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Volume 44, No. 12 $7.50


The Most Powerful Blood, Afire Bey V The Most Powerful Breeding Program, Maroon Fire Arabians& Shea Stables! In the 25 years of their partnership, Maroon Fire and Shea Stables’ combined breeding program has earned countless awards for the all-time leading sire of national winners, Afire Bey V.

2013 National winners bred by Maroon Fire & Shea Stables

In 2013, horses bred by the partnership won 12 national champion or national reserve champion titles.

DIVA AFIRE | Afire Bey V x The Grand Diva U.S. National Reserve Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure Select AATR

At the 2013 national shows, Afire Bey V sired 20 Arabians and Half-Arabians who won 25 championships or reserves. Contact us for available young prospects sired by Afire Bey V and National Champion IXL Noble Express.  Visit our website for information and videos.  www.AfireBeyV.com

AFIRES STYLE | Afire Bey V x LBC Nobelinda U.S. National Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure Junior Horse CHARDONNAY DGL | A Temptation x Chamorrita Afire Canadian National Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure Select AATR DEFYING GRAVITY RGS | Afire Bey V x MA Nobella Canadian National Champion Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over Canadian National Champion Arabian English Pleasure AATR

DIVVINCI | Afire Bey V x Rimone GW Youth National Reserve Champion HA/AA Country English Pleasure JOTR 14-18 EMPERORS FIRE | Afire Bey V x Ritida U.S. National Champion HA/AA English Pleasure Junior Horse U.S. National Champion HA/AA English Pleasure AAOTR Maturity EVES FIRE | Afire Bey V x Ritida U.S. National Champion HA/AA English Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over EXPRESSLY BELLA | IXL Noble Express x Colorado Sage U.S. National Champion Arabian English Pleasure NOBLE HUNTER | IXL Noble Express x Hidee Afire Youth National Reserve Champion Arabian Park Horse JTR 18 & Under NOBLE WAY | IXL Noble Express x Chamorrita Afire Canadian National Reserve Champion Arabian English Pleasure Canadian National Champion Arabian English Pleasure JTR 18 & Under NOBLEMIS | IXL Noble Express x Brassmis U.S. National Reserve Champion Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR Maturity SISTER CHRISTIAN RA | Afire Bey V x Ritida U.S. National Reserve Champion HA/AA English Pleasure AAOTR 19-39


Huckleberry Bey x Autumn Fire

2013 Overall Leading Sire Arabian & Half-Arabian National English Performance Horses AFIRE BEY V and IXL NOBLE EXPRESS Owned by MAROON FIRE ARABIANS Dave & Gail Liniger 2012 USEF BREEDERS OF THE YEAR

Standing at SHEA STABLES Tim & Marty Shea St. Clair, MI • 810.329.6392

www.AfireBeyV.com


proUD to be ListeD by tHe ArAbiAn Horse Times mAgAzine As A LeADng owner & breeDer of nAtionAL HALter & fUtUrity progrAM winners

Khadraj nA+++/ Khadraj x Aphrodite nA+++/ x fA Aphrodite fA fULL sibLing fULLto sibLing MULti-nAtionAL to MULti-nAtionAL CHAMpion CHAMpion KHArAsMAtiC KHArAsMAtiC pgA+// pgA+// in foal to sundance in foal toKid sundance V Kid V

Versace x Moonrose Delight A LeADing HALf-ArAbiAn HALter Horse of 2013 3x 2013 U.s. nAtionAL CHAMpion HALf-ArAbiAn MAre, s/H type

in foal to *pogrom

2 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

Versace x oliviah MULti U.s. nAtionAL CHAMpion HALf-ArAbiAn MAre, s/H type in foal to Khash pgA


DA Valentino x faberge AA 2013 CAnADiAn nAtionAL CHAMpion 2-yeAr-oLD CoLt witH AnDrew seLLMAn U.s. nAtionAL top ten 2-yeAr-oLD CoLt

vesty photo

now in training with Jody strand SCID & CA Clear • Iowa Gold Star Nominated Minnesota Medallion stallion breeders sweepstakes nominated sire

proudly owned & bred by

stonegAte ArAbiAns, LLC.

Jay Krusenstjerna & barb sink-Krusenstjerna Waukee, IA • 515.371.7407

“special thank you to Andy sellman and the team at Argent farms for the tremendous care you have given our horses.” ~barb & Jay

Volume 44, No. 12 | 3


Contents Issue 5 • Volume 44, No. 12

34

146

14

Cover Story: Al Maliik

by Mary Kirkman

34

Ali Jamaal (1982-2014)

by Mary Kirkman

42

Leader Of The Times: A Jericho

by Kara Larson

2 Midwest

Midwest—What Happened In Vegas … Is Heard Around The World!

90

Halter—Breeders And Trainers Talk About The Division

110

Zefyr—An American Gentleman

by Kara Larson

5 Tutto

*Wieza Mocy: Tower Of Power—Conquers Las Vegas

by Jeff Wallace

146

The 2014 Arabian Breeders World Cup— The Stars Came Out And Out And Out

by Jeff Wallace

182

Gaining Momentum In 2014: The Arabian English Division

218

Hunt & Hack

232

Trainers’ Directory

238

In Memoriam

244

Self-Awareness and Mental Focus: Conquering The Show Ring With Yoga

by Lindsay Smith

Volume 44, No. 12 $7.50

On The Cover:

Al Maliik (Marwan Al Shaqab x Maya El Jamaal), owned by Al Maliik LLC.

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6

Comments From The Publisher

211

Faces & Places

239

25 Things You Don’t Know About Me

248

Calendar Of Events

256

Looking Ahead

259

Index Of Advertisers


Photography by: Avalon Photography Design by: mickĂŠandoliver

We are proud of our homebred champion! Silver Champion Yearling Colt at the Las Vegas ABWC. Thank you to Giacomo Capacci for presenting him and our other two class winners, MG Saffire and Ariadne. by Marwan Al Shaqab ex Athina El Jamaal by Maysoun contact: info@aljassimyafarm.com | www.aljassimyafarm.com Volume 44, No. 12 | 5


Comments From The Publisher Publisher Lara Ames Operations Manager/Editor Barbara Lee Writers Mary Kirkman Kara Larson Advertising Account Executive Tony Bergren Walter Mishek Production Manager Jody Thompson Senior Designer Marketing Director Wayne Anderson Print & Web Design Tony Ferguson Leah Matzke Editorial Coordinator Proofreader Charlene Deyle Sales/Editorial Assistant Accounts Receivable Karen Fell Administrative Assistant Sharon Brunette © Copyright AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Articles or opinions published by the AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times are not necessarily the expressed views of the AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times. AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times is not responsible for the accuracy of advertising content or manipulation of images that are provided by the advertiser. ARABIAN HORSE TIMES (ISSN 0279-8125) Volume 44, No. 12, May 2014, is published monthly by AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times, 20276 Delaware Avenue, Jordan, Minnesota 55352. Periodical postage paid at Jordan, Minnesota 55352 and at additional entry offices. Single copies in U.S. and Canada $7.50. Subscription in U.S. $40 per year, $65 two years, $90 three years. Canada $65 one year, $125 two years, $170 three years, U.S. funds. Foreign Subscriptions: $95 one year, $185 two years, $280 three years, payable in advance, U.S. funds. Sorry, no refunds on subscription orders. For subscription and change of address, please send old address as printed on last label. Please allow four to six weeks for your first subscription to be shipped. Occasionally ARABIAN HORSE TIMES makes its mailing list available to other organizations. If you prefer not to receive these mailings, please write to ARABIAN HORSE TIMES, Editorial Offices, P.O. Box 69, Jordan, MN 55352. The publisher is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographic materials. Printed in U.S.A. • P OSTMASTER: Please send returns to Arabian Horse Times, P.O. Box 69, Jordan, MN 55352; and address changes to Arabian Horse Times, P.O. Box 15816, North Hollywood, CA 91615-5816. For subscription information, call 1-855-240-4637 (in the U.S.A.) or 952-492-3213 (for outside of the U.S.A.) Arabian Horse Times • P .O. Box 15816, North Hollywood, CA 91615-5816 • Tel: 952-492-3213 • F ax: 952-492-3228 1-800-AHTIMES • www.ahtimes.com

As Arabian Horse Times readers know, we pretty much focus on the show and breeding industries. But as spring has finally come to Minnesota, I can’t help but remember that so many people who own Arabians—including myself—love another activity as well, and that is trail riding. You don’t have to compete to enjoy these horses, and when it’s pretty out, I can’t think of anything more fun than just enjoying nature from the back of a horse. To me, trail riding can be the ultimate enjoyment. Don’t get me wrong; I love to show. I love the adrenaline rush of competition. But I have a busy life, and between Arabian Horse Times, family obligations and other commitments, things can get pretty hectic. They can for most of us. Getting on a horse, getting away from computers and telephones (carry your mobile for safety, but resolve not to chat or text), and just breathing fresh air and enjoying your horse is amazing. Your mind calms down, you become aware of all the beauty of the countryside, and it is so easy to feel at peace. And you are never alone, because your horse is your partner. For me, trail riding is not about competition, but I understand that for some people it is. The Arabian Horse Association has programs in which trail riders can earn awards and prizes for distance riding, as well as the Frequent Rider Program for those who simply want to log miles and hours, expressly not in competition. I applaud them all, because just as being alone with your horse is wonderful, so too is another great benefit of trail riding, and that is all the great people you can meet. There is just one difficulty for some who want to trail ride these days, and that is finding a place to do it. As subdivisions and industrial parks spread over our landscape, finding open country can be a challenge. That is where clubs and programs for trail riders can be helpful; if you don’t have unlimited acreage yourself, groups of riders can open doors for you. Check AHA’s website and a roster of your local clubs for more information. State and national parks are possibilities as well. But whatever you do, if you have the opportunity, do yourself a favor and hit the trail with an Arabian or Half-Arabian horse!

Lara Ames Lara Ames Publisher

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Congratulations

ArAbiAn breeders World Cup ChAmpions sired by

GOLD SUPREME CHAMPION JUNIOR MARE DONNA MOLTA BELLA SRA (DA Valentino x RD Fabreanna) BRONZE SUPREME CHAMPION JUNIOR MARE VALENTINO'S ANGEL MI (DA Valentino x Always An Angel) BRONZE SUPREME CHAMPION SENIOR MARE VALORI TRF (DA Valentino x Satin Chall LL) GOLD SUPREME CHAMPION FREESTYLE LIBERTY MI GRAND VALENTINO (DA Valentino x GA Mi Grandlady) STONE RIDGE ARABIANS • Dan and Maureen Grossman 2552 South Smith Road - Bloomington, Indiana 47401 FOR SALES VIDEO, CONTACT: mogrossma@aol.com

www.MidwestArabian.com

Volume 44, No. 12 | 7


By popular demand ...

Sweden ArAbiAn Stud FArm

Gustavsberg 250 451 91 Uddevalla, Sweden Kathleen Olsson phone: 0046 - 76 223 59 10 e-mail: contact@blackarabians.se www.magic-magnifique.com

Gold Champion Colt Travagliato B Show, Italy Gold Champion Colt Porto Sant'Elpidio B Show, Italy Gold Champion Colt Italian Nationals Gold Champion Colt Giardini Naxos, Italy Class winner All Nations Cup, Aachen Bronze Champion Colt Norwegian International B Show Best Head Colt (3rd Place) World Championship, Paris 8 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


T h e I n T e r n aT I o n a l C h a m p I o n . . . T h e I n T e r n aT I o n a l S I r e

Special introductory breeding incentives offered for a limited time.

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For breeding information: David Boggs, cell: 612-328-8312 ~ midwest@sbwireless.net Nate White, cell: 563-663-7383 ~ natemidwest@sbwireless.net Judi Anderson, cell: 612-328-1057 ~ judimidwest@sbwireless.net

www.MidwestArabian.com Volume 44, No. 12 | 9


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Volume 44, No. 12 | 11


Want neck? Want trot?

12 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


Essence Of Fire SMP (The Renaissance x Escada SCA) 2011 Arabian Stallion

Catch My Breath SMP (The Renaissance x Being Watched) 2013 H/A Filly

Ingenue SMP (The Renaissance x Tranquillity Bey) 2012 Arabian Filly

Amazing Grace SMP (The Renaissance x Pretty Amazing)

Look

2012 Arabian Filly

B E AU T Y & M OT I O N

ML Afire Dream x Fire Essense, by Pro-Fire U.S. National Champion Arabian English Pleasure Futurity Arabian Celebration Champion English Pleasure Scottsdale Champion English Pleasure Breeders Sweepstakes Nominated • Region 12 Spotlight Stallion Scottsdale Signature Stallion • WCAHA All Star Futurity • AEPA Enrolled Sire

Rod & Jacqueline Thompson 865.816.0070 • 865.816.2406

Lenoir City, TN

www.SmokyMountainParkArabians.com

Volume 44, No. 12 | 13


COVER STORY

Al Maliik by MARY KIRKMAN

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That is what they all say, everyone who knows Al Maliik.

Danielle Taylor, breeder of Al Maliik and owner of his dam, the late Maya El Jamaal: “When [he was a foal], I walked the field and he would be the first out of 20 to come up to me. From day one, he never offered to kick; he was always happy, always had his tail up. I never had to correct him. [When he was older] I would jump on him in the field and ride him around.”

Ricardo Rivero, who conditioned the stallion in preparation for his introduction to the public at parties in Scottsdale: “He is so hard to fault. He has no conformational flaws, no bad feet, no bad legs—it’s all together. But while he has a showy presence, his temperament is exceptionally trainable. He’s so easy to work with and cool in the barn. Anybody can go in the stall with him.”

Cynics might say that the horse can’t be that pretty if everyone talks about his personality first. They would be dead wrong, and the proof is in the facts. At the 2014 World Cup, Al Maliik scored the highest for ‘body and type’ of any entry at the show, placing reserve champion in Stallions 5-8 Years Old and Bronze Supreme Champion Senior Stallion.

Suzanne Acevedo, who owns Al Maliik with her husband, Daniel: “We’ve owned other stallions that are wonderful, but never one like this. He’s got a different feel about him. I don’t know how you explain it; it’s a demeanor, like he’s a true gentleman. He has the charisma and show attitude, but he’s so gentle. He has heart, so you want to handle him softly.”

“He’s like the old world Arabian paintings of white stallions,” observes Acevedo, citing the celebrated Adolf Schreyer portraits that for more than a century have represented the Arabian horse for its beauty, fiery spirit and partnership with its human companions. “That’s how he acts; he’s majestic. He looks like a horse who can take you where you need to go.”

“Aesthetically, he is an awesome horse,” says Andy Sellman of Al Maliik, the 7-year-old stallion he debuted at the Arabian Breeders World Cup. “He is beautiful to look at, but what stands out to me—what I love most about him—is his character.”

Volume 44, No. 12 | 15


COVER STORY

The story of Al Maliik is one of faith and, unmistakably, one of love. Danielle Taylor bred him because she was in love with his dam, Maya El Jamaal, and Maya’s son Major Jamaal. Major, who was bred to be her western horse, turned out to be so pretty that he became a very successful halter contender, earning the titles of Canadian National Champion Stallion, and U.S. National Reserve Champion Yearling and Junior Stallion, among other honors. What, she wondered, would she get if she bred Maya to Marwan Al Shaqab? Michael Byatt, who not only stands Marwan but also imported Maya El Jamaal from Brazil, agreed. “I loved Maya,” he says. “She was an amazing mare that I thought was the ultimate as to what I was looking for in type and quality. Having lived my life with Marwan, it just seemed so obvious.” “When her baby was born, he was late,” Taylor recalls of Al Maliik’s May 2007 foaling. “He was fuzzy red, but I loved him. He was Maya’s baby and Major’s little brother.”

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As a lifelong horsewoman, Taylor knew what she was looking at. She has been the breeder of several national champions, including, most recently, 2014 Scottsdale Supreme Classic Champion Baahir El Marwan and multi-World and All Nations Cup Champion Baanderos. She gave the new colt time; his childhood was marked with awkward stages, she remembers, but because “his whole pedigree is beautiful,” she didn’t give up on him. When he was 2, Taylor took him to Scottsdale to show. Robin Hopkinson, who had directed her to Maya El Jamaal in the beginning, coached her in preparation for the amateur class and the Signature Futurity. When it was all over, the breeder was smiling; she had shown Maya’s son to top ten in both of his competitions, one of which included 36 entries, and one judge had marked him first in his class. Taylor took Al Maliik, who was then known as El Molok, home and turned him out to grow up. She


COVER STORY

watched him, loved him and was just considering a career for him as a show horse and breeding stallion when circumstances required her to sell him. Even then, she searched for the right buyer, and it was Suzanne and Daniel Acevedo who fit her requirements. “They were buying him because they wanted a Marwan colt, not to sell him,” she says. “I felt her heart in it. He was more than sentimental to me.” Acevedo remembers getting a call about a Marwan son for sale after the 2013 World Cup. She already was aware of his pedigree, and it took only a couple of looks at two cell phone photos for her to commit to the purchase. When he arrived in June, she was more than satisfied. “When he got off the trailer, he just had so much star quality,” she recalls. “I had recently seen Marwan, and in the stall he is so majestic; and that is what this horse is like. They have this air about them— but they’re very gentle. It’s absolutely beautiful.” Right away, she called Andy Sellman, who had handled Baahir El Marwan and others from the Taylor program, and he agreed to show Al Maliik when the time came. “I knew who he was,” Sellman says. “I’d seen pictures and a video, and I loved his pedigree. It was a no-brainer.”

He first saw Al Maliik in person during the Scottsdale Breeder Finals. In the interim, Ricardo Rivero had visited Acevedo, and it had been decided that the stallion would profit from being exhibited to breeders at the Scottsdale Show in February. Rivero had taken on the task of conditioning him. Like everyone else, Rivero and his staff became the next in a lengthening line of those who appreciate the silvergrey stallion’s intrinsic value. As they trimmed off his pasture weight to reveal his correct conformation, they succumbed to his nature as well. “He has the charisma,” Rivero nods. “He knows when to turn it on and how to be a gentleman.” When Al Maliik arrived in Wisconsin after Scottsdale, Sellman and his staff had to agree. “I loved him from the time I saw him at Ricardo’s,” he says, “and I liked him even more, the more I was around him. That sounds like an easy answer to give, but the horse is just a wonderful citizen, an extremely intelligent and dignified horse, and very easy to train. He doesn’t do goofy things; he doesn’t have any vices—he’s smart and mannerly and easy to be around.” Five weeks later, they headed to Las Vegas.

Volume 44, No. 12 | 17


COVER STORY

The proof of Al Maliik’s worth in competition would come in the ring. “He’s a great show horse,” Sellman says. “I wasn’t concerned about him, but you never know how it’s going to come across until you have them in that setting. And I was just elated with how he handled himself. “First, when he came in, he trotted beautifully, and he was real brave and charismatic. Then when we did the walk with all the other horses at the same time, he was very regal—he was curious about the other horses and the setting, and he was very bowed up, but he wasn’t acting on the muscle or anything like that. He was just really proud and did a beautiful walk around. And when I showed him, his stand-up was exactly what we’d planned for, which doesn’t always happen, especially the first time you show a horse. He couldn’t have conducted himself any better.” Perhaps what made the World Cup all the more impressive—if, in fact, something could exceed a firsttime effort that put the stallion number three in a class that included many of the world’s top male show horses—was the fact that in his brief time with Sellman, Al Maliik had fulfilled a demanding schedule. He trained most days and serviced mares every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The newcomer took it all in with his trademark approach of “What do you want me to do? Oh, okay.” “He is such a dignified gentleman of a horse,” Sellman smiles. “He doesn’t get worked up unnecessarily and waste his energy. That to me is a sign of a really intelligent horse; he can easily differentiate how he is supposed to be and what he is supposed to be doing. Mentally, he is one of the best stallions I’ve ever been around.” Even last year, settling in at Acevedo Arabians in Scottsdale, Al Maliik attracted attention, particularly from experienced breeders who could see his quality and were acquainted with his bloodlines. After February, and especially since Las Vegas, interest in him has expanded exponentially. “Since last fall, we’ve sold more than 60 breedings,” Suzanne Acevedo reports. “A lot of people have taken notice. He’s just a complete horse for Arabian type. Everything about him is shape; there are not straight lines on this horse.”

18 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

That, some might argue, is no more than one would expect from a pedigree that includes Marwan, a multiU.S. National Champion, twice World Champion, European Champion and All Nations Cup Champion Stallion, and Maya El Jamaal, U.S. and Canadian National Reserve Champion Mare. Add to that, Marwan’s heritage of Gazal Al Shaqab (U.S. National Reserve Champion Senior Stallion), Fame VF (U.S. National Champion Stallion), Kajora (U.S. National Champion Mare), Ruminaja Ali (U.S. National Reserve Champion Stallion) and Bey Shah (U.S. National Champion Stallion); and Maya El Jamaal’s family of Ali Jamaal (U.S. and Brazilian National Champion Stallion), Khemosabi (U.S. National Champion Stallion), and the multi-national top ten stallions who went on to become influential progenitors, *Ansata Ibn Halima and El Hilal. Nearly every individual in the pedigree was either a national titlist or the sire or dam of one, sometimes many. Ross McDonald remembers the first time he saw Al Maliik, just a day or two after the stallion had been delivered to the Acevedos’ ranch in Scottsdale. “He’s a great horse,” McDonald says. “I was so impressed with his shoulder. A lot of the mares we have in the U.S. are a little long-backed and their shoulders are a little straight, and he has the most fantastic shoulder I’ve ever seen. That and his short back are what first struck me when I saw him.” At the time, McDonald qualifies, the horse had not begun show conditioning and was a little “chunky.” “He’s just gotten better and better,” the breeder says, “and Andy still has some more work to do, so I’m really excited to see his babies.” “He’s the next genetic giant,” Ricardo Rivero says. “With his beauty and nearly flawless conformation, he is destined to sire exceptional foals.” Looking toward the future, Acevedo is hopeful, and perhaps prophetically, she can offer another artist whose most famous work resembles Al Maliik. “He looks like a Gladys Brown Edwards painting,” she says. “It’s the same horse—his back is shorter than his hip, and that isn’t all that common these days.”


COVER STORY

Still, the stallion’s remarkable personality is what endears him to his associates. “I don’t want to downplay his aesthetic value, because it’s really high,” Andy Sellman reflects. “But his mental quality is as good as I’ve seen on any stallion, any time.” So, Al Maliik fires on all cylinders, and time will tell the story in both the show ring and as a sire. But so far, with his impressive debut at the World Cup, he has already demonstrated that he can hold his own in competition. He just proves that nice guys can finish at the top, too. ■

Volume 44, No. 12 | 19


Andrew Sellman 2013 AHT Readers’ Choice Halter Trainer of the Year 2013 AHW Totally Tops #1 Halter Trainer 2014 ABWC Handler of excellence

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avalon photo

avalon photo

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2013 Arabian Horse Times Magazine #1 overall Leading Halter Trainer #1 Purebred Leading Halter Trainer #1 Half-Arabian Leading Halter Trainer of national Halter Champions and Reserves

Congratulations to the following Leading Breeders, owners & our friends of today’s Champion Halter Horses Recorded by the Arabian Horse Times Magazine. LeAding BReedeRs Jay and Barb Krusenstjerna Claire and Margaret Larson Cindy Mcgown and Mark davis Tangle Ridge Farm

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LeAding HALTeR HoRses VsH dominic, Texie Lowery Veyonce, Jay and Barb Krusenstjerna spitfyre VF, Morning sun Arabians dC Benedict, Renee Mendel


Andrew & Angie sellman 92 County Road F River Falls, Wisconsin 54022 715.425.9001 www.argentfarms.com

Volume 44, No. 12 | 21


Proudly owned by John & Cynthia Moore

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standing at Argent Farms Andrew & Angie sellman and Family 92 County Road F, River Falls, Wisconsin 54022 715.425.9001 www.argentfarms.com


Special thanks to Glenn Schoukens for the excellent job handling Ensync in the Junior Stallion Championship

Las Vegas World Cup Gold Supreme Champion Junior Stallion

Eden C x Miss Fame MRM

Volume 44, No. 12 | 23


anderson photo

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avalon photo

Las Vegas World Cup Silver Supreme Champion Junior Stallion

Marwan Al Magnififcoo x ATA Psyches Psong Proudly owned by Mark & Val sylla Claire & Margaret Larson Andrew & Angie sellman standing at Argent Farms Andrew & Angie sellman and Family 92 County Road F, River Falls, Wisconsin 54022 715.425.9001 www.argentfarms.com

Volume 44, No. 12 | 25


Las Vegas World Cup Bronze Supreme Champion Junior mare

DA Valentino x Always An Angel

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Proudly owned by Al Mohamadia stud HRH Prince Abdullah Bin Fahd Al saud Manager Bruce McCrea Argent Farms Andrew & Angie sellman and Family 92 County Road F, River Falls, Wisconsin 54022 715.425.9001 www.argentfarms.com

Volume 44, No. 12 | 27


Las Vegas World Cup Bronze Supreme Champion Senior Mare

DA Valentino x Satin Chall LL

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Proudly owned by Claire & Margaret Larson Argent Farms Andrew & Angie sellman and Family 92 County Road F, River Falls, Wisconsin 54022 715.425.9001 www.argentfarms.com Volume 44, No. 12 | 29


Las Vegas World Cup Bronze Supreme Champion Senior Stallion

Marwan Al Shaqab Ă— Maya El Jamaal

30 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


Proudly owned by Al Maliik LLC Dan & Suzanne Acevedo almaliik.stallion@gmail.com Standing at Argent Farms Andrew & Angie Sellman and Family 92 County Road F, River Falls, Wisconsin 54022 715.425.9001 www.argentfarms.com

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Volume 44, No. 12 | 33


Ali Jamaal (March 21, 1982 - March 29, 2014) by Mary Kirkman

Ali Jamaal was one of the great ones. Just about anyone in the Arabian horse world would tell you that; even breeders who didn’t use him and owners who never breed knew who he was, knew he was a major influence, perhaps owned one of his sons or daughters or a member of the prepotent line of horses he founded. “His pedigree is in every country around the world that breeds Arabian horses,” observes trainer Greg Gallún, who showed the stallion to 34 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

many of his top awards. “No matter how much I loved and respected him, the thing I’m most proud of is the impact he’s had on the breed.” Ali Jamaal was so well-known that for most of his life, he often was referred to only as “Jamaal,” and no matter how many times the word resounded in the names of his descendants, no one was ever confused. There was only one Jamaal.


Left: A young Ali Jamaal in the ring with David Gardner. Center: Ali Jamaal with Greg Gallún and Lenita Perroy. Right: Greg Gallún showing Ali Jamaal.

The Early Years

Ali Jamaal was born March 21, 1982, in Muskegon, Mich., the fifth foal from the El Magato mare Heritage Memory. He was bred by Jim Bergren and co-owned by Bergren and his brother Tom; the pair also owned the colt’s sire, U.S. National Reserve Champion Stallion Ruminaja Ali. Their nephew, Tony Bergren, remembers seeing Ali Jamaal soon after the colt was born and thinking he looked pretty good (which was not surprising, as Heritage Memory had proven very adept as a broodmare). When Tony returned in the fall and saw the then-weanling, he upped the volume on his approval. “It was like, ‘Holy moly! He’s the real deal.’” They named him Ali Jamaal—“Ali” for his sire, and according to one story, “Jamaal” for Los Angeles Lakers star Jamaal Wilkes. Tony provided Ali Jamaal’s early show training and was his partner in the ring the following year, when the colt roared through an undefeated yearling campaign in Michigan. Then, as he recalls, Bill Addis and Stan Morey checked the colt out for David Gardner, one of the Arabian horse industry’s top trainers and marketers. They gave a thumbs-up, and that winter, Ali Jamaal went to Gardner Bloodstock, in Waco, Texas, where his sire, Ruminaja Ali, stood at stud. With Gardner, he continued to collect championships throughout the Midwest. In those days, there were no national titles for yearlings and 2-year-olds, so it was 1985 before Ali Jamaal trotted into the ring at U.S. Nationals for the first time. There were 58 entries in the futurity colts competition, which was a challenge, but Gardner added to the level of achievement by presenting his 3-year-old without the aid of a whip. The judges were so impressed that they were unanimous in their choice: Ali Jamaal was the year’s U.S. National Champion Futurity Colt. In the Albuquerque stands that day, unnoticed by the colt’s connections, a young trainer named Greg Gallún watched

the class. “I thought, ‘That is the most beautiful horse I’ve ever seen in my life,’” Gallún remembers, and chuckles. “I felt like I was having an impure thought!” Very much a part of the Lasma program—at the time, he and his brother, Brad, were promoting the Polish-bred Strike, who would be named U.S. National Champion Stallion later in the week—he was not usually attracted to horses with Egyptian blood. But he really liked that half-Egyptian colt who had just won the futurity class. He just had no idea that he was looking at his own future.

The Stars Align

The spring of 1986 may have been the most important time of Ali Jamaal’s life. That was when Brazilian owner and horsewoman Lenita Perroy, who had founded her breeding program five years earlier, came to the U.S. to shop for a sire. “I lost my heart when I saw Ali Jamaal the first time,” she recalls. “He was the most marvelous horse.” Perroy, working with American horseman Doug Dahmen, approached the Bergren brothers about purchasing the young stallion, but the figure they named was substantial. She was undaunted; securing a 15-day option, she flew home to Brazil, and as she relates in a 2005 book on Ali Jamaal, she hastily sold property for less than it was worth and floated loans to round up the money. Then, remarkably, she converted it all to cash and travelled back to the United States with the bills on her person (reportedly several hundred thousand dollars). It was the stuff of legend. The Bergren brothers told her to drop off the money and give them overnight to think about it, so she did. The next morning, they agreed to the sale and said they’d mail her the registration papers. With a nod, she returned to Brazil. There was nothing on paper, but the Bergrens lived up to their word. Two weeks later, in May 1986, Ali Jamaal was hers. In the fall, having concluded his North American breeding obligations, he flew to his new home at Haras Meia Lua. Volume 44, No. 12 | 35


It would be 1989 before the stallion returned to show in the United States. He went to Doug Dahmen’s Intara Arabians, which at the time was established on a leased section of the Gainey Ranch in Santa Ynez, Calif. Although Dahmen was a well-known trainer and handler, the word went out that he and Perroy had decided that someone else would show Ali Jamaal. “I was pretty unknown then,” Greg Gallún recalls, “but I took a gamble and drove over to Gainey’s and said, ‘If someone is going to show this horse, I’d love to be the guy to do it.’ And a couple of days later, Doug and Lenita came to my farm, shook my hand and said, ‘Okay, you’re showing him.’ It changed my life. Totally. That horse, and Lenita and Doug’s confidence in me, made a big difference, because I had not shown a horse of that magnitude yet, not even close.” First, however, Ali Jamaal had to be qualified in performance, and Jim Lowe was tapped for the job. Lowe schooled the horse in western pleasure, and in early June, headed out to the All Arabian Show in Paso Robles. Gallún still shakes his head at how the story unfolded. Everything was going fine until Lowe added the saddle to the longing routine before the class. “Jamaal wanted no part of that saddle,” Gallún says. “Jim had ridden him all over the place at home, but he wanted no part of that saddle at the show and he let us know it—he ended up falling over while he was being longed. Lenita said, ‘When this is over, he’s never going to be ridden again. Never, ever, ever!’” But she needn’t have worried. Jamaal got up, they put the bridle on, Lowe mounted, and they emerged from the class with fifth place in a class of 19. From there, Ali Jamaal had only a couple of stops to make before Albuquerque in October. First, he annexed the Pacific Slope Stallion Championship, and in August, he was named Canadian National Champion Stallion. Then it was off to New Mexico. By that time, Greg Gallún had come to know him well. “He was one of those horses who filled up the barn,” the trainer says, and adds wryly, “You knew where Jamaal was at all times. We took probably 15 horses to Albuquerque that year 36 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

and it took maybe two days before finally we found a stall that made him happy. “He was like an emperor,” he continues. “He had very little time for you unless you were doing something for him. You couldn’t disrespect him; if you disrespected him, you paid a price. Not physically—he was not aggressive with me. He would just turn away from you, as if he were saying, ‘No, you’re not a part of my life.’ I loved him. He was just imperial—he knew he was better than everybody. Sometimes it would be like taking Prince Charles and trying to make him dig a ditch. He just wasn’t going to do it.” In terms of show quality, Ali Jamaal’s opinion of himself was entirely correct, Gallún says. “He was the most beautiful stallion. He had such amazing eyes and ears, and the fineness of his skin was like nothing I’d never seen. I’ve seen a lot of horses since, and when he was at his best, I don’t recall a horse being more beautiful than he was.” Still, the stallion class was tight that year. Gene LaCroix was showing the typey chestnut Exceladdinn, who in the end was named champion, with Ali Jamaal reserve. The crowd was divided and vocal; the cheers that followed the dark bay Jamaal out of the ring were loud and extended. “I was devastated when Jamaal got second,” Gallún admits, “even though it was to my mentor, Gene LaCroix.” Worse, Perroy concluded that Jamaal had had his chance, and took him home to Brazil to resume his stud duties. Gallún called often to persuade her to bring him back, but it was not until the next summer that she acquiesced, and the trainer traveled to Brazil to accompany the stallion back. They arrived in late August, and within 30 days, Ali Jamaal was ready for the ring. In 1990, the U.S. National Stallion Championship was even more competitive than before. Four contenders in addition to Ali Jamaal were already U.S. national reserve champions: Top Contender (1985), Alada Baskin (1986), Imperial Imdal (1988), and Monogramm, who was 1985 U.S. National


Reserve Champion Futurity Colt. This time, however, the title belonged to Ali Jamaal. He became the first stallion ever to win the national championships both in futurity colts and stallions, and in Louisville that Saturday night, he received a frenzied standing ovation.

