beautiful broodmares and outstanding stallions such as Al Adeed Al Shaqab, Ashhal Al Rayyan, Ansata Selman and Faris Al Rayyan. As if by prophesy, the songs predicting Halim Shah's future the year he was born came true. In the year of his passage into greener pastures, they had been replaced by another prophetic set, Always, Take a Bow, Broken Hearted, and The Crossroads. But the tunes I remember that seemed to fit him best were those of the early 90's, when he was in his prime, Here and Now, All Around the World and Nothing Compares 2 U. Ansata Halim Shah achieved legendary status as a classic Arabian stallion by which many others are measured, and as an unsurpassed sire during and after his time on earth. He touched countless lives, leaving each person with a treasured remembrance of his remarkable virtues. Rik Van Lent Jr., was the last artist with a camera to portray him at Al Shaqab in 1994. His beautiful portraits and thoughtful observation provide an everlasting memory, “Halim Shah never died. He will always live on and his remarkable influence will always be there.”

Al Shaqab Stud is very lucky because the blood of Ansata Halim Shah is running into new generations of stallions born here, and Al Aadeed Al Shaqab is one of them” Sheikh Hamad bin Ali remarked. Al Aadeed is shown here winning World Senior Stallion Championship at the Salon du Cheval. His succeeding generations are also winning championships at home and abroad. Escher photo. AL SH AQAB | 19 | Ar abian Horse Times


Ansata Halim Shah in the Qatari desert. Rik Van Lent Jr. photo. AL SH AQAB | 20 | Ar abian Horse Times


ANSATA HALIM SHAH

"Here and Now," "All Around the World,� "Nothing Compares 2 U" Nothing compares Nothing compares to you Cause nothing compares Nothing compares to you. (Lyrics by Prince)

SH. HAMAD BIN ALI AL THANI Manager of Breeding & Show Department www.alshaqab.com


Rik Van Lent Jr. photo.

ANSATA HALIM SHAH

SH. HAMAD BIN ALI AL THANI Manager of Breeding & Show Department www.alshaqab.com


Presents its VHTC

U.S. NATIONAL CONTENDERS Vicki H um p h r e y, J e ssi c a C l i n to n D e S o to , G ab e D e S o to & He ws O l d h a m C a n to n , G e o r g i a ~ 7 7 0 . 3 3 5 . 6 1 9 4 ~ V HTC @ V i c k i Hu m p h r e y. c o m www. V i c k i Hu m p h r e y Tr ai n i n g C e n te r. c o m Ar abian Horse Times | 41 | Volume 47, No. 5A


Heiristocracy +

JK

National Champion

Arabian English Pleasure 40 & Over AAOTR with Debbie Pearson

Afires Heir x VTM Pistachia

OWNED

BY

RON & DEBBIE PEARSON

Ar abian Horse Times | 42 | Volume 47, No. 5A


Blocî ˜ Buster National Champion

Arabian Country English Pleasure Junior Horse with Jessica Clinton DeSoto

Baskghazi x Afires Quintina

OWNED

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ROBIN CHISOLM-SEYMOUR

Ar abian Horse Times | 43 | Volume 47, No. 5A

PF


e r i irl On F

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National Champion

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LESLIE PALMER-GARVIS

Ar abian Horse Times | 44 | Volume 47, No. 5A


Rebel Love National Champion

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OWNED

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LESLIE PALMER-GARVIS

Ar abian Horse Times | 45 | Volume 47, No. 5A

MA


Missknowita National Champion

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Baske Afire x I’m Miss New York

OWNED

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LAURIE AMES-HUSBAND

Ar abian Horse Times | 46 | Volume 47, No. 5A


Firecracker National Champion

ROL

ABS Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR Jackpot Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 19-35 Arabian Country Pleasure Driving AAOTD with Sarah Beth Womble

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Ar abian Horse Times | 47 | Volume 47, No. 5A


s s e rickly Busin

St

National Champion

ABS Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR Jackpot Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 19-35 with Jenny Lau

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Ar abian Horse Times | 48 | Volume 47, No. 5A


Flawless Ghazi H/A English Pleasure Futurity with Jessica Clinton DeSoto

Baskghazi x The Phantom Lady

OWNED

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TOM & ELIZABETH MOORE

Ar abian Horse Times | 49 | Volume 47, No. 5A


e r i f A

N

otorious

National Champion

VA

Arabian Country English Pleasure Open with Gabe DeSoto Arabian Country English Pleasure Select AATR with Karen Michels

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Ar abian Horse Times | 50 | Volume 47, No. 5A


JA

Mustafire National Champion

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Baske Afire x Vamus

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ART & ELIZABETH BARTLETT

Ar abian Horse Times | 51 | Volume 47, No. 5A


S

r e hoc Brok H/A English Pleasure Junior Horse H/A AEPA English Futurity with Gabe DeSoto

SF Aftershoc x Only Girl In Town

OWNED

BY

TRACY DOWSON

Ar abian Horse Times | 52 | Volume 47, No. 5A


g g Like Ja

VH

er

Moves H/A Country English Pleasure AAOTR Maturity with Kevin McBride H/A Country English Pleasure Junior Horse with Vicki Humphrey

Baske Afire x The Phantom Lady

Afire Siren

National Reserve Champion

H/A English Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over

with Kevin McBride Available for purchase

Afire Bey V x Only Girl In Town

OWNED

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KEVIN MCBRIDE

Ar abian Horse Times | 53 | Volume 47, No. 5A


Ju stafire Connection Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR Maturity with Leslie Palmer-Garvis Available for purchase

Hucks Connection V x Candlelightaffair

OWNED

BY

LESLIE PALMER-GARVIS

Ar abian Horse Times | 54 | Volume 47, No. 5A


English ... from star nish! t to fi BRED

Little Miss Strange

(Baske Afire x Only Girl In Town)

Afire Siren

(Afire Bey V x Only Girl In Town)

|

TRAINED

Shine On VH

(Baske Afire x Only Girl In Town)

Amelia Heirhart

(Afires Heir x Only Girl In Town)

|

SHOWN BY VHTC

Missknowitall

(Baske Afire x I’m Miss New York)

Shoc Broker

(SF Aftershoc x Only Girl In Town)

2017 FOALS EXPECTED SIRE DAM Baskghazi The Phantom Lady Dam of Moves Like Jagger VH, Flawless Ghazi SF Aftershoc

Undulatas Chick Chat, by Undulata’s Nutcracker

Baske Afire Only Girl In Town Full Sibilings to Girl On Fire, Shine On VH, Voodoo Child, Little Miss Strange Baskghazi Only Girl In Town Dam of Afire Siren, Shoc Broker HA Toskcan Sun

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Gloria X, by Barbary

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Baskghazi I’m Miss New York Dam of Missknowitall, Carrie Bradshaw HA Toskcan Sun

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(Baske Afire x Only Girl In Town)

Vicki Humphrey | Jessica Clinton DeSoto | Gabe DeSoto | Hews Oldham Canton, Georgia | 770.335.6194 | VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com

Ar abian Horse Times | 55 | Volume 47, No. 5A

Carrie Bradshaw

(Baske Afire x I’m Miss New York)

Moves Like Jagger VH

(Baske Afire x The Phantom Lady)


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RESERVE YOUR AD SPACE TODAY! Lara Ames 612.210.1592 lara@ahtimes.com | MichaĂŤl Steurs +32 (0) 497 54 99 44 michael@arabianhorseresults.com Riyan Rivero 480.650.0731 riyan@arabianhorseglobal.com | Lesley Blain 608.751.2069 lesley.blain3@gmail.com Ar abian Horse Times | 56 | Volume 47, No. 5A


ONE SHINING MOMENT

CELEBRATING GREAT MOMENTS OF U.S. NATIONALS Arabian Horse Times celebrates the 50th anniversary of U.S. Nationals over the next few issues, with 50 favorite moments from those in our community. … continued from September AA, page 85.

Ar abian Horse Times | 57 | Volume 47, No. 5A


GREG GALLUN &

Brother, Brad Gallun, with

Ali Jamaal ... 1990 National Champion Stallion

Strike ... 1985 National Champion Stallion

Ar abian Horse Times | 58 | Volume 47, No. 5A


ONE SHINING MOMENT

AUDE ESPOURTEILLE

*Elkana … 1972 National Champion Mare

*Pesenka … 1980 National Reserve Champion Mare

Ar abian Horse Times | 59 | Volume 47, No. 5A


TIM SHEA

1985 ‌ winning first National Championships with J.K. Jedi, English Pleasure Open

and Barnaby-B, Pleasure Driving Open

Ar abian Horse Times | 60 | Volume 47, No. 5A


ONE SHINING MOMENT

STEVE HEATHCOTT

Maisa El Mars … 1988 National Reserve Champion Mare with Chad Veenendall (stopped keepsake V and I from winning the Triple Crown, but I was so proud of him)!

Ar abian Horse Times | 61 | Volume 47, No. 5A


DR. DECAROL WILLIAMSON

DA Trinidad … 2002 National Champion English Pleasure Futurity. First home-bred and trained National Champion.

Ar abian Horse Times | 62 | Volume 47, No. 5A


ONE SHINING MOMENT

PHILIP DEL POZZO

Enzo … 2005 National Champion Stallion

Ar abian Horse Times | 63 | Volume 47, No. 5A


KATHARYN HART

AM Silversparrow … 1967 National Champion Western Pleasure with mom, Katharyn (Heide) Simpson

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ONE SHINING MOMENT

MAUREEN GROSSMAN

DA Valentino … 2006 National Champion 3-Year-Old and Futurity Colt

Valentino’s daughter, Donna Molta Bella SRA … 2013 National Champion Yearling and Junior Filly

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GREG KNOWLES, 5-year run

Miss Escada … 2000 National Champion Yearling Filly

Ames Jasmine … 2001 National Champion Yearling Filly

IA Ana Vida … 2003 National Champion Yearling Filly

Amelia B … 2002 National Champion Yearling Filly

RHR Ggisele … 2004 National Reserve Champion Yearling Filly

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ONE SHINING MOMENT

ALLAN EHRLICK

Magnum Psyche … 1998 National Champion Stallion

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BOB HART JR.

Rohara Moon Storm … 2006 Nationals

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ONE SHINING MOMENT

VICKI HUMPHREY

Daughter Lea Dearing with Little Miss Strange … 2015 U.S. National Champion H/A English Pleasure AAOTR Maturity

*Correction

Daughter Jessica Clinton with JK Heiristocracy … 2015 U.S. National Champion Arabian English Pleasure Open

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A JUDGE’S PERSPECTIVE Grace Greenlee

Grace with the Warranty (Aladdinn x Wizja) daughter, Sans Souci Souvenir of War, on the farm in July of this year.

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GRACE GREENLEE

Years as a judge: I have held an AHSA/USEF card for 26 years, but have been judging much longer. Why did you decide to become a judge? First of all a little background. I have been riding since I was around 6 years old. I bought my first Half-Arabian, a weanling colt, when I was 12, so horses, and especially Arabian horses, have always been a part of my life. I began judging as a competitive livestock judge in college at N.C. State University in Raleigh, NC, where I was an undergraduate Animal Science student. The competitions were mostly livestock, but did include some breeding horse classes. I think this experience gave me the ability to mentally separate parts of the subject and analyze them, then put them back together for a total picture. It also set me firmly on the path of paying close attention to class specifications and judging the individuals based on those specifications, as I was judging multiple species and multiple breeds within the species. The competitions also instilled in me the ability to be able to provide reasons for my decisions, whether to myself within the decision making process, or to owners who wanted additional information concerning their animals. In my final year of collegiate judging, I tied for National Champion Judge at the North American Livestock Expo. This competitive judging success hooked me on judging; it was something I wanted to continue to do! Following my time in Raleigh, I returned to the family farm in Marion, NC, and opened Sans Souci Show Horses, a training and breeding facility, and while establishing the business, continued judging in the open and multi-breed arena while also showing both farm and client horses in Class A, Regional and National Arabian shows.