As A Sire

As exciting as Ali Jamaal’s show career was, ultimately he would become more important to the breed as a sire. Gallún attributes much of Jamaal’s look to his dam. “He got the length of leg and the refinement—the fineness of skin, the set of his eyes and his intelligence—from Ruminaja Ali,” he says, “but I think if you look at his structure and shoulder, that all comes from El Magato and Heritage Memory. He was very proportioned. Jamaal was kind of like Khemosabi was; the pedigree didn’t really make sense, but what came out of it was magic.” Ali Jamaal remained in California for the next breeding season, and then at the age of 9 returned to Haras Meia Lua. From there, his meteoric rise as a sire just never stopped. “He crossed well with all lines,” Perroy notes, “but especially for us at Haras Meia Lua, the Bey Shah lines.” The dynasty Ali Jamaal founded is too large to record, but from the outset, he sent a parade of show horses to the ring, many of whom went on to influence bloodstock worldwide. From his first crop in Brazil alone came Eloise El Jamaal and Miss El Jamaal, both Brazilian national champions, and Gaizar El Jamaal, who became a Chilean national champion. Any list, even abbreviated, of Ali Jamaal’s success stories would have to include Europa El Jamaal, U.S. and Canadian National Champion Mare; Dakar El Jamaal, U.S. National Champion Stallion; Parys El Jamaal and Pershahn El Jamaal, both U.S. National Reserve Champion Stallion (Parys went on to sire, among others, Shalina El Jamaal, U.S. National Champion Junior Mare); and Tulle el Jamaal, U.S. National Reserve Champion Mare. There have been countless other champions as well, and among the best-

known stallions who carry on his line are Ludjin El Jamaal, Yllan El Jamaal, and Ryad El Jamaal (2000, 2002 and 2003 leading sire of Brazilian national champions). And in the United States, there also is Jullyen El Jamaal, selected to carry forward type and beauty in the influential Varian Arabians program. “He was one of the greatest sires of the Arabian breed and his name will remain in history,” says Perroy. “I thank God for the privilege of having him with me since he was 4 years old. And I thank the people that made all his success come true—Doug Dahmen, for his guidance since I began breeding, and Greg Gallún, for showing Jamaal to the highest level. Their talent, support, and friendship have been an important part of my breeding philosophy—and of my life.” Over the years, Ali Jamaal and Lenita Perroy became one of the breed’s great love stories. “I’ve said this before, but it’s true,” Greg Gallún smiles. “Those two—Jamaal and Lenita—would both have been extremely successful even if they had never met, because they were very good at what they did. But together, they were historic.”

Looking Back

Even decades later, those who knew Ali Jamaal best remain moved by the experience of knowing him. “I consider myself very fortunate and blessed to be associated with a horse of that caliber and magnitude,” Tony Bergren says. “He’s got to be in the top five all-time breeding horses.” “To this day, he is alone in my mind as the strongest, most prepotent sire I have ever seen,” Gallún nods. “His offspring and grand offspring have that unique Jamaal type that is so special. His blood is utilized around the world and still so highly regarded. We salute and our respects go to his great friend and companion, Lenita Perroy. His legacy will be eternal. “We all work like crazy to make a national champion every year,” he reflects, “but if you look at it, it’s only every now and then that one comes along who really affects the breed. Ali Jamaal was one of those.” n Volume 44, No. 12 | 37


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Volume 44, No. 12 | 39


E

M ult i- N a t iona l Cha m p i o n

verlastin Love

Canadian Love x Ring Of Fire BM

1995-2014 He was a foal; Brooksley was 12. She named him Eddie before we knew he would be that once-in-a-lifetime horse that would grace our lives for almost 19 years. He was the epitome of beauty and elegance, strength and endurance. He and Brooksley grew up together. He carried her to her first National Championship at Youth Nationals as well as to a U.S. National Championship in Hunter Pleasure 18-39. In between, Brooklsey and Eddie, and Eddie and John, raised the bar in Hunter Pleasure and gave us many unforgettable rides. I didn't have the honor of giving him his last carrot, but through my tears, the vision of Brooksley and Eddie hand galloping around the ring will continue to give me great joy. My ears will never tire of hearing my favorite song, Everlastin Love. — Jo Ann & Phil Sheehe

I had the unique honor of being Everlastin Love's breeder, owner, and trainer the first time he was named unanimous U.S. National Champion. He remained under my care his entire life and my memories of his many victory passes with both Brooksley and myself will stay with me forever. He was rich in beauty and talent, but most importantly, he had an unbelievable heart and soul. Thank you to the Sheehe family for the years of support, love and faith in me, and to all his fans who always applauded him. He remains Everlastin in our hearts. —John Rannenberg

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When I think of Eddie, I think of these top three moments that people maybe don't know ... When I was 16, I had my softball mentor and coach, twotime Olympic Gold Medalist Michele Smith, come out to Rohara to watch me ride my "new horse." Wanting to impress her and being nervous, I hadn't been on him for more than 5 minutes and fell off at the walk onto my right arm. He galloped away and went behind the trees. As Michele was freaking out that I broke my pitching arm ( I was fine), Eddie came out from behind the trees, walking bashfully towards us in a way that said, "Sorry, I guess I had a little too much fun." We were at region 15 in 2000 to qualify for Youth Nationals, and it was our last shot. We got the gate in the first class—we were a disaster. We went to the warm-up ring and literally, had ONE class left to qualify or we were not going to be able to go to Youth. As the gate reopened for our last chance, Eddie was spooked and I went flying off. Horses were going into the ring and he was galloping away as I lay sprawled out in the dirt. I hit the ground so hard my bun fell out. I told John I still wanted to compete, dirt leaving a trail in the wind from my pants and jacket. As I passed my mother on the rail, she asked what happened to my bun. My mother and I squabbled for the rest of the class and Eddie and I won and qualified. About 20 days later we were National Champions. It was during the hand gallop the second way during the final class at U.S. Nationals in 2010. I got in a two point and let him do what he loved. He hit a speed that we had never hit before in the ring, and for the first time I felt weightless. It was the most incredible feeling to have the sensation of floating. His gate was so correct and unbelievable, that at a high speed, it felt like we were literally flying. That was the last National Championship we attained at U.S. Nationals. I will NEVER forget that class, not because we won, but because of that moment. Winning was awesome, but it was the feeling Eddie was able to give to me that I will never forget. Thank you, Eddie, for all of the lessons you taught me and all of the incredible moments we shared. You are the horse of my lifetime.

Love, Brooksley

Volume 44, No. 12 | 41


Leaders Of The Times: May Calendar Feature

A Jericho by KARA LARSON

The Abel family consists of a long line of competitive athletes. The most prominent being Sid Abel—a former Detroit Red Wing whose iconic #12 jersey is one of seven hung in the rafters at Detroit’s Joe Louis Arena. Playing alongside Gordie Howe and Ted Lindsay, Canadian native Abel will go down in history as the third member of this “Production Line,” one of the most intimidating combinations in NHL hockey history. 42 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

As we take this family’s story from the ice rink to the show ring, the next competitive athlete of the family comes in the form of beautiful 2-year-old Arabian colt A Jericho (A Jakarta x Destiny VF). From the brilliant A Jakarta, an Ali Jamaal grandson, and on his dam’s side, Destiny VF, a great-granddaughter of the one-and-only Padrons Psyche, A Jericho has a foundation as firm as the ground beneath his hooves.


On this impeccable pedigree, Aude Espourteille, a friend of the Abel family and owner of A Jakarta, offers her take on what his lines might say about him as a show horse and future breeding stallion. “For me, A Jakarta is a sire that exemplifies through his pedigree the greatness and quality of legendary sires Ali Jamaal, Bey Shah+ and Ferzon. The grand dam of A Jakarta is a full sister to U.S. National Champion Stallion, Gai Parada, therefore his tail female line is second to none. Specifically, through these bloodlines, A Jakarta exudes type and refinement, with a long neck, and the fountain tail that has somewhat been lost in the Arabian breed. A Jakarta then passed the traits of these rich and historical bloodlines to his son A Jericho, who perfectly represents the next generation.” CATCHING THE SHOWRING BUG It must be stated that the Abel family didn’t get their start in the business with A Jericho. First, it was the thrill of competition that rendered them helpless to the irresistible Arabian horse. It was January of 2011 and the Abel family was looking for a black Arabian riding horse.

As they journeyed to Ventura Farms and happened upon a mare called Destiny VF, they discovered that this mare came with a breeding to A Jakarta. So with the purchase of their sought-after black Arabian riding horse, the Abel family had accomplished all they needed to in the Arabian horse business? Well, not exactly. Like many other starts in this industry, this first purchase proved to be a humble beginning to a whole future of Arabian horse endeavors. As the Abel’s headed to the Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show in February of that year, they introduced themselves to Aude as the new owners of Destiny VF, and made plans to come by the farm to breed her to A Jakarta. At this time, they also spoke to Aude about purchasing another family riding gelding for $7,500.00. Aude reflects, “I’ll tell you what, there’s a really pretty yearling filly over there. She is what we refer to in the Arabian world as a smart foundation purchase and should you make that type of a choice—you are ready. Her name is Athena VF and she’s by TF

Volume 44, No. 12 | 43


LEADERS OF THE TIMES

Psymreekhe and out of the mare Appolonia ACF. You can also ride her when she gets older. She’s pretty, she’s got a beautiful pedigree, and she’s not very expensive.’ So, they bought her sight unseen. I didn’t know that at the time. I, of course, assumed they went to look at her. So the beautiful Athena VF came up to the ranch and started getting ready for the 2011 show season.” A few weeks later at the Region 4 show in Idaho, Aude learned of Norma Jean and Allan’s blind purchase of Athena VF when Allan shared, “Aude, we’ve never seen her.” A rather shocked and surprised Aude replied, “You

mean you bought her just because I told you that she was a good one?” Just moments later Athena entered the arena and won the yearling filly sweepstakes class at region four, and a competitive class at that. Athena VF sealed the deal and in that moment, the Abel’s caught the show ring bug forever.” A DESTINED COLT This whirlwind of excitement and competition surrounding yearling filly Athena seemed to seamlessly transfer into a young colt called A Jericho. Now 2012, after Destiny had the A Jakarta foal, Aude went up to Canada to see the offspring. “They had sent me pictures and it seemed that A Jericho was special. He was very refined and never took a bad picture—even with a Polaroid. I said to them, “This one is extreme, and I think we need to take him to Scottsdale.” So they decided to send him down in October of 2012 to Tara and I to condition and train him for the Scottsdale show.”   Fast-forward to Scottsdale 2013 and A Jericho is the champion Scottsdale Signature colt, shown by Jocelyn Hazelwood. A 2013 successful show season had begun. Next on the bill was the World Cup Show in Las Vegas—an increasingly significant show. Again Jocelyn won the futurity class, and then he was in the qualifying class for the open. He was shown to a championship by Sandro Piñha, and then in the yearling championship, he was World Cup Silver Supreme Yearling Champion, shown by Pawel Kozikowski.  Following this magnanimous show, A Jericho manufactured a lot of excitement and accrued many offers from people who wanted to own this up-andcoming colt. But for all of the great amounts of money, the potential future excitement and pride of ownership won out. The Abel family decided to keep A Jericho and continue the quest. Also at this show, David Boggs expressed interest in the colt for the U.S. Nationals. And with that, in the Yearling Colt Championship with Boggs in Tulsa, A Jericho was shown to a brilliant reserve win. Although he was tied for first, the champion edged A Jericho by half of point. Impressive wins at the three most prestigious shows in the country made for a banner year in the Abel family.

44 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


LEADERS OF THE TIMES

A UNIQUE FAMILY “For me, it has been fun to see a family go from having no intentions of getting into showing Arabian horses in 2011, to having a horse like A Jericho,” Aude shares. “They are a family of very hard workers—the type that really started from the ground up and they’re not a showy bunch. They weren’t used to the excitement of big offers and everybody chasing their horse and the nerve-wracking experience of a major show. There was just a lot of attention on them, but they handled it all so well. They are really gracious and giving while having a great time.”   More than a fun hobby, horses have brought the Abel family even more together—offering a wonderful activity all can enjoy. This family really loves animals and always have many of them around. Horse shows have also become a family thing. They all can come and have a great time. When they arrive in Scottsdale, Vegas, or the U.S. Nationals, it’s not just four or five people—they bring twelve or fifteen. They simply love doing this.” As A Jericho became a family treasure, something very special for the Abel family to bond over and enjoy

together, he also allowed the Abels to become part of a bigger family, that of the Arabian horse. And today, as their love for the horse and their total number of horses grows exponentially from that initial black riding mare, the Abel’s are getting more serious about breeding the Arabian horse as well as looking out for their prized possession—A Jericho. Coming off a big year, the colt now resides in Minnesota at Midwest Training Centre while holding on to a strong relationship with Aude Espourteille and Tara Boresek, as well.   Trainer David Boggs offers, “It is a tremendous honor to show A Jericho for the Abel family as I had the pleasure of showing his sire, A Jakarta as a yearling, too. Both father and son represent the highest level of quality while exhibiting exquisite breed type. These are horses whose lineage includes the legendary stallions, Bey Shah+ and *Padron, both phenomenal show horses and breeding stallions that I had the pleasure of managing and living with. A Jericho embodies all of the great qualities these horses stood for. I feel blessed to have A Jericho in my life today and look forward to watching a bright future unfold for this very impressive colt.” n

Volume 44, No. 12 | 45


A Sire of Worldwide Influence

*J ullyen e l J amaal

x

G ai S chara ,

by

b ey S hah +

Over 40% of A-Jakarta get have been sold to 5 continents with record-setting prices.

46 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


A Jakarta get have won championships, been sold to, and/or breedings purchased to A-Jakarta in ‌ Qatar China Kuwait South Africa Saudi Arabia Lebanon Australia

Mexico Canada Argentina Brazil England USA

FROZEN SEMEN AVAILABLE WORLD-WIDE AUDE ESPOURTEILLE/DEOR FARMS

TARA BORESEK/ROYAL ARABIANS

Butte Falls, OregOn usa tel: 602-509-8228 Or 503-865-9302

www.a-Jakarta .com

Volume 44, No. 12 | 47


Thank You to Breeders: Shawn Stachowski kim morris - mirage arabians Ltd diane and ava Lapham rebecca Fleck karley Vanwormer ZinNora arabians

awe Struck Lr Purebred colt thunder Struck Lr x Nottalooza by apollopalooza congratulations to new owner dwane Hankins

SuNFiSH Lr Half-arabian colt thunder Struck Lr x Lela rose by immigrant (aSB) congratulations to new owner allen Zellar

SF Specs Shocwave x Berre Striking by Hucklebey Berry Stud fee $1,500

www.trotwoodFarm.com Lindsay rinehart (269) 838-6473 Hickory corners, michigan 48 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


M

idwest

World Class ... World Champions


What happens in Vegas...

M

IDWEST

ARABIAN BREEDERS WORLD CUP RESULTS According to the judges, breeders, owners, handlers and others who attended the Arabian Breeders World Cup, the show has achieved the highest in status the Arabian horse industry. The quality and depth of the competition equals and even surpasses that of any other show in the world. To win Gold at the Breeders World Cup, you must bring your very best! Team Midwest and their clients surely brought their best to the World Cup and as a result, they brought home an impressive FOUR Gold Supreme Championships. The Breeders World Cup Gold Supreme Champions shown by Team Midwest represent internationally acclaimed breeding programs from three countries: Qatar, Poland and the United States. In addition, Team Midwest won two Silver Supreme Championships, two Bronze Supreme Championships, eight Class Champions, two Class Reserve Champions and 21 Top Ten Class winners. Team Midwest won more titles at the Arabian Breeders World Cup than any other team competing at the event!


Is heard around the World!


The Arabian Breeders World Cup Gold Supreme Senior Champion Stallion was Hariry Al Shaqab (Marwan Al Shaqab x White Silkk, by Dakar El Jamaal), bred and owned by Al Shaqab, Member Qatar Foundation of Doha, Qatar and presented by David Boggs. Hariry Al Shaqab was also the World Cup Champion Four-Year-Old Stallion. Al Shaqab can add Hariry’s prestigious Breeders World Cup titles to his impressive resume, which includes four U.S. National Championship titles and Scottsdale Championship titles as well. This young superstar stallion has amassed an amazing show ring record in a very short time. In addition to establishing himself as one of the most successful show horses in the world, Hariry Al Shaqab took the first steps to fulfilling his ultimate destiny as a global sire. Midwest presented Hariry with an exceptional group of mares with diverse bloodlines to test his ability. His first foals will be arriving this year. We anxiously await this next generation of champions! Whatever the venue – U.S. Nationals, Scottsdale or the World Cup – Hariry Al Shaqab is a splendid 2 • M IDW EST


representative of the world famous Al Shaqab breeding program. Hariry’s outstanding performance in Las Vegas positioned Al Shaqab at the forefront of all competing breeders. Al Shaqab was proclaimed the high scoring breeder of the show and winner of the 2014 Breeders Cup Award! The Arabian Breeders World Cup was the perfect setting for another priceless gem from Poland’s famed Michalow State Stud breeding program. The breathtaking bay beauty, Wieza Mocy (QR Marc x Wieza Marzen by Ekstern) was named Breeders World Cup Gold Supreme Champion Senior Mare and Breeders World Cup Champion Four-Year-Old Mare, presented by David Boggs. With her near flawless beauty, conformation and movement, Wieza Mocy earned the title of Highest Scoring Horse of the show! Wieza Mocy was bred by the Michalow State Stud and is leased by Oak Ridge Arabians, owned by the Janey Morse family. M IDW EST •

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The source of Wieza Mocy’s great beauty runs deep in her bloodlines. Her sire is the astounding QR Marc, a stallion that the Polish breeders have used with more success than any others. Wieza Mocy’s dam line is a wealth of beauty and quality as well. She is a granddaughter of the great sire, Monogramm and the U.S. National Champion Mare Wizja, a mare also bred by Michalow State Stud. In Poland, the breeders’ touch is golden, their vision is legendary and their art is magical – they seem to create one miracle of beauty after another. Wieza Mocy is a lovely, contemporary example of the expert skill and artistry the Polish breeders have practiced for almost two centuries. Team Midwest, together with Janey Morse, owner of Oak Ridge Arabians, are honored to be entrusted with this priceless mare. They are deeply committed to providing every opportunity for Wieza Mocy, “The Princess of Poland”, to achieve her greatest potential in the show ring and as a vessel of life. The Breeders World Cup in Las Vegas was Wieza Mocy’s debut to the American show ring. It was a resounding success and the promise of her stellar future with Janey Morse and Team Midwest. The excitement and energy at the Breeders World Cup championships were off the chart. When the young mares entered the arena, it was like an audition for America’s Next Top Model! The beauty of the contestants was unbelievable. Yet, there was one individual who stood out as the clear winner – Donna Molta Bella SRA (DA Valentino x RD Fabreanna), bred by Dan and Maureen Grossman of

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Stoneridge Arabians and owned by Mr. Bassam of Al Saqran Stud of Dubai and Kuwait. Donna Molta Bella SRA was named World Cup Gold Supreme Champion Junior Mare and Gold Champion Two-Year-Old Filly presented by David Boggs. Expectations were very high for Donna Molta Bella SRA as she was sired by the Grossman’s six-time National Champion, DA Valentino and out of the National Champion Mare, RD Fabreanna. However, Donna Molta Bella has met and exceeded every expectation, hope and dream for her. She will continue her show ring career and also begin her breeding career under the ownership of Mr. Bassam, owner of Scottsdale Supreme Champion Halter Horse and Supreme Champion Senior Stallion – Baahir Al Marwan. Another World Cup Champion presented by Team Midwest was Vitorios Amore (Vitorio TO x MP Danza), bred by McDonald Arabians and owned by the Marino family. A.J. Marino, Jr. escorted the lovely Vitorios Amore to her prestigious title of Arabian Breeders World Cup Gold Supreme M IDW EST •

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Champion Mare/Filly ATH, where she outshined all other females presented in the amateur to handle classes. There was a tremendous amount of support for Vitorios Amore from Team Midwest because she is owned by the dedicated Marino family, and also because she was sired by Oak Ridge Arabians’ international superstar – Vitorio TO. Part of the fun and personal fulfillment of showing horses through Midwest are the deep and meaningful friendships that grow between everyone involved – breeders and owners, handlers and support staff – everyone works so hard to make dreams come true. And, when they are fortunate enough to achieve their dreams, everyone is sincerely happy for the success of others and everyone is ready to celebrate their achievements! Another champion presented by Team Midwest was Victoria Principal M (Vitorio TO x Diamond of Versace), bred by the Marino family and owned by Thamer Abdullah Alkanhal from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The exotic, dark bay beauty Victoria Principal M was named Breeders World Cup Champion Mare 3-4 Years Old ATH and Breeders World Cup Silver Supreme Champion Mare/Filly ATH presented by Austin Garrett. Even at the tender age of three, Victoria Principal M is a highly successful show champion. Additional titles earned by this stunning beauty include Scottsdale Champion Yearling Filly and Reserve National Champion Yearling Filly. 6 • M IDW EST


Victoria Al Shaqab (Farhoud Al Shaqab x Victoria II HPS) was another big winner for Al Shaqab, Member Qatar Foundation. This very special youngster earned the titles of Champion Yearling Filly and Silver Supreme Champion Yearling Filly presented by David Boggs. Not only is Victoria Al Shaqab a beautiful filly, she is royally bred. Her sire, Farhoud Al Shaqab, is a straight Egyptian son of the influential sire, Al Adeed Al Shaqab making Victoria three generations of Al Shaqab breeding. In addition, Victoria Al Shaqab’s dam contributes the prolific champion producing lines of Bey Shah and Khemosabi. Although these lines were established in the last century, their influence is clearly seen in international show ring champions of today. Victoria Al Shaqab is a wonderful representative of the Al Shaqab breeding program, which is dominating the Arabian horse culture around the world. It should have come as no surprise to anyone that Arabella M (WH Justice x Bella ValentinaFA) earned high honors in Las Vegas. The titles she claimed include Arabian Breeders World Cup Champion Yearling Filly, Arabian Breeders World Cup Bronze Supreme Champion Yearling Filly and in fact, Arabella M was the Highest Scoring Yearling of the show! Glen Schoukens presented Arabella M for owners Ann and Bernard Joye of Belgium, Team Midwest and her breeders, the Marino family. Arabella’s sire, WH Justice, is one of the most beloved and respected sires in the breed and her dam, Bella Valentina, is by DA Valentino and out of a daughter of Padrons Psyche. The combination of bloodlines in Arabella’s pedigree gives her three crosses to the legendary sire of the Arabian breed – Padrons Psyche! What a phenomenal future is in store for this extraordinary filly! M IDW EST •

7


Vitorino DC (Vitorio TO x Kharalisa BPA), bred and owned by Daniel and Fabiana Pastorino of Uruguay, was Breeders World Cup Reserve Champion Yearling Colt and Bronze Supreme Champion Yearling Colt presented by Alcides Rodrigues. What a spectacular pedigree this young champion has! Among his predecessors are legendary sires and dams of the breed induding Khadraj NA, Ponomarev, Salon. Naborr, Padron, Padrons Psyche, El Shaklan, Versace, DA Valentino, Bey Shah, Fame VF, Echo Magnifficoo, Aladdinn, Port Bask, Bask, Ali Jamaal, An Malik, Soufian, Ruminaja Ali, Shaikh Al Badi, Morafic, Nazeer and so many others. Every generation represents the crème de la crème of the breed. Vitorino DC was bred to be a champion and a champion producer. His success at the Arabian Breeders World Cup was his first step to fulfilling his inherent promise and potential. The Arabian Breeders World Cup is an event created by breeders – for breeders. The international community comes together to share ideas and to showcase their breeding programs. Team Midwest has taken a very active role in supporting this fantastic event. Janey Morse of Oak Ridge Arabians is the proud owner of five-time National Champion Vitorio TO, now on lease to the Michalow State Stud in Poland. Vitorio TO sired Vitorios Amore, the Breeders World Cup Gold Supreme Champion Mare/Filly ATH, Victoria Principal M, the Breeders World Cup Champion Mare 3-4 Years Old ATH and Breeders World Cup Silver Supreme Champion Mare/Filly ATH and Vitorino DC, the Breeders World Cup Reserve Champion Yearling Colt and Bronze Supreme Champion Yearling Colt. Vitorio also sired six additional World Cup Top Ten winners! The culmination of the World Cup is the acknowledgement of the best breeders of the show. Al Shaqab, Member of the Qatar Foundation was the high scoring breeder of the show and winner of the 2014 Breeders Cup Award! We also congratulate the A.J. Marino family, members of Team Midwest who were recognized as World Cup Breeders of Distinction! 8 • M IDW EST


Th a nk yo u . . .

“Special thanks to each member of TEAM Midwest, including Nate White, Alcides & Margo Rodrigues, Dagmar Gordiano, Andy Carroll, Austin Garrett and AJ Marino. It is because of your never-ending commitment, hard work and love of the Arabian

horse that our clients and horses are able to continue to achieve the highest honors at every show we attend. YOU are the best of the best!” — David Boggs

M IDW EST •

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2014 ArAbiAn breeders World Cup G o l d s u p r e m e C h A m p i o n s tA l l i o n presented

by

d Av i d b o G G s

Marwan al Shaqab x white Silkk

www.alshaqab.com pseterra@qf.org.qa

10 • M IDW EST


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h i G h e s t s C o r i n G s tA l l i o n 2014 ArAbiAn breeders World Cup Thank you to more than 80 of the industry's top breeders, who have put their trust and confidence in us and Hariry by booking over 200 breedings so far.

www.alshaqab.com pseterra@qf.org.qa

photo by Nawaf Al Johani

12 • M IDW EST


Anaza El Farid Gazal Al Shaqab Kajora Marwan Al Shaqab Fame VF Little Liza Fame Katahza

*Ali Jamaal Dakar El Jamaal *Sonoma Lady White Silkk Echo Magnifficoo KH First Prize Sweet Srrender

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Ruminaja Ali Bint Deenaa Kaborr *Edjora Bey Shah+ Raffoleta-Rose Aza Destiny Afhar Rahza Ruminaja Ali Heritage Memory KJ Jordgee Boy Brandie Aladdinn Echo S S Magnolia El Hilal Esperanzo Mara


Marwan al Shaqab x white Silkk

www.alshaqab.com pseterra@qf.org.qa

Midwest@sbwireless.net David Boggs - 612-328-8312 Nate White - 563-663-7383

14 • M IDW EST


2014 Arabian Breeders World Cup G o l d S u p r e m e C h a m p i o n S ta l l i o n P r e s e n t e d b y D a v i d B o gg s 2 0 1 3 U n i t e d S tat e s U n a n i m o u s N at i o n a l C h a m p i o n J u n i o r C o lt 2 0 1 2 U n i t e d S tat e s N at i o n a l C h a m p i o n C o lt 2012 Scottsdale U n a n i m o u s C h a m p i o n C o lt

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2014 ArAbiAn breeders World Cup Gold supreme ChAmpion senior mAre p r e s e n t e d b y d Av i d b o G G s

On lease to OAK RIDGE ARABIANS Freeport, illinois WWW .o Ak r idGe A rAbiAns . Com

Bred and owned by MICHALOW STATE STUD polAnd 16 • M IDW EST


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World ChAmpion

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2014 reGion 7 unAnimous ChAmpion mAre

On lease to OAK RIDGE ARABIANS Freeport, illinois WWW .o Ak r idGe A rAbiAns . Com

Bred and owned by MICHALOW STATE STUD polAnd 18 • M IDW EST


2014 ArAbiAn breeders World Cup Gold supreme ChAmpion senior mAre

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m M IDW EST •

19


Owned by AL SAQRAN STUD United ArAb emirAtes & KUwAit

20 • M IDW EST


D o nna SRA ol ta B el l a M DA V Alentino

x

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2014 ArAbiAn breeders world CUp Gold sUpreme ChAmpion JUnior mAre p r e s e n t e d b y d Av i d b o G G s

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m M IDW EST •

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2014 ArAbiAn breeders world CUp Gold sUpreme ChAmpion JUnior mAre p r e s e n t e d b y d Av i d b o G G s

Owned by AL SAQRAN STUD United ArAb emirAtes & KUwAit

22 • M IDW EST


Do nna SRA o lt a B el l a M

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2 0 1 3 U n i t e d s tAt e s n At i o n A l C h A m p i o n y e A r l i n G F i l ly 2 0 1 3 U n i t e d s tAt e s n At i o n A l C h A m p i o n J U n i o r F i l ly

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m M IDW EST •

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2014 ArAbiAn breeders World Cup s i lv e r s u p r e m e C h A m p i o n Y e A r l i n g F i l lY p r e s e n t e d b Y d Av i d b o g g s

www.alshaqab.com pseterra@qf.org.qa

24 • M IDW EST


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2014 ArAbiAn breeders World Cup Gold supreme ChAmpion Freestyle liberty presented by AlCides rodriGues

2014 s C o tt s dAle p lAti num p e rFormAnCe $5,000 A rAbi An l i be rty C hAmpi on

Owned by: GrAnd ArAbiAns - lindA mehney And m idWest t rAininG & b reedinG s tAtions 26 • M IDW EST


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2014 ArAbiAn breeders World Cup b r o n z e s u p r e m e C h A m p i o n Y e A r l i n g C o lt presented bY AlCides rodrigues

2014 REGION 7 UNANIMOUS CHAMPION YEARLING COLT

Owned by DANIEL & FABIANA PASTORINO

uruguAY 28 • M IDW EST


V

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“Marino Arabians is proud to have been a high point breeder at the Arabian Breeders World Cup. We are also proud to have bred two champions— Victoria Principal M and Arabella M. We congratulate their new owners and wish them the best of luck with their future careers abroad” —Anthony, Denise, AJ and Brittany Marino Birmingham, Alabama

30 • M IDW EST


V

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2014 ArAbiAn breeders World Cup G o l d s u p r e m e C h A m p i o n m A r e s / F i l l i e s AT h presenTed by AJ mArino

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Excellence ... "... I firmly believe that any man's finest hours— his greatest fulfillment of all that he holds dear— is that moment when he has worked his heart out in good cause and lies exhausted on the field of battle—victorious."

"The spirit, the will to win and the will to excel— these are the things what will endure and these are the qualities that are so much more important than any of the events themselves." "They call it coaching but it is teaching. You do not just tell them ... you show them the reasons." "After all the cheers have died down and the stadium is empty, after the headlines have been written, and after you are back in the quiet of your room and the championship ring has been placed on the dresser and after all the pomp and fanfare have faded, the enduring thing that is left is the dedication to doing with our lives the very best we can to make the world a better place in which to live." —Vince Lombardi

www.MidwestArabian.com


Valentino

DESTINYED

(DA Valentino x Fabrices Destiny)

SCOTTSDALE CHAMPION 5-YEAR-OLD STALLION with Steve Heathcott AHA Sweepstakes | Scottsdale Signature Stallion | SCID/CA Clear Introductory Stud Fee: $1,500

Our philosophy … breeding to quality should not break the bank.

Sire of Vvallor

Scottsdale Top Ten 2-Year-Old Colt (3rd overall) with Keith Krichke Contact: Kevin or Renee Holt • Renee, 206-295-1448 Krholt1@embarqmail.com WWW.MAPLEVIEWARABIANS.COM Volume 44, No. 12 | 85


My inspiration for Adandy Enjoy a serene bed and breakfast — available to clients and outside guests.

My inspiration for English A sire of National winning English horses — competing in open and amateur.

Scarlet O Butler

Pretentious CA

Gitar MF x AF Ellenai (Medall)

Gitar MF x Precocious AF (Premis EF)

Independence G Gitar MF x Starlite Flite (AA Apollo Bey)

Gibson Gitar

Vibrato G

Gitar MF x Ghazis Flaminstar (Bask Flame)

Gitar MF x Starlite Flite (AA Apollo Bey)

86 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


... Mom's Place ... GITAR

GITAR MF Afire Bey V x Gitara PASB (Eskimos)

Contact us for B & B Reservations Sales & Breeding Information

Adandy Farm

Greenwood, Delaware • Cathy Vincent: 302.236.6665 • Tim Phelan: 585.943.4333 Office: 302.349.5116 • Alayna Mala: 413.552.7716

www.adandyfarm.com Volume 44, No. 12 | 87


Returning to U . S . N AT I O N A L S

I Believe

FF

(DA Valentino x PF Just Peachy Keen)

2012 U.S. National Reserve Champion H/A Yearling Filly U.S. National Reserve Champion H/A Two and Under Filly 2013 U.S. National Reserve Champion H/A Two-Year-Old Filly 2014 Scottsdale Reserve Champion H/A Mare U.S. National Championships ... to be presented by Rodolfo Guzzo in H/A 3-Year-Old Futurity Filly

Proudly owned by: Perry and Suzanne Perkins • 805-895-2138 Suzanne@suzanneperkins.com • Santa Barbara, California 88 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


Hometown

JB

Hottie (Baske Afire x Petite Sweet)

13-Time National Champion 4-Time National Reserve Champion

Phone: +1 (480) 361- 6926 Fax: +1 (480) 361-6928 guzzoworldwidellc@gmail.com

w w w. g u z z o a t . c o m Volume 44, No. 12 | 89


Halter Breeders And Trainers Talk About The Division As in every horse breed, the past few years have presented challenges for those

trying to recruit new owners, sell horses and enhance the market. But even with all the competition for today’s leisure dollar, there are promising new avenues,

opportunities that offer growth for the Arabian horse breed and new horizons

for its owners. For one thing, the global market is expanding exponentially, and halter is the discipline that is leading the way.

To find out how not only to survive, but to thrive in today’s halter community, Arabian Horse Times talked to a wide spectrum of its owners, breeders and

trainers. We asked them four questions, exploring the kind of horses they breed, how they succeed, and of course, where they see their segment of the show ring going in the future. As happens when talking to people involved in creative

endeavors, we got a range of answers for nearly every taste. Is there room for

improvement in the industry as we know it? Of course there is. The good news is that plenty of people are willing to make it happen.

90 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


Suzanne Acevedo

Acevedo Arabians - Scottsdale, Ariz.

What are the most important characteristics that halter breeders are looking for today? Halter breeders are trying to achieve that “20” score across the board. To get that, you can’t breed just for a pretty face or a long, swan neck. You have to consider feet, legs, shoulder, topline, and movement—all things that the versatile Arabian horse is famous for. These are the building blocks that, when stacked correctly, create the perfect Arabian. The goal should be to produce a perfect horse, not perfect parts. Arabian breeders seem to be split into two groups currently; one is the European-style Arabian halter horse and the other is the American-style. Our farm is striving to breed a horse that combines the type of the European horse with the stretch and structure of the American-style Arabian. The combination of these styles seems to be what we are all looking for in today’s market. Marwan Al Shaqab has been the leading sire for this type of Arabian in all the major international shows. He is a great example of what the market is looking for today. When breeding today’s halter horse, what criteria do you use to produce a halter champion, as well as one that will sell? We started with a strong foundation of mares. Throughout the years, we have collected some beautiful mares who are all halter champions or are sired by or out of national champions. The phenotype and genotype have to work together; one is not more important than the other. We breed our mares to stallions that will emphasize their strong characteristics and Arabian type. Breeding opposites to try to “pretty up” a head or lengthen a neck doesn’t work. Breeding this way will only land you somewhere in the middle with an average horse. Another thing that we focus on is breeding for “Arabian type.” Type is what makes an Arabian what it is. The horse must have that Arabian attitude that makes it so exciting. If they can’t move and don’t have tail carriage, they will neither be marketable nor competitive in the show ring.  What changes need to be implemented to bring the halter show ring and halter breeding industry back to the pinnacle of our industry? Our industry needs to bring back the excitement of the show ring. That should be the focus of our industry—to breed the best and then to show them. It is also important to have our industry be welcoming to new people; after all, that is the only way we can grow. Successful breeding and showing needs to be attainable by all, because otherwise, no one will want to

92 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

make those sacrifices to play in this industry. Practicing good ethics will also keep people around in the long run. Halter horses are bred and sought after worldwide. Is there, and should there be, an international standard for the Arabian horse? If so, why? Currently there is not an official international standard. The last decade has brought Arabians from around the world to show together, so it seems that we are starting to see a standard that seems to be winning consistently in the large international shows. There are still some differences between horses showing in Europe and the U.S. I feel that we should come to an international standard for the marketability of our horses.

Cathy Vincent

Adandy Farm - Greenwood, Del.

What are the most important characteristics that halter breeders are looking for today? Overall type is the utmost important thing. I feel that conformation and athletic ability is extremely important, and we have gotten away from that. It is very important to have a horse that is functional. We need to get back to horses that are “formed to function.” Horses with pretty heads and bad body structure are not good Arabians. When breeding today’s halter horse, what criteria do you use to produce a halter champion, as well as one that will sell? Going back to the answer to my first question, first you need a mare and a stallion with incredible type, conformation and quality. There is an enormous amount of time spent studying pedigrees of mares and stallions in order to produce a quality and correct individual. We need to breed not only “head” type, but overall conformation, quality, and especially athletic ability! What changes need to be implemented to bring the halter show ring and halter breeding industry back to the pinnacle of our industry? I am not against the scoring system. I think it is a very fair and methodical way to judge the beauty of the Arabian horse. However, it is my suggestion that when we are using the scoring system on a regional or national level we not show the scores prior to the pinning of the class, in order to make it more exciting for the exhibitors and spectators. The scores can be announced or shown after the class has been pinned. Halter horses are bred and sought after worldwide. Is there, and should there be, an international standard for the Arabian horse? If so, why? There should be no difference between the


international standard and the standard that we have here in the United States. Trainers and breeders in the U.S. have bred the most beautiful Arabian horses in the world. We are selling our beautiful halter horses overseas to improve the international breeders’ horses. In closing, it is getting more difficult over time to breed to some of the stallions that have been shipped overseas, due to having to deal with frozen semen and higher stud fees.

Sandro Pinha

Arabians International - Scottsdale, Ariz.

What are the most important characteristics that halter breeders are looking for today? My opinion is that we should not be breeding for halter horses. We should be breeding Arabian horses, in accordance with the standard of the breed. We already have a standard Arabian horse picture [the Gladys Brown Edwards ideal]—shouldn’t we be breeding for that? When breeding today’s halter horse, what criteria do you use to produce a halter champion, as well as one that will sell? You have to have a belief in the ideal horse and that is what you have to breed; you have to celebrate the beauty of the Arabian horse. Beauty and perfection are what sells. I’d like to believe that that’s what people have been breeding for their whole life, although I know that’s not always the case. But that is the ideal: always breed to have a perfect standard of the Arabian horse. It’s always been successful. I think many people believe that the ideal has changed, but it hasn’t. It has always been successful. Ten years ago, when the American market was stronger, the American people liked a “neckier” horse that trots higher because they like to ride, but beauty was always celebrated. Maybe it was not celebrated as much as it is today, by the American concept, but the international concept has always been the beauty of the Arabian horse. The Arabian horse is known by its beauty. If you go anywhere that people who know about horses are talking about horses, and you talk about Arabian horses, the first thing they talk about is how beautiful Arabians are. What changes need to be implemented to bring the halter show ring and halter breeding industry back to the pinnacle of our industry? I think the halter industry is getting stronger, but changing our judging system would help. We have specialized judging in every riding discipline, so it is time for our association, our leaders, to start thinking about specialized judging for our breeding horses. We need a program to train the judges that judge breeding horses, and no longer use performance judges to judge our breeding horses. I think it starts there—develop a group of judges who breed halter horses themselves, and provide them with more specialized training. Regarding the shows themselves, I think we need to look at what is working. The Scottsdale Show is phenomenal, and we have new venues like the Las Vegas World Cup and the Arabian Horse Celebration, where it is more exciting to show your horses. Top to bottom: Suzanne Acevedo, Cathy Vincent, Sandro Pinha Volume 44, No. 12 | 93


Also, I believe that our regional system needs to be rethought. We have too many shows, and that is what makes too many of our horse shows small. The way it is, there is no need for people to compete against each other until the national championships because we have so many places to qualify—and our qualifications require so little that I’m not sure why we have them. The system was great, but it was created decades ago. Let’s update it to fit today’s needs. Overall, I don’t want to sound negative because I’m not. I don’t believe anything needs to be fixed. I just think we need to make improvements. Halter horses are bred and sought after worldwide. Is there, and should there be, an international standard for the Arabian horse? If so, why? We already have a standard. We all have different tastes, but if we are breeding something that has been created for 3,000 years, who are we to decide what they should look like? We should celebrate them and breed what they are supposed to be.

Brent Stone and Dr. Philip Del Pozzo Enzo Ltd. - Auburn, Calif.

From Brent … What are the most important characteristics that halter breeders are looking for today? I’m looking for a horse who is very pretty. I don’t want to say “extreme,” but I do mean very pretty, with a lot of type. For instance, I’d rather have a shorter neck with a lot of shape than a long one that’s planky and straight. And they have to have a lot of motion and carriage. I want the horse to be complete, but at the same time I’ll let some attributes go a little if I can reward the horse for excellence in one or more areas. By that I mean, I would pick a horse if he is extreme in the face, has a lot of shape to his neck, and also a lot of motion, versus a horse that is good all over, but has nothing extreme about him.

When breeding today’s halter horse, what criteria do you use to produce a halter champion, as well as one that will sell? Arabian type and carriage—naturally.

When breeding today’s halter horse, what criteria do you use to produce a halter champion, as well as one that will sell? Arabians are my passion; I don’t play golf or have a boat. While I do well in my business (I’ve been a real estate broker for 30 years), I have to be realistic. If I want to continue having and breeding Arabians, I have to sell a certain amount of horses. But having said that, I believe that today you need to breed to own. Breed something that you would like to keep. If you are so lucky that you have someone come along who wants to buy your horse at a price you like, then you can sell and you are lucky that you can. If you breed just to sell, that’s the craziest thing I’ve ever heard. You might as well start buying lottery tickets. It’s not that easy in today’s Arabian horse world and with today’s economics.

What changes need to be implemented to bring the halter show ring and halter breeding industry back to the pinnacle of our industry? We need to lower the cost and make the show ring exciting. Look at the Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show, the biggest show of the year—with the highest numbers of the year worldwide! It is judged the comparison way, and now we have the World Cup in Las Vegas, which is judged with the scorecard. It has the venue and also the excitement. You cannot say that halter breeding is dead unless you live in a cave.

I’ve had people say to me, “Oh, you breed halter horses.” I do not breed halter horses. I try to breed the very best and most correct Arabian horse I can. If you do that and your foal comes out that way, you will have options. If it is beautiful and it can win in halter, there is no reason that it should not be able to go under saddle too. If you are breeding for all the things you are supposed to be breeding for, you will have the qualities you need for it to go under saddle: it should be good footed and good legged, it should be pretty, and it should have motion and a mind.

Halter horses are bred and sought after worldwide. Is there, and should there be, an international standard for the Arabian horse? If so, why? An international standard? I’m not sure. It seems that the international group of buyers is buying American-bred horses, so perhaps the answer is no.

Having said that, let me add that, of course, there are certain lines that can throw more of what you are looking for in certain disciplines (for instance, Afire Bey V in English). I love to watch performance horses and I love to ride, but I don’t breed for any particular discipline.

Aude Espourteille

Deor Farms Arabians - Butte Falls, Ore.

What are the most important characteristics that halter breeders are looking for today? I personally breed for type, carriage and the style of what the Arabian horse looks like. I also want a horse that is ride-able, so I believe that halter/ breeding horses should be able to be ridden.

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Normally, in addition to a pretty horse, I’ll get one suited for western or hunter pleasure. I may not get one that can go under saddle and be ridden every time, but there are plenty of places our horses can go and plenty of people they can be matched with. What changes need to be implemented to bring the halter show ring and halter breeding industry back to the pinnacle of our industry? You have to educate people and have them be realistic as far as what their expectations are. And you have to be honest. But educate them and let them make their own decisions. There is no such thing as a flawless horse, so disclose what they need to know. Just be fair with everyone. Keep it simple; treat everyone the way you’d like to be treated. I know we want to be positive about our breed, I agree, but you have to be honest and realistic. Yes, the market has been down, but you have to find a way to reinvent yourself and go forward. Think of a solution, try to be a part of it and help everyone out. Halter horses are bred and sought after worldwide. Is there, and should there be, an international standard for the Arabian horse? If so, why? Absolutely not. There is a standard and there has always been—for any horse. We’re looking for good conformation regardless of breed, but an international standard of Arabian? There is no such thing; there are different types and strains of Arabians, which is one reason there are judges. We may all like different things and judges’ opinions may be different from mine, but [assuming the basic standard of conformation is met], I have no problem when judges may judge horses a point or two differently than I do. I can look at a horse and appreciate it for what it is, even though it may not be my preference. There is so much pressure to win and sell horses today. I wish that more of us could just enjoy the journey—the ride, the process—more and just go with it. Otherwise, I’m afraid many people won’t keep doing this. I can’t help remembering what Kenny Rodgers said a long time ago when I asked him why he got out of Arabian horses. He said, “I always told myself that when something I’m doing stops being fun, I stop doing it. And it quit being fun.” I don’t want to see that happen in Arabian horses.

Luciana Fasano

Fazenda Floresta - Itu, Brazil

What are the most important characteristics that halter breeders are looking for today? Type, attitude, balance (I love a balanced horse!), and height (a tall horse). My key word for this answer is “balance.” When breeding today’s halter horse, what criteria do you use to produce a halter champion, as well as one that will sell? I am in only my first year of breeding, but I pay a lot of attention to the blending of pedigrees, and especially to outcrossing. For me, breeding represents making the best decision for a better Arabian horse. Top to bottom: Aude Espourteille, Brent Stone, Tony Shooshani and Philip Del Pozzo, Luciana Fasano Volume 44, No. 12 | 95


What changes need to be implemented to bring the halter show ring and halter breeding industry back to the pinnacle of our industry? For strong marketing, breeders need to come together and try to attract new people. We need an open door policy so that new breeders will feel welcome and we need to conduct ourselves with integrity, because new breeders need to know that they can trust the investment they are making or the hobby they are pursuing. I would also say that the judging is very important. In my opinion, only participants in the halter industry should judge halter, and likewise, only those with performance experience should judge performance classes. Halter horses are bred and sought after worldwide. Is there, and should there be, an international standard for the Arabian horse? If so, why? I do not think we should have a separation on the Arabian breed. By that, I mean not something like an “American horse” or “European horse.” We should be blending all bloodlines to make an Arabian horse. It might take many years, but that should be the goal. We are all part of one club called the Arabian horse. If we continue with this separation, we will end up like countries that have been separated. We all need to be united for a better and stronger breed, and we will not grow unless we are united!

Cynthia and John Moore Four Moore Ranch - Bluff Dale, Tex.

What are the most important characteristics that halter breeders are looking for today? For us, it’s presence with type first. A horse that is beautifully correct with motion and brilliance can make its own statement. We believe most people are looking for some ideal that they have memorized, such as the Gladys Brown Edwards ideal. Combine type with presence and there is a horse with a “wow” factor, one that can rise above the others. When breeding today’s halter horse, what criteria do you use to produce a halter champion, as well as one that will sell? We have been breeding for 35 years, but we have only been successful in the show ring and with sales for the last seven years. We have learned a few things. We especially look at breeding for solid, well proven pedigrees to the bottom line. If the pedigree is solid, the babies will be consistent. We also breed for something that has a life after halter. Our beautiful mare Enzia FMA was a beautiful halter horse. She was fourth in ATH at Scottsdale her yearling year. However, her forte is western pleasure (2013 Canadian National Champion and 2012, both Canadian and U.S. National Reserve Champion).

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We have only three mares and breed one or two babies a year. Our foundation mare is the solidly bred Sue Bees Honey—with Ferzon and Gainy-bred horses to the bottom—dam of the Eden C daughter Erianna FMA, who we sold to Brazil. We breed Sue Bees daughter, Enzia FMA, and our other mare is Miss Fame MRM, who is the dam of Ensync FMA, 2014 Arabian Gold Cup Supreme Champion Junior Stallion. The stallions that we choose are proven, with excellent pedigrees. Enzo, Eden C, Ever After NA and Onyx A have all sired our type of horse with great dispositions. People who have helped us along our journey have been Andy Sellman, J.T. Keller, Kim Morgan, Steve Heathcott, Claude Pacheco and Tessa Hege. What changes need to be implemented to bring the halter show ring and halter breeding industry back to the pinnacle of our industry? A couple of things could make it more interesting right away. We really love the competitive stance at the end of a halter class. As a small breeder, you can see that, yes, the judges might pick one horse, but it may not have the qualities your mare needs. So in that comparison, an owner might pick a different individual for breeding. Sadly, the Nationals no longer offer excitement in the halter ring. Scottsdale and Las Vegas are fun shows, with excitement and audience participation to the end. Also, a change in class schedules should allow for performance trainers and breeders to watch halter classes, to look for their future stars. Our western trainer, J.T. Keller, loves a beautiful horse. The industry is much smaller now than it was in the 1980s, and we believe that by the separate divisions rewarding different things in each division, the breed has divided into different categories. Owners may like to own several disciplines, but at this time, they could not watch many divisions. All of the classes would be more exciting if the audience were exposed to more of the classes. Halter horses are bred and sought after worldwide. Is there, and should there be, an international standard for the Arabian horse? If so, why? No, we have a standard by which the industry is supposed to be measured. A balanced and beautiful Arabian horse, regardless of where it is bred and shown, should be the winner. In looking at judges’ cards, it’s obvious that each judge has a different vision of his or her ideal horse and that’s why at the larger shows, multiple judges are and should be used. In the end, regardless of what you do with your horse, if you enjoy and love them, that’s what matters.


Nancy and Greg Gallún Gallún Farms Inc. - Santa Ynez, Calif.

What are the most important characteristics that halter breeders are looking for today? The judging criteria has not really changed; the rulebook still reads the same as it did 30 years ago. There used to be a fairly wide difference between an “American” style versus a “European” style Arabian. Now, the line is almost nonexistent; the best American horses can win overseas and hence, the European horses are winning here with regularity. Numbers may be down, but quality is at an all-time high! When breeding today’s halter horse, what criteria do you use to produce a halter champion, as well as one that will sell? To be successful in the show/sale arena, it used to be enough that if you had an animal that had all things good and one point exceptional (head, neck, body), you had a great chance of success. The quality has risen so high in the past few years that now you must have two to three points exceptional (great head, long neck, super trot), and all other aspects at least very good. It’s getting hard to impress judges and buyers. What changes need to be implemented to bring the halter show ring and halter breeding industry back to the pinnacle of our industry? Transparency in judging is paramount! A judge should be willing and able to offer reasons for his or her placement or point allocation. We also as a community need to remember that horse shows should be entertaining and fun. Unfortunately, at this time, we offer so many divisions and classes that we have a watered down depth of classes. It would be nice to keep the show classes simpler. When our U.S. Nationals was at its largest, classes were stallion, mare, gelding, etc., and it was the same in performance. With so many classes offered now, a national or regional championship has lost some of its value. Halter horses are bred and sought after worldwide. Is there, and should there be, an international standard for the Arabian horse? If so, why? As my previous answer reflects, my belief is that the standard is virtually the same or very close to the same. Ten years ago there was indeed a very different horse standard from country to country. The ability to access video or live feed from almost any event has really erased any line that may have existed. I think this is very positive in the long run.

Margaret and Claire Larson Tea, S. Dak.

When breeding today’s halter horse, what criteria do you use to produce a halter champion, as well as one that will sell? Many components are required to breed a star. Quality, balance, attitude and disposition are all things very important to us. Top to bottom: Cynthia and John Moore, Nancy and Greg Gallún, Claire and Margaret Larson Volume 44, No. 12 | 97


What changes need to be implemented to bring the halter show ring and halter breeding industry back to the pinnacle of our industry? The popularity of new shows like Las Vegas is very helpful in developing more worldwide unity in Arabian breeding. Continuing to support positive events like it, is very important. Halter horses are bred and sought after worldwide. Is there, and should there be, an international standard for the Arabian horse? If so, why? The common factor in the international standard should be overall quality. The horse who has great overall conformation and disposition will never go out of style.

Kevin and Renee Holt Maple View Arabians - Poulsbo, Wash.

What are the most important characteristics that halter breeders are looking for today? Collectively, the trend seems to be ultra-exotic heads. However, from our personal standpoint, we look for horses that are balanced, with great neck shape, free flowing movement, solid legs and feet, and of course, the “pretty” factor. When breeding today’s halter horse, what criteria do you use to produce a halter champion, as well as one that will sell? Successful breeders are going to know the strengths of their mares and search for a stallion(s) who will complement and improve upon the mares. We don’t believe in “fad” breeding. At the end of the day, we are simply not willing to sacrifice overall correctness by focusing on only one aspect of the horse. Overall quality is the key. What changes need to be implemented to bring the halter show ring and halter breeding industry back to the pinnacle of our industry? We believe the main problems are the integrity and the education of the judging panels; the exhibitors need to feel they are working with a level playing field. How many times have we seen a panel where most judges place a horse either first or second, and then another judge places that horse last or doesn’t even utilize it? We’ve seen cards at shows where judges gave scores of 15 and 16 for legs/feet and then another judge gave the same horse a 9 in that same category. Can anyone think of a “legitimate” reason for such a discrepancy in those scores? Events such as those are highly damaging to the industry. Halter horses are bred and sought after worldwide. Is there, and should there be, an international standard for the Arabian horse? If so, why? Initially the response would be yes, but at the same time, there are many factors to consider. Therefore, we’ll refrain from commenting at this time.

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Lisa Markley

Markley Arabians - Scottsdale, Ariz.

What are the most important characteristics that halter breeders are looking for today? For me, the most important characteristics that I want to breed for are overall quality, elegance, eyes, ears, balance (one-third hip/one-third back/ one-third neck), and style. When breeding today’s halter horse, what criteria do you use to produce a halter champion, as well as one that will sell? First off,  I feel that a true halter champion should be beautiful just standing in the stall, cross-tied, or out in the paddock. So to me, that goes back to overall quality, type, balance and style.  My personal criteria that I am trying to achieve when breeding my mares include  well-shaped necks that come out of the shoulder high, with a fine throat (I’m not a fan of a long neck that doesn’t come out right and/or has no shape). They should have big expressive eyes, fine muzzles, and pretty ears (years of living with Magic Dream make this a must-have!), and I want strong bodies and good tail carriage. It’s important to me that my horses are confident, so I raise my foals to not be afraid of things; I try to make their lives fun, so that they always feel safe and trust that I won’t let bad things happen to them. In raising them this way, I believe that they are better, more confident show horses. That being said, I love my mares, but being honest with myself, none of them are perfect. So, when I choose each stallion, he must fit what I consider to be “the standard”, have the physical attributes that my mare needs, and then he must have the pedigree that backs up why he looks the way he does. I look for stallions that will complement my mares without giving up what I love about each of them.  Because attitude and confidence are huge to me, I won’t breed to a stallion that doesn’t have it. I don’t like weak horses; I love confident horses. As far as “ones that will sell,” my good friend Lucy Whittier has always told me, “Breed the best horse possible, and everything else will follow.” It’s true. High quality horses sell. What changes need to be implemented to bring the halter show ring and halter breeding industry back to the pinnacle of our industry? As for as the halter show ring, there is still way too much emphasis put on the stand-up. Because of this, it puts too much pressure on the handlers (which, in turn,


puts too much pressure on the horses). Their motion and carriage can be evaluated when they are coming into the arena. It should be possible to judge conformation when the horses are walking on the rail, and then when they are walking to and away from the judges. One thing that I feel is absolutely “a must” is hiring judges that know the standards of our breed. All of us know of the Gladys Brown Edwards drawing, and I’ve never heard of anyone saying that that isn’t the ideal. Judges need to be accountable. It’s not hard to see when games are being played. (For example, horses being put down on their cards so that the one that they want to win will have a better chance.) After all these years, it’s amazing that this is still going on. Restoring halter breeding to the pinnacle of the industry is difficult; all aspects of breeding are very expensive. Because it is all so expensive, it’s that much more important to do your homework and put thought into what stallions you are breeding to. Don’t just breed to the most recent winner. He may not be right for your mare. And finally, it must be a labor of love or you just shouldn’t do it. Halter horses are bred and sought after worldwide. Is there, and should there be, an international standard for the Arabian horse? If so, why? I believe that none of us will ever see eye to eye and agree 100 percent. But I do think that Gladys Brown Edwards has the best ideal of what an Arabian horse should look like. So, if we were to have a standard, her illustration would be mine. 

Bruce McCrea

Al-Mohamadia Arabian Horse Stud - Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

What are the most important characteristics that halter breeders are looking for today? It takes a very special horse to compete in the top shows today. The competition is very strong, especially at the major shows in Europe and the Middle East. You must breed horses with quality, extreme type and charisma. Pretty heads with great eyes and ears, long necks with fine throatlatches, strong bodies with short backs and flat toplines, plus “tail over the back, snort and blow”—that is what you need to produce if you hope to win. When breeding today’s halter horse, what criteria do you use to produce a halter champion, as well as one that will sell? You need high quality, wellbred individuals to start with. Again, you must produce pretty horses with charisma and show horse attitudes. There are obviously certain pedigrees that have been successful over the years. To name just a few, we have a lot of Marwan Al Shaqab in our pedigrees. I like El Shaklan and other “Om El” horses in the dam lines. I also like Padrons Psyche on the dam side. There is probably still too much emphasis on pretty heads, but it is very necessary. Fortunately, we are getting away from just an extreme dish. They also need to have good ears, big dark eyes (no white), and a good neck. Hopefully, we are past the days when Top to bottom: Kevin and Renee Holt, Lisa Markley, Bruce McCrea Volume 44, No. 12 | 99


an extreme, dishy head attached to the chest is winning. Unfortunately, we are breeding lots of bad bodies these days. Judges need to be more critical of poorly coupled horses with short, sloping croups and bad hips! The horses that sell easily and for high prices are the ones that can win the big shows. Everyone is looking for them and they are very, very hard to find. What changes need to be implemented to bring the halter show ring and halter breeding industry back to the pinnacle of our industry? That is a tough task! I think halter classes are coming back a little in America. The Scottsdale Show is still fantastic. Shows like the Las Vegas World Cup and the Arabian Breeder Finals are getting better and better, and I think regional halter classes will be up this year. Somehow, U.S. Nationals needs to regain its prestige. The reality is that most of our great breeders are gone. There is no more pure Polish, straight Russian, Gainey breeding, etc.; they were replaced with people that were breeding for a specific market. Consequently, the next great HalfArabian English prospect was selling for more than the next superstar halter filly. I think it is coming back slowly. Several American breeders and trainers are selling high quality and high priced horses to the international markets. Halter horses are bred and sought after worldwide. Is there, and should there be, an international standard for the Arabian horse? If so, why? No, I do not think we need an international standard. With any of the scoring systems, you are still going to get some personal preferences and many different styles and types of horses to judge. I do think, however, that the difference between the American and European types is getting much closer nowadays.

David Boggs

Midwest - Rogers, Minn.

What are the most important characteristics that halter breeders are looking for today? Type and beauty, combined with free movement and that classical air, those characteristics that set the horse apart from all other breeds. When breeding today’s halter horse, what criteria do you use to produce a halter champion, as well as one that will sell? You need reliability from the stallion and his pedigree, so look to proven production—look to those stallions being promoted to give you “that boost” in marketing your foal. A stallion owner must promote his product and assist those

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that purchase his services. The same applies when looking for that special mare to breed; search her production record. You may be better off spending your investment/budget to purchase an embryo right to a top quality mare with proven bloodlines and tractability. What changes need to be implemented to bring the halter show ring and halter breeding industry back to the pinnacle of our industry? We need a long, healthy, several hour discussion on this topic. In short, a committee needs to follow the outline of those shows that “are successful,” such as Scottsdale and the World Cup in Las Vegas. Halter horses are bred and sought after worldwide. Is there, and should there be, an international standard for the Arabian horse? If so, why? Of course there should. Even though the horses are bred worldwide, the Arabian community is small and tightly connected.

Sheena and Mike Steenhart

Morning Sun Arabians - Crossfield, Alberta, Canada

What are the most important characteristics that halter breeders are looking for today? Most halter breeders seem to be focused on the latest trends—pretty faces and long necks— with little thought to what the horse might do after halter. They also seem to stick to the latest bloodlines. In our opinion, this is shrinking our gene pool to the long term detriment of our breed and the industry as a whole. When breeding today’s halter horse, what criteria do you use to produce a halter champion, as well as one that will sell? We focus on breeding a well-balanced, correct, athletic individual with a trainable disposition that can have a job after halter. Breeding a pretty horse is very important, but it cannot be the only focus. Breeding for athletic ability and disposition is vital to ensuring that these horses are sellable. We are a small operation and we do this for enjoyment; that makes disposition of utmost importance to us. We want to enjoy being around these horses and we want to ensure that the people who buy them enjoy them as well. What changes need to be implemented to bring the halter show ring and halter breeding industry back to the pinnacle of our industry? We believe that a focus on educating our judges to ensure that they can confidently  judge each individual to our breed standard will assist in leveling the playing field, ensuring that the best horse—not the horse with the most famous pedigree or the best known handler/owner—wins.