At this time, and pretty much ever since, horses and horse activities fill virtually every corner of my life, so acquiring a AHSA card to judge the Class A shows was really the next natural step and so the journey began. It was a journey that would take me to some of the most wonderful locations to see spectacular horses and meet the special people associated with this breed. Whether judging in a small town in the U.S. or Canada with beginner horses and owners, judging at the Australian National Stud Show with some of Australian’s finest breeding stock, teaching judging seminars for the wonderful and welcoming breeders and judges of South Africa, judging Brazil’s extraordinary breeding horses, or judging at our own U.S. Nationals with its spectacular performances and breathtakingly beautiful equine individuals, it has been, and is, a journey like no other. Without it my life would not have been the same, nor would it have been complete. When judges are asked why they started judging, we often answer that we judge to give back to the industry and certainly we all wish to do that, however, there is absolutely no way I can give back to judging what it has given me in wonderful experiences and increased knowledge about our amazingly beautiful athlete, the Arabian horse. Now, 26 years later, every show is still a learning, growing experience, in one way or another, and I cannot imagine my life without judging. What are you most looking forward to at this year’s 50th Nationals? Standing in center ring and knowing that coming through the in-gate will be some of the best horses this breed has to offer and knowing I get to look at them in a very special way, from a very special vantage point. It’s an honor, but also a momentous responsibility.

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U.S. Nationals show. And while the days may be long, it appears the classes are situated well among the panels so that we will not have such crowded work days. Something may pop up at Nationals, but judges learn to be pretty resilient. It is going to be a great Nationals!

Radarlin, the Half-Arabian weanling colt that started it all for Grace. He is pictured here on the day of his arrival at the farm in 1967 with a MUCH younger Grace. Notably, 1967 was also the same year as the first stand-alone U.S. National Championships. Following a successful Class A and Regional show career, Radarlin remained at Sans Souci with Grace until his death in December, 2000, at 34 years of age.

That IAHA/AHA has been able to provide this show experience for Arabian horse enthusiasts consistently for 50 years is an impressive accomplishment. That I have had the opportunity to personally take part in multiple ways (judge, exhibitor, volunteer) for many of the last 40 of those years (my first year to compete was 1976), makes me very grateful. What do you do to prepare for Nationals? Much of it is mental; knowing the specs and knowing the priorities for the classes. If I have individual scoring classes, I practice scoring with tapes. I always reread the rules before every show, large or small, as it focuses me and both judges and exhibitors need to be focused, prepared, positive and determined to do the job at hand to the best of their ability. Judging U.S. Nationals makes for long work days. What is the biggest obstacle for you to overcome? In looking at the schedule this year, it appears to be the least hectic schedule I have ever had while judging a

What do you do at the show when not judging? I like to relax and watch some of the other division classes. It’s wonderful to be able to just follow a great horse’s performance and not worry about needing to evaluate the entire class—just relax and enjoy. If time permits, I like to make a visit to the commercial area, since over the years I have met some great folks that have booths there and it is good to be able to visit for a minute and do a little shopping. It is also great to get the chance to go out for a meal with the rest of the panel to just “recharge the batteries” and get ready to focus on the job at hand when we next step into the ring. In 10 words or less, can you tell exhibitors the key to show ring success? Be prepared, be positive, focus, know your horse, have fun. What do you feel is the biggest misconception about judges? In my opinion, the biggest misconception voiced is that judges in general do not judge without prejudice and that they allow personalities or politics to dominate their decisions. Nothing makes me angrier than to hear it said, that judges do this, when I know that this is not the case with me or the majority of judges. Yes, there may be a very few that judge for the wrong reasons and with the wrong priorities, but please do not lump us all into a single group and apply this judgment across the board. To do so is supremely unfair to judges who work very hard to be impartial and evaluate accurately and fairly the horses that are presented to them. Do you have a favorite ‘memorable moment’ from past U.S. Nationals? How can I narrow down to a single paragraph all the great rides, the emotional moments and the truly hilarious happening of decades of Nationals … impossible! In reminiscing, I remember judging a great Half-Arabian English pleasure driving horse that

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GRACE GREENLEE

trotted with such elegance and engagement that you had difficulty tearing your eyes away from him to evaluate the others in the class, and I remember judging horses of riders who trusted their western horses enough to allow them the freedom to excel. I remember costume horses who seemed to scarcely touch the earth with their forelimbs and show hacks with impeccable manners that changed gears like a well driven Lamborghini. I also remember judging my first National Stallions class at my first National judging assignment, and feeling like I had the weight of the entire Arabian world on my shoulders, because I was aware that there would be many who would make breeding decisions based on the outcome of our decision. We, I, had to get it right. On the flip side, as a spectator, I also remember a hilarious evening when the bovine subject of the Working Cow Horse finals class ended up standing on the cream colored sofa in center ring while the ring staff and judges evacuated center ring for the safety of the green shavings on the arena floor. And, as an exhibitor, I remember the first Half-Arabian/AngloArabian Park class in Freedom Hall—I will NEVER forget it! Scary only begins to describe it; the class really needed two sections. The photographer literally jumped from the ring to escape the oncoming rush of horses. Yes, the first fifty years of Nationals is going to be a hard act to follow! What would you say to encourage others to become a judge? Judging is not easy, if it were, everyone would do it, and everyone should not judge! But for those that should and who judge for the right reasons, it is a very special and rewarding experience. Be absolutely certain, before you take on the responsibility of making decisions that will affect the hard work and dreams of so many dedicated individuals, that you want to be a judge for the correct reasons. Further, after you start judging, be sure you continue to love it. If at any time the passion for the job ceases, then leave it; do not continue to judge. If you love it, the times spent judging will be some of the best times you will spend in the equine world.

Grace with her three *El Mudir daughters taken in 1997, the same year she judged her first U.S. National Championships.

And finally, if horses entering the ring to be evaluated by you do not still make the adrenalin flow, question yourself as to why you judge or want to continue to do so. If you can pass all these tests and maintain the commitment required, then judging will be one of the greatest equine related experiences of your life. What is on your “bucket list” of to-dos? Listed in no particular order: ~ I would like to go to Antarctica, just to say I have been there! Quick trip though, way too cold to stay very long! ~ I have judged in many places around the world, including national and regional shows in multiple countries, but have never judged the Scottsdale Show in February. I would really love to do that, as it is such a significant part of the Arabian horse show world. ~ I would like to travel the west coast of Ireland on horseback and visit the land of some of my ancestors. ~ I loved teaching the Judges Seminars in South Africa and would love to go back now to judge the horses. ~ And, last but not least, I want to still be riding, or at least driving horses, when I am 90! n

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A JUDGE’S PERSPECTIVE Dana Gardner

Dana judging in South Africa where she stayed at a game lodge “Jabulani” and loved the lion cub!

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DANA GARDNER

Years as a judge: I got my Arabian card in 1990.   Why did you decide to become a judge? Being a military brad, my father, Col. Lawrence Gardner (fighter pilot/test pilot), always used to tell me if you don’t like something, then change it! I wasn’t always happy with what I saw in judging, so I wanted to make a difference!   What are you most looking forward to at this year’s 50th Nationals? This will be my first U.S. Nationals, so it would be the beautiful horses, of course!     What do you do to prepare for Nationals? Make sure I have reviewed the rules, done my homework and be prepared!  

Judging U.S. Nationals makes for long work days. What is the biggest obstacle for you to overcome? Judging can be brutal. Lack of sleep is always an obstacle when you haven’t had much rest!

Above: Bey Ninja (Bey Shah x Zar Hallisa, by Zar Hallany), owned by Gardner Arabians. Right top to bottom: Dana’s father (middle) on the cover of the book, 52-Charlie, who was the top of his class in Top Gun School.; Dana with Leslie Connor sightseeing while judging in Brussels, Belgium.

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Top, left to right: The Gardner Girls on Mother’s Day, l-r: sister Laurie, Dana, Dana’s mom and niece, Kateland; Dana with Judy Forbis, judging at the Egyptian Event; Dana and Justanother Bey.

What do you do at the show when not judging? I love to browse through the vendors if we have the time, but mostly I return to my room and prepare for the next day, then sleep!   In less than ten words, can you tell exhibitors the key to show ring success? Read your rules, know where you can improve and do your homework!   

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DANA GARDNER

Top to bottom: Dana aboard East Coast Reserve Champion High Voltage for owners, Chuck, Lisa and Sydney Pence; ‘Dynasty, a multi-champion in Show Hack and Hunter Pleasure, owned by Cathy and Bob McDonald. A very special horse!

What do you feel is the biggest misconception about judges? I know with our judging seminars we are required to attend every three years to stay educated and informed. We have some really great judges! Stan Morey, our commissioner, has been instrumental for judges to succeed the standard of excellence.     Do you have a favorite ‘memorable moment’ from past U.S. Nationals? This being my first Nationals as a judge, I know I will have many great moments!    What would you say to encourage others to become a judge? You have got to love it! To judge on a positive, not the negative. Have a high standard of ethics, commitment and loyalty to the breed to do the right thing. If you have these qualities, you’ll be a great judge!   What is on your “bucket list” of to-dos? As an international judge, I have traveled the world, but to judge Scottsdale would be right there at the top … or the Arabian U.S. Open at the Rolex Central Park Show and Ohio Buckeye … just to name a few. Would love to get back to riding in the show ring at Nationals again. I do miss it! n

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LOWE SHOW HORSE CENTRE | JIM LOWE | SOMIS, CA | 805.444.8583 WWW.LOWESHOWHORSECENTRE.COM | WWW.LOWERIDERSACADEMY.COM Ar abian Horse Times | 78 | Volume 47, No. 5A


2 02 10 6 1U 6. S U.. SN. ANTA IO TN I OANLA SL S

THE PLACE TO BELIEVE

ARISTA (9) AND VENZIA (7) LOWE

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3 TIME NATIONAL CHAMPION

SF STONEWOODS N COOK 2016 CANADIAN NATIONAL CHAMPION HALF-ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE AND SHOW HACK OWNED BY DR. NANCY O’REILLY | AMAZING HORSE WOMAN LLC Ar abian Horse Times | 81 | Volume 47, No. 5A


2 TIME NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION

P H I B E T A K A P P A H +/ 2016 SCOTTSDALE CHAMPION HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE AND COUNTRY DRIVING U.S. NATIONALS OPEN WITH JIM LOWE AND 55 & OVER WITH NANCY O’REILLY OWNED BY DR. NANCY O’REILLY | AMAZING HORSE WOMAN LLC Ar abian Horse Times | 82 | Volume 47, No. 5A


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5 TIME NATIONAL CHAMPION

CSP HENNESSY U.S. NATIONALS ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE OPEN AND AAOTR OWNED BY DR. NANCY O’REILLY | AMAZING HORSE WOMAN LLC Ar abian Horse Times | 84 | Volume 47, No. 5A


2 TIME NATIONAL CHAMPION

CEY HEY 2016 CANADIAN NATIONAL CHAMPION ARABIAN SHOW HACK SHOW HACK OWNED BY DR. NANCY O’REILLY | AMAZING HORSE WOMAN LLC Ar abian Horse Times | 85 | Volume 47, No. 5A


3 TIME NATIONAL CHAMPION

PA VAQUERO KID 2016 CANADIAN NATIONAL CHAMPION AND 2X NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION ARABIAN HUNTER PLEASURE JUNIOR HORSE AND AMATEUR 19-39 OWNED BY LELA AND DEBORAH REYNOLDS | DOLCE FARMS ARABIANS Ar abian Horse Times | 86 | Volume 47, No. 5A


3 TIME NATIONAL CHAMPION

V E N D E T T A A +/ 2016 UNANIMOUS CANADIAN NATIONAL CHAMPION ATD AND NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE DRIVING OPEN OWNED AND SHOWN BY BETH JUPP | MAMAGE GENETICS LLC Ar abian Horse Times | 87 | Volume 47, No. 5A


14 TIME NATIONAL CHAMPION

H A L S T E A D S D E V E N + // 2016 SCOTTSDALE CHAMPION HALF-ARABIAN PARK AND PLEASURE DRIVING U.S. NATIONALS HALF-ARABIAN PARK AND PLEASURE DRIVING WITH JIM LOWE HALF-ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE AND PARK AAOTR WITH IONA FERRERO Ar abian Horse Times | 88 | Volume 47, No. 5A


ALL THE RIGHT PARTS FOR THE NEXT GENERATION


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A JUDGE’S PERSPECTIVE Rick Ma xson

Rick in front of his chariot, Stockyards I, owned by Joplin Stockyards.