Halter horses are bred and sought after worldwide. Is there, and should there be, an international standard for the Arabian horse? If so, why? We have always understood that there was an international breed standard: the Gladys Brown Edwards depiction. Around the world, different breeding farms have focused on different things, but all should still judge their success on how close they can come to achieving that complete picture.

Suzanne and Perry Perkins Santa Barbara, Calif.

From Perry … What are the most important characteristics that halter breeders are looking for today? The first thing for judges is the head, the second is the neck and throatlatch, the third would be the body, and the fourth would be the legs. Suzanne and I breed Half-Arabians. We took three horses to Scottsdale, and we had one reserve and two horses won their classes. At the recent Region 7 Show, we had two championships and two reserves with three horses. When breeding today’s halter horse, what criteria do you use to produce a halter champion, as well as one that will sell? I have been breeding Arabian horses for 40 years, and I believe that you have to have a great dam to start with. If you don’t, you’re wasting your time and money, no matter what stallion you breed to. The criteria that I mentioned before still stands. As far as breeding a horse for sell-ability, you need to have a well-known, well recognized product. In other words, the stallion needs to be well recognized if you expect to have a return on your investment. If you have a mare that has a big name—such as, we own Hometown Hottie, who has 13 national championships in halter—that’s doubly good. What changes need to be implemented to bring the halter show ring and halter breeding industry back to the pinnacle of our industry? That’s a complex question that everyone would like to have a simple answer to, and it’s not easy. I believe we are still in a bad economy and I think it will be a couple more years before it starts roaring again. Halter horses are bred and sought after worldwide. Is there, and should there be, an international standard for the Arabian horse? If so, why? I don’t know that there should be an international standard. Obviously, the European horses are different from our horses; however, the Middle Eastern owners are buying the great horses from America and taking them to the Middle East and Europe and showing them there. I don’t know that we would want the Europeans to impose their standards on us, so I don’t know that we should impose our standards on them or anyone else. As things are, breeding horses now are being co-mingled so much that we may be headed to an international standard whether we want to or not. Top to bottom: David Boggs, Mike Steenhart, Perry and Suzanne Perkins Volume 44, No. 12 | 101


Shirley and Murray Popplewell

Rae-Dawn Arabians - Saskatoon, Sask., and Scottsdale, Ariz.

What are the most important characteristics that halter breeders are looking for today? Today, breeders are looking for exotic faces. For ourselves, we focus on breeding for a horse that is balanced. When breeding today’s halter horse, what criteria do you use to produce a halter champion, as well as one that will sell? Today’s halter horse has to be well-balanced. Today’s halter champion is very difficult to breed, as the standard in North America is extremely high and requires a horse that is strong in all categories. What changes need to be implemented to bring the halter show ring and halter breeding industry back to the pinnacle of our industry? More recognition for the breeder first, the owner second, and then the trainer/handler. Breeding farms must compete at shows, not training facilities. Today, we see training facilities renting stalls and setting up with a wide variety of horses and multiple owners, which causes disappointment and disgruntled owners/breeders. We must first learn to love the Arabian horse, then love the show. The other way around, to love the show first, doesn’t work, as the show can be far too hard to handle if we don’t love our horses. Halter horses are bred and sought after worldwide. Is there, and should there be, an international standard for the Arabian horse? If so, why? Yes, there should be a standard. When we see an economic downturn in the industry in a certain country, we see breeders changing their breeding programs for the market because of the different standards from one country to another. That cannot be good for the breed, which holds a high standard for beauty and quality. We see countries that have hundreds of years of strict breeding programs now ejecting North American sires because of an economic market. A universal standard would improve this. Quite often we hear, “That’s a European-style horse,” which means it fits a different style and belongs in a different region.

Joe Alberti

Rohara- Orange Lake, Fla.

What are the most important characteristics that halter breeders are looking for today? I think the “American” horse and the “European” horse are slowly coming together to form one idealistic Arabian, which is a great thing. Breeders today are looking for extreme head type, something that is unmistakable Arabian, so type is becoming a number one factor, as it should

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be. That means extreme face, short back, an extremely high, proud tail carriage, and also, you want a very athletic horse. Through the years, we’ve had very “necky” horses that have won, but who weren’t very pretty-headed, and we’ve had horses that had a lot of trot but maybe weren’t as pretty. Now, I think, it has come full circle and we’re taking all of those pieces and starting to want them to be in one horse. When breeding today’s halter horse, what criteria do you use to produce a halter champion, as well as one that will sell? I think that if you breed for the type of horse I described, you will have more potential for sale. In the past, it depended a lot on who the popular breeding horses were. They all had various attributes that everyone wanted—and maybe went overboard in getting, so that some other traits which did not contribute to the ideal Arabian type became more developed as well. (I’m not knocking the horses bred with other priorities in mind, but just saying that perhaps they did not contribute to the look of the ideal Arabian horse.) When the economy took such a hit, some breeders left the market, just as overseas demand and purchasing power became more apparent. That has changed the look to what we are seeing more of now, as we try to incorporate it all. What changes need to be implemented to bring the halter show ring and halter breeding industry back to the pinnacle of our industry? First and foremost, we need to have a level playing field. We need judges that will pick the best representation of the breed standard. One of the downfalls of the halter industry has been that people have not felt like they were getting a fair shake. I believe that AHA and all the applicable people are doing a great job and doing the best they can, and they need to continue to move forward in hiring judges who have the best interests of the breed in mind. When judges pick champions, they are determining and altering the future of the breed, because people typically breed to the horses that win (whether or not those horses are the best ones for them to use). In past years, that sometimes has been detrimental. I think we’re seeing a rise in halter numbers. This past February was my 18th consecutive Scottsdale Show, and I felt like the quality was better than I’ve ever seen it before—and there have been years that I have not felt that. This year, I truly felt the quality was exceptional. One other improvement I’d like to see is at U.S. Nationals. I still hear from my performance friends that they never get to see halter because they are busy doing their thing in another


arena. That hurts. We need to do everything we can to reunite the industry, and the halter industry is the ground level of our breed. Halter horses are bred and sought after worldwide. Is there, and should there be, an international standard for the Arabian horse? If so, why? I think the standard of the ideal Arabian worldwide is becoming more of the same entity, the same animal. Five or 10 years ago, the winning American horse and the winning European horse were very different looking. Now, I think they look much more the same, and we’re seeing more horses that are being shipped overseas and showing there, or coming over here, and winning globally. I think that’s a great thing; I don’t think we need to spell out a standard. We have one in place. Our breed standard is what it is, and has been in place since the inception of the Arabian judging system.

Barbara Sink-Krusenstjerna and Jay Krusenstjerna Stonegate Farm- Waukee, Iowa

From Barbara … I can only answer the halter questions from my personal wants and needs. I want a halter horse that ultimately has a job at the end of its halter career. It must be able to “ride.” I have learned so much by blending my time with Andy Sellman (halter) and Jody Strand (performance), as well as many others. Though I am still learning and adjusting, my ultimate goal is a horse that is beautiful enough for the halter ring, but has the structure and heart to be a competitive performance horse. That is my uppermost goal, what will drive me— and I think that will ultimately sell itself.

Kathleen Olsson

Sweden Arabian Stud - Uddevalla, Sweden

What are the most important characteristics that halter breeders are looking for today? In Europe you want a complete horse in the show ring. But show attitude and type are, of course, very important. When breeding today’s halter horse, what criteria do you use to produce a halter champion, as well as one that will sell? A correct horse with type, movement, and correctness in both legs and body. You always have the goal of breeding a “perfect” horse. Halter horses are bred and sought after worldwide. Is there, and should there be, an international standard for the Arabian horse? If so, why? I think we have a good international standard. Sure, the horses you see in, for example, the United States, can be a bit different from Europe and so on, but I think the quality today is quite high. n Top to bottom: Shirley and Murray Popplewell, Joe Alberti, Jay and Barb Krusenstjerna, Kathleen Olsson


2013 National Halter Leaders

Includes U.S., Canadian and Youth National Halter Champion and Reserve wins. No Showmanship.

Overall Leading Horses

owner

by number of wins

1. VSH Dominic 2. Shaddo Magniphied 3. Shes Still Jammin Veyonce 4. JB Hometown Hottie Maghnus Z Spitfyre VF 5. Blazin Knight Im Adiva Too ORA SB Marina TCR Exotica Valldez

5 championships 3 championships, 1 reserve 3 championships 3 championships 2 championships, 1 reserve 2 championships, 1 reserve 2 championships, 1 reserve 1 championship, 2 reserves 1 championship, 2 reserves 1 championship, 2 reserves 1 championship, 2 reserves 1 championship, 2 reserves

Arabian Leading Horses

owner

by number of wins

1. Spitfyre VF 2. SB Marina Valldez 3. Black Opzz DC Benedict Donna Molta Bella SRA Fabian TRF Fidenzio Hariry Al Shaqab Honey’s Delight RB Kharisma M Octavius NA Pogrom RD Challs Angel Shaqs Legacy MH

2 championships, 1 reserve 1 championships, 2 reserves 1 championships, 2 reserves 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships

Half-Arabian Leading Horses by number of wins

1. VSH Dominic 2. Shaddo Magniphied 3. Shes Still Jammin Veyonce 4. JB Hometown Hottie Maghnus Z 5. Blazin Knight Im Adiva Too ORA TCR Exotica 6. BPA Venus Ebony By Valentino Khant Wait J

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Texie Lowery Amelia Hruban Midwest Station II, Inc. Jay and Barbara Krusenstjerna Perry and Suzanne Perkins Maddy and Jay Winer Mike Steenhart Oak Haven Arabian Horse Farm Lori Watson Murray and Shirley Popplewell Patrick and Tammie McGinnis Steve and Darla Miles

5 championships 3 championships, 1 reserve 3 championships 3 championships 2 championships, 1 reserve 2 championships, 1 reserve 1 championship, 2 reserves 1 championship, 2 reserves 1 championship, 2 reserves 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships

Mike Steenhart Murray and Shirley Popplewell Steve and Darla Miles Shuster Arabians LLC; Jerry Schall Rica Mendel Dan and Maureen Grossman Cassandra Stafford Diane and Jennifer Lavallee Al Shaqab Masterpiece Arabian Partners LLC Anthony Marino Sr and Anthony Marino Jr Michael Bills Janow Podlaski Stud Pegasus Arabians Roxanne and Jeff Schall

owner Texie Lowery Amelia Hruban Midwest Station II, Inc. Jay and Barbara Krusenstjerna Perry and Suzanne Perkins Maddy and Jay Winer Oak Haven Arabian Horse Farm Lori Watson Patrick and Tammie McGinnis Linda Pawlowski and Roger Perry Sally Bedeker Lawrence Jerome


Arabian Overall Leading Sires by number of winners

1. DA Valentino 2. Versace 3. Baske Afire Marwan Al Shaqab 4. Bey Ambition DS Major Afire

12 6 5 5 4 4

Arabian Leading Sires by number of

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

1. DA Valentino 17 2. Versace 10 3. Marwan Al Shaqab 9 Baske Afire 9 4. Magnum Chall HVP 6

ArA rAbi AbiA biAn An winners

by number of

HAlf Alf-ArA rAbi AbiA biAn An winners

by number of

DA Valentino Marwan Al Shaqab Bey Ambition Aria Impresario Audacious PS Besson Carol Eden C Jullyen El Jamaal Magnum Chall HVP SF Veraz Trussardi Versace

by number of

by number of wins

1. Baske Afire 2. DA Valentino Versace 3. DS Major Afire 4. Justify Khadraj NA

8 5 4 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

5 4 4 3 2 2

Overall Leading Trainers by number of winners

1. Andy Sellman 2. Jeff Schall 3. David Boggs Michael Byatt 4. Joe Alberti Greg Gallun Rodolfo Guzzo Keith Krichke

19 8 6 6 4 4 4 4

ArA rAbi AbiA biAn An wins

1. DA Valentino 2. Marwan Al Shaqab 3. Aria Impresario Bey Ambition 4. Besson Carol

11 9 5 5 4

HAlf Alf-ArA rAbi AbiA biAn An wins

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Baske Afire Versace DA Valentino Shaddofax DS Major Afire Fausto CRH Justify Khadraj NA Magnum Chall HVP Monogramm JD Vitorio TO

9 8 6 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

by number of wins

1. Andy Sellman 2. Jeff Schall 3. David Boggs Michael Byatt 4. Joe Alberti

26 11 9 9 7

Arabian Leading Trainers

Half-Arabian Leading Trainers

1. Andy Sellman 2. David Boggs Jeff Schall 3. Michael Byatt 4. Keith Krichke

1. 2. 3. 4.

by number of winners

14 6 6 5 4

by number of winners

Andy Sellman Joe Alberti Austin Boggs Dagmar Gordiano Rodolfo Guzzo Christine Ryan Jeff Schall

5 4 3 2 2 2 2 Volume 44, No. 12 | 105


Overall Leading Owners by number of winners

1. Murray and Shirley Popplewell Jay and Barbara Krusenstjerna 2. Al Shaqab Stud Elaine Finney Claire and Margaret Larson

5 5 3 3 3

Arabian Leading Owners

Half-Arabian Leading Owners

by number of winners

1. Murray and Shirley Popplewell 2. Claire and Margaret Larson 3. Al Shahania Stud Jay and Barbara Krusenstjerna Cindy McGown and Mark Davis Roxanne and Jeff Schall

by number of winners

5 3 2 2 2 2

1. Elaine Finney Jay and Barbara Krusenstjerna 2. Robert and Janene Boggs Perry and Suzanne Perkins

3 3 2 2

Overall Leading Breeders by number of winners

1. Oak Ridge Arabians 2. Murray and Shirley Popplewell Barbara Sink-Krusenstjerna Varian Arabians 3. Hank and Sandra DeShazer Ruth and Michael Doe Elaine Finney Lawrence Jerome Tangle Ridge Farm Robert Williams MD and John Brown

5 4 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2

Arabian Leading Breeders

Half-Arabian Leading Breeders

by number of winners

1. Murray and Shirley Popplewell 2. Varian Arabians 3. Sharon Day Hank and Sandra DeShazer Ruth and Michael Doe Tangle Ridge Farm

106 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

by number of winners

4 3 2 2 2 2

1. Oak Ridge Arabians 2. Elaine Finney Lawrence Jerome Barbara Sink-Krusenstjerna

4 2 2 2


Thank you to a special horse and a salute to those who love him. TF Psymreekhe

Red Flame BRSB

Special Thanks to Andy Sellman and those at Argent Farms for the tremendous care and preparation you have given Spitfyre in your barn. His health and happiness is so important to us and your respect for him goes unparalleled.

2013 U.S. & Canadian National Champion Stallion AOTH 2013 U.S. National Reserve Champion Stallion 4-5 2013 U.S. National Top Ten Senior Stallion 4 & Over

Breeders Sweepstakes Nominated Sire • Scottsdale Signature Stallion SCID & CA Clear Proudly owned by and standing at Morning Sun Arabians PO Box 208, Crossfield, AB T0M 0S0, Canada • (P) 403.946.5292 MorningSunArabians.com

Volume 44, No. 12 | 107


Arabian Horse Times Leading Horses and Trainer of 2013 National Halter Champions and Reserves

Joe Alberti #2 Half-Arabian Leading Trainer & #4 Overall Leading Trainer Shaddo Magniphied #2 Overall Leading Halter Horse & #2 Half-Arabian Leading Halter Horse Maghnus Z+// #4 Overall Leading Halter Horse & #4 Half-Arabian Leading Halter Horse Shaddofax #4 Leading Sire by Number of Half-Arabian Wins

Rohara Arabians | P.O. Box 110, Orange Lake, FL 32681 | 352.591.4661 | rohara@windstream.net

108 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


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110 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


A name drawn from the Greek god Zephyrus, god of the west wind, black Arabian stallion Zefyr possesses an air of greatness much like his name suggests. From his rolling hand gallop to his charming personality on the ground, this stallion captivates all who come in contact with him. Laura Koch, along with her husband, Bert Sanders, have owned Zefyr (Sundance Kid V x Pattrice, by Pesniar) for two years, but Laura’s involvement with the Arabian horse goes back to 1989. A successful English rider and halter handler, she has been the recipient of many national championships; however, it wasn’t until recently that the western division became a part of her show repertoire. Laura offers, “My sister and I used to watch the western classes intently, doing a quick study of what we found to be desirable in the division. Before that, I really had no idea what they were looking for in the western division.” She adds, “My sister soon started showing with Jody Strand, and I would just go and watch and visit, and well, I soon ended up with my first western horse, Victoriosa, a Half-Arabian mare that was Canadian National Champion Junior Horse, caught-rode by Josh Quintus. I was also Canadian National Champion Amateur Western Pleasure with Victoriosa in my first year showing as a western rider. In addition, Jody rode my Half-Arabian gelding, Azavache, to the Canadian Reserve National Champion Junior Horse in the same class as Victoriosa. After that, I was hooked on western horses!” And then came Zefyr. At the time, he was with Katie Beck and turning into a very impressive Arabian western horse. “When I saw the horse, I just had to have him! Once I became more knowledgeable about what was required of a western horse, in my mind, I knew that Zefyr would be perfect,” Laura shares. As people speculated about this horse, he was predicted to be in the league of iconic western horses like My Tiffany—a horse that, for many people, is the model for a western horse. And now, this 12-year-old black stallion by Sundance Kid V, lives up to the incredible Varian breeding in his lineage. He is double Huckleberry Bey, double *Bask, and exemplifies all of the great bloodlines of not only great western horses like Desperado V and Ali Jamaal, but he goes back to El Magato, and also back to the great Mister Storm.

Volume 44, No. 12 | 111


ZEFYR

With a dynamite pedigree in his arsenal, Zefyr has lived up to his predecessors in his magnanimous show record. As the unanimous 2013 U.S. National Champion Western Pleasure horse, Zefyr gave trainer Jody Strand his first purebred open national championship. “That was definitely on my bucket list of things to do in my career. Winning unanimously and with such a good ride made it all the more special. He was just remarkable in that class. I was so excited about the performance. He stepped up and he was just an adventure; the whole thing was quite surreal.” It was this performance that sparked a great deal of activity in terms of breeding. “The fact that he won U.S. Nationals unanimously opened up a lot of doors. Everybody has always loved Zefyr, after U.S., he generated a ton of interest, especially at Scottsdale this year—a lot of people stopped by the stall. They see him in the ring, they love what they see, so they come by the stalls, and I walk back there and just kick the door

112 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

open and tell them to go on in with him. And they say ‘Really?’ He’s like a big dog. I would literally let my kids crawl around on him in the stall if he was lying down. He’s just a super, super sweetheart of a horse. And that probably sold as many breedings as anything—the fact that people could just go in and love on him and he’s not one that’s nipping or biting at you or grumpy; he just loves the attention.” From big wins to these sweet glimpses into his kind personality, Zefyr’s fan base expanded even further, giving even more people a chance to fall for this remarkable stallion. Well aware of Zefyr’s many admirers, Jody acquiesces a laugh and says, “Everybody just loves him! You know, kids love him, trainers love him, adult amateurs—he’s one of those that is popular across the board. Even people that show against him love the horse. I have been warming up for a class and one of my competitors will come up and say I love him—he is so cool.”


ZEFYR

Laura Koch and Burt Sanders

A BOLD BREEDING FUTURE As the future of this 12-year-old unfolds, the depths of his pedigree open up more and more opportunities. Besides heading to Canadian and U.S. Nationals this 2014 show season, Zefyr is breeding more than ever this year. This is an exciting feat for the stallion as he has just more than 20 foals on the ground. However, of this small group, one impressive offspring, Zees A Dallas Cowboy, has already excelled in the show ring, winning reserve national champion Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Horse with Jody. In addition, he was the 2013 Scottsdale Champion Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Horse. With about 25% of his foals being black in color, one of which being this young horse, the opportunity for beautiful black western horses is highly likely.”

In terms of what his pedigree denotes from a training standpoint, Jody shares, “I’ve worked with the Sundance horses, and they are pretty sweet, but not quite as sweet as this one. His temperament comes from his sire and dam. On his dam’s side, she is a Pesniar daughter. In my experience, the Pesniar-bred horses I’ve had have always been wonderful, sweet horses and will just crawl in your pocket. These Pesniar horses are also very nice horses, have great worth ethic, and are very strong and athletic, the one thing I loved about them. They weren’t coming up sore all the time. They were well built, put together horses. They tried. They have great work ethic, and Zefyr, being a combination of Sundance and a Pesniar mare, I think it is a really neat cross. We just got the whole cookie with him.”

Laura shares, “The horse has got a breeder’s pedigree. He’s a great horse and he’s beginning to sire great horses. And more than this, he’s siring great black horses. He’s also crossing well with both purebreds and Half-Arabians, so that opens up a lot of possibility.”

Already having bred around 15 mares so far this year, his foal crop for 2015 is more promising than ever. Breeders Sweepstakes, Scottsdale Signature, Iowa Gold Star, and Minnesota Medallion Stallion nominated, Laura and Bert are also offering some special incentives

Volume 44, No. 12 | 113


ZEFYR

Zefyr and Reserve National Champion progeny Zees A Dallas Cowboy (Zefyr x Kings Poco Blackburn).

in breeding to Zefyr. “We’re excited about getting Zefyr babies out there. And Bert is very enthusiastic, as he is in everything, about the horse. We’re both enthusiastic about not only having the horse in showing, but promoting him as a breeding horse and working with other breeders. So, when people want to breed a great western horse, we’ll be more than happy to work with them on whatever their needs could be. Enthusiastically. This is our first breeding horse and it’s definitely an exciting thing.” THE ZEFYR APPEAL In attempting to pin down exactly what sets Zefyr apart from the mass of western horses in the show ring today, it is helpful to consider him in the most classic sense. With a debonair demeanor and dashing good looks, he is a horse that stands on his own. In Laura’s eyes, he is as true as they come. “First off, not only is he true gaited, but he looks like an Arabian. It’s called western pleasure, and for him it looks like it is a pleasure. He uses his ears well and nothing about him reads mechanical. His conformation

114 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

and athletic ability allows for him to make a beautiful picture of a true western horse.” For Jody, it is Zefyr’s quality and ring presence that elevates him from the rest. However, more than his quality, extreme beauty, strength, and the other amounting qualities, people really seem to love his gallop. “If you watch a lot of classes, you’ll see horses jog and lope well, but when they start to gallop, a lot of horses tend to fall down on their shoulders as they open up and gallop and cover ground. They don’t free up. But when Zefyr gallops, he actually opens his shoulders and becomes a bigger mover. He starts rolling with his gallop and covers a lot of ground with ease.” Among Zefyr’s biggest fans, especially when it comes to the hand gallop, is Vicki Humphrey. She shares, “He has such fluid, free-shouldered movement at both the lope and jog. His gaits set a standard for the western discipline. Those gaits, combined with his great expression and quality make him a poster child for the breed.”


ZEFYR

A few more self-proclaimed Zefyr enthusiasts are Gary Dearth and Tamara Hanby Black of Tamar Arabians. Jody shares, “Gary and I have talked about the horse several times. He met me right at the gate when I came out at U.S. nationals and congratulated me and told me I did a good job with him. And Tamar is going to breed 5 or 6 mares to him this year, so that’s exciting.” Beyond his potential to build excitement and love for the Arabian horse, Zefyr carries a brilliant promise to bring some very dynamic progeny into the future of the western horse. Jody shares, “Zefyr has done a lot for me. Since he was my first open national championship at U.S., that comes with a

lot of recognition and appreciation. When I train and show him, I actually have to focus on a whole different level. I think I have taught him a lot, but he has also taught me a lot.” But Jody has to admit that certain aspects of Zefyr’s greatness are inherent qualities and things no trainer could have afforded him. “I would love to take credit for his famous hand gallop, but that’s just how he moves. I’ve trained Zefyr to do things and I’ve put some of my own buttons on him, but I can’t take credit for his athleticism, and that’s what makes him a great horse. You can’t train try, strength, athleticism, and heart.” ■

Volume 44, No. 12 | 115


NATIoNAl ChAMPIoN ZefyR+// PICTuReD wITh hIS ReSeRve NATIoNAl ChAMPIoN SoN ZeeS A DAllAS Cowboy+ (Zefyr+// x Kings Poco blackburn)

Sundance Kid V x Pattrice (*Pesniar/*Bask) Multi-Program Nominated Sire • SCID Clear Proudly owned by Laura Koch & Bert Sanders u.s. NatioNal uNaNimous ChampioN WesterN pleasure With Jody straNd

ferrara photo

Thank you to all the amazing breeders who are choosing Zefyr+// for their breeding programs!

Standing at Strand’s Arabian Stables 3625 Alice Rd, Toddville, IA 52341 • 319.393.4816 • mobile 319.360.5997 • info@strandsarabians.com • www.Strandsarabians.com 116 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


T U T T O

A R A B I

S P E C I A L

E D I T I O N

(QR Marc x Wieza Marzen)

2014 LAS VEGAS ARABIAN BREEDERS WORLD CUP

GOLD SUPREME CHAMPION MARE PRESENTED BY MR. DAVID BOGGS

Bred and owned by Michal贸w State Stud of Poland | On lease to Oak Ridge Arabians of United States W WW.MIDWE STA RA BIA N.C OM


AAS

(Eden C x Sempre, by Versace)

2011 U.S. National Champion Arabian Two-Year-Old Colt 2011 Arabian Breeders World Cup Gold Supreme Champion Junior Colt Arabian Breeders World Cup Champion Two-Year-Old Colt 2010 U.S. National Champion Arabian Yearling Breeders Sweepstakes Colt/Gelding


PetlaSerondella

Only Serondella

(AAS-Elishahh x EVHA Serondella)

Owned by Haras Serondella

Anna Marie

RA

(AAS-Elishahh x Jelable) Owned by Haras Serondella

(AAS-Elishahh x Overlook Jubilee) Congratulations to owners: Regan and Renae Rohl

Breeding information: Fazenda Floresta • L uciana Fasano lufasano@gmail.com • ( 11) 4013-6111 • c ell: 5511 9987-72352 • www .fazendaflorestaarabians.com


LLC

Fasario (Aria Impresario x RD Fabreanna, by Falcon BHF)

2012 Brazilian National Champion Colt 2014 Unanimous Scottsdale Reserve Champion

Standing at: GUZZO WORLDWIDE LLC • Phone: +1 (480) 361- 6926 • Fax: +1 (480) 361-6928 • guzzoworldwidellc@gmail.com w w w. g u z z o a t . c o m 2 • TuT To A r Abi | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


Alexandra

LF

(LLC Fasario x Pandora, by Hylan) Owned by Fazenda Floresta

Amelia

LF

(LLC Fasario x Phenycia AMW,

by Sharif El Johann)

Owned by Fazenda Floresta

Breeding information: Fazenda Floresta • L uciana Fasano lufasano@gmail.com • ( 11) 4013-6111 • c ell: 5511 9987-72352 • www .fazendaflorestaarabians.com Volume 44, No. 12 | TuT To A r Abi •

3


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Tower

of

P o w e r —C o n q u e r s L a s V e g a s

WiezaMocy

*

By Jeff Wallace

*Wieza Mocy is simply adored around the globe now by a countless number of fans and that, of course, includes: her breeders, Michalów State Stud of Poland, Janey Morse of Oak Ridge Arabians in the U.S. who has leased *Wieza Mocy for two years, and David Boggs, who has the honor of presenting this exotic young beauty in the show ring.

*Wieza Mocy (QR Marc x Wieza Marzen) started a winning streak in Poland when she was named Polish National Champion Junior Filly, and at four years of age, the winning streak continues. *Wieza Mocy, prior to the show in Las Vegas, had become a World Gold Champion Junior Filly in Paris, European Gold Champion Junior Filly in Italy, and in Poland again, Bialka Spring Show Best in Show winner. Gene LaCroix, importer of the immortal *Bask++, had this to say about this once-in-a-lifetime Polish Princess, “We first saw *Wieza Mocy in Poland at Michalów in 2011. She was a yearling and was very special. So special, we went back to see her three different times and she looked amazing each time. She was an extreme version of her great-grandmother *Wizja, who in my mind, was one of the most refined and elegant mares of all time. We were not surprised to hear that *Wieza Mocy had won the World Championship in Paris, and is now a Supreme Champion titlist at the 2014 Las Vegas Breeder’s World Cup Show.” In some very deep competition in Las Vegas, *Wieza Mocy was named Gold Supreme Champion Senior Mare—receiving perfect scores for head and type as well as having the highest number of points awarded at the Vegas show—and a

few days later at Region 7 in Scottsdale, she was also named Champion Mare. Like her great-granddam, 1977 U.S. National Champion Mare *Wizja, she is very regal and seems to always be the crystal clear choice—she is simply a gorgeous and glorious creature. A grateful and exuberant David Boggs emotes, “I have been so fortunate and blessed to have shown so many beautiful Arabian mares during my career, but never one I don’t believe, who represents a meaningful and deep-rooted past, the perfect contemporary look of the present, and the promise of the future as well, all wrapped up in one spectacular mare. I am so honored to be able to present this mare for both Poland and my dear friend Janey Morse who is so passionate about Mocy, as well as her stallion, Vitorio, who is standing this year in Poland at Michalów. This is all so amazing for everyone involved.” For Janey Morse, “*Wieza Mocy has touched me in a way no other horse ever has, not only for her kindness, beauty, grace and ‘power’, but for the ‘Pride of Poland’ she represents.” She continues, “We are all so honored and humbled to have the opportunity to represent Poland and share their treasure with the United States. It is an awesome responsibility that we hold dear to our hearts and pledge to do our very best.” *Wizja, with all of her worldliness and graciousness, has passed this on to her great-granddaughter. There is true humility at the core of greatness. *Wizja knew that, as does *Wieza Mocy, 2014 Las Vegas Arabian World Cup Gold Supreme Champion Senior Mare. ■

Volume 44, No. 12 | TuT To A r Abi •

5


avalon photos

w w w. A r A b i A n S i n t e r n At i o n A l . c o m

Sandro Pinha: 480.226.0001 Gil Valdez: 480.226.7357 Pam Donnelly: 480.414.8194 Cave Creek, Arizona 6 • Tu tto A r a b i | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


*Magnum Chall HVP x Major Love Affair

World Cup Champion Stallion 6-8

World Cup Silver Supreme Champion Senior Stallion with Sandro Pinha ... next StoP ~ U.S. nAtionAl chAmPionShiPS multi-Program nominated Sire Proudly owned by North Arabians • Contact: Robert North 619.992.9832 or Mike McNally 760.500.0792 • www.NorthArabians.com


World Cup Bronze Supreme Champion Junior Stallion with Sandro Pinha World Cup Champion 2-Year-Old Colt

*El Nabila B x Om El Beladeena

www.ArabianSoulLTD.com • SCID & CA Clear • Contact Sandro Pinha: 480.226.0001 or Gil Valdez: 480.226.7357


World Cup Gold Supreme Champion Yearling Filly with Sandro Pinha World Cup Champion Yearling Filly

... next StoP ~ menton

Ever After NA x Psyches Amber Dream

ScottSDAle chAmPion YeArlinG FillY (Sr.) ScottSDAle reSerVe chAmPion JUnior FillY reGion 7 UnAnimoUS chAmPion YeArlinG FillY

Volume 44, No. 12 | Tu tto A r a b i • 9


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Volume 44, No. 12 | Tu T To A r A b i •

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12 • Tu T To A r A b i | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


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For sales information on these fillies and other Enzo get please contact: Enzo Worldwide llc Auburn, California uSA 415.516.4255 info@enzoltd.com www.enzoltd.com

Volume 44, No. 12 | Tu T To A r A b i •

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WORLD CUP

THE 2014 AR ABIAN BREEDERS WORLD CUP THE STARS CAME OUT AND OUT AND OUT by JEFF WALLACE

There are truly nothing but great things to say about this year’s Arabian Breeders World Cup Show in Las Vegas, starting with the extreme quality of the Gold Supreme Champion Mare *Wieza Mocy (QR Marc x Wieza Marzen) and the Gold Supreme Champion Stallion *Hariry Al Shaqab (Marwan Al Shaqab x White Silkk). *Wieza Mocy is the crown jewel of the family of Wizja and *Hariry Al Shaqab embodies a series of legendary sires of significance in the Arabian breed.

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W

e are very fortunate in America these days, to have such a grand event that is so well managed and beautifully executed. Judges and spectators alike were treated to a group of horses of amazing quality and elite competition—there were world champions, U.S. and Canadian national champions, Scottsdale champions and international champions. International Judge Shannon Armstrong shares, “From a judge’s point of view, the level of quality in the championships on Sunday can be summed up with two words—Pure Joy! It was exciting to stand in center ring with all of those gorgeous Arabian horses. The board of directors are doing an amazing job with this annual show. “I remember heading to Aachen in September for the All Nations Cup Show which is a phenomenal experience in terms of excitement, quality of horses entered, its interesting social aspect, and so on, and

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now thanks to a handful of visionary thinkers, we have this same type of gratifying experience right here at home. Arabian breeders, owners, showmen, and enthusiasts from over 16 countries traveled from around the globe to share in this fresh and exciting experience in Las Vegas in April.” Judge, Steve Lieblang, concurs. "If you want to have a weekend where you can see some of the greatest treasures in the Arabian breed, and visit with some of the finest breeders, then you should definitely go to the Arabian Breeders World Cup! The quality across the board was very high and the mares were off the chart!" Board of Directors member, Scott Bailey adds, “I wanted people to be impressed and excited from the minute they walked in the door until they witnessed the last horse wearing roses exit the arena. I wanted them to absorb and enjoy the excitement and uniqueness of every moment.”


WORLD CUP

Judges: Shannon Armstrong (USA), Irina Stigler (Russia), Eileen Verdieck (UAE), Steve Lieblang (USA), Peter Gamlin (United Kingdom), and Vico Rocco (Brazil).

Arabian Breeders Cup Perpetual Trophy recipient Al Shaqab.

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Judy Sirbasku and Shawn Crews accepting the 2014 Ambassador Award for Thee Desperado.

It is a credit to the Board for continuing to stay true to this being a breeders’ show, offering an annual Breeders Cup to the high point breeder of the show. This year’s recipient was the heralded breeding program of Al Shaqab, member of the Qatar Foundation, Doha Qatar. Runner-up to the illustrious award went to the AJ Marino Family from Birmingham, Alabama. Anthony Marino of Marino Arabians professes, “We were honored to be runner-up to the winners of the High Point Breeder award, but mostly, we are very proud of our son AJ for breeding such beautiful and competitive horses for us to exhibit. The show overall was just a perfect experience for our family.” In addition to the Breeders Award, the show also acknowledges an Ambassador Award winner with this year’s honor going to the deserving duo of Judy Sirbasku and Shawn Crews. An important aspect to

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the Breeders World Cup, honor and respect is paid to great contributors to our breed. A lovely tribute to Thee Desperado and Arabians Ltd. kept the audience spellbound on Saturday, and on Sunday, Greg Gallún acknowledged his relationship with Lenita Perroy and the recent passing of the great Ali Jamaal. Beyond recognizing excellence, other highlights of the Las Vegas show included the ever popular gala known as the Breeders Bash this year, and beyond that, the shared experience of getting together to honor our breed and share in the beauty of the Arabian horse. Rosecrest Arabians owner Inga Applequist relates, “The classes at Las Vegas were very deep. I had an amazing time from watching gorgeous horses in the ring, and reuniting with old friends, to making new ones from all over the world. I will certainly be back in April 2015.”


WORLD CUP

Andy Sellman, Glen Schoukens, Ensync FMA, Michael Carpio and John Moore.

Our breed continues to go through cyclical changes. Therefore, it is so important to nurture the constant and positive, like this show, that are a part of our breed. Most everyone who walked away from the World Cup took away a positive experience unique to them. John and Cynthia Moore of Four Moore Ranch remember, “We were thrilled and surprised that the judges actually re-judged the junior colt championship rather than just going with who they chose the first time around. We are very proud breeders of our boy, Gold Supreme Champion Junior Stallion Ensync FMA, a look-alike son of national champion Eden C.” The judges’ exceptional job also did not go unnoticed by exhibitor and this year’s Handler of Excellence recipient, Andy Sellman. “The judges of this year’s Arabian Breeders World Cup should be used as an example of a cohesive, honorable and professional

Handler Of Excellence winner Andrew Sellman with Chris & Sonya Bickford.

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*Hariry Al Shaqab and David Boggs.

judging panel! Those of us who exhibited horses at this year’s show were treated to what felt as much like a level playing field as I can remember at any show. The judges came from different backgrounds, but consistently had one thing in common: giving honest, intelligent judgments to the horses presented to them. From my standpoint, that is the ultimate complement to the exhibitors who asked for their opinions.” And he doesn’t stop there. On the show, Andy had this to say, “I am grateful to the AHBA Board of Directors for putting so much thought into providing a venue where our clients can showcase their horses they care so much about. I truly feel that the World Cup show is helping create new enthusiasm for breeding great Arabians. It’s an exciting, upbeat, well-constructed event. Most all the people I’ve spoken with who attended this year are eager to return next year.”

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If the competition and results of the junior and yearling classes are any indication of the future of our breed, it looks bright indeed with: Gold Supreme Champion Junior Filly, Donna Molta Bella SRA (DA Valentino x RD Fabreanna), shown by David Boggs for owner Al Saqran Stud; Gold Supreme Champion Junior Colt Ensync FMA (Eden C x Miss Fame MRM), shown by Glen Schoukens for owners John and Cynthia Moore; Gold Supreme Champion Yearling Filly Pitonisia AS (Ever After NA x Psyches Amber Dream), shown by Sandro Pinha for owner Arabian Soul Partners, Ltd; and the Gold Supreme Champion Yearling Colt Conquest BR (Versace x Lee Anna PSY), shown by Greg Gallún for owner Conquest BR Partners, Inc. David Boggs of Midwest Training and Breeding, shares, “It is an experience of great pride and joy to escort horses such as *Wieza Mocy, *Hariry Al


WORLD CUP

AJ Marino, Bernard Joyce and Arabella M.

David Boggs, Donna Molta Bella SRA and Wayne Newton.

Lisa Markley, Pitonisa AS and Sandro Pinha.

Neil Braverman, Conquest BR and Greg and Nancy Gallún.

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Lifetime Achievement Award recipient Howard Kale Jr. with Board of Directors: Robert North, Robert Boggs, Larry Jerome, James Constanti, James Swaenopoel, Jeff Sloan, Murray Popplewell and Scott Bailey, and Wayne Newton with wife, Kathleen.

Shaqab, and Donna Molta Bella SRA into the World Cup arena in Las Vegas. These are icons of the breed and come from some of the greatest programs as well. I know they will make contributions to carry this breed forward in so many ways. It was rewarding and heartfelt to see them all be appreciated not only by well-respected judges, but by the spectators, too— such an exciting and fun event all the way around.” Sandro Pinha, Arabians International, concurs about his experience, “Pitonisa is one of the most exciting horses I have ever had the pleasure of showing as she is breathtaking, and we are all so happy she won. Onward to Europe with her now.” And Aria Arabians’ Jeff Sloan states, “Conquest is a rare colt in that he is not only complete and correct, but extreme as well. How often do you see all of

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those things in one horse? Also, it was an amazing show full of great quality horses, astute judging, and enthusiastic spectators. We simply can’t wait till next year.” With the final championship classes on Sunday afternoon, the family of Howard Kale Jr. was honored as 2014 marks their 75th year of breeding, showing, owning, and importing beautiful Arabian horses—the epitome of positivity and constancy. A wonderful film tribute from Darryl Larson Productions left not a dry eye in the house. Included was many wonderful Kale Family horses and special moments, and the footage of Triple Crown winning stallion, *Muscat was beyond spectacular. *Muscat, shown by Howie himself, was the first stallion to win the Triple Crown title in North America. After the viewing, Howard Kale Jr., this year’s Lifetime


WORLD CUP

Breeder Award recipient, along with legendary breeder Wayne Newton, spoke for a few moments on what the Arabian horse has meant to their family. It was a few moments when time seemed to stand still for all present. Howie’s young daughter, Joanna, sums it all up quite well, not only for the Kale’s, but really for all of us who have such a deep passion for this great breed. “Arabian horses have always been a symbol of honor, dedication, and hope: honor for the generations of horses and breeders who have come before, dedication to the current generation, and hope for the future. In the days leading up to the award ceremony, my parents and I talked about what it meant to us—gratitude, respect, honor, family, love. All the things that make a life worth living. For us, it was a manifestation of all of the hopes and dreams, tears and heartache, and, ultimately, profound gratitude that made the love and honor of the Arabian horse a lifetime passion, and a lifetime achievement. To everyone who shared it with us, thank you for being part of our lives, and part of such a magnificent breed.” It is safe to say, that the 2014 Arabian Breeders Cup Show in Las Vegas was somewhat magical for all.

Bernie, Jeff and Andrea Sloan, Tammy Graham and Rich Sloan.

Natalia Nieves and Son.

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The 2014 AHBA World Cup Show Apr i l 10 -13, 2 014 • Las Vegas, Nevada

Senior Stallions Supreme Championship

photo by Nawaf Al Johani

HARIRY AL SHAQAB

Senior Stallion Gold Supreme Champion and Senior Stallion 4 Years winner (Marwan Al Shaqab x White Silkk), shown by David Boggs for owner Al Shaqab, QAT.

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WORLD CUP

EL CHALL WR

Senior Stallion Silver Supreme Champion and Senior Stallion 5-8 Years winner (Magnum Chall HVP x Major Love Affair), shown by Sandro Pinha for owner North Family Trust, USA.

AL MALIIK

Senior Stallion Bronze Supreme Champion (Marwan Al Shaqab x Maya El Jamaal), shown by Andrew Sellman for owner Al Maliik, LLC, USA.

Senior Stallions Supreme Championship TOP TEN

ART DEKKO TT (Audacious PS x HC Amareea), B: Dale and Gloria Hotchkiss, O: Art Dekko Partners, LLC; BEY AMBITION (Regal Actor JP x Bey Shahs Lady), B: Lucy Whittier, O: Murray and Shirley Popplewell; BRIXX IA (Gazal Al Shaqab x Bella Versace), B: Richard DeWalt, O: Regan and Renae Rohl; SKORONEEK IA (Ecaho x BA Famous Lace), B: Rixhard DeWalt, O: Eric and Michelle Loftis; RD DYNAMO (Bey Ambition x TF Falconsimprint), B: Murray and Shirley Popplewell, O: Laura Koch and Bert Sanders; EF KINGSTON (Padrons Psyche x The Dreamspinner), B: Bruce Edwards, O: Kristi Hopp; COBRA LRA (Marwan Al Shaqab x Serenata Eljamaal), B/O: Ron and Laura Armstrong. Volume 44, No. 12 | TuT To A r Abi •

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The 2014 AHBA World Cup Show Apr i l 10 -13, 2 014 • Las Vegas, Nevada

Senior Mares Supreme Championship

WIEZA MOCY

Senior Mare Gold Supreme Champion and Senior Mare 4 Years winner (QR Marc x Wieza Marzan), shown by David Boggs for owner Michalow State Stud Farm, POL.

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WORLD CUP

RH TRIANA

Senior Mare Silver Supreme Champion (ROL Intencyty x Sylviah WLF), shown by Rodolfo Guzzo for owner Freeland Farm, LLC, USA.

VALORI TRF

Senior Mare Bronze Supreme Champion and Senior Mare 6-8 Years winner (DA Valentino x Satin Chall LL), shown by Andrew Sellman for owners Claire and Margaret Larson, USA.

Senior Mares Supreme Championship TOP TEN

KLASSICAL DREAM MI (Klass x Mustangs Magnum), B: Mulawa Arabian Stud, O: HRH Khaled Bin Sultan bin Abdulaziz Al Saud; GHAZALA EL JAMAAL (Marwan Al Shaqab x Foxbriar Parysel), B: Marlene Ann Rieder, O: Paul Anthony Clark; WC JASMINE (Pyro Thyme SA x Jullye Jones JCA), B: Cynthia Beck, O: Shamrock Farms LLC; MG SAFFIRE (Ffatal Attraction x Nouvelle), B: Mark Gamlin, O: Aljassimya Farm; EXQUISITE LADY BFA (ML Mostly Padron x BFA Bint Fahda), B: Cecil and Frances Butler, O: Frances Butler and Mary Lennon; WC GODIVA (Gazal Al Shaqab x JE Ali Selene), B: Holly Woods Dillin, O: Cindy McGown and Mark Davis; ESSENCE OF GOLD SF (Legacy of Gold x Essence SF), B: Michael and Janice Zierke, O: Dams of Distinction Partners. Volume 44, No. 12 | TuT To A r Abi •

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The 2014 AHBA World Cup Show Apr i l 10 -13, 2 014 • Las Vegas, Nevada

Junior Stallions Supreme Championship

ENSYNC FMA

Junior Stallion Gold Supreme Champion (Eden C x Miss Fame MRM), shown by Glen Schoukens for owners John and Cynthia Moore, USA.

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WORLD CUP

MISSION WR

Junior Stallion Silver Supreme Champion and Junior Stallion of 2011 winner (Marwan Al Magnifficoo x ATA Psyches Psong), shown by Andrew Sellman for owners Mark Sylla and Claire Larson, USA.

TITAN AS

Junior Stallion Bronze Supreme Champion and Junior Colt of 2012 (A) winner (El Nabila B x Om El Beladeena), shown by Sandro Pinha for owner Arabian Soul Partners Ltd., USA.

Junior Stallions Supreme Championship TOP TEN

BYZANTIUM O (Jaipur El Perseus x Clio Belize), B: oOne, LLC, O: The Jaipur Initiative, LLC; OLYMPUS CW (Magnum Psyche x Dyna HCF), B: Janice McCrea Wight and Alex Chrys, O: Francisco Cobo; EDISSON (Enzo x Monica PGA), B/O: Stricklin Stone Intl., Inc.; SOUL OF GAZAL SF (Gazal Al Shaqab x Veronica GA), B, Patti Scheier, O: Arabian Soul Partners Ltd.; CADANCE PA (Cavalli x Donatella), B/O: Pegasus Arabians.

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The 2014 AHBA World Cup Show Apr i l 10 -13, 2 014 • Las Vegas, Nevada

Junior Mares Supreme Championship

DONNA MOLTA BELLA Junior Mare Gold Supreme Champion and Junior Filly of 2012 (A) winner (DA Valentino x RD Fabreanna), shown by David Boggs for owner Al Saqran Stud, KAT/UAE.

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WORLD CUP

STAR OF AL ZOBAIR

Junior Mare Silver Supreme Champion and Junior Filly of 2012 (B) winner (Ajman Moniscione x S Rhapsody), shown by Greg Gallún for owner Sheikh Abdullah Mohammed Bin Al Thani, SHJ.

VALENTINO’S ANGEL MI

Junior Mare Bronze Supreme Champion (DA Valentino x Always An Angel), shown by Andrew Sellman for owner HRH Prince Abdullah Bin Fahad Al Saud, SAU.

Junior Mares Supreme Championship TOP TEN

MINWAH (Kahil Al Shaqab x LC Primavera), B: Mohamed Al SLitaiti, O: Aljassimya Farm; ROYAL SAMARA H (FA El Shawan x H Zandra H), B: Hennessey Arabian LLC, O: Cindy McGown and Mark Davis; EVENING SONG IA (Ever After NA x Cajun Spyce KBS), B: Richard DeWalt, O: Arabian Soul Partners Ltd.; JOI EL JIULIUSZ (Jiuliusz De Wiec x Enjoi E), B: Enzo Ltd. O: Cavallino Arabians, Inc.; RD EVERETTA (Ever After NA x RD Arietta Bay), B: Murray and Shirley Popplewell, O: North Family Trust; DURAR AA (Gazal Al Shaqab x Dafina AA), B: Ariela Arabians, O: Arabian Heights; BAHIA ALFABIA (ZT Marwteyn x ZT Shakgeromit), B: Grasso Gianluigi, O: Al Shahania.

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The 2014 AHBA World Cup Show Apr i l 10 -13, 2 014 • Las Vegas, Nevada

Yearling Colts Supreme Championship

CONQUEST BR

Yearling Colt Gold Supreme Champion and Junior Colt of 2013 (C) winner (Versace x Lee Anna Psy), shown by Greg Gallún for owner Conquest BR Partners, Inc. USA.

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WORLD CUP

GHAZWAN ALJASSIMYA

Yearling Colt Silver Supreme Champion and Junior Colt of 2013 (B) winner (Marwan Al Shaqab x Athina El Jamaal), shown by Giacomo Capacci for owner Aljassimya Farm, USA.

VITORINO DC

Yearling Colt Bronze Supreme Champion (Vitorio TO x Kharalisa BPA), shown by Alcides Rodrigues for owners Daniel and Fabiana Pastorino, URUG.

Yearling Colts Supreme Championship TOP TEN

EPIIC (AJ Thee Luca x Anastasiaa), B: Manuel Durini, O: Travis Training Center; VIVACE EM (AAS-Elishahh x R Arabella), B: Kim Accurso, O: Ryan Mason and Eric England; MC VULCAN (Vitorio TO x Lovins Khrush SSA), B: Ross and Marjeanne McDonald, O: Oak Ridge Arabians; PREMINISION SF (Baahir El Marwan x Im Fabulous SF), B/O: Shamrock Farms LLC; RD E-BEY (Bey Ambition x Magic Enchantment), B/O: Murray and Shirley Popplewell; SIR POGROM APA (Pogrom x Angellinah WLF), B/O: Arabian Park Arabians, LLC; NAYROZ ALENAYA (Al Raheb AA x Ophelie BPA), B: M A Shatila, O: Tarig Enaya.

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The 2014 AHBA World Cup Show Apr i l 10 -13, 2 014 • Las Vegas, Nevada

Yearling Fillies Supreme Championship

PITONISA AS

Yearling Filly Gold Supreme Champion

and Junior Filly of 2013 (A) winner (Ever After NA x Psyches Amber Dream), shown by Sandro Pinha for owner Arabian Soul Partners, Ltd., USA.

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WORLD CUP

VICTORIA AL SHAQAB

Yearling Filly Silver Supreme Champion

and Junior Filly of 2013 (B) winner (Farhoud Al Shaqab x Victoria II HPS), shown by David Boggs for owner Al Shaqab, QATR.

ARABELLA M

Yearling Filly Bronze Supreme Champion and Junior Filly of 2013 (C) winner (WH Justice x Bella Valentina FA), shown by Glen Schoukens for owners Anthony Marino and Anthony Marino Jr., USA.

Yearling Fillies Supreme Championship TOP TEN

VENETA CS (JJ Bellagio x MZ Briona), B: Platinum+, O: Charlene Bonneaudeau; DUTCHESS OF DAVINCI (Da Vinci FM x Duchess of Marwan), B: Sally Bedeker, O: FA El Rasheem Partners LLC; SWEET SENSATION BRSB (HK Keav Power x RA Nefertiti), B/O: Humberto Florezi; RA ANNA MARIE (AAS-Elishahh x Overlook Jubilee), B/O: Regan and Renae Rohl; BELLARIA CS (JJ Bellagio x Dark Angel GA), B: Chris Barter and Scott Mason, O: João Sorvilo; JUMAANA QF (Rohara Extrem Justice x Forbidden Love LL), B: Toni and Dennis Pierce, O: Al Sayed Stud; RA GABRIELLA (Trussardi x Challese LL), B/O: Regan and Renae Rohl.

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SIR POGROM APA

ATH Stallion/Colt Gold Champion

and ATH Colt 1- & 2-Year-Old winner (Pogrom x Angellinah WLF), shown by Jason Tackett for owner Arabian Park Arabians, LLC, USA.

VITORIOS AMORE

ATH Mare/Filly Gold Champion

(Vitorio TO x MP Danza), shown by owner Anthony Marino Jr., USA.

MI GRAND VALENTINO Freestyle Liberty winner

(DA Valentino x GA Mi Grandlady), shown by Alcides Rodrigues for owner Renee Leach, USA.

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WORLD CUP ATH Stallions/Colts - Gold: SIR POGROM APA (Pogrom x Angellinah WLF), B/O: Arabian Park Arabians, LLC; Silver: ROYAL MAESTRO (Pershahn El Jamaal x Aria Marchestra), B/O: Cindy McGown and Mark Davis; Bronze: OCTAVIUS NA (Ever After NA x Psylk Obsession), B, Robert and Dixie North, O: Michael Bills; Reserve: PINNACLE DESHA (Richteous x Om El Shadina), B/O: Hank and Sandra DeShazer. ATH Mares/Fillies - Gold: VITORIOS AMORE (Vitorio TO x MP Danza), B: McDonald Arabians, O: Anthony Marino and Anthony Marino Jr.; Silver: VICTORIA PRINCIPAL M (Vitorio TO x Diamond of Versace), B: Anthony Marino and Anthony Marino Jr., O: Thamer Abdullah Alkanhal; Bronze: ELENA ENIGMA SA (Trussardi x MC Sophie), B: Gary and Holly McDonald, O: Robert and Delma Koessler; Reserve: ENCHANTED SF (Ever After NA x Love Devine SF), B: Richard and Tamara Anderson, O: Norma Jean Abel. Freestyle Liberty - 1st: MI GRAND VALENTINO (DA Valentino x GA Mi Grandlady), B: Linda Mehney and David Boggs, O: Renee Leach; 2nd: EVG PILAHR (Pershahn El Jamaal x Palestyna), B: Evergreen Arabians LLC, O: Gallun Farms, Inc.; 3rd: FINESSA NA (Sir Fames HBV x Hafati Futurista), B: Robert and Dixie North, O: Pam and Mike Donnelly; 4th: JULIA ROBERTS (El Nabila B x Rohara Psultry), B: Rohara Arabians LLC, O: Gilberto Valdez; 5th: MONA LISA NA (Ajman Moniscione x EA Moneila Psyche), B: Mindy Peters, O: Renee Leach; 6th: WC GODIVA (Gazal Al Shaqab x JE Ali Selene), B: Holly Woods Dillin, O: Cindy McGown and Mark Davis; 7th: COBRA LRA (Marwan Al Shaqab x Serenata Eljamaal), B/O: Ron and Laura Armstrong; 8th: QA GADIEL (Ganges x MWF Donica), B/O: Dan and Laurie Olmstead. AHBA Futurity 2-Year-Old Colts - 1st: CESARI PA (Masquerade PA x Fadila POF), B/O: Pegasus Arabians; 2nd: MARSAI MARA (Selket Marque x Focus Vejora), B/O: Stonewall Farm Arabians; 3rd: JERICHO SWF (Jagger SWF x Ivory Lavita E Bella), B/O: Stonewall Farm Arabians, LLC. AHBA Futurity 2-Year-Old Fillies - 1st: ALTIMA USA (Rahere x RA Khansuela), B: Ever After Arabians, O: John Blincoe; 2nd: LADY FADORA PA (Cavalli x Fadilla PCF), B/O: Pegasus Arabians; 3rd: CHANTILLY LACE ORA (Vitorio TO x Raherra), B/O: Oak Ridge Arabians; 4th: OM EL BESHAYER (Om El Shahmaan x Om El Beladeena), B: Om El Arab International, O: Diane Brown; 5th: ISABELLA SWF (Ajman Moniscione x Ivory Lavita E Bella), B/O: Stonewall Farm Arabians, LLC. AHBA Futurity 1-Year-Old Colts - 1st: NADEEM AL GAZAL (Armir x Aria Eliandra), B: Desert Wind Arabians LLC, O: Mounir Shatila Trust; 2nd:

PHOENIX EEA (Shanghai EA x Psycily), B: Enzo Ltd., O: Dr. Philip Del Pozzo; 3rd: MONTANA MARJAN (Montana Firenze x Song of Marwan AF), B: Janet Aston, O: Montana Henke; 4th: MARZAL (Selket Marque x Miss Justina SWF), B: Chandler Marks, O: NMotion Equestrian; 5th: MC KHRAVE (Crave FF x MC Khardia), B/O: Ross and Marjeanne McDonald. AHBA Futurity 1-Year-Old Fillies - 1st: RD MARCIEA BEY (Bay Ambition x RD Marciena), B/O: Murray and Shirley Popplewell; 2nd: FANTASHIA PA (Freedom Pa x Cayanne PA), B/O: Pegasus Arabians; 3rd: CHALLINDAA RL (Magnum Chall HVP x Belindaa), B/O: Raegen Lurken; 4th: RAH TOPAZ (Rahere x Magnums Caress), B: Janice McCrea Wight, O: Janice McCrea Wight and Alex Chrys; 5th: ADIYA (WH Justice x Diya Forx), B/O: Hennessey Arabians and Psynergy Ent. & Dev.; 6th: BELLADONA PA (Masquerade PA x Fadila), B/O: Pegasus Arabians; 7th: SULTRESS ORA (Vegas DPA x Raherra), B: Oak Ridge Arabians, O: Carlos and Christiane Roizner; 8th: STAR OF VITORIO ORA (Vitorio TO x Star of Gaishea), B/O: Oak Ridge Arabians; 9th: DESIRE BEY FF (Crave FF x Aurora Bey), B: Ashley Shan Fyfe-Brown and Susan Fyfe, O: Doyle and Kate Dertell; 10th: BIANCA SWF (Jagger SWF x KFR Bay Elektra), B: Svenn and Deborah Mikkelsen, O: James Cains. AHBA Legacy Yearling Colts - 1st: RD BEYONNI (Bey Ambition x Miss Giovanna), B/O: Murray and Shirley Popplewell; 2nd: ULTIMATE EDEN BSA (Eden C x CR Sparkling Star), B/O: Kari Henderson; 3rd: PRECISION B (Pogrom x Promonahde), B/O: Robert and Janene Boggs; 4th: KHALIF SWF (WH Justice x Focus Vejora), B/O: Stonewall Farm Arabians, LLC; 5th: MAARIK (ZT Maewteyn x Marcaaysa FA), B: Riyan Rivero, B: Riyan Rivero and Greg Knowles; 6th: JUDAHH BEN HUR (Montana Firenze x Rubi N Roses), B/O: Madelyn Leeds; 7th: KAMAL SF (L A Karat x Celiah), B: Scarab Farms, O: Sara Bagg and Scarab Farms. AHBA Legacy Yearling Fillies - 1st: QR ANDREA (ZT Marwteyn x QR Jazmeen), B/O: Vicki Doyle; 2nd: LOVELLAWTEYN QF (ZT Marwteyn x Forbidden Love LL), B: Toni and Dennis Pierce, O: Stonewall Farm Arabians, LLC; 3rd: VINTAGE PSILK NA (Ever After NA x JA Psilk N Lace), B/O: North Family Trust; 4th: CHALLS GLORY (Magnum Chall HVP x Gameelah KA), B: Sharon & Max Warke, Shona Young and Olivia Cleary, O: K. & D. Dertell and Olivia Cleary; 5th: KHALEESI SWF (WH Justice x Shervasta), B: V. Huggins and Stonewall Farm Arabians, LLC, O: Stonewall Farm Arabians, LLC; 6th: ZENDAYA AF (Om El Bellissimo x HED Caramba), B/O: Angela Sellman; 7th: FLAMINGO FANTASY SWF (WH Justice x F Cognacs Fantasy), B: Stonewall Farm Arabians, LLC, O: Cindy McGown and Mark Davis. ■

Volume 44, No. 12 | TuT To A r Abi •

51


Breeding National Winners For Over 40 Years

Lollie, Lara and Dick Ames

Visit our website to find your next champion!

Mike Brennan, Breeding Manager • 612-202-6985 • mike@cedarridgearabians.com

ww w.Ce d a rRid ge Ara b ia n s.co m


SIRE

2014 Foals

SIR MARWAN CRF

X

SIR MARWAN CRF

X

TA MOZART

X

TA MOZART

X

A NOBLE CAUSE

X

POGROM

X

AFIRES HEIR

X

BASKE AFIRE

X

A NOBLE CAUSE

X

HH MAXEMUS

X

TA MOZART

X

TA MOZART

X

TA MOZART

X

AFIRE BEY V

X

TA MOZART

X

A NOBLE CAUSE

X

MAGNUM PSYCHE

X

A NOBLE CAUSE

X

SHF ENCORE

X

TA MOZART

X

AFIRES HEIR

X

NOBLE SUPREME CRF

X

NOBLE SUPREME CRF

X

A NOBLE CAUSE

X

A NOBLE CAUSE

X

(Marwan Al Shaqab x Ames Mirage) (Marwan Al Shaqab x Ames Mirage) (Kordelas x Marieta) (Kordelas x Marieta) (IXL Noble Express x Sweet Summer Fire) (QR Marc x Petla) (Afire Bey V x Brassmis) (Afire Bey V x Mac Baske) (IXL Noble Express x Sweet Summer Fire) (Zee Mega Bucks x Khabreah) (Kordelas x Marieta) (Kordelas x Marieta) (Kordelas x Marieta) (Huckleberry Bey x Autumn Fire) (Kordelas x Marieta) (IXL Noble Express x Sweet Summer Fire) (Padrons Psyche x A Fancy Miracle) (IXL Noble Express x Sweet Summer Fire) (Apollopalooza x SMS Forever Bay) (Kordelas x Marieta) (Afire Bey V x Brassmis) (A Noble Cause x Toi Jabaska) (A Noble Cause x Toi Jabaska) (IXL Noble Express x Sweet Summer Fire) (IXL Noble Express x Sweet Summer Fire)

DAM

TOI JABASKA

(Matoi x MC Jabaskolee)

EXOTIC ANGEL AB

(Ames Image x Carnello)

AM THORNY ROSE

(AM Power Raid x Al Marah Capricorn)

AM STARRY NIGHT

(AM Good Oldboy x Carmel Bythe Sea)

JULIETTA AMES

(Afires Heir x Toi Jabaska)

CRF BRIANNA

(DS Major Afire x G Kallora)

ARIAS ENDLESS SUMMER

(IXL Noble Express x Sweet Summer Fire)

ON TULSA TIME

(Undulata’s Nutcracker x Heir Spray)

STELLA

Grade Mare

GOLDEN’S LIL SUGAR

(Brennas Golden Dunit x A Twinkle In Her Eye)

NSPIRING JAZZ

(Hesa Zee x Sarabask)

AL MARAH SWIFT RIVER

(Al Marah Quebec x AM Dreamtime Girl)

MINDING PS AND QS (Hesa Zee x Sarabask)

AMES PATINA

(A Noble Cause x Olympia Bey)

AM HEAVENLY DESIGN

(Al Marah Horatio x AM Shining Sword)

HA SAHARA AFIRE

(Baske Afire x Oct Tassahara)

MARION AMES

(Brass x Afire Inmy Eyes)

VDF BELLA GHAZI

(El Ghazi x Amber Ring)

COLETTE AMES

(A Noble Cause x PWA Tusea)

AL-MARAH AMELIUS

(Bremervale Andronicus x Al Marah So Bellicose)

ALPHA PHI

(Phi Slama Jama x Desert’s Lovely Event)

COLETTE AMES

(A Noble Cause x PWA Tusea)

GLAMORIZE

(The Talk Of The Town x Beautiphi)

MADAME GHAZI

(El Ghazi x Daca La Baska)

LADY MACHINE

(The Mean Machine x She’s Superb)


UnanimoUs Gold sUpreme Champion arabian breeders World CUp YearlinG Colt UnanimoUs sCottsdale JUnior Champion Colt

Sired by Versace Out of Lee Anna Psy SCID & CA Clear

Proudly Owned by Conquest BR Partners, LLC Neil Braverman & Jeff Sloan Represented by Gallún Farms, Inc. Greg & Nancy Gallún ~ www.gallunfarms.com


CRA Looking for your next BROODMARE to produce an ENGLISH BABY, a young PROSPECT, or a FINISHED HORSE that is ready to wear roses?