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RICK MAXSON

Years as a judge: 41 (31 as an Arabian judge). Why did you decide to become a judge? I became a judge to perpetuate the artistry of the true horseman. Ranch raised, as a kid one of the only things Dad would let me out of ranch work for, was to go to 4-H and FFA judging contests Judging got me thru college and I was on four National and International Champion Intercollegiate Judging Teams. What are you most looking forward to at this year’s 50th Nationals? Seeing some new faces on some honest horses.  What do you do to prepare for Nationals? This is the 24th National Championship or World Championship that I have judged in different breeds and disciplines. The Nationals is actually an easier show to judge than some smaller, less than average shows. You have more good horses to pick from and they challenge each other to do their best. Judging U.S. Nationals makes for long work days. What is the biggest obstacle for you to overcome? My biggest obstacle is helping keep up the sense of humor of the working staff. I’ve got to have some laughs, even if it involves laughing at myself. What do you do at the show when not judging? I watch the other classes. It’s the best seat in the house!  In less than ten words, can you tell exhibitors the key to show ring success? Be the change you want the world to be. Don’t follow fads.

Top, clockwise: Top Rick’s first horse, Daisy. He couldn’t get her registered anywhere, not even Pinto; College rodeo days; Rick doing ranch work on his purebred gelding, Dirtybird; Ryle and Karee doing ranch work on SCS Cochise and Vallejo Cyko.

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Top, left to right: Dargario, a purebred Arabian stallion who won the Open Bridle Horse Sweepstakes, Oklahoma/ Texas Reined Cow Horse Assoc.; Rick’s purebred gelding, Vallejo Cyko, a National Champion Working Cow Horse; Rick and Fifth Avenue, a NSH mare; Rick with Georgia ZA; A family event—Rick with Ryle and Karee aboard the Arabian gelding, SCS Cochise.

Success is not all about winning. It could be just helping someone get into the ring to do better than they did the last time.  What do you feel is the biggest misconception about judges? That judging is all politics. I’ve had to judge some really good horses exhibited to me by ex’s. I figured out early on, that it wasn’t the horse’s fault who shows them. The horses can’t pick their owners! Just give an honest opinion, because the horse may have a new owner next week. The trouble with politicians is, they won’t stay bought. 

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RICK MAXSON

Top, left to right: Rick’s Arabian Herd Work Stallion, Conquest MIR, an El Paso grandson and *Cytrys great grandson; Flying to Rodeos: Rich Skelton, Trever Brazil and Rick; Irie, Top Ten Half-Arabian Cow Horse; making friends with the fish!

What would you say to encourage others to become a judge? Judging is a lot of fun. It will get you places that you would not go on your own. You will meet some special people that share your passion for horses.  What is on your “bucket list” of to-dos? My biggest fear is having a boring life. Being ranch raised in Kansas, I had to become very creative to entertain myself. My son, Ryle, is a rocket scientist. My daughter, Karee, makes documentary films.

I’ve bred, trained and shown a national champion working cow horse. I’ve judged in Argentina, Brazil, South Africa and Canada. I’ve flown planes and cowboys to every major rodeo in the U.S. I’ve scuba dived in Pennecamp and Negril. I’ve fished Reindeer Lake, Islamorada and the Gray Reef. I’ve photo safaried the Kruger, landed jets in Telluride and skied the Matterhorn. Got any ideas? I need another bucket. Maybe Australia? n

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A JUDGE’S PERSPECTIVE Jeremy Harper

The Harper Family: Jeremy, Chelsea, Payne, and Chloe.

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Years as a judge: 20 years. Why did you decide to become a judge? So I could have an impact on the Arabian industry in a positive manner. What are you most looking forward to at this year’s 50th Nationals? I am most excited to judge the new Arabian Western Pleasure Association classes. I think these classes will help build up the market for western pleasure horses. What do you do to prepare for Nationals? I like to refresh myself on the rulebook so I feel completely prepared, should a problem arise. Judging U.S. Nationals makes for long work days. What is the biggest obstacle for you to overcome? Keeping myself mentally sharp for every class. It is something I pride myself on when working big shows that I give 100% to every exhibitor who shows at Nationals. What do you do at the show when not judging? Relax and watch other classes.

In less than ten words, can you tell exhibitors the key to show ring success? Confidence, Ring savvy and preparedness! What do you feel is the biggest misconception about judges? That they judge the rider instead of the horse. I don’t care who is riding; I care about how the horse is performing in that class on that day. Do you have a favorite ‘memorable moment’ from past U.S. Nationals? Winning the 2003 U.S. National Arabian Western Pleasure 18-39 class on Laurel Starr, a mare my family bred and raised. What would you say to encourage others to become a judge? Becoming a judge gives you greater perspective on the show ring and makes you a better exhibitor, a better showman, and a better Arabian ambassador. What is on your “bucket list” of to-dos? Go to the college football national championship (even better, if I get to watch the Razorbacks in the game)! n

Top, left to right: Jeremy with wife Chelsea; new addition, daughter Quinn; son Payne; and daughter Chloe.

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2016

Canadian Nationals A Gat her i ng Place For Ever y t h i ng Good by Mary Mag Wilson he unwavering support and community spirit at the Canadian National Championship Horse Show this year was evident in the horse show’s success, memories made and atmosphere. Always striving to grow the Arabian industry closer as a whole, the Royal Red horse show worked hard to make sure all were cared for—trainers, exhibitors and spectators alike—as each respectively commenced into the arena. Competitors at this year’s competition raised the bar another notch as memorial trips were made with the crowned 2016 National Champion victory passes. With entries up in numbers this year, competitors and major farms traveled from all over the United States and Canada. The Keystone Centre was home to outstanding performances, in which multitudes of dreams came true in the exquisite venue that is Westman Place. There were many highlights from the show, leaving lasting impressions for spectators present, as well as for those unable to attend through live-feed.

T

The quality of the horses and riders/handlers is very high and the fact that it is a family show with classes for all ages and disciplines makes it very special. ~ Allan Ehrlick

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After a successful first year in 13 & Under at Youth Nationals, Madison Rose made her way to Canada. Competing in the Saddle Seat Equitation division with her multi-National Champion, DC One Man Show, Madison executed precise rail work and a seamless pattern with ‘Biggie,’ resulting in the unanimous national championship title. The beautiful team of Amelia Hruben and Shaddo Magniphied received the national championship title in the HalfArabian Hunter Pleasure AATR Select Rider. Primarily and mostly known for his steadfast success with halter horses, Joe Alberti trained this versatile, chestnut halter gelding to be under-saddle as well. The nine-time national halter champion brings home Amelia Hruben’s first under-saddle national championship victory, making this a noteworthy and historical moment. Continuing to grow in class size, the Select Rider division has been a great benefit to national championship horse shows and the industry as a whole. The Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Select AATR Championship jogged into the arena with two particular stand-outs. Not only do the top two finishers in this class portray the same style, respectively One Knight Stand and Jesse James, but are top western horses who match in physical attributes. Following their performance, One Knight Stand and Sheila Curley left the arena with the Reserve National Champion honors. Susan Arnot and the black gelding, Jesse James, portrayed a veteran’s presentation of a comfortable, light and perfect partnership, earning the two the national champion title. AHA’s Cynthia Richardson and her staff again successfully managed this event in Brandon, leaving individuals talking around the country. Each day, the quality of competition and relationships nurtured throughout the show continued to grow and get stronger, as the Keystone Centre provided hotels, restaurants, and pubs, with stabling and show arenas all under one roof, allowing those at the show to never have to leave individually to seek these things out. And as the only national championship horse show to offer competition for youth, adult and open competitors, the success of this year’s Canadian Nationals left families hungry for the next opportunity to be a part of its history. The overall relaxed and enjoyable environment of this year’s competition brought the world’s attention to this community, and leaves those who participated, anxious to prepare and compete next year at the “Royal Red” 2017 Arabian and HalfArabian Canadian National Championship Horse Show.

Canadian Nationals is special and unique for a national championship event. I enjoy its relaxed environment, along with a facility that allows community. Canadian Nationals offers something for everyone, from sport horse to the main ring, and for a national show, that sets itself apart. While Canadian Nationals is not as large in numbers as the U.S. Nationals, it has clearly presented itself with very competitive and high quality horses. It is always thrilling to judge horses of such high-caliber. ~ Duane Esser The Canadian Nationals is special, because people from all areas of the Unites States and Canada travel to show there. ~ Liz Bentley

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National Champions...

Halter

Champion Stallion MAJESTICO (Marwan Al Shaqab x La Visa Lloca) shown by Jerry Schall for owner Nancy Seward.

Champion Mare IMPRESSA MI (Aria Impresario x Mulawa Alexa) shown by Andrew Sellman for owner Joanne Gunabalan.

Champion Futurity Colt TURISMO RA (Trussardi x Marlene Dietrich) shown by Michael Byatt for owner Silver Stag Arabians LLC.

Champion Futurity Filly JR FRANCESCA (Marwan Al Shaqab x Valori TRF) shown by Andrew Sellman for owner Joanne Gunabalan.

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2016 CANADIAN NATIONALS

National Champions...

Performance

Champion Country English Pleasure EXTRAORDIN HEIR (Afires Heir x Gwyneth D) ridden by Jason Krohn for owner Shamrock Farms LLC.

Champion English Pleasure ROL DIVINE STYLE (Afire Bey V x IXL Miss Firefly) ridden by Leah Beth Golladay for owner Delsan Arabian LLC.

Champion Hunter Pleasure A TIME TO DANCE (Apollopalooza x Dancing Rain X) ridden by Tamara Collins for owner Bay Area Equine Vet Camp LLC.

Champion Western Pleasure RD HABANERO (Bey Ambition x NW Siena Psyche) ridden by LaRae Fletcher Powell, owner of Silver Aspen Farm.

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2016 CANADIAN NATIONALS

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2016 CANADIAN NATIONALS

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Candid photos taken by Ashley Toye, Simon Pate & Riyan Rivero.

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Firelight Arabians congratulates their clients and horses on a great Canadian Nationals show!

2-time

National Champion National Champion Sport Horse In-Hand Dressage Type, 2015 & 2016 Top Ten Country English Pleasure Select AATR Top Ten Sport Horse In-Hand Hunter Type

2007 Stallion Breeders Sweepstakes Nominated Sire SCID/CA/LFS Clear Shipped Semen Available

Top Ten Show Hack l-r: Movado BA++/ with Viktoria Monroe, Tazzer+++/ with Jennifer Henderson, and Patriot V++++// with Lorie Henderson. Sierra Midnite++// and Katherine Tate Top Ten H/A Western Horsemanship Top Ten H/A Western Pl. JOTR Top Ten H/A Ladies Western Side Saddle KW Kharisma+/ and Katherine Tate Top Ten Hunter Pleasure JOTR and JTR Movado BA++/ and Viktoria Monroe Reserve Champion Dressage Type Gelding In-Hand Top Ten Dressage Type Gelding ATH, Sport Horse Under Saddle JTR and Sport Horse Show Hack Ar abian Horse Times | 109 | Volume 47, No. 5A

Fisherville, KY 502-477-1018 • Firelightarabians.com


Canadian National Reserve Champion HA Western Pleasure Select AATR with Sheila Curley Canadian National Top Ten Western Pleasure JOTR and JTR 18 & Under with Jenna Curley

Canadian National Reserve Champion PB Western Pleasure Select AATR with Sheila Curley Canadian National Reserve Champion PB Western Pleasure JOTR 14-18 & JTR 14-18 with Jenna Curley

Proudly owned by Sheila & Jenna Curley Southington, Connecticut Trained by The Brass Ring, Inc. www.thebrassringinc.com Ar abian Horse Times | 110 | Volume 47, No. 5A


2016

Arabian Sport Horse Nationals The Partner Of Choice

T

he atmosphere at the 14th Annual Sport Horse Nationals show was like a scene from a classic movie. Family, friends, long time horse enthusiasts and those who dream of riding someday, walked the beautiful grounds at the Idaho Horse Center in dream-like weather that carried the crisp reminder that Fall had arrived. From intense competition to the sweet laughter of young horse lovers, one could not help but be enlightened by the love of the game and the drive to ‘go for the gold.’