CEDAR RIDGE IS THE FARM TO VISIT.

Contact Leah Boyd 515-520-7604 • leah@cedarridgearabians.com or visit our website for your NEXT CHAMPION! W W W. C E D A R - R I D G E . C O M

Volume 44, No. 12 | 173


What leading breeders are saying ... Caralyn and I first saw VJ Royal Heir while visiting Tish Kondas when he was just 2 years old. We were very taken by his extremely high-set long neck, his long legs, and extraordinary bounce in his step. He was aptly named—he had such a regal attitude. Later, seeing him presented by Joel Kiesner, just confirmed our previous thoughts. We have recommended this stallion to many of our clients for breeding, as well as breeding to our own mares. He is truly a Royal Heir. —Rob Bick and Caralyn Schroter, RBC Show Horses, LLC A fires H eir x MA GHAztA trot, by e l GHAzi

To see VJ Royal Heir is to love him. He is a beautiful horse with an ethereal elegance and big soft eyes that reveal his disposition. We liked this horse so much we purchased a full sibling in-utero, and bred to him. From a breeder’s perspective, he is by Afires Heir, a truly great sire, and out of an El Ghazi daughter. Huck/El Ghazi is the golden cross, and we are excited to now own his full sister. We can’t wait to see his foal! —Peter Conway, Conway Arabians

174 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

I have ALWAYS dreamed of breeding an English horse and thanks to Kelli Aguirre, my dream came true, and became reality when my mare foaled a VERY special filly a few weeks ago ... and she like all of his other babies sincerely ALL have that “SOMETHING EXTRA.” Royal Heir's get will surely take our industry to the next level in the English division. He is the complete package—not only are these foals SUPER athletic, they are as beautiful as our halter horses! —Kristi Waters

I was extremely excited to breed to VJ Royal Heir after I saw him show at U.S. Nationals. He has so much quality and talent. We love our 2014 Royal Heir colt and look forward to breeding to Royal Heir in the future. —Katie Burr


6 Generations of National Champion Sires!

Royal Heir is one of the most powerful and striking purebred English horses I have ever seen—he can do things that make my jaw drop! Believe me, you haven't seen anything yet! His combination of extreme English elegance and beauty, effortless carriage and raw power, will be his trademark and his legacy as his offspring begin to emerge into the show ring as superstars. —Joel Kiesner, Kiesner Training

2013 U.s. NAtioNAl UNANiMoUs CHAMpioN eNGlisH pleAsUre JUNior Horse Breeders Sweepstakes Nominated Sire AEPA Enrolled Sire • Region 12 Spotlight Stallion

Proudly owned by Southern Oaks Farm, Kelli Aguirre • Jupiter, Florida Standing at Kiesner Training, Louisville, TN • Barn: 865-984-5245 • Fax: 865-984-5246 Joel's Cell: 865-556-0413 • Ashton's Cell: 865-556-0412 • www.KiesnerTraining.com Volume 44, No. 12 | 175


English PAF HOLLYWOOD TOI AND EMILY MOORE

Unanimous Champion UPHA Challenge Cup Unanimous Champion Saddle Seat Equitation 15-18

AFIRE SIREN AND LESLIE GARVIS

Reserve Champion H/A English Pleasure AAOTR

PROPER ENGLISH AND JESSICA CLINTON DESOTO Champion H/A Country English Pleasure Open

REBEL LOVE MA AND LESLIE GARVIS Purchased at Scottsdale “Thank You, Kim Jarvis! We love him!”

POP MUZIK AND HEWS OLDHAM

Top Ten Scottsdale Region 12 Champion Available for Purchase

Vicki Humphrey, Jessica Clinton DeSoto & Gabe DeSoto Canton, Georgia ~ 770.335.6194 ~ VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com 176 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


at

Scottsdale 2014

MADISSON AVENUE AND GABE DESOTO

Reserve Champion Country English Pleasure Jr. Horse

BONFIRE ROF AND ANNA RAYBOURN Unanimous Champion Country English Pleasure ATR Available for Purchase

PROPER ENGLISH AND KEVIN MCBRIDE Champion H/A Country English Pleasure AAOTR

QUINTESSENTIAL FIRE AND VICKI HUMPHREY

Scottsdale Top Ten Country English Pleasure Jr. Horse Region 12 Reserve Champion

CARRY ON LOA AND LINDSEY CLAIRE FARNI Champion Country English Pleasure JOTR Champion Native Costume Available for Purchase

Volume 44, No. 12 | 177


Multi-ChaMpion and national top ten half-arabian english pleasure horse

B laz n T ime

Very gifted, beautiful and ready for any Open, Amateur or Youth PRICED TO SELL

Chris T Sloan Pension x Jeweled Spirit 2006 Bay, Half-Arabian Gelding Owned by: John & Sarah Thomas Contact Mike Whelihan: 253-224-4073 | Farm: 253-875-5033 6620 320th Street East, Eatonville, WA 98328 178 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


Multi-u.s. and Canadian national ChaMpion and reserve half-arabian Country english pleasure and driving horse

B eyond T he G lory SF

Multi-Regional, Scottsdale and Youth Champion; a winner for all age groups— Amateur, Youth and Open PRICED TO SELL

Cologne x Admirals Supreme Glory 2000 Bay, Half-Arabian Gelding Owned by: Diane Franklin

www.WhelihanArabianFarms.com Volume 44, No. 12 | 179


English fun! Lets Dance

Ridden and owned by Katherine Kirby ROL

2013 U.S. National Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 19-35

CP

Shenanigan

2013 Unanimous U.S. National Champion Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR Maturity 2013 Unanimous U.S. National Champion Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 19-35

Trained by: Stachowski Farm. Inc. | Jim Stachowski, Peter Stachowski and Ashley Roberts | Mantua, Ohio 180 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


My Allience

REA

2013 Leading Half-Arabian English Performance Horse 8-Time National Champion or Reserve Champion Half-Arabian Park Horse

Allience x My Diamond Girl

Owned by Shafer Arabians • Nancy Shafer, Gregg & Lotta Shafer West Farmington, Ohio

Volume 44, No. 12 | 181


- Gaining Momentum In 2014 -

The Arabian English Division

182 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


Based in the timeless performance element of the Arabian English horse, their abilities

are enhanced by incredible balance, cadence, flexibility, and lastly, in their ring presence.

Irresistible and truly one-of-a-kind, they have the beauty and talent to fill stands and wow spectators. The following pages follow the top English trainers and owners as they delve into everything the English horse signifies in 2014.

Volume 44, No. 12 | 183


Gabe DeSoto

- Vicki Humphrey Training CenterNumber of years involved with the Arabian breed: 16

performance. The breeding benefits, to me, are huge as well. As young trainers, we’re going to be scrounging for horses if breeding doesn’t bounce back. From a breeder’s standpoint, you get to see each individual horse go in the ring and perform. And that helps breeders evaluate more pedigrees and see firsthand what sort of success they could have for themselves. What saddle seat horse has made the biggest impact on changing the standard for the saddle seat horses? Well, I wasn’t around for him, but I’d have to say *Bask. Everyone relates their breeding program to *Bask, and in his time, he naturally sparked the evolution of a rounder, higher motion that we see in our English horses today.

In today’s world of showing, how are training techniques, vet work, and the number of classes each horse is shown in affecting our horses? Are their careers longer or shorter than ever? I think training techniques and vet work go along with each other. I think the harder we work our horses reflects how technical and specified the breed has become. You want more motion and more quality in order to keep up with what judges are looking for. But as a response to increased demand, instead of pushing them so much at tons of shows, we’re actually more specific in our training and selective in what shows we choose to do throughout the year. And it depends on the horse. Some horses are good for one class at a show and some can do a class every day and look the same. That’s what makes our job hard—figuring out how to specifically show each individual horse. How important do you feel the AEPA classes have been in making the saddle seat division grow? I think it’s a huge boost for our industry. To have a money class like that—it’s the only one out there with that sort of return. I think it’s great; I think it’s more about the horse, rather than who’s riding it and that’s what it needs to be about. It’s about the quality of the

184 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

There has been a lot of mention of removing pads from country horses, what are your thoughts on this? I disagree with removing the pads—I think the pads help our horses. They’re not aiding in motion as much as they’re helping keep the horse comfortable with a shoe on. It actually prevents thrush in a horse and helps keep the frog moist. There are a lot of benefits to having pads. Now wedges, I could agree with. But I don’t think that it would be very good for the industry. It is also a responsibility for the judges to pick horses that are truly country horses so we can place our focus in more beneficial directions. The walk has become a very instrumental gait in country classes. Why do you feel this is so important? Honestly, I don’t find it very important. I think it ruins the momentum of a horse show—people want excitement and the walk should be judged as a transitional gait rather than something that loses the best horse a national championship. Who are your all-time favorite park, English, and country horses? Favorite park horse is Appolopalooza. He was one of the greatest purebred park horses—we need more purebreds like him. I’ve seen videos of him and I’ve worked with several of his foals. For an English horse, ERA Moonlite Serenade—her junior English class at Buckeye and U.S. was so impressive. I had the opportunity of working with her and I truly love that horse. For a country horse, Rumina Afire.


Joel Gangi - Gangi, Inc. -

Number of years involved with the Arabian breed: 44

How important do you feel the AEPA classes have been in making the saddle seat division grow? I feel the AEPA class is very entertaining to watch and a blast to participate in. I’m not so sure the saddle seat division has grown. I would have to see the numbers to state that. What saddle seat horse has made the biggest impact on changing the standard for the saddle seat horses? *Bask. There has been a lot of mention of removing pads from country horses, what are your thoughts on this? In my opinion, that would be like asking basketball players to play in dress shoes instead of tennis shoes. Not a very smart thing to do. The walk has become a very instrumental gait in country classes. Why do you feel this is so important? The walk is a gait just like any other gait of the horse. Who are your all-time favorite park, English, and country horses? Park: *Prowizja, English: FF Summer Storm and Mark IV Escapade, and for country: Starbucks BF.

In today’s world of showing, how are training techniques, vet work, and the number of classes each horse is shown in affecting our horses? Are their careers longer or shorter than ever? I can only comment on my own training techniques. I incorporate a lot of conditioning and nutrition in my training program. I believe that contributes to the longevity of my horses show careers. Vet work contributes to the maintenance of the horses’ well-being. So of course, it is important. The number of classes a horse is entered and shown in affects our horses’ careers, but that is really a management issue and is regulated by the owners and trainers. It just makes sense that the more classes a horse competes in, the more wear and tear that horse will have on his body. I don’t have a problem with my horses’ length of career in terms of time—each horse is different and ages differently.  If you could breed one mare and one stallion to have a potential national champion purebred  saddle seat horse, who would you breed and why? Stallion: *Bask, and Mare: *Prowizja or Susecion. I feel those were the best two crosses in quality, athleticism, and consistency  ever, in the Arabian English breed.

John Golladay

- Cedar Ridge Arabians -

Number of years involved with the Arabian breed: 30 (my whole life)

How important do you feel the AEPA classes have been in making the saddle seat division grow? I think that it’s

Volume 44, No. 12 | 185


absolutely given breeders an incentive to try to breed as nice an English horse as possible. Since it’s a money class, it’s more appetizing for people to feel like they’re getting some of their investment back in the show ring, rather than just selling it. So from a marketing standpoint, it’s been huge. People like Tim Shea, Peter Conway, Joel Kiesner, the Ames family, and everyone else on the board have worked really hard to make it prestigious and I think that really helps as well. From an entertainment standpoint, it is equally as valuable. At the last few years at nationals, it has been the most exciting class.

Leah Golladay

- Cedar Ridge Arabians -

Number of years involved with the Arabian breed: 21

I love showing in it. I love the opening ceremony of the class; I love the energy of the class. It’s super exciting and I think it’s exactly what our industry is looking for. The entries have been great, the quality has been fantastic—I just think it’s a win-win for exhibitors and spectators. What saddle seat horse has made the biggest impact on changing the standard for the saddle seat horses? In the early days, it was *Bask who produced a certain amount of athleticism and type that we probably miss today. But in my opinion, as *Bask daughters crossed with Huckleberry Bey, that cross changed everything because it helped give strength along with extra flexibility, softness, and looseness that has brought our industry to where it is today. There has been a lot of mention of removing pads from country horses, what are your thoughts on this? I think that we’ve tried hard to make the horses as comfortable as they can be and obviously, it gets misconstrued with trying to add more talent. In my own personal opinion, we absolutely need to have pads on our country horses. I think it balances their feet, helps them at times find their feet, and can help with correcting an angle issue. I think if we took pads off our country horses, we would really miss a certain amount of finished motion it offers. It’s all corrective and it’s all beneficial. I don’t really think there are people out there using too many pads. If anything, I think people are using heavier shoes. Who are your all-time favorite park, English, and country horses? Park: Matoi, English: Afires Heir or Nabasken Afire, and for country: Rumina Afire.

186 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

In today’s world of showing, how are training techniques, vet work, and the number of classes each horse is shown in affecting our horses? Are their careers longer or shorter than ever? I think this depends on what your goals with your horse are. If your goal is to be competitive at the highest level, you’re going to have a lot more success managing your horse like an athlete. If you take great care of your horse and show in classes for a purpose (as opposed to showing in anything possible), the horse will probably have a good shot at a long and successful career. If your goal is to show in any class that you can, your horse probably won’t have as much longevity. I think it’s important to set a goal for each horse, and stick to a plan that sets you up for success.   How important do you feel the AEPA classes have been in making the saddle seat division grow? People are shopping for English horses right now! I don’t know if it has anything to do with the AEPA classes, but it has opened up the four-year-old year for our horses. Previously, I think a lot of people had their horses sit out their four-year-old year, not being sure they’d be as competitive against the five-year-olds.


Regardless, they’ve become my favorite classes to watch at U.S nationals. There has been a lot of mention of removing pads from country horses, what are your thoughts on this? Pads are used for many things besides making a horse trot bigger. A lot of horses need pads for soundness. I don’t think it’s a positive step for our industry. 

Vicki Humphrey

- Vicki Humphrey Training Center Number of years involved with the Arabian breed: 40

The walk has become a very instrumental gait in country classes. Why do you feel this is so important? I think it’s important for a country horse to walk, but I don’t think a horse should lose a first place ribbon in a class because it has a step or two of a jig. A judge can tell if a horse is wound up, I think the demeanor of the horse during the entire class should take precedence over a few steps of one gait. Who are your all-time favorite park, English, and country horses? My favorite park horse is Matoi. So many of the horses that compete in the park division today could show in the English division and be just as competitive. I was born too late to see the numerous *Bask offspring that won so many park classes back in the day, but I imagine them to be brimming with ability and talent, coupled with an explosive personality that makes them park horses to the core, too much for an English class. Having never seen those horses in person, I could be wrong about this, but I think Matoi is one of the last of that type of park horse. He’s 28 now, and if you saddled him up there’s not doubt in my mind that he would take off park trotting—a park horse through and through!  Plus, I love his babies! My favorite English horse is Second Editions Debut.  There will never be another one like her. I’ve never seen a horse light up in the show ring the way she did. She wanted to win as much (if not more) than her rider, and it showed in every step she took. My favorite country horse is Shock And Awe DSF.  He’s in our barn now, which is awesome, but I’ve always been a big fan. I love how framey he is and how happy he is doing his job!

If you could breed one mare and one stallion to have a potential national champion purebred saddle seat horse, who would you breed and why? Rumina Afire to SF After Shoc. Just a hunch. How important do you feel the AEPA classes have been in making the saddle seat division grow? It has been extremely important. The AEPA has maintained its integrity of purpose and rewards English talent. So many prize money programs give in to mediocrity as there are more numbers there. The AEPA classes reward specific effort to breed English talent and add a great deal of excitement and enthusiasm for breeders and riders.       There has been a lot of mention of removing pads from country horses, what are your thoughts on this? Assuming that this suggestion comes from the inability to distinguish the difference between an English horse and a country horse in the show ring, I can see no reason to penalize the soundness and comfort of the country horse because, 1. As judges, we cannot take a stand and refuse to tie an English horse in country despite the fact it may be the best horse, and 2. As trainers, we cannot ride each class

Volume 44, No. 12 | 187


according to its specs. If we rode the country horses softly, quietly and with ease, while adding more energy, speed, and enthusiastic energy to our English rides, we could preserve our divisions and not go to desperate measures like making more shoeing rules.

Joel Kiesner - Kiesner Farms -

Number of years involved with the Arabian breed: 40

On another note, we have been given a great deal of freedom with the new shoeing rules. I applauded the changes and was certain, as horsemen, we would shoe our horses thoughtfully and educate ourselves so as not to abuse our freedoms. Unfortunately, we have, instead, pushed the limits of the rules and have produced some heavy footed, anvil flinging, unbalanced horses. I realize this is part of the learning curve of being handed freedoms we never had before. I am in favor of a freer, lighter, easy moving Arabian and hope we move back in that direction. But lets not make our changes through more regulations. Let’s make them through education and remembering our goal of shoeing healthy, sound horses as well as talented ones. The walk has become a very instrumental gait in country classes. Why do you feel this is so important? Unfortunately, the ever-present pendulum continues to swing. When it finally finds a resting place, the walk will be a part of the whole, a piece of the pie that balances the class and the icing on the cake when it is a soft, easy walk that is true and flat footed. There was a time that the walk was totally disregarded and was used solely as a transition between the “important” gaits. Now, it seems to have become the most important gait and of disproportionate value. A slight “jig” at the walk seems to be one of those easy to identify faults, the same as a wrong lead for one stride, or a one stride break in stride. While these are all errors and must be considered, they are, in my mind, much lesser faults than a poor gait, too much speed, poor bridling, or lack of quality. I think a crooked walk with mouth gaping, hip twisting to the inside, or ear pinning, is a bad walk. An energetic walk, with a horse showing enthusiasm and a desire to work that results in a stride or two of a “jig” is now penalized much too harshly when the walk is otherwise straight, quiet mouthed, and soft. Seems we have to go to both extremes before we land in the middle. 

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In today’s world of showing, how are training techniques, vet work, and the number of classes each horse is shown in affecting our horses? Are their careers longer or shorter than ever? I think that it is all to the benefit of the horses. My recollection was that horses didn’t have near as long careers back in the day. Especially your big time horses; they only showed a couple of years, they won, and then they moved on. And now, we have horses that keep coming back for the highest level of competition year after year after year. And I think it has a lot to do with the care of their horses. Since, what people would call the “heyday” of the Arabian horse business, horse training has become much more humane. Horses are treated better from a training standpoint, from a horse husbandry standpoint.  We know a lot more about how to take care of horses.  The vet work has become a lot better. I think when sports medicine first came out, I don’t know that it always had the long-term, long range good of the horse at heart. And I’m not sure if it was because it was ignored; I think that they didn’t know what was going to happen. So now people know a lot more and it’s all taken into consideration. I think the proof is in the pudding that you see older horses going into the arena and putting on really brilliant performances. The other thing that you have to think about


is not only are they showing well into their teens and with brilliant performances, but they’re doing a lot more. They’re not just waltzing around the arena. They’re really putting themselves at risk and bending almost every joint in their body. And yet, they’re doing it and doing it better and with quieter, better training. There are, of course, some heavyhanded trainers even still at the top level, but generally you will see that their horses don’t last as long.  

same. From the rail and from being on a horse in the class, it’s awesome. We have more work to do, but we’ve got our foot to the pedal and we’re going to keep on going.    

How important do you feel the AEPA classes have been in making the saddle seat division grow? I haven’t done any research in the last couple of years, but in the first few years of the AEPA, we were looking at trends of registrations and we closely followed the horses that are actually in the AEPA, the English stallions, and their breeding was actually going up, albeit a little bit, they were going up while the trend in the rest of AHA’s registration were going down. Now that being said, I think that we still have a lot of work to do. I think that what we’re doing with the AEPA has the possibility to— well more than a possibility—make it almost a fact that it’s the best class at U.S. nationals. It is the most exciting; it has drama, the way the class is introduced, the music, the reverse order of the calling out for the money. There are just so many things that make it fun and exciting and people really love this class. So, if we can do that with one class, we can do it with another class. If we could do it with a couple of classes, we could do it with a whole session. Maybe we could do it with a whole show. I don’t know if it’s possible to do it with a whole show and keep up that level of excitement, but certainly we could do it for classes and sessions. So, I do think it’s wonderfully exciting. I do think that last year it was the best class that the AEPA has put on and I think that it’s possible to do better and certainly, that with the competitiveness in breeding now, the bar has been raised. And the only thing I wish is that we had more horses and more horses to choose from because we have better horses than we’ve ever had in the breed.  

There has been a lot of mention of removing pads from country horses, what are your thoughts on this? I don’t think it’s a good idea. If you’re a proponent of this, I think what you’re saying is that you just cannot educate or trust the judges. My first answer says that we’re doing a great job of taking care of them and showing them so that they last a long time. There are a lot of horses out there and there is a big market. It’s one of the biggest markets for the Arabian and Half-Arabian horse. And a lot of people have already spent millions and millions of dollars on the current country horses that are out there. So if you take $100,000 for a top-flight country horse, how would you like to be the guy that spent $100,000 on a really top-flight country horse because you love the way it looks, but one step further, it’s a horse that needs a wedge pad to look like that. And people love riding those country horses because they’re beautiful, they have a lovely way of moving, they’re easier to ride, and just sometimes a little bit more pleasurable than an English horse. You’re going to tell the people who have spent all of that money that we are fundamentally going to change that horse. And what they spent their money on is no longer there. It vanishes right before their eyes. I think that in a time when the breed needs all the help it can get with it’s marketability, it is such a huge risk to change all the horses you ride overnight and make every one of those horses less attractive.

We have to do something that brings people into the stands to watch classes. And if we can do that, then I feel like all this becomes more interesting, and more fun, and it will grow. For me, it’s the most fun thing I’ve ever done riding a horse. I’ve had a number of people tell me the

What saddle seat horse has made the biggest impact on changing the standard for the saddle seat horses? I’d say, *Bask did, and Afire Bey V currently, in the last ten years, changed it.

And I can see the argument already starting. But it is the loudest people that are saying to get rid of the pads. I don’t believe that it’s most of the people—I think it’s a loud minority. So yeah, they will all be the same, they will all be less attractive, they will all be less desirable, but I personally think that the answer is not to take that completely away. If we get judged as country horses, people will show country horses. It just needs to be laid out. Not only do you educate the judges, but you have to educate the exhibitors.

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The walk has become a very instrumental gait in country classes. Why do you feel this is so important? Well, I feel like the walk is important because it’s like a primary training gait for me. So usually, our horses walk. I can’t stand riding a horse that doesn’t walk, to be honest. If you’re going to spend time on an animal, then they need to be mentally relaxed, supple, and soft in their body. And so when a horse does not walk, it is a telltale sign that they’re not mentally relaxed nor are they physically supple and soft. And usually a horse that doesn’t walk isn’t moving through the bridle and following through with their stride.  Who are your all-time favorite park, English, and country horses? I’m going to say IXL Noble Express, Afires Heir, and Rumina Afire, based not only on performance, but how they breed.   

Tish Kondas - Showtime LLC -

Number of years involved with the Arabian breed: 33

In today’s world of showing, how are training techniques, vet work, and the number of classes each horse is shown in affecting our horses? Are their careers longer or shorter than ever? As a whole, I feel that we have a tremendous group of horses, horsemen,

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vets, farriers, owners, exhibitors, and breeders that keep a watchful eye on making sure that the horses come first! Meaning the following: training techniques are constantly evolving because our horses’ mental and physical abilities do. Vetting within reason is important and necessary to insure comfort of these royal animals. And knowing how many classes and how much your horse can handle is a responsibility and purely based on each horse individually. This has and should continue to lengthen a horses show career. How important do you feel the AEPA classes have been in making the saddle seat division grow? The AEPA classes are making a huge impact on the saddle seat division. It is a wonderful way to see future English potential, the prize money is a big incentive for owners, and it is a wonderful way to display our breeding programs! There has been a lot of mention of removing pads from country horses, what are your thoughts on this? The removal of pads in any division is absurd! Pads are first and foremost designed for a horse’s support and every division uses them. Having pads on a hunter certainly doesn’t make it English, nor will having them on a country horse make it into an English or a park horse. It will, however, cause lameness issues for horses with unbalanced feet or horses that lose shoes and rip half of their foot off and need the pads to make up the difference in length. I don’t think that any of us want to watch horses flip their feet in the ring either … it is 2014! The walk has become a very instrumental gait in country classes. Why do you feel this is so important? I feel that the walk has too much emphasis placed on it. I do believe that country horses should flat walk and be mannerly; however, I don’t feel that it should be what makes or breaks a class. No one ever congratulates you on your national championship walk. Who are your all-time favorite park, English, and country horses? Park: PF Emotion, English: Cool Night, and for country: Americanbeautie.


Steve and Diana Lazzarini - BL Ranch -

Number of years involved with the Arabian breed: Steve, 27, and Diana 35

In today’s world of showing, how are training techniques, vet work, and the number of classes each horse is shown in affecting our horses? Are their careers longer or shorter than ever? I feel that we have come a long ways in the care AND training of our show horses. I think of them the same as professional  athletes. The advance of sports medicine in general has helped our horses have longer and more comfortable careers. The horses are benefiting from things like Lasers and Magnetic Therapy that just were not available to us a decade ago.I think the veterinary care and technology have come ten-fold since we started in this business. We are all blessed to have some great practitioners call Arabians their horse of choice.   I think we have too many classes and possibly show these incredible animals too much. My theory is, they only have so many times  around that ring before  their  show career ends, at a certain level. There are some horses though that just love to show, and as long as they are healthy and sound, that is fine, as long as they are managed correctly. I think the individual horse will tell you when they are done, but we must be responsible enough to know when it is  time to retire them.

If you could breed one mare and one stallion to have a potential national champion purebred saddle seat horse, who would you breed and why? IXL Noble Express to Rumina Afire.   I might be a little bias here, but Rumina Afire has been  bred to eight different stallions to date, and we will introduce her to two new stallions this year. ALL of the foals have been square trotting individuals with extreme cadence, but the IXL Noble Express cross is just a bit prettier and a bit flashier. Don’t get me wrong, we have a nice group of offspring to compare and see the traits of the various stallions, and I am proud to have bred ALL of them. There has not been a bad one yet, in my opinion, and I know that there are others in the industry that will agree. The offspring’s show records support this statement 100%. It is important to remember, not all great show horses make great breeding animals, but in this case, Rumina Afire has outdone herself without question. In the end, I feel that it’s about the mare 70%, so thank you AHA for embryo transfers!   How important do you feel the AEPA classes have been in making the saddle seat division grow? As a breeder of performance horses, we understand that it is not a quick fix in the breeding game. It takes time for a program to grow and prove itself. I think the AEPA has helped immensely in putting not only the excitement back in the arena, but it is also getting people to breed quality back in our industry. People have the AEPA in mind as a goal for their young horses to be on stage early in their careers, without having to be absolutely perfect. Any time you have prize money within reach, everybody is excited!   What Saddle Seat horse has made the biggest impact on changing the standard for the saddle seat horses?  Afires Heir.   There has been a lot of mention of removing pads from country horses, what are your thoughts on this? Without question, I feel that whatever we can do to help the comfort of our horses, and aid in their performance, we should do it, but I don’t think removing the pad is the answer.

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The walk has become a very instrumental gait in country classes. Why do you feel this is so important? I think it is a gait that is missed often in judging our horses. It is easy to rev a horse up and have it look through the bridle and trot high, but it is harder to have that same horse calm down and flat walk with ease. The other problem I have is that so many of our country and English horses fail to bridle properly during the class. We need to judge the horses according to rules set forth, not just that fancy horse up front. A balanced and cadenced horse should always place higher than the big fancy horse up front that is missing those traits during the class. Who are your all-time favorite park, English, and country horses? MHR Nobility, Mac Bask, and Rumina Afire.

Gregg Shafer - Siemon Stables -

Number of years involved with the Arabian breed: 42

If you could breed one mare and one stallion to have a potential national champion purebred saddle seat horse, who would you breed and why? The stallion is an easy pick because we had Allience for ten years and that was our breeding program. The mare is important also, but that’s a tough one to answer because he’s crossed with so many lines so well when we used him. The main thing we like is a back-end on a horse. So that’s why we had Allience and that’s why we have Ronde Vu, because they put back-ends on their progeny.  How important do you feel the AEPA classes have been in making the saddle seat division grow? I believe they are a huge help. I like that they go to four years of age and from what I’ve heard, a great deal of last year’s entries sold.  Some of them for good money, so it seems to be generating a market for English horses.    What saddle seat horse has made the biggest impact on changing the standard for the saddle seat horses?  *Bask. There has been a lot of mention of removing pads from country horses, what are your thoughts on this? I’m not opposed to the pads, but they do give some cushion to the horse. I think maybe the shoe weight ought to be restricted rather than removing the pads altogether. The walk has become a very instrumental gait in country classes. Why do you feel this is so important? I think in country it is important, because these horses are supposed to go relaxed and fluid. And the walk shows that they do have manners, and the original reason for country was for these horses that were more relaxed and not as high-trotting. I think that is one class where the walk is an important gait.

In today’s world of showing, how are training techniques, vet work, and the number of classes each horse is shown in affecting our horses? Are their careers longer or shorter than ever? I think the training techniques have advanced over the years and so have the advancements in veterinary medicine. When both of them are used correctly, it does further the horse’s career. We don’t show our horses a lot, maybe one or two classes at a show. And yeah, English horses especially.   

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Who are your all-time favorite park, English, and country horses? For a park horse, this might seem strange since I had My Allience and Allience, but I also had Matta Royale, so I’ve got to pick her. She’s the horse that won my first national championship on and I was also the first amateur to win an open park national championship. And my all-time favorite English horse, I’d have to say is FF Summer Storm. For country, I’m going with Alicia CA. 


Matthew Siemon -Siemon Stables -

Number of years involved with the Arabian breed: 30

What saddle seat horse has made the biggest impact on changing the standard for the saddle seat horses? For me, Afire Bey V has made the biggest impact on changing the standard for the saddle seat horse. There has been a lot of mention of removing pads from country horses, what are your thoughts on this? I feel that would not be beneficial for the country horses because some country horses need the support to prevent injury and to help them trot properly. Trainers and farriers are knowledgeable enough to only put on their horse what they need and can handle. The walk has become a very instrumental gait in country classes. Why do you feel this is so important? A true country horse should be calm and relaxed at all gaits, and that includes the walk. The walk will show how calm and relaxed the horse really is.