Sport Horse Nationals is the only single-breed sport horse event in the nation. From dressage to hunter jumper, to pleasure carriage driving and much more, the show consists of some of the best horse athletes in the industry. The show took place in historic Nampa, Idaho, at the Idaho Horse Park, used for horse shows; and the Ford Sports Center, used for track and field events, including the home meets of the Boise State University Broncos track teams. Over 375 horses competed this year, displaying their athletic abilities in four different divisions: sport horse, dressage, over fences and carriage driving. The horses and their owners, trainers and breeders, came from all over the United States and Canada. n

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TEAM TIMES BRINGS

Anna Marie

THE

B E S T ...

Arabian U.S. Open at Rolex Central Park Horse Show

S I LV E R C H A M P I O N S E N I O R M A R E

FOR

OAK

BHF

SHOWN BY ANDREW SELLMAN RIDGE ARABIANS AND MARINO ARABIANS

Marwan Al Shaqab x BHF Anna Tevkah

Multi-National Champion and Reserve National Champion Owned by Oak Ridge Arabians ~ Freeport, Illinois Marino Arabians ~ Birmingham, Alabama

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s n o i t a l u t a r CHLong SANCTION

27 years old and Still Rocking the City in Mounted Native Costume!

Thank you, Aljassimya Farm, for giving us the opportunity to showcase our beautiful horses in such a magical setting. It was a proud evening for the breed and I was honored to be part of it once again.

R uss & C athy V ecsey E aston , C onnecticut 203-261-0525 • 203-414-1541 rjvecsey @ optonline . net

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DA Valentino x Always An Angel

U.S. OPEN CENTRAL PARK GOLD CHAMPION ARABIAN JUNIOR STALLION Owned by Mulawa Arabian Stud

Gazal Al Shaqab x Karess

U.S. OPEN CENTRAL PARK SILVER CHAMPION ARABIAN SENIOR STALLION Owned by Joanne Gunabalan

Marwan Al Shaqab x BHF Anna Tevkah

U.S. OPEN CENTRAL PARK SILVER CHAMPION ARABIAN SENIOR MARE Owned by Oak Ridge Arabians and Anthony Marino Sr. & Anthony Marino Jr.

“Thank you to all the owners for participating with Team Times and a special thanks to Andrew Sellman for presenting them all so beautifully.” —Lara Ames

Proud Sponsor of the 2016 U.S. Open Central Park

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“Thank you to all involved for this once-in-a-lifetime experience...” ~ Lara Ames

A Noble Cause x Justa New Look

U.S OPEN CENTRAL PARK SILVER CHAMPION COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE PRO/AM Ridden by Leah Beth Golladay and Lara Ames

Owned by Cedar Ridge Arabians Jordan, MN | www.CedarRidgeArabians.com

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Magic In Manhattan: THE 2ND ARABIAN U.S. OPEN by Theresa Cardamone

N

ew York City is full of iconic imagery … from the Brooklyn Bridge and Empire State Building to the emerald oasis that is Central Park. Miraculously preserved for posterity by forward-thinking city planners, the 843 acres that make up Manhattan’s “back yard” is also the home of the Arabian U.S. Open. One of the landmark sites within Central Park is the Wollman Ice Rink. Usually the home to a wellworn collection of carnival rides when it is not skating season, over the course of a few days every autumn, the rink is transformed into a world-class horse show arena. Bleachers are installed, a VIP seating area is constructed, and a Jumbo-Tron screen erected. A f leet of small, efficient vehicles brings load after load of the finest arena footing available from where it has been stored since last year’s show in a cave-like cranny beneath the Park’s hilly terrain. Additional footing turns a nearby ballfield into a stable area and warm-up ring. It is a showcase setting for a showcase breed. AHA President Cynthia Richardson, VP/Paddock Manager Glenn Petty, Project Consultant Michelle Kelly, and the rest of the incredibly capable show committee work hand-in-hand with the greater Rolex U.S. Open organizers to make the opening night event go smoothly. Collaboration with the various agencies responsible for protecting Central Park and complying with city ordinances is extensive and effective.

Top trainer Michael Byatt, who handled the Gold Champion Junior and Senior Mares, Aria Quintessa and Aria Qatars Angel, and the Gold Champion Stallion, Aria Impresario, applauded the effort. “From the moment I walked into the stabling area, to the show venue itself, the energy and excitement was palpable,” he said. “We all owe a debt of gratitude to the many people that worked so hard to bring the NYC show to fruition. Congratulations!” Accolades well earned. With only 50 horses per day allowed in the barn area, they are housed at Gladstone, the historic facility of the U.S. Equestrian Team in New Jersey. The horses are loaded into a string of vans that bring them into the center of the city during the wee hours of the morning when there is no traffic to contend with. One by one, the vans roll to a stop, their ramps are lowered, and the horses emerge, stepping the short distance to the stable area. The next day, they make their way along the pedestrian walkways to the southeast corner of the Park a half mile away. There, they get their first glimpse of the elegant arena that they will perform in later that night. The exhibitors experience the thrill of being in the heart of the greatest city in the world. Cathy Vecsey has now shown her indefatigable partner HL Sanction to back-to-back Gold Champion Native Costume honors in Central Park. “You can use every

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adjective you can think of to describe this experience to other riders, but there are not enough words to describe how amazing this experience is!” she reports. “Those horses and riders who showed this year did it with style and class! This was the best of the best of the Arabian breed for the world to see and we should all be proud of our horses and the presentation they gave to the world.” Cathy was especially grateful to share the spotlight with Sanction once again. At 27 years old and with armfuls of national championships to his credit, Sanction’s public appearances have become rare. “I was really nervous this year to show again! The first year was fun because I really had no expectations, but the second time I so badly wanted Sanction to do well since it may be the last time we ever show together. It is the only time all year that I show him anymore and I feel like I have been preparing all summer for a 10-minute ride! But if I

Sincere thanks to Show Patron Aljassimya Farm

only get to show him for 10 minutes, let it be under the lights in Central Park!” Arabian Horse Times Publisher Lara Ames, was both a sponsor and an exhibitor this year after supporting last year’s inaugural, shining in her half of the Pro/ Am Country English Pleasure Championship on her homebred Ames Inspiration as they brought home the Silver Championship. “It was amazing,” Lara comments. “You did not really care about the color of the ribbon, but more the moment. The open sky, the lights … the exposure was just amazing!” Greg Gallún and his wife Nancy manage Sahara Scottsdale for Jeff Sloan, who along with his partners brought home the three Gold Championships earned by the horses that Byattt handled. “We all feel that the U.S. Open show brings a level of exposure and grandeur that are unique and special for sure,” Greg said. “While the

Arabian Mounted Native Costume Gold Champion HL SANCTION (The Chief Justice x Overlook Seratifa), ridden by owner Cathy Vecsey, Hawk Haven Farms.

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Schatzberg photos

Arabian Senior Stallion Halter Gold Champion ARIA IMPRESARIO (Marwan Al Shaqab x GC Echlectica), shown by Michael Byatt for owner Aria Impresario Holdings LLC.

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SHOW RESULTS

2016 Arabian U.S. Open at the Rolex Central Park Horse Show ARABIAN SENIOR STALLION HALTER Gold Champion: ARIA IMPRESARIO (Marwan Al Shaqab x GC Echlectica), O: Aria Impresario Holdings LLC, B: Gerald Canda Silver Champion: KAVALLE MI (Gazal Al Shaqab x Karess), O: Joanne Gunabalan, B: Mulawa Arabian Stud ARABIAN JUNIOR STALLION HALTER Gold Champion: VANGELIS MI (DA Valentino x Always An Angel), O/B: Mulawa Arabian Stud Silver Champion: WORTEX KALLISTE (Shanghai EA x Mirwanah Kalliste), O/B: S.A.R.L. Kalliste Arabians Bronze Champion: CTJ KUDURO (Vitorio TO x Faustiana), O: Colton Jacobs, B: Oak Ridge Arabians ARABIAN SENIOR MARE HALTER Gold Champion: ARIA QATARS ANGEL (Abha Qatar x BHF Dark Angel), O: Quintessa Partners LLC, B: Desert Horse Partners, LLC Silver Champion: ANNA MARIE BHF (Marwan Al Shaqab x BHF Anna Tevkah), O: Anthony Marino Sr. and Anthony Marino Jr. and Oak Ridge Arabians, B: Battle Hill Farm Bronze Champion: CASTTASPELL (OFW Magic Wan x Crysstal Echo), O: Angela Sellman, B: Gail Ann Czuczko ARABIAN JUNIOR MARE HALTER Gold Champion: ARIA QUINTESSA (Trussardi x MC Sophiie), O: Quintessa Partners LLC, B: Robert or Delma Koessler Silver Champion: FASCINATION J (FA El Rasheem x Inspiration J), O/B: Daria Stransky and Lawrence Jerome ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE PRO/AM Gold Champion: AFIRES STYLE (Afire Bey V x LBC Nobelinda), O: I Ask LLC, B: Tim and Marty Shea Silver Champion: AMES INSPIRATION (A Noble Cause x Justa New Look), O/B: Cedar Ridge Arabians Bronze Champion: AFIREANDBRIMSTONE SCA (Afire Bey V x Flames Lullaby), O: Kenneth and Susan Knipe, B: Todd and Carrie Brown ARABIAN WESTERN PLEASURE PRO/AM Gold Champion: PA KID KHAN (Sundance Kid V x Kharrea PGA), O/B: Frank and Sara Chisholm Silver Champion: POSSESION PGA (Khadraj NA x RA Po Okela), O: Nan Harley, B: Petroglyph Arabians Bronze Champion: HOLDIN ACES (Arezzo NL x Hollygolitely DDF), O/B: Joelle and Robert Wright ARABIAN HUNTER PLEASURE PRO/AM Gold Champion: C HONDO (Enzo x Enchantes Bey), O: Wolf Springs Ranches, Inc., B: Bill Cunningham Silver Champion: ROYAL T PHORTE (Eden C x Pianissima), O: Theresa Lungwitz, B: Janow Podlaski State Stud Bronze Champion: ARIYA ENCORE (Aria Impresario x Airiya), O: The Ryssell Family Trust, B: Robert or Jerry Meade ARABIAN MOUNTED NATIVE COSTUME Gold Champion: HL SANCTION (The Chief Justice x Overlook Seratifa), O: Hawk Haven Farms, B: Jayne Solberg Silver Champion: CAPTAIN COURAGEOUS PA (Bucharest V x Autumn Teapestry), O: Madison Fernandes and Krystal Duarte, B: Wikel Arabians Bronze Champion: SQUEEZEBOX (IXL Noble Express x MF Afires Joy), O: Mary Elizabeth Kelly, B: Kimberley Munro

Emma Maxwell photo

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Kelle King photos

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Arabian Western Pleasure Pro/Am Gold Champion PA KID KHAN (Sundance Kid V x Kharrea PGA), ridden by Janie Wasilewski for owners Frank and Sara Chisholm. Ar abian Horse Times | 122 | Volume 47, No. 5A


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Arabian Country English Pleasure Pro/Am Gold Champion AFIRES STYLE (Afire Bey V x LBC Nobelinda), ridden by Alexa Cohn for owner I Ask LLC.