In today’s world of showing, how are training techniques, vet work, and the number of classes each horse is shown in affecting our horses? Are their careers longer or shorter than ever? I think the training and vet work techniques are a lot more advanced than they used to be allowing for effective and more progressive training and vet work for the horses. As opposed to the past, I think people are becoming more aware of the amount of classes they show their horses in and are starting to show in fewer classes. Because of that, their careers are longer.

Who are your all-time favorite park, English, and country horses? Park: Supreme Decision, English: HBB, and in country: He’s the Berries. I have been very blessed to work with Supreme Decision and He’s the Berries in my career as a trainer.

Jacque Thompson

- Smoky Mountain Park Arabians -

If you could breed one mare and one stallion to have a potential national champion purebred saddle seat horse, who would you breed and why? There are a lot of stallions in our breed that I would breed to. When picking a stallion, I look for a stallion that is athletic, has a good mind, beauty, strong hindend, and one that has already proven it can produce successfully.   How important do you feel the AEPA classes have been in making the saddle seat division grow? This class has helped to promote breeding for English horses. It showcases talented young horses; therefore, making people excited about English horses and their sires. That is important because it allows spectators to see firsthand the horses work and perform.

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In today’s world of showing, how are training techniques, vet work, and the number of classes each horse is shown in affecting our horses? Are their careers longer or shorter than ever? Recently I have had occasion to talk to a number of small breeders and little known Arabian horse enthusiasts who are often mainly interested in the saddle seat divisions. If there is a common complaint among them, it is that the small classes at our shows and their lack of participation in them is related to our shoeing and training techniques.     If you could breed one mare and one stallion to have a potential national champion purebred  saddle seat horse, who would you breed and why? Baske Afire Revue SMP is currently in training with Jimmy Stachowski and so breeding her is not practical, but if I only could breed one stallion to one mare to produce that national champion saddle seat purebred Arabian, I would bring her home and breed her to The Renaissance.     How important do you feel the AEPA classes have been in making the saddle seat division grow? The AEPA classes have been of great importance to us here at Smoky Mountain Park Arabians as the Yearling In-Hand class at the Buckeye has given us a place to promote our breeding program through the foals produced the year before.     There has been a lot of mention of removing pads from country horses, what are your thoughts on this? I am happy to show Smoky Mountain Park Arabians horses with or without pads; however, there are some reasons to have a class of English horses without pads. First, people investigating our breed often find it difficult to determine if a class in the show ring is a country English pleasure class or an English pleasure class unless they are aware of the class number and refer to the program. It may be that losing the pads in the country class could help them detect a difference. Second, it could be that losing the pads could bring some of the sport horse enthusiasts back into the saddle seat world.  I know a lot of saddle seat people are not in favor of this, but perhaps everyone could benefit if there was a class that could help to unify us into one arena once in a while.   The walk has become a very instrumental gait in country classes. Why do you feel this is so important? I think the walk is important in all pleasure horse divisions because it shows a horse is willing to relax. Now this is going to be controversial, but I also think the flat walk is a waste of time in the park division.  

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Cathy Vincent - Adandy Farm -

In today’s world of showing, how are training techniques, vet work, and the number of classes each horse is shown in affecting our horses? Are their careers longer or shorter than ever? Well, I think we’ve all become better trainers and I think that the owners have become better owners as well. We have realized that we’re asking these horses to do an enormous amount at a high level of performance. And the vets are amazing. If allowed, we can keep our horses going for a long time as long as they are taken care of and well preserved. So, I think it’s definitely made the English performance horse excel. There’s no question about it, they’re a heck of a lot better now than they were 20 years ago. So I think with all of those things combined, with the veterinarians, the good trainers, and the amount of classes horses show in, we don’t need to over-show our horses. We’ve all been there, done that, and we all know that it’s not very good for a horse, especially an English performance horse. Those horses are like racehorses.  They’re expected to go in and perform at a high level.  They can’t do it in 40 classes a show, so I don’t believe in that.    If you could breed one mare and one stallion to have a potential national champion purebred  saddle seat horse, who would you breed and why? Well I’m a little partial to Gitar MF, and I’d breed him to Spectra PR.


How important do you feel the AEPA classes have been in making the saddle seat division grow? Absolutely extremely influential. This has been a thing that we all sat around at the Buckeye years and years ago and I talked to Jimmy, and Jimmy talked to Joel and Brian, and by the time we got done at the Buckeye, I think there was about $20,000 already donated to it, and look what it has become. It is a powerful entity. It is big money and it is definitely helping us breed and market. There is no doubt that it’s been very influential and very important in the growth of the Arabian English pleasure horse. It is also exciting for the crowd and I’m so glad that they’ve combined it with the U.S. national championships so many people can be witness to it.    What saddle seat horse has made the biggest impact on changing the standard for the saddle seat horses?  It would have to be Afire Bey V. It just has to be. He has put forth so many great ones in his 20 some years of being a breeding horse—it’s just amazing.    There has been a lot of mention of removing pads from country horses, what are your thoughts on this? I think they need to leave well enough alone. If they keep changing the showing rules, these poor animals are never going to get it figured out and neither are the exhibitors and farriers. They need to leave things be. These horses are not getting injured—they’re absolutely magnificent. I mean, at Scottsdale last year when I judged, I’d never seen such beautiful moving horses in my life and none of them looked like they were laboring or having a problem. They all looked comfortable and happy. And I don’t believe tinkering around with the shoeing rule is going to change anything. The walk has become a very instrumental gait in country classes. Why do you feel this is so important? Well it’s always been an influential gait. A country pleasure horse must walk and be quiet and comfortable, and walk at a true, four beat walk. It’s part of the class specs and is very important. If they’re rammed up in the bridle, not happy, and they’re not walking, then they’re not country horses.  As far as the loose rein walk, I’d like to see a horse with a relaxed neck, a looser rein, but still walking up to the bridle.  They bend their necks down, they don’t put their heads upside down, and they don’t trip over their reins. I don’t like to see people walking

horses on a loose rein on the buckle. It’s not a very good idea for a horse in two bits and a full bridle; I just don’t believe in that.  For me, I like to see the rider just drop their hands down, loosen up their rein, let the horses relax their neck, quiet their mouth, and walk along at a four beat walk.  Who are your all-time favorite park, English, and country horses? Park: Sophisticated Lady. English: Hucklebey Berry, Tim Shea, Gene LaCroix, and Bob Battaglia all did a fabulous job with him throughout his life. He was magnificent and to die for to watch.  I don’t know what to say about country horses; there are so many great ones. I rode a really good one named AH Alexandra. She was the daughter of *Pesniar and she won probably national champion three or four times in that division and was a big, beautiful chestnut mare. She’s long gone now, but I do love that mare. And she just kept going, and going, and going.

Mike Whelihan - Whelian Farms -

Number of years involved with the Arabian breed: 45

In today’s world of showing, how are training techniques, vet work, and the number of classes each horse is shown in affecting our horses? Are their careers longer or shorter than ever? Good, solid training technique never goes out of style. The horse’s show careers are longer due to better horsemanship; they show in about the same number of classes.

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How important do you feel the AEPA classes have been in making the saddle seat division grow? The class is interesting to watch, but I haven’t seen much growth in the English division because of it yet. If you could breed one mare and one stallion to have a potential national champion purebred  saddle seat horse, who would you breed and why? I would use Pension for heart and roundness of motion and any pretty Afire Bey V-bred mare. The walk has become a very instrumental gait in country classes. Why do you feel this is so important? Horse show classes were put in place to simulate what the horse was used for in the past. The walk in country is very important as you would want a good walking horse to go for a nice ride out in the country. Who are your all-time favorite park, English, and country horses? Zodiac Matador, Pension, and Prim N Proper—all three have many national championships to their credit.

Shan Wilson - Chrishan Park -

Number of years involved with the Arabian breed: 37

more breeding activity in terms of the numbers of foals produced per year yet. What saddle seat horse has made the biggest impact on changing the standard for the saddle seat horses? Afire Bey V. He’s got so many babies showing out there right now, jis reach is just incredible. There has been a lot of mention of removing pads from country horses, what are your thoughts on this? I certainly think that sometimes pads are necessary to help get the shoeing more balanced on a horse. I feel like we’re always changing something maybe just for the sake of changing it. I’d rather see it left alone, but on the other hand, tell me what the rules are and I’ll play by them. Everyone will be on the same playing field, so it doesn’t really matter, but I’ve seen the benefits of wedge pads in low-heeled horses, and to take that away, it might not be the best thing. The walk has become a very instrumental gait in country classes. Why do you feel this is so important? I definitely think that we have to separate our country horses from our English horses and that is one way—to make them more quiet and relaxed and able to display that. However, sometimes to get a really showy country horse to walk and walk off on a loose rein, you have to take a lot of energy out of the horse somehow. Usually that means lunging or riding a lot, which thereby jeopardizes the soundness and also taking a bit of the show out of the horse. So, yes, it is a way that we can differentiate, but I also see it causing us to overwork our horses. Who are your all-time favorite park, English, and country horses? SA Sophisticated Lady for a park horse. She’s amazing. She can carry an awful lot of speed and still hold a really cool frame.

If you could breed one mare and one stallion to have a potential national champion purebred saddle seat horse, who would you breed and why? CSP Grand Caymon to Bel Heir LR. How important do you feel the AEPA classes have been in making the saddle seat division grow? I like the concept and idea behind the class. I’m not sure it’s stimulated much

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For English, I would have to say Second Edition’s Debut. She was such a fun horse to show—she used her ears so well and every time we hit the show ring, she was intense and so dynamic. I don’t know the actual total of national championships she had, but it was somewhere around 65. She was in the winner’s circle with roses on her neck so many times—it was really unbelievable. And in country, Wash My Socks. He’s 3/4 Saddlebred, so even though we don’t show him in Arabian shows, he has won the country championship at National Show Horse Finals several years in a row. Just a super great country horse.


- 2013 -

National English Performance Leaders

Includes U.S., Canadian and Youth National English Champion and Reserve wins. AEPA Saddle Seat Futurity, English Pleasure, Country English, and Park Horse classes. Open and amateur/junior classes only.

Overall arabian & Half-arabian leading HOrses by number of wins 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Afireandbrimstone SCA REA My Allience Summer Temptation Natalie Woods BF CP Shenanigan Defying Gravity RGS Emperors Fire GSF Alejandro Majic Trick SA Sophisticated Lady Strickly Business Toi Slamtastic CRF

3 championships, 1 reserve 2 championships, 2 reserves 2 championships, 1 reserve 1 championship, 2 reserves 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships

arabian leading HOrses by number of wins

1. Afireandbrimstone SCA 2. Summer Temptation 3. CP Shenanigan Defying Gravity RGS Strickly Business 4. A Tempting Grace Born Of Fire WL Heir To Motion KW Hero Noble Way Ronde Vu

Kenneth and Susan Knipe Nancy Shafer and Gregg Shafer Mark and Deborah Himmel Boisvert Farms LLC Katherine Kirby Cheryl Doran Starline Arabians LLC Bill Castro Cynthia Labrecque Mike and Jessica Medved Michael and Jenny Lau Janice and Laura Morton

Owner 3 championships, 1 reserve 2 championships, 1 reserve 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 1 championship, 1 reserve 1 championship, 1 reserve 1 championship, 1 reserve 1 championship, 1 reserve 1 championship, 1 reserve 1 championship, 1 reserve

Half-arabian leading HOrses by number of wins

1. REA My Allience 2. Natalie Woods BF 3. Emperors Fire GSF Alejandro Majic Trick SA Sophisticated Lady Toi Slamtastic CRF 4. DA Slim Shady Halsteads Watchme KRA Afire Song Lady Marmalade RTA Miss Jewely My Name Is Earl RH Gladiator Sal Mineo Siereusly Hot WH

Owner

2 championships, 2 reserves 1 championship, 2 reserves 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 1 championship, 1 reserve 1 championship, 1 reserve 1 championship, 1 reserve 1 championship, 1 reserve 1 championship, 1 reserve 1 championship, 1 reserve 1 championship, 1 reserve 1 championship, 1 reserve 1 championship, 1 reserve

Kenneth and Susan Knipe Mark and Deborah Himmel Katherine Kirby Cheryl Doran Michael and Jenny Lau Allison and Hennasey Zimmerman Kimberly and Linda Misco Jill Nelson Kingswood Farms Conway Arabians, Inc. Nancy Shafer and Gregg Shafer Owner Nancy Shafer and Gregg Shafer Boisvert Farms LLC Starline Arabians LLC Bill Castro Cynthia Labrecque Mike and Jessica Medved Janice and Laura Morton Michelle Rickert Jenna Tekolste Patrick and Emma Kendrick Kellie Aguirre Lisa Jo White Texie Lowery Debra and Ken Smith Boisvert Farms LLC Mary Catherine Ellis

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arabian Overall leading sires

by number of winning get

by number of wins

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Afire Bey V 20 Baske Afire 16 Mamage 9 Afires Heir 7 Apollopalooza (deceased) 5

arabian leading sires

Afire Bey V Baske Afire Mamage Afires Heir A Temptation

25 17 15 8 7

by number of Arabian winning get

by number of Arabian wins

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

1. Afire Bey V 16 2. Afires Heir 8 Baske Afire 8 3. A Temptation 7 4. Apollopalooza (deceased) 6

Afire Bey V 12 Baske Afire 8 Afires Heir 7 Apollopalooza (deceased) 5 A Temptation 4 IXL Noble Express 4

by number of Half-Arabian winning get 1. Afire Bey V Baske Afire 2. Mamage 3. KRA Afire Works Nobilistic BF SF Aftershoc

8 8 6 3 3 3

by number of Half-Arabian wins 1. Mamage 2. Afire Bey V Baske Afire 3. Allience 4. Ariberry Bey V KRA Afire Works

11 9 9 5 4 4

Overall leading Open Trainers by number of horses

1. Joel Gangi 2. Jim Stachowski 3. Joel Kiesner Matthew Siemon 4. Gabriel DeSoto Charles Ethier Vicki Humphrey Jason Krohn Jonathan Ramsay

7 6 4 4 2 2 2 2 2

arabian leading Open Trainers

Half-arabian leading Open Trainers

1. Joel Gangi 2. Joel Kiesner 3. Vicki Humphrey Jonathan Ramsay Matthew Siemon Jim Stachowski

1. Joel Gangi Jim Stachowski 2. Gabriel DeSoto Matthew Siemon

by number of horses

198 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

4 3 2 2 2 2

by number of horses

4 4 2 2


Overall leading Owners

arabian leading Owners

by number of horses 1. 2. 3. 4.

Boisvert Farms LLC Starline Arabians LLC Oak Haven South Arabians LLC Kellie Aguirre Burline LLC Ashley GallĂşn Kimberly Jarvis Jill Nelson Nancy Shafer and Gregg Shafer Lois Skeeles W B Arabians Whispers Acres, Inc.

by number of horses 5 4 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

1. Lois Skeeles Starline Arabians LLC W B Arabians

2 2 2

Half-arabian leading Owners by number of horses

1. Boisvert Farms LLC 2. Burrline LLC Ashley GallĂşn Oak Haven South Arabians LLC Starline Arabians LLC Whispers Acres, Inc.

4 2 2 2 2 2

Overall leading breeders by number of horses 1. 2. 3. 4 5.

Marty Shea Cedar Ridge Arabians Nick and Juliet Carden Boisvert Farms LLC Vicki Humphrey Maroon Fire Arabians, Inc. Prestige Farms LLC R O Lervick Arabians

8 7 6 5 4 4 4 4

arabian leading breeders

Half-arabian leading breeders

by number of horses

1. Nick and Juliet Carden 2. Cedar Ridge Arabians Maroon Fire Arabians, Inc. Marty Shea 3. R O Lervick Arabians Strawberry Banks Farm

by number of horses 5 4 4 4 3 3

1. Boisvert Farms LLC 2. Marty Shea 3. Cedar Ridge Arabians Vicki Humphrey Shawn Stachowski Clarke and Karen Vesty

5 4 3 3 3 3

Volume 44, No. 12 | 199


G

G A N G I , I N C . ...

English

an o b se ssi o n fo r

Joel Gangi ... Overall Leading Trainer 2013 National Open English winners KW HERO MEGATROPOLIS BF NOBIL POSSESSION SAL MINEO BF SPLASHDOWN WB STARBUCKS BF SUMMER TEMPTATION

STARBUCKS BF U.S. Champion HA/AA Country English Pleasure owned by Boisvert Farms

SPLASHDOWN WB U.S. Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure Futurity

owned by W B Arabians

SUMMER TEMPTATION Canadian Champion Arabian English Pleasure owned by Mark & Deborah Himmel

GanGi, inc. •

Joel Gangi 16447 Carriage Lane • Prairieville, LA 70769 225.802.8895 • Defiancce@aol.com 200 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


Boisvert Farms ... Overall Leading Owner of 2013 National English winners GSF RIZING SON MEGATROPOLIS BF NATALIE WOODS BF SAL MINEO BF STARBUCKS BF

Boisvert Farms ... Leading Breeder of 2013 National H/A English winners GIRL NEXT DOOR BF MEGATROPOLIS BF NATALIE WOODS BF NOBIL POSSESSION SAL MINEO BF STARBUCKS BF

Boisvert Farms, LLC •

Scott & Susan Purdin and Amanda Purdin Standish & Rhein Standish 630 Louisiana Avenue • Baton Rouge, LA 70802 farm: 225.933.6109 • info@boisvertfarmsllc.com www.BoisvertFarmsLLC.com Volume 44, No. 12 | 201


Showtime

past

Evitaa

PF Emotion+//

Cool Night+//

WP Rosanna Orana

Jonni Rocket+//

Mercy Mercy Me

Won For The Road

Snow In Summer

Heir Strike+/

202 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


Iraining

present A Noble Pass

PF Tonka Toi

Argentinaa

Nobles Diva

Double Platinum

Oh So Tempting

PF Tonka Toi

VF Playing With Fire

Visit Our New Website www.ShowtimeTrainingCenter.net Ghazis Dutch Warrior

Volume 44, No. 12 | 203


future Callaways Blue Norther Wine Women And Song Feather Light

Will Shriver Royally Blue Courageous Admiral Raines Cactus Flower

ArrowheAds Unlike Any other For What Its Worth Miss Moriarty Miss Megabucks

Worthy Son In Reality Prosperity Profit Mias Time

S H OWT I M E T RA I N I N G C E N T E R 493 Boone Road, newnan, Ga 30263 • BaRn 770-252-3300 • Tish Kondas 678-427-0595 • CaRla sChilTz 253-380-0853

W W W. S H OW T I M E T R A I N I N G C E N T E R . N E T

204 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


They say lightning doesn't strike twice in the same place... well they're wrong! Arrowheads Unlike Any Other aka "Elvis" is a saddlebred stallion with the "It" factor. He is captivatingly beautiful and athletic which will make him a star in the show ring. His tremendous bloodlines will make him an incredible producer in the breeding shed. Looking forward to an electrifying future!

— Tish Kondas "One of the most beautiful young stallions I have ever seen - Looks like he will have a great show and future breeding career." —Tim Shea

For over 50 years and 2 generations, the Moore family has trained, owned and shown countless numbers of Saddlebred World Champions. One stallion, Arrowhead’s Unlike Any Other, is the great one we have all been waiting for! From the day he was born, I knew he was special. I insured him at 30 days old, and I NEVER insure foals. His is a big, beautiful stallion with perfect conformation—I can’t fault him. This stallion will create a new benchmark and generations of World and National Champions for the Saddlebred and Arabian breeds. —Melinda Moore

Owned by EAC EQUINE LLC

Volume 44, No. 12 | 205


Of All his purebred progeny shown,

50% aRE NatiONal CHaMPiONS!

4x National Champion

DS

CSP HENNESSY

(DS Mick Jagger x MHR Martinna) Owned by Brian Galbraith

WitH NO liNES tO HuCklEBERRY BEY HE iS tHE PERfECt OutCROSS fOR YOuR afiRE BEY V DauGHtERS! Matoi x JJ Sioux Hope Contact Chris Wilson at 417.761.2031 chriswilson1211@gmail.com www.ChriShanPark.com 206 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


PuREBREDS CSP aDRiaNa (Vegaz x CSP Gisele by Mamage) 2011 PB chestnut mare. Just brought her inside. CSP HalO (HS Justatemptation x CSP angel by DS Mick Jagger) 2011 PB bay colt. Very nice. Very trainable. tall neck and good ears. futurity contender. this one will be a winner in the show ring and the breeding shed.

CSP GOSSiP GiRl

Ef tallaDEGa (afires Heir x MD Nobilette by MHR Nobility) 2011 PB chestnut gelding. Priced to sell. Very nice gelding. Broke to ride. HEiRMES (afires Heir x Shes the Ritz by apollopalooza) 2011 PB bay mare. tons of motion. Big time filly. MOMENta Va (H Mobility H x Miz Miranda V by Bravado Bey V) 2011 PB grey mare. tall and necky. Very talented. Very trainable. CSP aCE Of SPaDz (Vegaz x JJ Sioux Hope by MC Sir Hope) 2010 PB bay gelding. Big Hunter prospect. Good motion. Very pretty. CSP JuSt DaNzE (Vegaz x Music Nthe air by afire Bey V) 2010 PB chestnut gelding. tall. Great amateur Country or English prospect. Priced to sell!

Ef MOONSHiNE

llC CHaNtillY laCE (Vegaz x llC Morfire by OkW firecracker) 2010 PB bay mare. Big time English mare. aEPa prospect. CSP GOSSiP GiRl Vegaz x Pistola by Matoi) 2009 bay mare. English/Park superstar! She’s got game! Ef MOONSHiNE (Vegaz x tainted luv by a temptation) 2009 PB grey stallion. Breeder’s pedigree. Great amateur English horse. Built to do it in the show ring and in the breeding shed! fiftY SHaDES Of GREY (afires Heir x Shes the Ritz by aa apollo Bey) 2009 PB grey mare. tall necky mare. Good size. Country amateur. SiRtaiN HEiRS (afires Heir x Sirah Bey by Hucklebey Berry) 2009 PB chestnut gelding. Ef tRifiC SHOC (Sf Specs Shocwave x Da trifinity by triften) 2008 PB bay gelding. Big time Hunter.

Ef tRifiC SHOC

SiRENaDE BEY (Ja Magnificat x Sirah Bey by Hucklebey Berry) 2005 PB chestnut gelding. flashy Hunter with 4 whites. Could accommodate any age amateur. MaGNilOquENt BEY (Ja Magnificat x Sirah Bey by Hucklebey Berry) 2002 PB chestnut gelding. all ages amateur friendly. Could do Country, English, or Park.

Half-aRaBiaNS CSP ROCk ON (DS Mick Jagger x Santana’s Rare Essence) 2011 Ha bay gelding. Still in pasture. looks very cool. JSN MaGNEtO (Vegaz x Yolanda) 2010 Ha chestnut gelding. Superstar. Ready for an amateur.

JSN MaGNEtO

CSP StaRt ME uP (DS Mick Jagger x Worthy’s take a Bow) 2010 Ha bay gelding. tall and COOl. Big time Country horse. Volume 44, No. 12 | 207


A phenomenal show horse & a legendary brood mare! BL ExprEssion ixL noble Express x rumina Afire regional Champion & U.s. national Top Ten owner Chaos Arabians BL Torrid AffAir ixL noble Express x rumina Afire owners steve & diana Lazzarini

BL sMooTh CriMinAL

BL Miss Chips hf Mister Chips x rumina Afire owner Kelli Aguirre BL sMooTh CriMinAL sir William robert x rumina Afire U.s. national reserve Champion owner Gail Waldon BL CrysTAL CLEAr Majesteit x rumina Afire owners steve & diana Lazzarini rEjoiCE rEjoiCE A Temptation x rumina Afire U.s. national reserve Champion owner strawberry Banks farm

rEjoiCE rEjoiCE

sA GisELE ixL noble Express x rumina Afire U.s. national reserve Champion regional & scottsdale Champion owner starline Arabians BL sLpAsh AfirE ixL noble Express x rumina Afire owner darlene hopkins nUTorioUs Undulata’s nutcracker x rumina Afire owner starline Arabians

sA GisELE

sA AdriAnA h Mobility h x rumina Afire owner starline Arabians BL sMooTh TALKEr nutcracker’s nirvana x rumina Afire owner james stachowski

Looking forward to ... 2014 foAL By Vj royAL hEir owner james stachowski 2015 foAL By AfTErshoC owner Vicki humphrey, Twin Creeks farm 2015 foAL By h MoBiLiTy h owner hennessey Arabians 2015 foAL By Vj royAL hEir owners steve & diana Lazzarini 208 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

BL ExprEssion BL CrysTAL CLEAr


CoMinG soon To A shoW rinG nEAr yoU ...

BL sMooTh TALKEr

sA AdriAnA

nUToriUoUs

steve Lazzarini 760-219-5292 desertVip@aol.com

diana Lazzarini 760-625-5522 desertvipservices@live.com Volume 44, No. 12 | 209


Thank You, Matt!

—Bill Castro, Paul Heiman, Kim & Bud Hillsamer, Brian McKee and Faydelle Schott

MATT SIEMON

National Champion English Trainer SIEMON STABLES INC. 9311 Lower Valley Pike • New Carlisle, Ohio 45344 • 937-849-1487 w w w. s i e m o n s t a b l e s . c o m 210 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


FACES & PLACES E

MILY MAITA AND BRANDON FLOOD WERE joined in matrimony on March 15, 2014, at the Desert Foothills in Scottsdale, Arizona, amongst family and friends.

➔➔ For latest news and events visit www.ahtimes.com

Volume 44, No. 12 | 211


60 Years

OF BREEDING ARABIAN HORSES

Sheila with *Bachantka, Baychatka, Moska, Spinning Song and Sweet Inspiration V.

DESPERADO V

(Huckleberry Bey x Daraska)

MACLINTOCK V

(Desperado V x Marigold V)

MAJOR MAC V

(Maclintock V x Majors Tiffany GA)

AUDACIOUS PS

(Fame VF x Hal Flirtatious)

*JULLYEN EL JAMAAL

(Ali Jamaal x Jullye El Ludjin)

VA R I A N A R A B I A N S sheila varian • 1 275 corbett canyon road arroyo Grande, ca 93420 • P hone: 805.489.5802

Volume 44, No. 12 | 213


Wildf lower Farms … Breeder of

2013 Top Hunter Pleasure Horse in the Nation* 3-TIME NATIONAL CHAMPION

FANFARE WF (Desert Heat VF x WF Fantazzia)

Congratulations to Nicole Davis and Melissa Garcia on their purchase of Fanfare WF! *(Based on 2013 Championship wins at U.S., Canadian and Youth Nationals)

Announcing Wildflower Farms’ 2014 Hunter Pleasure Contenders Following In Fanfare’s Footsteps! Breeders and Owners: MARK AND DEBBIE HELMICK

DANTE WF

SUN DRIFTER WF

2014 U.S. Nationals Hunter Pleasure Futurity Contender

2014 Region 7 Reserve Champion Hunter Pleasure Junior Horse

(Rodan LTD x CBS Dahzzle)

(Sundance Kid V x Desert Enchantress)

2014 U.S. Nationals Hunter Pleasure Junior Horse and Maturity Contender Sally Randle 30200 Magic Dog Circle, Kiowa, Colorado 80117 (951) 551-5861 www.randleperformancehorses.com 214 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


Congratulations

Sally Randle

Shea Urgitus

Shea Urgitus

SS Jack Daniels

(Standing Room Only x Jordanelle) 2014 Scottsdale Champion HA/AA Hunter Pleasure Open 2013 U.S. National Champion HA/AA Hunter Pleasure AOTR 19-35 2013 Canadian National Champion HA/AA Hunter Pleasure Open 2013 Scottsdale Champion HA/AA Hunter Pleasure Open Owner: SHEA URGITUS

Special Congratulations to Sally Randle A 2013 Leading Trainer of National Winners in Open Hunt/Show Hack Jarvis Insurance - AHT Readers’ Choice Show Hack/Hunter Trainer of the Year

Sally Randle 30200 Magic Dog Circle, Kiowa, Colorado 80117 (951) 551-5861 www.randleperformancehorses.com Volume 44, No. 12 | 215


www.freewillfarmllc.com

Training . Lessons . Sales

Head Trainer: Wendy Griffith Potts Assistant Trainer: Jamie Gilmore Ph: (805) 443-5645 freewillfarm@gmail.com 6130 Bennett Lawson Rd. Mansfield, Texas

216 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


H a l f -A R a b i a n E n g l i s h S h ow H a c k S ta r s

Raven Gropp &

Apollo McCartney Competing at Region 12 & 14 Ohio Buckeye Youth Nationals Arabian Celebration in Half-Arabian English Show Hack Open, AOTR, JOTR & JTR Proud Parents: Billy & Jeanne Gropp Trained by:

nimous Champion 2014 Region 12 Una ack Open & ATR H/A English Show H Vicki Humphrey, Jessica Clinton & Gabe DeSoto Canton, GA ~ 770.335.6194 ~ VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com Volume 44, No. 12 | 217


&

Hunt Hack

Ground covering. Round and well-mannered. Refined, yet strong. These are the attributes of a quality hunt or show hack horse. Their classes are easy to watch, but the simplicity stops there. Read on to discover the ins and outs of the hunt and show hack divisions of the Arabian horse industry.


Wendy Griffith Potts

Freewill Farms Number of years involved with the Arabian breed: 43 Describe the mechanics of the ideal hunter frame. How do you accomplish this? The ideal hunter frame is not as collected as a western horse and not as pushed up as an English horse, but it still involves a lot of collection. The horse’s hindquarters are underneath of them and their shoulders are up. And they’re definitely in a more relaxed frame than the other two divisions. The horse should be moving well underneath themselves with an open shoulder and a big stride. I teach my horses to go that way by doing a lot of collection and pushing them forward with a lot of impulsion. Even though every horse requires a different training regimen, what have you found to be a universal truth in training the Arabian hunt horse? For me, it’s being able to move the horse laterally. They need to be able to walk up into their head while keeping their shoulders up, while most people tend to roll them over and drop them on their forehand. As you work for the perfect roundness in the neck with a ground-covering, sweeping stride, how do you gauge the ideal level of collection for the horse? That ideal level is simply the place at which they can carry themselves. They kind of each tell you the best way they can go. You’re going to have some that have more suspension than others, but the perfect speed at which they are able to carry themselves is what you’re looking for. And each horse is different depending on how they’re built and their temperament. Besides riding, what other methods of training aid you in finishing your horses? What do these help you accomplish in the training process? I bit a lot in the long lines. I think that they work through their lateral stuff while bitting to the sides. And that teaches them to get up underneath of themselves. Moving to the wall, side to side—it’s great when they learn to move by themselves. When looking at young prospects, what do you look for conformation-wise, in temperament, and in their motion?  If it’s barefoot, I look for one that is almost like a country horse—a really free mover that might not be set as high or have as laid back a shoulder as a country horse. But I definitely don’t want one with a straight neck. The thing that I’ve noticed is that a lot of muscling occurs once you start working them, so just when you think they’re going to have a straight neck in terms of it not being very cresty, that is just a muscle that is developed. Also, straight legs would be

Wendy Griffith Potts

preferable, although I have quite a few really nice ones that don’t have straight legs. I would also prefer them not to have a super flat croup. So, a little bit of slope to the croup, a short back, a balanced horse—you know, when you draw your three little circles, they should be balanced and proportional. They also should have freedom in their shoulder, that oiliness. In terms of their mind, I don’t mind if they’re bright, but that’s something you can’t really tell until you’re working them. You can gauge a lot by their bloodlines in terms of all these traits, but that isn’t always the case. Who is your all-time favorite hunter horse? NDL Pericles. In today’s world of showing, how are training techniques, vet work, and the number of classes each horse is shown in affecting our horses? Are their careers longer or shorter than ever? I think it completely depends on the horse’s conformation and also who owns and trains the horse. For me, horse’s legs are like tires and they only have a certain amount of miles on them. But if you’ve got one like Pericles who had great legs—we worked him a lot and he was in a lot of classes, but he was obviously fine with that. He loved to show! It also depends on how you maintain them. Once the horse is trained, you don’t work the heck out of them at home. I think that you give them time off and in the back of my mind, I’m always thinking about running on those set of tires that only have a certain amount of tread.