numbers were small, the quality was world class. The venue, just like the city itself, is magical, almost looks like a movie set in the night sky. So many people watched in person and on live feed, the calls and messages have all been so positive about the evening. The format is great; I like the pro-am idea in the performance division. Halter was great to watch and the horses superbly shown by all the handlers. A great showcase for our great breed.” This being the second year of the show’s existence, veterans noticed differences from 2015. “There was much clearer communication to those of us in the stall area about when we had to leave for the ring (which is great since it is a 10-minute walk!),” commended Vecsey. “The basic info we received from Kelly ahead of the event was timely and pertinent, and any

questions or issues were immediately handled. It was great seeing larger performance classes, and with such nice horses! I loved the pro-am concept! It was also wonderful to hear Peter Fenton’s voice and to see Van Jacobsen and Howie in the ring!” Larry Jerome has been breeding Arabian horses for over 50 years and enjoyed seeing the offspring of his legendary stallion Khadraj NA dominate the Western Pleasure Championship, he being the maternal grandsire of Gold Champion PA Kid Khan and the sire of Silver Champion Possesion PGA. “The 2016 Arabian Central Park show was again an extremely impressive event,” he said. “The setting is truly unbelievable, the reception by people touring the park is exciting as their curiosity gets the best of them when they see these magnificent animals parading

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Arabian Hunter Pleasure Pro/Am Gold Champion C HONDO (Enzo x Enchantes Bey), ridden by Anna Redmond for owner Wolf Springs Ranches, Inc.

through this iconic park. I think things f lowed together well with fewer hitches.” Larry honed in on a particular facet of the Central Park show that sets it far apart from any others. “Participants, trainers, and assistants all banded together to help one another,” he stated. “I think that it is important to remember, that this show is not an end all competition, but rather a chance to showcase the Arabian horse to a part of the world where it is not an everyday occurrence.” Greg Gallún agrees, “The level of sportsmanship and support between exhibitors was great through the travel process to and from Central Park and throughout the show day. The logistics are a challenge, however all went really seamlessly thanks to Michelle Kelly and Kelly Charpentier. A big thanks to all of the team who made this a reality.” “I think the potential is incredible,” Jerome expounded. “And I think we are also truly fortunate

Arabian Junior Stallion Halter Gold Champion VANGELIS MI (DA Valentino x Always An Angel), shown by Andrew Sellman for owner Mulawa Arabian Stud. Schatzberg photo

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to have sponsors that are so willing to support it. I am thrilled and honored to have been a part of it again in 2016, and once again my hat’s off to all the supporters!” Greg Gallún may well have been speaking for all of the participants when he said, “All

of us from Sahara Scottsdale would like to thank Aljassimya Stud for sponsoring and producing this show. We hope to always bring horses and participate in future years.” ■

Arabian Senior Mare Halter Gold Champion ARIA QATARS ANGEL (Abha Qatar x BHF Dark Angel), shown by Michael Byatt for owner Quintessa Partners LLC.

Arabian Junior Mare Halter Gold Champion ARIA QUINTESSA (Trussardi x MC Sophiie), shown by Michael Byatt for owner Quintessa Partners LLC.

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A JUDGE’S PERSPECTIVE Cathy Murphy Economy

Cathy and Voltaire FM (Da Vinci FM x HL Infactuation), 2013 U.S. National Top Ten Futurity Colt.

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CATHY MURPHY ECONOMY

Years as a judge: I have been judging Arabian horses for 32 years now! Wow, does the time pass fast! Why did you decide to become a judge? We were raised on a farm in Michigan and my parents, Don and Barbra Murphy, always had a special love for the Arabian horse over all others. They were also involved in showing dogs. My parents always encouraged all of us to be the best we could be in anything we did. For some reason, as we began showing, judging just became the next logical step. Thoughts of improving were always paramount in our minds as we began as 4-H judges and won many national titles. My mom became an AHA Judge which was something she took great pride in and absolutely loved to do. Together, my mother and I had the opportunity to judge together numerous times, which is a great memory for me. It was very exciting and something I will never forget. We did not always agree, but we sure had fun! Together my mother and I had the opportunity to coach many 4-H and AHA teams also, and experienced great success with multiple national titles. This was something we both found extremely rewarding. My brother, Don, and sister, Kelly, were also involved in judging. Kelly was National Champion Youth Judge. I guess the desire to judge was just a family trait! It is something I love to do and plan to continue well into the future.   

What are you most looking forward to at this year’s 50th Nationals? Seeing the collection of high quality horses all assembled in one arena. I really look forward to seeing all the new yearlings by all the different sires and the new pedigrees that breeders are trying. It is also exciting to see all the new faces, both equine and human. Change is healthy and I love to see someone unexpected, come and make a statement! What do you do to prepare for Nationals? I always go over the rules and new procedures, and stay off the internet!

Above: Da Vinci FM (Versace x Full Moon Astar). Left: Matisse FM (Marwan Al Shaqab x Selket Promise Kept), Brazilian National Champion Stallion.

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Cathy with Da Vinci FM.

Judging U.S. Nationals makes for long work days. What is the biggest obstacle for you to overcome? I thoroughly enjoy the long days, as this is my passion. I can’t see enough great horses! It excites me about the future. What do you do at the show when not judging? Spend money in the commercial exhibits. I love to go through the exhibits, as they have some amazing things you can’t find at home. I enjoy the entire atmosphere and experience. In less than ten words, can you tell exhibitors the key to show ring success? Show ring success list: quality, preparation, conditioning, training, excitement, passion, prayer.

Redemption FM (Da Vinci FM x Special Treat, by Marwan Al Shaqab), 2016 Canadian National Champion Stallion AOTH.

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CATHY MURPHY ECONOMY

Tommy and Cathy Economy.

What do you feel is the biggest misconception about judges? Believing that their minds are set. I’m always looking for that special horse, regardless of who is at the end of the line! Be a salesman and make our decisions easier by giving us everything we need to put YOU first! Do you have a favorite ‘memorable moment’ from past U.S. Nationals? Judging Eternety. What would you say to encourage others to become a judge? Be honest in your evaluations, know your rules, and be prepared physically and mentally for long days. Put the good of the breed first. Be able to look in the mirror when you are done and like what you see.

Top to bottom: Brittney Wright on JogeesDavine Wind (Da Vinci FM x Jogees Windstar); Nephews, Chris Ronan and Sean Murphy.

What is on your “bucket list” of to-dos? I have been so fortunate to reach many of my goals. I have bred National Champions and shown National Champions and had the opportunity to judge some of the top shows in the world. I have been blessed. On my current bucket list, is for my husband and I to continue breeding better horses every generation and eventually, but not too soon, hand Full Moon Arabians to our daughter, Brittney, and to our nephews, Christopher and Sean. It will be a thrill to watch them grow and excel. n

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A Close-Up Look At U.S. Nationals ... cont. from Sept. AA, page 139.

TRAINERS What makes U.S. Nationals different from all the other events you attend in the year? I love the 3- and 4-year-old classes! It’s so fun to see the up-and-coming talent!

Leah GoLLaday

GoLLaday TraininG

How do you mentally and physically prepare yourself and horses for U.S. Nationals? We use all of the shows throughout the year to work the kinks out with horses and riders! Hopefully, by October, everyone’s ready to go! What do you do at your farm that relieves the stress of the show during the event? We try to keep it fun! There’s always another show! What makes your farm and clients special? We have great clients! We have a great mix of new and old customers, and everyone is fun-loving and supportive. What happens outside of the show ring is what it’s all about! What do your clients do to get in the team spirit? Spirit wear, group dinners, cocktails, etc. ... I think supporting each other is the biggest team builder! # of horses competing: 25 How many years have you been attending U.S. Nationals? I don’t think I have missed a U.S. Nationals since 1996, so 20 years!

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is your proudest moment to date, from previous U.S. Nationals? Winning the Open English in 2011 with Starr Llight!

Jada reed

reed TraininG STabLe How many years have you been attending U.S. Nationals? This is my second year showing at U.S. Nationals. What makes U.S. Nationals different from all the other events you attend in the year? It’s a big deal; U.S. Nationals has such great quality in its horses, trainers, and turn out. You can definitely feel the energy in the atmosphere! How do you mentally and physically prepare yourself and horses for U.S. Nationals? I truly try to back off on the pressure of my horses. I try to fit them the best I can; keep them physically fit and mentally happy before the big trip. When my horses are green, I try to do as much teaching as I can, but also try to recognize how they are learning mentally, and teach to their level ... I don’t try to change much on a schooled horse. What do you do at your farm that relieves the stress of the show during the event? I try to keep my horses happy. I don’t take my horses to shows if I don’t think they are mentally prepared for it, or at least exposed to at least the basics of training/horse shows. What makes your farm and clients special? We work very hard in our barn to teach riders how to work with their horses; not just ride, but understand how to fix problems before or when they arise. We use special

training methods to help our horses, and try to be one step ahead of their thoughts so we don’t have to fix problems later. What do your clients do to get in the team spirit? We like to hang out, decorate, and spend time together. We’ve been a great crew for a long time! This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is your proudest moment to date, from previous U.S. Nationals? Last year I was National Champion H/A Hunter Pleasure Open on Simply Irrezistible+/. That was a pretty special moment to our family, and barn family alike!

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something special, even if you are just attending to watch the show. You know you are “at Nationals.”

aLexiS ScoTT

aKS FarmS LLc

How do you mentally and physically prepare yourself and horses for U.S. Nationals? I think it’s important to maintain a peak level of fitness all season, but definitely emphasize it at the end of the year. This is our “Super Bowl,” so obviously we want everyone to be the best they can be! What do you do at your farm that relieves the stress of the show during the event? Have fun and treat it like any other show! If you get caught up in the whole “Nationals” vibe, it can put a lot of unneeded stress on you as a competitor. I want everyone to do great, but I think it’s important to remember this is a hobby and it’s supposed to be fun! What makes your farm and clients special? We’re a smaller operation, so we are really close and treat each other like family. We have a great support system for each other and have a great time together. It makes it easier to have a good time at a show, no matter how the results go!

# of horses competing: 5 How many years have you been attending U.S. Nationals? I have been attending U.S. Nationals pretty regularly since 1993, but this is our first year going as exhibitors!

What do your clients do to get in the team spirit? We do a lot of things together as a group. Before we leave for U.S., we have a BIG barn Halloween Party which everyone looks forward to all year long. I try to establish a level of fun and familiarity with everyone and it’s important to make the barn a fun place to be! It helps that I have great clients!

What makes U.S. Nationals different from all the other events you attend in the year? I think it’s really the atmosphere. They go above and beyond to make sure you know and feel that you are at the “most prestigious North American Arabian Horse Championship show.” It’s

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is your proudest moment to date, from previous U.S. Nationals? The proudest moment for me so far is having clients headed to U.S. for the first time this year! We are super excited and ready to rock and roll!

caThy VincenT adandy Farm

# of horses competing: 8 How many years have you been attending U.S. Nationals? Since 1973. What makes U.S. Nationals different from all the other events you attend in the year? At the U.S. Nationals, the cream rises to the top! Never have I ever seen such spectacular horses, horsewomen and horsemen, under one roof ! I judged the Nationals in 2003 and it was one of the most exciting events I ever had the privilege to officiate. Since then, the show has evolved into a true sensation that everyone needs to attend! How do you mentally and physically prepare yourself and horses for U.S. Nationals? Preparation is never easy when it comes to U.S. Nationals. It takes a fantastic team of trainers, caretakers, farriers and vets to bring the horses to their peak. Doing that is the most challenging for me. Peaking these fantastic athletes without injuries is, without a doubt, the true test of the trainer’s capabilities. What do you do at your farm that relieves the stress of the show during the event? Adandy Farm has always created a warm and comfortable set up that is very welcoming and relaxing to the clients. Sheryl Mala is our chef and just the smell of her cooking attracts many folks! Our doors are always open and everyone is welcome to visit!

What makes your farm and clients special? The passion and love we all have for the Arabian horse! We are all in this to promote our breed. We are not a big farm and that enables us to be more hands-on with the horses and clients. We give quite a bit more attention to horse, handler and rider. What do your clients do to get in the team spirit? All of our clients are supportive of each other’s horses. They all attend each and every class that we show in. The cheers are heartwarming. I love Team Adandy! This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is your proudest moment to date, from previous U.S. Nationals? I have been blessed with many wins on a national level. I’m proud of all of them! I’m as proud of the many wins I’ve witnessed throughout the years. What I’m most proud of is, how this breed has evolved into “The Most Beautiful Breed In The World!”

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OWNERS anGeLa baLduchi AFF: aKS FarmS

# of horses competing: 1 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? This will be my first year competing at Nationals. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? I love watching the AEPA classes. It’s fun to see trainers do patterns. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? I am looking forward to showing my horse, I Love New York, in the HalfArabian Country English Pleasure Select. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Since this is my first time competing, I would tell a first-time spectator to soak it all in by watching classes and walking thru the barns. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? We always do a family dinner. I love eating out with my barn family. This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? I have never had the chance to see her at U.S.

Nationals, but SA Sophisticated Lady winning both the amateur and open park with Jessica Medved. What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? I can’t remember a show that I haven’t been helping in some way to get horses or riders ready for the show ring; but I would say shopping. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Always remember to have fun and ride what is beneath you.

bob brown

AFF: aKS FarmS # of horses competing: 1 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? This is my first year. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? Getting a top ten placing. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Just enjoy the experience. Don’t overdo the self-inflicted pressure. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? Great camaraderie.

What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? Visiting the vendors. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Try and become one with your horse.

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carrie brown

AFF: ryan Show horSeS # of horses competing: 1 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? 16. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? My 2007 U.S. National win on Escada SCA in Arabian English Pleasure AOTR. I bred Escada and it was such a surprise for me to win! I knew I had a great ride, but I about fell off the horse when they called my number! It was really special and really fun! What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? I love to show horses! I’m always geeked out about a show, but at Nationals, I’m extra hyped! Johnny say’s I’m not allowed coffee or sugar! I love the competition, the horses and the people! If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Just enjoy the experience and learn as much as you can, but mostly, have fun! What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? Ryan Show Horses has dinner catered in for us every night; it really gives everyone a chance to get to know each other and support one other. Our barn is very supportive and we all have a great time. Johnny and Christine also do a good job prepping the horses and making sure things are done well, so that their exhibitors can relax and have fun.

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? Watching Carmelle Rooker ride Apollopalooza—they were an amazing team. Carmelle always exhibited that intangible elegance that we always strive for in our rides, and they were both beauty, power and elegance with true lightness and collection. I will never forget watching them perform—it was always a clinic on how to do it right! What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? Not much! It’s all about the horses, horse stuff and horse people for me. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Be ready physically and mentally, and enjoy the ride!

KaThy cranFord

AFF: coLoniaL wood TraininG cenTer # of horses competing: 2 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? Since 2001. I wasn’t able to attend in 2003, so this will be my 15th U.S. Nationals! What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? My first top ten in Arabian Hunter Pleasure in 2002, showing my stallion, CF Phoenix Sun. He was a definite underdog in that field of so many horses (46), but he showed his heart out and I will never forget the joy and sense of accomplishment in being named top ten in that class. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? Showing my fabulous “old faithful”, Sundance King R in H/A Hunter Pleasure 55 & Over, and looking just as forward to riding my new boy, Designed By Versace in Arabian Hunter Pleasure 55 & Over. I’m so blessed and excited to have these two beautiful horses to show!

What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? Well, there isn’t enough space to document everything Colonial Wood does to make this show special for us, from our beautiful stall set-up to our “doublewide” kitchen! As for our horses, each one has been painstakingly prepared to its best and comes to the show ready to compete and win!

If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? In the midst of your excitement and nervousness, stop for a moment and look around. You have made it to our flagship show. You have the good fortune to be showing with the best horses and riders in the country. Yes, be excited and be nervous (we all are!), but most of all, be grateful. We are all so fortunate to be able to do what we love and to come together for our fabulous U.S. National show. Enjoy every minute, and don’t forget to breathe!

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? I think it would have to be Bob Hart’s presentation of Rohara Moonstorm at Louisville in 2006. That night was so full of emotion, and seeing this beautiful horse presented for the last time … and showing in Louisville for the last time, will always be a treasured memory.

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What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? Definitely just hanging out with all my dearest and best friends who show with Colonial Wood. Also, getting to see and chat with people that I may only see once or twice a year. Face to face is so much better than Facebook!

What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? First, last and always … “Enjoy The Ride.”

wiLLiam daViS

AFF: KrichKe TraininG # of horses competing: 1 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? This is our first year. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? We are thrilled to have the opportunity to show our filly. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? Seeing how Natalee has developed over the summer. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? We are in this together as first timers!

Nationals winners. We would have loved to have seen our friends experience the journey.

What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? Krichke Training does a fantastic job of making events family friendly and fun!

What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? We enjoy watching other disciplines and getting an education on their competitions.

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? We own horses from several bloodlines of

What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Our motto is to learn or experience something new every time we participate in a show.

cindy hiGh-FiSchmann

AFF: rooKer TraininG STabLe/r.o. LerVicK arabianS/KieSner TraininG STabLe # of horses competing: 1 or 2 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? 8 years. My first nationals in which I competed was 2008. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? Reserve Champion Park last year on GSF Ambienze. I had not been riding in months, and didn’t ride very well, but Ambienze still got the job done— what a horse! What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? Competing with GSF Ambienze and riding better than last year! If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Ride your own ride and have fun. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? Well, all three farms I am with have the same approach, they create a fun and low stress atmosphere, with great people, food, camaraderie and nice lounge areas. This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? The U.S. National Park class I watched as a child. So much learning for me from watching; what I agreed with, and didn’t.

Especially since I was there on a judging team. Sakr was reserve champion in Park. He should have won it by a mile in my view; he and Tom McNair … what a team. What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? That’s tough, as with the National show being in Tulsa, I haven’t found anything there to do other than the horse show. Many shows are the same, with the exception of Scottsdale, where we hike and visit all the sites. Scottsdale is the best run show in the U.S., with nonhorse stuff to do even at the show. Note to AHA … What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? YOLO (You Only Live Once), is my personal motto. I sometimes do things just for fun, to be different.

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meLiSSa meiSKey Fry AFF: ryan Show horSeS

This being your first U.S. Nationals, what are you most looking forward to? I can’t wait to trot into that ring on Harry Trotter! He loves to show and I love to ride him. I can’t believe a year ago, I was watching on live feed and now I’m preparing to compete myself ! I’m looking forward to reveling in the whole Nationals experience … spending 11 days enjoying my horse, watching the best of the best compete and having fun with family, friends and so many people that share my same passion. How did you become involved in showing Arabians? My mother, thank God! I remember taking lessons at a local hunter/jumper barn and my mom asking me if I wanted to pursue that or Arabians. I said Arabians. She has always been an “Arabian snob” and the apple didn’t fall far from the tree. They are the best! Mary Trowbridge sold us our first two “show” Arabians and saddle seat quickly became my passion. What do you appreciate most about the farm you train with? Ryan Show Horses has done so much for me in a short time. We started shopping for the perfect country English pleasure horse for me and I knew Johnny would find the best, and he did in Harry Trotter. I think one of the most important things you can have in your trainer is trust. Johnny has exceeded my expectations with Harry Trotter—the training/ care of him, the coaching of myself and the clientele that have become our second family, who cheer for and support one another. Johnny, Christine and Tim have been so welcoming to the point of getting their clients’ kids an extra tack stall at regionals to serve as a playroom, and bought a pony so our kids can take lessons and show in lead line! They are one of a kind! What advice have you received in regards to showing at U.S. Nationals? Show your best; show what you got and concentrate on having the best ride you can have. My goal is always to have a better ride than the last.

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, it could become a historical moment for you as well. What do you hope happens? I hope Tim and I have the best rides we have had all year on Harry. However, who doesn’t want to win?! Tim brings out the best in Harry and I hope they have some unforgettable rides. No pressure, Tim! Who has supported you in your efforts to get to Nationals? My husband, first and foremost. He has been nothing short of amazingly supportive. He watches the kids so I can take lessons and show, bought an RV that we can stay in, cooks for the team and has quickly learned about this showing thing. My mom … she still does my hair at every horse show like she did when I was a kid and shares the anticipation, excitement and true joy I feel to be back in the saddle. I am so grateful for all of my friends and family members who have been so encouraging. Last but not least, is the team at Ryan Show Horses. Who is your favorite Arabian horse not owned by you? Why? Why? Afire Bey V I am partial to, because he is Harry’s sire, and left in his legacy not only athleticism and beauty, but also intelligence and a willingness to work. And Defying Gravity RGS+//, also an Afire Bey V son, who I get to see weekly (lucky me). He gives me goosebumps every time I watch him because of his natural talent.

When not showing, what are your plans to fill the time? Watch classes and have fun with my family, including doing some local things with the kids around Tulsa.

Kiira harKinS

AFF: KieSner TraininG/empreSS arabianS # of horses competing: 4 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? This year will be my second as an exhibitor at U.S. Nationals. As a small child, I watched my mother compete and I have shown at Youth Nationals since I was 11. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? I have grown up hearing it said that there is no experience to compare with riding in Freedom Hall. In 2006, the last year at Louisville, I was a spectator and cheering section recruit for the last weekend of the show. Aparty Girl had wrapped up showing, so between sessions, my mom and I tacked her up and I rode her through the tunnel and around the ring for a few laps on the green shavings. I will never forget it!    My second highlight was when I took my first ride on Thank Ghaz in ’07. My family and I were shopping for my perfect equitation mount

(which he wasn’t!), and when we discovered that he would be offered for sale, we drove the golf cart directly to his stall where we camped out for hours with David Mikosz, my mother, and myself taking shifts to keep watch. I am sure we were quite the spectacle! I rode him in the dairy barn during the evening’s opening ceremonies and it was just about the most fun I’ve ever had on a horse. People came out from the surrounding barns to watch us. There was baby powder being tossed

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out from under the fence, cans being crumpled, and Thank Ghaz never dropped an ear. He had such an engine. If we hadn’t found each other, I would never have had the opportunity to acquire his dam, I Hear Voices, and consequently, would not have his little brother, Voulez Vu. It is funny how things work out sometimes! What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? I always eagerly anticipate showing, spectating, and supporting, but, to me, it always seems to be the spontaneous bonding moments shared with family, friends, and trainers outside the show ring that are the most memorable and meaningful. I look forward to adding more stories to my collection of memories to retell in the years to come. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? My first time showing at this venue was just last year and I can attest that it is so very easy to mentally psych yourself out. I was fortunate that my first class wasn’t until about midway through the show, and during the time leading up to my “big moment,” I watched, and I watched, and I watched some more. It soon became apparent that this was just another horse show; granted, a bit bigger with a little different energy, but simply a horse show all the same. This mentality helped diffuse my anxiety so that when my time came, I could direct my focus to feeling my horse and integrating last minute tips and reminders offered by my trainers. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? Joel and Ashton Kiesner go above and beyond when it comes to doing extra to enhance the nationals experience for their clients, even though I know they, and the whole crew, are so busy making sure

each horse, in every sense, is just right. Food is catered to the barn, team dinners are planned, and Kelle King even captures photos to chronicle all the behind the scenes “Team Kiesner” action. Afterwards, she compiles them to make the most beautiful album to remember the event. This year will be my first to show with Empress Arabians at nationals, and I am sure we will have our share of special moments as well. There is always a sense of camaraderie, and both barns promote a fun and a supportive environment. This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? Watching Anza Padron show with Jim Stachowski is something I will always remember. I was ten years old when I saw him for the first time at nationals in ’02 and I had never seen a horse that stunningly beautiful or that oily off all four corners. And the fact that he looked this way at ages 14, 15, and 16 in such a physically demanding division, is nothing short of remarkable. I very much regret that we never took the opportunity to breed to him. What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? Over the last few years, I have taken up running as a hobby and as a way to stay fit. I enjoy touring the show grounds or nearby trails and it is even better if my sister or father are able to run along, too. An added bonus is that it is such a great way to manage stress!  What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Not to take myself too seriously and remember how truly fortunate I am just to be here sharing moments with my beautiful horses.

Sarah medina

AFF: KrichKe TraininG cenTer/eaGLe ridGe arabianS # of horses competing: 2. How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? Since 1997. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? Winning U.S. National Champion Gelding AOTH with Pseltic Star and Dignity ER, both boys out of our matriarch mare VH Starlight. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? Competing in the Stallion Halter AOTH with our new stallion, Asgard of Rohan. We purchased him last November and I had the pleasure of showing him to Silver Champion Stallion AOTH during the Las Vegas show. We are excited to see his first foals for us come this spring. We are in love with his beauty, conformation, movement and wonderful personality. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? ENJOY yourself in the show ring with these beautiful animals. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? We are blessed to be a part of the Krichke family and the clients are all so wonderful. We all enjoy spending time with one another and sharing meals, laughs, hugs, victories and stories. They have an incredibly dedicated team and we are thankful for the endless hours they spend making our horses the best they can be.

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? We were particularly touched at last year’s nationals when Austin Boggs presented a colt for a young gentleman and they earned one of the top spots. The young man’s reaction was priceless and it is refreshing to see farms and clients share real and true joy with one another when presented with a trophy. What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? I love shopping with my mom and spending time with our horse family. I particularly love nationals, because we get to see family who live in Okla. that we otherwise wouldn’t be able to see very often. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Have fun, be safe and show for you.

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Linda mehney

AFF: Grand arabian FarmS # of horses competing: 1 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? 25 years. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? My national wins at halter and performance, including National Champion Futurity Stallion at United States and Canada. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? I always learn new things at the nationals. I am looking for stallions that are best suited for my mares. I am also interested in how my 3 year old, GA G-Wisz Beiji, compares to the others in her class. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Watch as many classes as possible in halter and performance. Learn as much as you can. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? When I had Padrons Mahogany and Minotaur, I always had fun events planned for my clients. Now I am not standing stallions at stud, but I have my competing horses with different trainers. I join them with their festivities.

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? There are many that I enjoyed. I cannot think of one that wowed me over the others. What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? I spend all my time at the show grounds. I do not spend any extra time on outside activities. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? If you have done you can do, enjoy the show.

Karen micheLS

AFF: VicKi humphrey TraininG cenTer # of horses competing: 1 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? 3. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? Still waiting for it. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? Seeing my horse Notorious Afire show in the Arabian Open Country class.  If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Have fun, because otherwise it can be pretty overwhelming. Appreciate the opportunity to be able to show and love these amazing animals. We are very fortunate! Enjoy the ride! What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? Can’t wait to find out!

What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? Hanging out with friends at the stalls. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Well, my daughter always says, if the call judge calls for the line-up and you start going around again, “you better not blow it.” 

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? When Vicki Humphrey won on Revelation after a very tough work off.

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Jeanne miLLer

AFF: STewarT perFormance horSeS # of horses competing: 2 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? 3. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? A great ride last year in the Half-Arabian Park AAOTR with a 3rd place finish. I was so happy! What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? The excitement of trotting thru the in-gate! Thrilling. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, whatwould it be? Take it all in and enjoy the moment. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? The Stewarts take great care of us at the shows with a fun environment and are focused always on the horses. This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? The stallion halter finals at my very

first Nationals in 1980. It was a tremendous thrill being in the packed stands in Freedom Hall watching *Muscat, Bey Shah, and Ruminaja Ali compete for the National title. The crowd was on fire. What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? I enjoy staying in my travel trailer at the local shows. It encourages my husband to come to the show! What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? “Ride Hard.”

KriSTine noLan

AFF: cheSTnuThiLL arabianS # of horses competing: 1 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? This is my first time! What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? Watching classes in Ford Truck Arena on Finals night. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? Showing my gelding, Expectations SS, in the AAOTH. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? We do dinners together as a team and always get ice cream to celebrate!

What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? I love spending time with my Chestnuthill Arabians family.

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? Watching Afires Heir win unanimously prior to his retirement.

What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Work hard, try your best, and remember that you have just as good a chance as anyone!

ron and debbie pearSon

AFF: VicKi humphrey TraininG cenTer # of horses competing: 1 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? 24 years. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? 2015 Open English Championship with JK Heiristocracy and Jessica Clinton DeSoto. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? My first time riding JK Heiristocracy in the amateur division at U.S. Nationals. Ar abian Horse Times | 138 | Volume 47, No. 5A


If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Try to enjoy every moment. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? Everyone tries very hard to make each show a good memorable experience for you and yourhorse. They work very hard on every little detail, making it a fun time.

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? Countess Vanessa. What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? Spending time with so many friends. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? “Never Ever Give Up.”

KaThy poLcSan AFF: adandy Farm

# of horses competing: 1 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? Since 1991. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? Razcal Bey +++/ going Top Ten Jr. Stallion in 2008 and Top Ten Western Horse in 2014. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? Watching the show and enjoying the company of friends and fellow exhibitors. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Relax and enjoy, or at least try to. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? They make it fun for all their clients. This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that

you’ve had no affiliation with? Way too many great horses to choose only one. What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? Seeing old friends. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Remember, this is supposed to be fun!

LeLa reynoLdS

AFF: Lowe Show horSe cenTre # of horses competing: 1 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? 1. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? This is my first time showing my own horse! I look forward to creating a highlight. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? I am looking forward to seeing all of the great friends I have made through the Arabian horse industry. We have such a loving and supportive community, and it is so fun to have everyone in one place! I also look forward to showing—this is my first year showing at Nationals! If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Well, since it is my first time showing I will tell everyone what I have been telling myself: don’t be nervous, just enjoy the ride. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? I look forward to finding out. :) This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve

had no affiliation with? I love performance, but I loved watching Vitorio TO take home the roses in 2009 in the Yearling Colts class. He gave me goosebumps; I knew he was going to be a special horse, and look! What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? I love the social aspect of a show like U.S. Nationals. As I said before, our Arabian horse community is like a family. We are all so supportive of each other. I love being able to see the friends that I have across the country. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Relax, and enjoy the ride!

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Linda rouTLedGe

AFF: coLoniaL wood arabianS # of horses competing: 1 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? Over the last 20+ years about 10 times. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? When my newly purchased purebred gelding went U.S. National Top Ten. I had decided to get back into showing horses after a 6+-year break. I had been looking to buy a new horse for 9-10 months to no avail, but when I saw his picture, I bought him in 15 minutes! What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? The excitement, anticipation, and this time, watching my own horse show under saddle. I also really love watching good friends having a great time showing their own horses as well (esp. Amateur Owner classes). Their excitement is contagious and when they do well, I am very excited for them. Their joy is wonderful. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Relax, have fun, ask questions and learn lots! Bring lots of money. Retail therapy is great fun! What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? Kindness and consideration from the two trainers who have cared for my horse. Kim Morgan showed him at halter and Josh Quintus will show him in western pleasure. Both have provided a welcoming and easy environment at their stalls throughout the show. I am most thankful to both.

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? When MHR Nobility showed at Louisville. It was the last Saturday night and the last class, Park. Although he was entered, I don’t think most thought he’d actually show up. He was totally awesome and as he blew thru the gate just as it was closing, the crowd went crazy! What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? Having fun with fellow competitors! We have a motorhome, so it’s very nice having the ability to relax when I want and then having the capability to go watch classes I really want to see. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Love your horse, love the time you have with them, and make lots of memories as life is short.

abbie Schwarz

Aff: cLanTon perFormance horSeS # of horses competing: 1 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? 2008 was my first year. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? Showing in Native Costume. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? I’m excited just to show again! Last year I had just had my second daughter, so I didn’t ride. This year I’m happy to be back in the ring. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Don’t be nervous and enjoy the ride.

Albuquerque. I was only nine and Patrick Swayze was showing. There was so much excitement in the air! The next year, Red Tape in Louisville was amazing to watch.

What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? So many fun things! CPH always has something going on!

What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? I love catching up with old friends, most of us live far apart. U.S. is often the only time we see each other all year.

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? I loved going to the 1991 Nationals in

What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Have fun! Tomorrow is not promised. It is a gift to just be able to ride.

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moLLy SiLbernaGeL

Aff: STewarT perFormance horSeS # of horses competing: 1 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? I competed as a youth in the 1980s, and this will be my 3rd time as an adult. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? Being awarded top tens in 2013 with my horse Fire, in H/A Country 36-54 and Maturity, whom I’m showing this year as well. A close second, is being awarded Top Ten Saddle Seat Equitation in 1989, on my beloved mare Elation.   What are you looking forward to the most at this U.S. Nationals? That it will be the first time my sister, Jeanne, and I are both showing, we get to cheer each other on, and our mom will be watching in the stands.   If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Relax, stay focused, keep your head up, show off and have fun!   What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? Our farm makes shows special by giving our horses the highest level of care, entertaining us with the cutest, most talented dogs around, and always keeping it fun.  

This being the 50th anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? Orans Adagio and Gene LaCroix will forever be etched into my mind.   What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? I love to watch my friends and family compete with their beautiful horses, cheer them on, catch up with those I don’t see often, and spend quality time with my family enjoying the horse we love.   What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Stay in the moment and ride hard!

KaTie TerLecKi

Aff: STewarT perFormance horSeS # of horses competing: 2 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? This is my second year. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? Last year being first on one of the judge’s cards. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? I’m very excited to be competing with both my horses at U.S. nationals this year.  If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Take it all in and enjoy the ride.  What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? The Stewarts go out of their way to make the show fun and get everyone involved. I love that they always keep an upbeat and positive attitude.

What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? Drinking! LOL … just kidding (not really), and socializing with the great friends you meet. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Stay focused and ride hard!

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? Adams Fire.

Ar abian Horse Times | 141 | Volume 47, No. 5A


Gary and peGGy weemS

AFF: STewarT perFormance horSeS # of horses competing: 2 How many years have you been competing at U.S. Nationals? I won a top ten in side saddle at the 1987 U.S. Nationals and have been many times since. What is the highlight to date for you at U.S. Nationals? There’s no thrill like winning a championship at Nationals. Luckily, I’ve gotten to do it four times. What are you looking forward to most at this U.S. Nationals? I’m eager to show my two special horses and visit with all my friends. If you were giving advice to an owner showing for their first time at U.S. Nationals, what would it be? Just ride your horse the best you can, and remember, you had to be good to even be here. What does the farm you are affiliated with do at shows to make the event special? We always have fun at the shows.

What is something you love doing at shows that does not involve the showing of horses? Visiting with friends. What is your motto or words of wisdom when competing? Old age and treachery can overcome youth and skill!

This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, what is a historical moment for you of one horse that stands out in your mind that you’ve had no affiliation with? Second Editions Debut.

mira younG

Aff: coTTon perFormance horSeS # of horses competing: 1 This being your first U.S. Nationals, what are you most looking forward to? Experiencing the U.S. Nationals arena for the first time. How did you become involved in showing Arabians? I started boarding at a farm in Howell, Mich., that was close to our house. I became interested in the Arabian shows and started showing with my first horse who was older. I then started showing at regionals when I got my first competitive Arabian. What do you appreciate most about the farm you train with? They are always willing to talk about what can be improved and what is good and what needs to be worked on. Also, all the time put forth in getting my horse and I ready.  What advice have you received in regards to showing at U.S. Nationals? I have been told to have fun and just ride.  When not showing, what are your plans to fill the time? I want to see what is around the area; what the town is like and if there are any sights to see. I will be wanting to be at the show a lot as well, to watch. This being the 50th Anniversary of U.S. Nationals, it could become a historical moment for you as well. What do you hope happens?

Obviously, I hope to win one of my classes, but all I want is to have clean, good rides and to make it into my finals. Who has supported you in your efforts to get to Nationals? My family, mainly my mom, my grandparents, and my uncle. They are always there supporting my horse shows. Of course, Abe and Nicole Cotton … they have helped us to get to this point. Who is your favorite Arabian horse not owned by you? Why? I don’t really have a favorite. I think there are so many awesome horses, it’s hard to pick one.

Ar abian Horse Times | 142 | Volume 47, No. 5A


CARETAKERS Joy haTTen

Aff: Grand arabianS What is the favorite part of your job? Being part of GA G-Wisz Beiji’s journey to the nationals and beyond, and when people tell you about the horses they have bought here and how much they love them. How many years have you been in this profession? 41 years ‌ 29 at Grand Arabians. What do you enjoy about horse shows the most? Youth classes put the fun back in the shows. Who is your favorite horse you have worked with and why? Padrons Mahogany and Minotaur. Both had a lot of charisma, they loved the crowd, and they both produced national winners. It was fun being a part of their contribution to the industry.

What makes the people you work with so special? Everyone shares the same love for the horses. Visitors often comment on how well-mannered and friendly they are. It is a team effort at both farms.

Where do you see yourself 10 years from now? Blazing new trails with my wonder Mahogany Minotaur gelding, Mahogony Forever.

What do you always keep in your groom bag? They all love a hug and carrot at the end of the day.

KeiTh miTzeL

AFF: ryan Show horSeS What is the favorite part of your job? Being able to spend time surrounded by Arabians each day. I love being able to watch them develop and grow, reaching new stages of their training. How many years have you been in this profession? I have been 2+ years in this profession. What do you enjoy about horse shows the most? Being in the warmup ring watching trainers schooling their horses. Who is your favorite horse you have worked with and why? Vegaz, because I have gotten to know him on a very personal level that many people have not had. Where do you see yourself 10 years from now? Still working at Ryan Show Horses, or having my own training facility, and hopefully, producing multi-national champions.

What makes the people you work with so special? That you will not find a more talented or diverse set of trainers. Their willingness to devote their time to coaching and teaching their amateurs sets the stage for success in the show arena. What do you always keep in your groom bag? Towels.

More Prof iles to follow in upcoming issue ...

Ar abian Horse Times | 143 | Volume 47, No. 5A


A JUDGE’S PERSPECTIVE Pamela Zimmerman

Pamela and RB Boot Scootin Boogie, National Champion Sport Horse Under Saddle Open.

Ar abian Horse Times | 144 | Volume 47, No. 5A


PAMELA ZIMMERMAN

Years as a judge: I received my judge’s card in 1992. Why did you decide to become a judge? I enjoy judging, traveling, meeting new friends and having the opportunity to see some truly outstanding Arabian horses from around the world. Judging offers a unique perspective on showing that just isn’t the same as what you see from the rail and is beneficial for all horsemen who desire to improve their showmanship and training skills. I feel that I contribute to the horse industry by bringing my experience, knowledge and impartiality to judging and my genuine love of the best breed in the world. What are you most looking forward to at this year’s 50th Nationals? The finest selection of Arabians and part-bred Arabians assembled in one place with the best trainers, owners and exhibitors all vying for their personal best performances. It is an awesome experience to have the best seat in the house and see the highest level of competition and superb horsemanship; to be part of that experience is an honor and a privilege. I enjoy the feeling that judging Nationals is like old home week, visiting with friends, favorite ring masters and show managers, and working with all the great people who dedicate so much of their lives to our industry to make our Nationals a success.

whatever the weather may be that week, gym clothes and a good book. Good nutrition, exercise and immune support gets me through a mentally and physically tough week and helps me maintain a good attitude. Judging U.S. Nationals makes for long work days. What is the biggest obstacle for you to overcome? Physically, it is keeping my feet and back pain-free by doing stretches each morning and night and wearing comfortable shoes. Keeping one hundred percent mentally focused for every single cut and class for every horse and exhibitor takes energy, so I let go of each class as soon as I have turned in my card so that I can concentrate on only one class at a time.

What do you do to prepare for Nationals? First, I always reread my rulebook and class specifications, look at the schedule to get a feel for the flow of the classes that I am judging, and prepare my “judging” tools: favorite pens, judging notepads and pack my briefcase with judging essentials. I always make a packing list for the entire week with the most comfortable shoes and layers for

Ar abian Horse Times | 145 | Volume 47, No. 5A


Pamela with Mooncyghtting, 1999 U.S. National Champion Half-Arabian Hunter Pleasure Futurity (Cytosk x Moonlightting).

In less than ten words, can you tell exhibitors the key to show ring success? Bobby Hart had a saying, “Ride to Train, Show to Win,” which sums up the best advice.

a “known” through hard work and talent. An exhibitor that shows the judge in center ring the winner, whatever division, will most likely be the winner. The known exhibitor has learned how to present his horse in the best way and to give the best performance that horse is capable of, and be showing some of the better horses. That doesn’t exclude others from out-showing and out-performing that handler.

What do you feel is the biggest misconception about judges? That we play favorites and that we wouldn’t place an “unknown” first. Everyone starts out an unknown; they have to become

Do you have a favorite ‘memorable moment’ from past U.S. Nationals? Zodiak Matador’s Park Horse Championship with good friend and former neighbor, Mike Whelihan.

What do you do at the show when not judging? When we have down time I like to tour the exhibits (shop), work out and visit with the other judges and sleep.

Ar abian Horse Times | 146 | Volume 47, No. 5A


PAMELA ZIMMERMAN

Above: Pamela, Scooter and trainer, Kim Seward, of Highland Park Stable. Left: Pamela with Naps Dee Lite.

What would you say to encourage others to become a judge? The journey to become a judge is worth all the work just for the increased knowledge, learning the judge’s perspective and gaining an appreciation of what it takes to become a judge. Judging is not for everyone, but for those who are passionate about judging, it a great experience and I recommend taking the step. What is on your “bucket list” of to-dos? Showing a really good futurity horse on through to the Maturity classes in whatever division, and finding a great country pleasure horse to develop in my price range. n

Ar abian Horse Times | 147 | Volume 47, No. 5A


2016

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Ar abian Horse Times | 149 | Volume 47, No. 5A


Sundance Kid V x Acapela V, by Simeon Shai

Western Pleasure with Tim Phelan Senior Mare Halter with Steve Heathcott Mare halter AAOTH with Lisa Gaudio Proudly owned by Lisa Gaudio & James Kazanjian www.KyrieArabians.com

www.RyanShowHorses.com Ar abian Horse Times | 150 | Volume 47, No. 5A


Johnny Ryan 609.558.4616 Christine Ryan 609.558.0643

Tim Phelan 585.943.4333 E-mail: cjmryan@aol.com

www.RyanShowHorses.com Ar abian Horse Times | 151 | Volume 47, No. 5A


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Ar abian Horse Times | 152 | Volume 47, No. 5A


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U.S. Postal Service Statement of Ownership, Management and Circulation (required by 39 U.S.C 3685). The ARABIAN HORSE TIMES is issued monthly with an annual subscription rate of $40. Known office of publication: ARABIAN HORSE TIMES, 20276 Delaware Ave., Jordan, MN 55352. Publisher: Lara K. Ames, P.O. Box 8, Jordan, MN 55352. Managing Editor: Charlene Deyle, Jordan, MN 55352. Owned by AHT, INC. Stockholder: Lara K. Ames. Known bondholders, mortgagees and other security holders owning or holding one percent or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages or other securities: Castle Rock Bank, 27925 Danville Ave, PO Box 518, Castle Rock MN 55010-0518. Total number of copies: average number from preceding twelve months, two thousand five hundred sixty three; actual number of copies printed nearest to filing date (October , 2016), two thousand five hundred. Paid circulation through dealers, carriers, street vendors and counter sales: none; actual for October, 2016, none. Mail subscriptions: average, one thousand eight hundred seventy two, actual for October, 2016, one thousand eight hundred eighteen. Free distribution by mail, carrier or other means: average, four hundred ten; actual for October 2016, filing date, six hundred. Total distribution: average: two thousand three hundred fifty three; actual for October 2016, filing date, two thousand four hundred ninety three. Copies not distributed: average, one hundred one; actual for October 2016 filing date, seventy five. Return from news agency: average, none; actual for October 2016, filing date, none. I certify that the statements made by me are correct and complete. Signed Lara K. Ames, publisher. September 30th two thousand and sixteen.

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Ar abian Horse Times | 153 | Volume 47, No. 5A


LOOKING AHE AD D E C E M B E R 2016

Celebrate Your Winners! U.S. Nationals

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AEPA Futurities and Brochure Arabians of the Southeast Call today for more information on how to be included. 1-800-248-4637 or 952-492-3213

W W W. A HTIMES.C OM Ar abian Horse Times | 154 | Volume 47, No. 5A


Index Of Advertisers A

M

Al Shaqab .................................. FC, BC, 17, 18, 1-20AlShaqab (19-38), 39, 40

Mamage Genetics LLC .................................................................................... 87

Ames-Husband, Laurie .....................................................................................46

McBride, Kevin.................................................................................................. 53

Argent Farms ...................................................................................................2, 3

Michels, Karen & Mikayla ............................................................................... 50

Amazing Horse Woman LLC........................................................ 80-85, 89-92 Arabian Horse Global Network ....................................................................... 56

B Bartlett, Art & Elizabeth.................................................................................. 51 Beloveds Farm .............................................................................................IFC, 1 Beni Hashim Arabians ................................................................................14, 15

C Cedar Ridge Arabians ....................................................................114, 156, IBC

Maroon Fire Arabians ..................................................................................... 153

McCulloch, Dr. Krystal ..............................................................................12, 13 Midwest ............................................................................................................ 112

Moore, Tom & Elizabeth.................................................................................. 49 Mulawa Arabians .............................................................................................2, 3

O Oak Ridge Arabians ........................................................................................ 112 O’Reilly, Nancy................................................................................ 80-85, 89-92

Chisolm-Seymour, Robin ................................................................................. 43

P

Curley, Sheila & Jenna .................................................................................... 110

Pearson, Ron & Debbie..................................................................................... 42

Chrishan Park Arabians ..............................................................................12, 13

Palmer-Garvis, Leslie............................................................................44, 45, 54

D

R

Dolce Farms Arabians ....................................................................................... 86

R.O. Lervick Arabians .................................................................................... 153

F

S

Dowson, Tracy ................................................................................................... 52 Ferroro, Iona....................................................................................................... 88

Firelight Arabians ............................................................................................ 109

Frierson Atkinson ............................................................................................ 153

G

Ryan Show Horses ....................................................................................149-151 Shada, Inc.........................................................................................................8, 9

Shea Stables ...................................................................................................... 153

T Team AHT ...................................................................................................... 114

Golladay Training............................................................................................ 114

The Brass Ring, Inc......................................................................................... 110

H

Trowbridge’s, Ltd.............................................................................................6, 7

Hawk Haven Farms LLC ............................................................................... 113

V

Hennessey Arabians ........................................................................................6, 7

Vicki Humphrey Training Center ...............................................................41-55

GRK Farms .................................................................................................. 10, 11

Hegg, Mrs. Mickey ......................................................................................... 153 Hobnail Farm ...................................................................................................8, 9

L Lau, Jenny........................................................................................................... 48

Lenarz, Dr. Kaylea Boutwell ............................................................................ 12

Lowe Show Horse Centre ........................................................................... 78-92

The Dancing Horse Theatre........................................................................... 152

Varian Arabians ................................................................................................. 16

W Wilkins Livestock Insurers, Inc...................................................................... 153

Womble, Sarah Beth ......................................................................................... 47 World Arabian Horse Championship ............................................................ 148

Ar abian Horse Times | 155 | Volume 47, No. 5A


For your next champion visit Cedar Ridge Arabians 952.492.6590 |cedarridgearabians.com


Falah Al Shaqab

© Gigi Grasso

(Fadi Al Shaqab x Joseph Just Emotion) 2013 chestnut Colt

SH. HAMAD BIN ALI AL THANI Manager of Breeding & Show Department www.alshaqab.com

Arabian Horse Times - Volume 47 No5A  
Arabian Horse Times - Volume 47 No5A