Raven Gropp Vick Humphrey Training Center Even though every horse requires a different training regimen, what have you found to be a universal truth in training the Arabian hunt horse? I am only sixteen so I have limited experience in training horse’s period. What I do know, is that taking your time to put a solid foundation on your horse will help you with whatever discipline you train for. The English show hack horse is my favorite when properly trained. My show hack horse works his “winter vacation” at home doing nothing but dressage and dressage exercises. I have found this is the only effective way to get true collection and extension from your horse and not merely a speeding up and slowing down of their gaits. Besides riding, what other methods of training aid you in finishing your horses? What do these help you accomplish in the training process? In our winter months, my horses have a very intense conditioning schedule with my dressage trainer twice a week. I alternate long-lining with riding and they are also allowed to spend free time in their paddocks for a few hours each day. The time they spend out makes such a difference in the horse’s attitude. They have a couple of hours just to themselves to act like horses. Then when I ask them to perform, they are very willing to work with me, instead of against me. In today’s world of showing, how are training techniques, vet work, and the number of classes each horse is shown in affecting our horses? Are their careers longer or shorter than ever? I would like to see the horses we show in better

Raven Gropp

physical condition. Most of the horses of today show in one class per day, maybe two. They tire quickly and lose their fire way too soon. Where is the stamina and endurance this breed is known for? We all know these horses are capable of performing at their peak for more than one class when properly conditioned. For me, that’s where dressage is so instrumental. The horses achieve that upper level of conditioning by schooling a full hour at different intensities. These horses have fewer sprains and strains on their legs, more brilliance in their performance, and their show careers are generally longer due to the soundness of their bodies.

Debbie and Mark Helmick

Wildflower Farms Number of years involved with the Arabian breed: 28

Describe the mechanics of the ideal hunter frame. How do you accomplish this? We breed athletic and well-balanced horses and then rely on our trainer Sally Randle (Randle Performance Horses) to teach them the hunter frame. Even though every horse requires a different training regimen, what have you found to be a universal truth in training the Arabian hunt horse? Make sure you listen to what the horse is subtly telling you! Last year, one of our hunt horses was getting muscle sore and irritable but not lame.  We tried massage and chiropractic work, but even though he was still winning, his attitude was telling us that he just was not

Debbie Helmick


completely right. It turned out he had a chip which, once removed, dramatically improved his attitude and outlook! He is like a different horse this year! Besides riding, what other methods of training aid you in finishing your horses? What do these help you accomplish in the training process? Long-lining for teaching flexion and steering, free exercise via turnout to give them some peace of mind and the chance to relax, hot walker for warm up, videos to see how the horse looks while being ridden.    When looking at young prospects, what do you look for conformation-wise, in temperament, and in their motion? Since we are breeders, we are generally not looking for young prospects except for in our pastures!  Then we look at their conformation and motion to determine which discipline will be the best fit. For example, our three-year-old Dante WF would look beautiful as a western pleasure horse with his chestnut color with lots of “chrome,” but his motion indicates that he is a hunter pleasure horse. He has a ground covering stride with a lot of nice motion for such a youngster. His attitude is willing and he is learning quickly which is always desirable in a young prospect. We also rely on Sally to get the prospects started and see which discipline seems to be the best fit.  Often it takes a while to determine which is best! For example, Fanfare WF, last year’s leading hunter pleasure winner, started out in training to be a reiner since he is compact and fairly quiet. Eventually, he moved into hunter pleasure training with Sally and the rest is history! 

In today’s world of showing, how are training techniques, vet work, and the number of classes each horse is shown in affecting our horses? Are their careers longer or shorter than ever? We think in general those show horses who can transition from open classes to showing as amateur mounts are tending to have longer careers. Vet work, good nutrition and appropriate training techniques are helping to prolong their careers.     Who is your all-time favorite hunter horse? Fanfare WF, of course!    If you could breed one mare and one stallion to have a potential national champion hunter horse, who would you breed and why? We love the Sundance Kid V offspring in general, but I must say that we are really high on the potential of our three year-old, Dante WF, who is sired by Rodan LTD and out of our mare CBS Dahzzle. We would love to have the chance to breed another national champion hunter pleasure prospect out of that cross but unfortunately, we lost her to a second colic surgery a couple months after she foaled Dante. We are trying the next best thing by breeding one of our other young mares to Rodan LTD this year and hope for the best. This mare, Desert Enchantress,  has already foaled a national top ten hunter pleasure futurity horse and is sired by Desert Heat VF and out of our Kaiyoum daughter. 

Sally Randle Randle Performance Horses, LLC Number of years involved with the Arabian breed: 40+ (since I was a child) Describe the mechanics of the ideal hunter frame. How do you accomplish this? The ideal hunter frame starts from the hindquarters. A horse must drive from behind and then lift his front-end, thus freeing up his shoulders to produce a rolling, ground-covering gate. The headset is the last piece of the puzzle and usually falls into place once the horse is moving forward and using himself. Even though every horse requires a different training regimen, what have you found to be a universal truth in training the Arabian hunt horse? Ensuring the horse is driving forward off my leg and being supple. I want to be able to move my horses’ body parts independently of each other. It is one thing for a horse to go in a straight line, but to maximize his potential; it is imperative that he be supple and is able to move off my leg in whatever direction I ask.

Sally Randle


As you work for the perfect roundness in the neck with a ground-covering, sweeping stride, how do you gauge the ideal level of collection for the horse? As mentioned, it all goes back to having the horse drive from behind. Rounding the neck with a groundcovering, sweeping stride cannot be accomplished without engagement of the hind end. If a horse is driving from behind with his back engaged, I know the horse is collecting. Then it is a matter of lifting his shoulders and then fine tuning everything else.

In today’s world of showing, how are training techniques, vet work, and the number of classes each horse is shown in affecting our horses? Are their careers longer or shorter than ever? Superior horsemanship and care is essential to the show life expectancy of a horse. Daily attention to shoeing, footing, and subtle lameness is critical. Knowing and reading your horse is imperative to keeping them happy, sound and healthy. With constant attention to every detail, long productive show careers are as possible as ever.

Besides riding, what other methods of training aid you in finishing your horses? What do these help you accomplish in the training process? Long-lining is my go-to method for ground work. It prepares a young horse for under saddle work by teaching them how to steer, stop, bend, and give. My finished horses benefit as it develops their muscles and gets them moving in a balanced and fluid manner.

Who is your all-time favorite hunter horse? I have watched and trained so many exceptional hunter horses through the years that it is difficult to pick one all-time favorite. I do have to say that all the hunters that are currently in my barn are outstanding and make my job fun and rewarding.

When looking at young prospects, what do you look for conformation-wise, in temperament, and in their motion? My ideal young prospect would possess a strong hind leg; short back; long, well-laid back shoulder, straight tail; flexible neck; pretty face and big eyes.

If you could breed one mare and one stallion to have a potential national champion hunter horse, who would you breed and why? It is difficult to pick just one combination of mare and stallion to breed a potential national champion. Each combination, no matter the breeding, has the potential to produce an exceptional show horse. As a trainer, I look for horses with quality movement, conformation, and attitude; the breeding is secondary.

John Rannenberg

Rohara Arabians Number of years involved with the Arabian breed: 39 Describe the mechanics of the ideal hunter frame. How do you accomplish this? There was a time when the hunter division was filled with horses that didn’t have enough motion for English, but were too hot for western. That was kind of how some horses fell into that category. Today, people are seeking a horse that has the ideal conformation, the pedigree, the temperament, the disposition, and the ability to move and have that appearance that everyone is trying to achieve. Now, as the hunt division becomes one of the largest divisions, I think that not only are the trainers and the exhibitors really learning what makes an ideal Arabian or Half-Arabian hunter, but I think that our judges are becoming more and more aware of what is correct and desirable. In the John Rannenberg


past, that wasn’t always the case, but I think people have become more educated and have a better understanding as to what is the epitome of the hunter horse. With that said, because the division is so competitive, I think it takes an exceptional individual in conformation, quality, substance, athletic ability, and temperament that really makes up the ideal horse. And today, we have also learned what the proper training for a hunt horse consists of while recognizing that the horse has to be beautiful, in great condition, and a good moving horse. Personally, I like a horse that has a lot of eye appeal and that has a high level of quality. But I think I draw the line a little bit to where they start to get a little too showy with too much motion. I still want to see a horse that really has a free flowing movement and round, ground covering motion, but not an up and down choppy movement.  A hunter should move a little bit closer to the ground and be ground covering, but still have a round and fluid motion to their stride. I don’t want to see a horse that has too much hock action, but yet engages and has a very smooth look to it. As you work for the perfect roundness in the neck with a ground-covering, sweeping stride, how do you gauge the ideal level of collection for the horse? Hunters, I think, need to be very consistent. They need to be very steady and even-paced. They need to be able to go through the transitions very smoothly and have a quiet look and disposition, and yet still look alert and aware of their surroundings because let’s face it, even though it is a pleasure class and it is a flat class, the idea is that these horses could potentially have the type of movement and conformation and frame that would go over a fence. So, if the horse is looking down at the ground because it’s over-bridled, I have a problem with that. The horse needs to have bend and length to its neck and be looking through the bridle and be on the bit, not being behind the vertical or bit or on a draped rein. A good hunter horse should go with contact in the rider’s hand because again, if you’re going up to a fence and that horse is behind the bit and there’s no contact, you’re not going to have a secure feeling. I appreciate the fact that we’re not judging as a horse going over a fence, but we’re judging

on those terms, so they should be on the bit and moving very consistently in pace. Even though every horse requires a different training regimen, what have you found to be a universal truth in training the Arabian hunt horse? I think the key word is consistency. And that really goes for any division, whether you’re working a halter horse, a western horse, a hunter horse, or a park horse; training horses respond to a consistent program and a consistent style. So as the horse develops or as you feel you need to change things, you have to adapt to what that horse is doing and what you want to accomplish. Whether it’s the shoeing, or the horse’s frame, or the horse’s condition, you have to be consistent in the method that you work the horse. Hunters need to appear to have a calm disposition and have a pleasant attitude. A horse that looks intimidated or that looks uncomfortable or agitated, to me, does not create a positive image when that horse is going around.  I want to see a horse that looks like it’s happy, that is consistent in its movement, consistent in its frame and its pace, that has got a quiet, responsive mouth, that isn’t necessarily looking like it’s being held back or also being prodded to move forward.  The horse should have a willingness. A quiet tail is certainly something that is desirable. You see a horse that’s ringing its tail, I question whether that horse is either mad, uncomfortable, or being asked too much. Who is your all-time favorite hunter horse? That would be Everlastin Love. We just lost him and he’s a multi, multi-national champion. I was fortunate to be the breeder, the owner and the trainer, the first time he was national champion. Then he was sold within the barn and remained with a client, the Sheehee family, and he had an amazing career. But what is very interesting about that horse, is that he was one of the pioneers in the hunt division and he never went out of style. He was great 17 years ago all the way up to the last time that he won it. He was, in my opinion, a horse that made an impact on the division along with a few other horses that have set the bar and set the standard as to what the epitome of the hunter horse was and is.     


Marggie Rushlow-Roberts, Chad Roberts, and Sally Rushlow Rushlow’s Arabians Number of years involved with the Arabian breed: Marggie, 34; Chad, 12; Sally, 60

Describe the mechanics of the ideal hunter frame. How do you accomplish this? An ideal hunter must be able to move freely through the shoulders and carry a collected, round frame without getting behind the bridle. They must willingly do their job with pleasant ears and a soft mouth. It should look very easy for them. Even though every horse requires a different training regimen, what have you found to be a universal truth in training the Arabian hunt horse? You never want your hunt horse behind the bridle or running though the bridle. This is a very fine line. They must travel around the arena with some speed, but never pushing through the bridle or running off their feet. You almost need them thinking slowly and calmly. I always prefer to be pushing my hunters and not holding back on them. As you work for the perfect roundness in the neck with a ground-covering, sweeping stride, how do you gauge the ideal level of collection for the horse? We do a ton of conditioning by jogging and loping our horses to make sure that they’re able to collect properly. In the show ring our riders push them on harder, knowing they can bring their horses back with their seat, without over-collecting them. We want them up to the bridle moving freely, but not just charging around. If I sit the trot, they should slow down without losing impulsion or making me pull on their face. I find that a lot of your skill in riding comes from your seat and legs, rather than your hands. Besides riding, what other methods of training aid you in finishing your horses? What do these help you accomplish in the training process? We long line our hunters just as much as we do our English horses. We also have found that if we put our horses out to play in paddocks regularly, their brains stay a lot fresher. They don’t seem to get burned out. When looking at young prospects, what do you look for conformation-wise, in temperament, and in their motion? We always love a horse that can move on all four corners. I look for a horse that has a strong hind end to drive it forward. A great hunter must be very smart, have a kind eye, and not be nervous when doing its job.

Marggie Rushlow-Roberts

In today’s world of showing, how are training techniques, vet work, and the number of classes each horse is shown in affecting our horses? Are their careers longer or shorter than ever? Our horses are athletes. As with any athlete, regular vet checkups are critical to maximum performance. I had a good friend tell me once all horses only have a certain number of great classes in them. I’ve found this to be true, and that’s why we always strive for quality, rather than quantity. When a horse enters the show ring, we are expecting 100% of them—there is no way a horse can give 100% four times in a day. I always tell my riders, “How about you take your SAT four times today, and strive for 100% each time,” and they realize that that’s not possible. If you’re willing to accept 50% and show in a ton of classes, you can, but your horse will probably not be happy or sound at the end of the show. I always try to make sure our show horses will be able to enjoy showing their whole lives, not just a few years. Who is your all-time favorite hunter horse? Edward Cullen, because last year alone, he won two national championships and 1 reserve at his first nationals and it was his rider’s first nationals. We have the pleasure to work around this horse every day and he is smart, athletic, and willing to please. His motion is the same on all four corners.


Shea Urgitus Randle Performance Horses Number of years involved with the Arabian breed: 13 Describe the mechanics of the ideal hunter frame. How do you accomplish this? An ideal hunter horse is steady in the face and can carry himself. They should have fluid movement and should look pleasurable to ride. Even though every horse requires a different training regimen, what have you found to be a universal truth in training the Arabian hunt horse? I think it is very hard to claim a universal truth that works for all horses’ training regime. However, if I had to choose one thing, I would say that when it comes to lessons and training sessions, it is the quality of the lesson, not the quantity. When you accomplish a task during a training session, it is important to end on that good note. Don’t try to fix everything you want to accomplish at once. As you work for the perfect roundness in the neck with a ground-covering, sweeping stride, how do you gauge the ideal level of collection for the horse? I showed show hack in the past, which really taught me how to gauge different levels of collections for different gates. It is important to ride at a steady pace with a strong cadence no matter what the gate. The horse’s stride should remain consistent all the way around the ring. Besides riding, what other methods of training aid you in finishing your horses? What do these help you accomplish in the training process? I think lunging, long-lining and free exercise are all very important to aid my horses’ training. Depending on the horse, these different methods accomplish different things. With my horse Jack Daniels, it is important for him to be lunged in order to get his “wild” energy out before I ride. This makes him happier to do his job. When looking at young prospects, what do you look for conformation-wise, in temperament, and in their motion? When looking at young prospects I look for a horse with a “hooky” or arched type neck, fluid motion and a willing temperament. A horse who does not love his job will not be very successful as a show horse.

Shea Urgitus

In today’s world of showing, how are training techniques, vet work, and the number of classes each horse is shown in affecting our horses? Are their careers longer or shorter than ever? In today’s horse show world I find that for my horses, they are really good at one particular class and are therefore not entered in more than two or three classes per show. I think horses in all divisions are getting fancier, which can sometimes lead to more vet work, but from my experience, I have not noticed my horses careers cut shorter. Preventative care often alleviates potential problems which leads to an extended and more successful show career. Who is your all-time favorite hunter horse? NDL Pericles.  If you could breed one mare and one stallion to have a potential national champion hunter horse, who would you breed and why? I would probably choose to breed Standing Room Only to Jordanelle so I could have a full sibling to my horse Jack.


Mike Whelihan Whelihan Arabian Farms Number of years involved with the Arabian breed: 45

Mike Whelihan

Describe the mechanics of the ideal hunter frame. How do you accomplish this? The horse should be in a soft frame, moving forward well; comfortable enough to carry himself and his rider for a long distance. This should be accomplished by moving the horse’s hind end up to a soft mouth. Even though every horse requires a different training regimen, what have you found to be a universal truth in training the Arabian hunt horse? I ask every training horse to use its hind end to move forward first, expect it to move up to a soft hand, stay soft in the mouth and be happy doing its job. It is the same regardless of what division the horse is showing in.   As you work for the perfect roundness in the neck with a ground-covering, sweeping stride, how do you gauge the ideal level of collection for the horse? It all works together. If a horse is not collected right, it won’t have a softness in the neck, it will shoot through its motion and be too much

work for the rider. Proper collection should produce more of a rolling trot as opposed to a sweeping stride.   Besides riding, what other methods of training aid you in finishing your horses? What do these help you accomplish in the training process? I long-line horses quite a bit, to achieve the soft frame from the ground. You can teach a horse a lot in the long-lines when it is done properly.    When looking at young prospects, what do you look for conformation-wise, in temperament, and in their motion? When looking for a hunter prospect, I would focus on pretty, nice substance and roundness of motion. To be a hunter, they should be able to pick their feet up enough to get over obstacles if they were in the field with a rider.    In today’s world of showing, how are training techniques, vet work, and the number of classes each horse is shown in affecting our horses? Are their careers longer or shorter than ever? Their careers are longer due to better horsemanship. That includes proper veterinarian care and a slower training process.   Who is your all-time favorite hunter horse? I have enjoyed watching several top horses perform. I enjoy watching big, beautiful, strong horses that can cover some ground. Noble Ladd is a favorite of mine.   If you could breed one mare and one stallion to have a potential national champion hunter horse, who would you breed and why? I would breed the sire of Bombey CC, The Arrsonist, to Vivienne. She is a big, strong, pretty mare, and he has consistently produced beautiful, great moving, trainable horses for us. That would produce my idea of the perfect horse.


2013 National Hunter/Hack Leaders Includes U.S., Canadian and Youth Nationals Hunter Champions and Reserves. Hunter Pleasure, Show Hack, and Hunter Hack classes. Open and amateur/junior classes only.

Overall Arabian & Half-Arabian Leading Horses

by number of wins Owner 1. MM Sabe 4 championships Morgan and Cynthia Kelly 2. Fanfare WF 3 championships Mark and Deborah Helmick 3. Edward Cullen 2 championships, 1 reserve Mary Gallagher Kuras O Lordy 2 championships, 1 reserve Laura Wolsey RD Nevaska 2 championships, 1 reserve John and Sheryl Yochum 4. Prince LOA 1 championship, 2 reserves L. David Pease 5. Chance To Jam 2 championships Ashley Lauren Toye DA Sovereign 2 championships II B Farms Delirious PGA 2 championships Sofia Kavanaugh Mr Gs Ringmaster 2 championships Raven Gropp Slam Dunk KS 2 championships Michelle Harbridge SS Jack Daniels 2 championships Shea Urgitus Victorey Pass DDS 2 championships Kendall Carkhuff

Arabian Leading Horses

by number of wins Owner 1. MM Sabe 4 championships Morgan and Cynthia Kelly 2. Fanfare WF 3 championships Mark and Deborah Helmick 3. O Lordy 2 championships, 1 reserve Laura Wolsey RD Nevaska 2 championships, 1 reserve John and Sheryl Yochum 4. Prince LOA 1 championship, 2 reserves L. David Pease 5. DA Sovereign 2 championships II B Farms Mr Gs Ringmaster 2 championships Raven Gropp 6. A Time To Dance 1 championship, 1 reserve Shoshana and Erica Mark Amnestey 1 championship, 1 reserve Robert and Janene Boggs Fidenzio 1 championship, 1 reserve Diane and Jennifer Lavallee Im Kinda Kool RTA 1 championship, 1 reserve Maudi Fleming Justifyablee Lace 1 championship, 1 reserve Emma and Jody Freeland

Half-Arabian Leading Horses

by number of wins Owner 1. Edward Cullen 2 championships, 1 reserve Mary Gallagher Kuras 2. Prince LOA 1 championship, 2 reserves L. David Pease 3. Chance To Jam 2 championships Ashley Lauren Toye Delirious PGA 2 championships Sofia Kavanaugh Slam Dunk KS 2 championships Michelle Harbridge SS Jack Daniels 2 championships Shea Urgitus Victorey Pass DDS 2 championships Kendall Carkhuff 4. Vivienne LR 1 championship, 1 reserve North By Northwest LLC 5. CF Badras Symphony 2 reserves Jennifer Schwing RHR Campus King 2 reserves Barrie Padgham Tamar Cool Kid 2 reserves Alexa Potts

Overall Leading Sires

by number of winning get by number of wins 1. Baske Afire 4 1. Baske Afire 2. Cytosk 3 2. Desperado V Sundance Kid V 3 Justify 3. Afire Bey V 2 Krewe Allionce 2 Sundance Kid V Always A Jullyen V 2 Apollopalooza (deceased) 2 DS Major Afire 2 Heir To Glory 2 Justify 2 Krewe 2 Mamage 2 Santa Fe V 2 Starof Fame V 2

6 4 4 4 4


Leading Arabian Sires

by number of Arabian winning get

by number of wins

1. Sundance Kid V 3 2. Afire Bey V 2 Always A Jullyen V 2 Baske Afire 2 Justify 2 Santa Fe V 2

1. Desperado V Justify 2. Afire Bey V Baske Afire Desert Heat V Nevada TBA The Firelord

by number of Half-Arabian winning get

by number of wins

1. Baske Afire 2 1. Cytosk 2 2. Krewe 2 Mamage 2 Starof Fame V 2 3.

Krewe Baske Afire JR Maximilian Starof Fame V CWP Chances Are Cytosk GR Psyches Rey Mamage Neposzar Versace

4 4 3 3 3 3 3

4 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2

Overall Leading Open Trainers

Arabian Leading Open Trainer

Overall Leading Owners

Arabian Leading Owner

by number of horses by number of horses 1. Wendy Potts 4 1. Wendy Potts 2 2. Cheryl Fletcher 3 3. Cynthia Burkman 2 Todd Ehret 2 Half-Arabian Leading Open Trainers Sally Randle 2 by number of horses Marggi Rushlow-Roberts 2 Kimberly Verhage 2 1. Cheryl Fletcher 2 Wendy Potts 2

by number of horses

1. Ricci Desiderio 2. Raven Gropp Barrie Padgham Shea Urgitus

by number of horses 3 2 2 2

1. Ricci Desiderio

2

Half-Arabian Leading Owners by number of horses

1. Barrie Padgham Shea Urgitus

2 2

Overall Leading Breeders

Arabian Leading Breeders

1. Conway Arabians, Inc. 2. R O Lervick Arabians 3. Frank and Sara Chisholm Live Oak Arabians, Inc. Petroglyph Arabians Scarab Farm, Inc. Janet Stevenson Bazy Tankersley Tierra Farms

1. Frank and Sara Chisholm Bazy Tankersley

by number of horses

4 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

by number of horses

2 2

Half-Arabian Leading Breeders by number of horses

1. Conway Arabians, Inc. 2. Live Oak Arabians, Inc. Petroglyph Arabians R O Lervick Arabians Scarab Farm, Inc.

3 2 2 2 2


MARGGIE RUSHLOW-ROBERTS

A 2013 AHT OVERALL LEADING TRAINER OF NATIONAL CHAMPIONS AND RESERVES IN HUNTER/HACK

LH Chevago and Sophia Lourenco

Edward Cullen and Mary Kuras

A to Z and Marggie Rushlow-Roberts

RA Halle Berry Bey and Rachele Cate

Michaelangelo DD and Abbey Mills Edward Cullen and Marggie Rushlow-Roberts

A Whole Lotta Heart and Sabrina Bronni

HSA Braveheart and Krystle Howe

GSF Lordof The Ring and Isabel Chism

TRAINING YOUR NEXT CHAMPION!

MARGGIE RUSHLOW-ROBERTS - RUSHLOW’S ARABIANS 29242 Bredow Rd., Romulus, MI 48174 • Ph/Fax: 734-782-1171 • www.rushlowsarabian.com Volume 44, No. 12 | 229


A 2013

AHT OVERALL LEADING TRAINER OF NATIONAL CHAMPIONS AND RESERVES IN HUNTER

Cynthia Burkman

www. Burkmancentre.com Cynthia Burkman (805) 350-0342 ~ Natalie Jones (480) 206-3146 Devin Miller (303) 888-0781 ~ Taryn Lundquist (480) 204-0844 6525 E. Dixileta Dr. ~ Cave Creek, AZ 85331 Fax: 480-515-8718 ~ Email: burkmancentre@cs.com 230 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


Arabians of the Southeast Will be featured in the JULY Issue of

This feature will include: • Highlights of the Region 12 Championship Show • Exclusive Breeder Profiles • Exclusive Trainer Profiles

In addition to the July issue of AHT, this section will also be sent out as a digital flip book.

Special ad rates and incentives available. Call for details.

Reserve your ad space today!

800-248-4637

www.AHTimes.com Volume 44, No. 12 | 231


2014

Farm & Trainers’

Directory For Fees: call, email or visit website.

ADANDY FARM Trainers: Cathy Vincent, Tim Phelan 13450 Adandy Farm Lane Greenville, DE 19950 302-349-5116 adandyfarm@aol.com http://www.adandyfarm.com Description of Services/Specialties: We train Arabians and National Show Horses in English, hunter, halter, western and driving with an emphasis on amateur riders.

ALJASSIMYA FARM / 100 OAKS RANCH 5125 Happy Canyon Road Santa Ynez, CA 93460 512-947-3167 info@aljassimyafarm.com http://aljassimyafarm.com

ARGENT FARMS, LLC Trainer: Andrew Sellman 92 County Road F River Falls, WI 54022 715-425-9001 info@ArgentFarms.com http://www.argentfarms.com Description of Services/Specialties: Specializing in training, showing and marketing Arabian breeding/halter horses.

BOISVERT FARMS LLC 6034 Flynn Road Port Allen, LA 70767 225-933-6109 info@boisvertfarmsllc.com http://www.boisvertfarmsllc.com

Description of Services/Specialties: We are focused on breeding candidates for the English division.

ARABIANS INTERNATIONAL Trainers: Sandro Pinha, Gill Valdez 28311 N 66th St. Cave Creek, AZ 85331 480-266-3324 Sandro@sandropinha.com http://arabiansinternational.com Description of Services/Specialties: We are proud to offer complete training, conditioning, marketing and stallion management.

232 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

BROOKHILL ARABIANS S102 W33053 Hwy LO Mukwonago, WI 53149 414-303-6677 meier@aptex.biz http://brookhillarabians.com

Description of Services/Specialties: We prize our mares and try to produce halter foals that are athletic enough to excel in the western and hunt arenas as adults, as well as English horses who have great motion and are pretty enough to be easily recognized as purebred Arabians.


BURKMAN CENTRE, INC. Trainers: Cynthia Burkman, Natalie Jones 6525 E. Dixileta Dr. Cave Creek, AZ 85331 805-350-0342 burkmancentre@cs.com http://www.burkmancentre.com Description of Services/Specialties: Full service show barn, training and sales of English, hunter, western, and show hack, along with training all ages of riders for show.

CEDAR RIDGE ARABIANS Trainers: John & Leah Golladay PO Box 8 Jordan, MN 55352 952-492-6590 leah@cedarridgearabians.com www.cedar-ridge.com Description of Services/Specialties: Training, starting and evaluation of young horses, conditioning, halter and performance training.

CHRISHAN PARK ARABIANS Trainers: Chris Wilson & Shan Wilson 2655 E Hwy. AA Springfield, MO 65803 417-833-6273 chris@chrishanpark.com shan@chrishanpark.com http://chrishanpark.com Description of Services/Specialties: Chris Wilson and Shan Wilson operate one of the most successful amateur and open training programs in the United States in their newly updated and expanded Springfield facility, and continue to specialize in English pleasure training.

DIAMOND HILL ARABIANS 6221 McNeely Road Waxhaw, NC 28173 704-843-2591 Janprointl1@aol.com http://hucksconnectionv.com Description of Services/Specialties: Breeding and training, all-around, beginner, English pleasure, eventing, hunter, hunter/ jumper, jumping, lessons.

The formula for success

lTD.com

ENZO WORLDWIDE, LLC 1851 State Highway 193 Cool, CA 95614 415-516-4255 info@enzoltd.com http://enzoltd.com

Description of Services/Specialties: Management, consulting, breeding, boarding and Arabian Farm tours.

FAZENDA FLORESTA Rua Roque Furtado 50 San Paulo, SP Brazil 05613070 011 55 11 4013 6111 lufasano@gmail.com http://www.fazendaflorestaarabians.com

Description of Services/Specialties: Breeding and training.

FOUR MOORE RANCH 1822 CR 156 Bluff Dale, TX 76433 254-968-7933 fourmooreranch@embarqmail.com http://fourmooreranch.com

Description of Services/Specialties: We are small but longtime breeders.

FREEWILL FARM Trainer: Wendy Potts 6130 Bennett Lawson Rd. Mansfield, TX 76063 817-563-9035 freewillfarm@gmail.com http://freewillfarmllc.com Description of Services/Specialties: Freewill Farm prides itself on providing exceptional care to the horses in our program. We work hard to create a healthy atmosphere for horses to be able to perform their best. Our top notch care and professional approach has lead us to have one of the most successful training programs for Arabians and Half-Arabians. Volume 44, No. 12 | 233


GALLUN FARMS, INC. Trainers: Greg Gallun, Bruno Ghiradelli 1977 Edison Street Santa Ynez, CA 93460 805-693-0083 info@gallunfarms.com http://www.gallunfarms.com Description of Services/Specialties: We are a USDA approved facility for semen collection and freezing, export and shipment to the European Union and South America, and have many of our stallions represented via frozen semen in the country of Australia. Our facility is a full-service training, showing, marketing and breeding program for the Arabian halter horse.

GANGI, INC. Trainer: Joel Gangi 16447 Carriage Lane Prairieville, LA 70769 225-802-8895 defiancce@aol.com

Description of Services/Specialties: Training.

GEMINI ACRES EQUINE Trainer: Chris Barter 6636 E Dale Lane Cave Creek, AZ 85331 480-513-1246 info@geminiacresequine.com http://www.geminiacresequine.com

Description of Services/Specialties: Breeding and training.

GUZZO WORLDWIDE LLC Trainer: Rudolfo Guzzo 9720 East Cactus Rd Scottsdale, AZ 85260 480-361-6926 guzzoworldwidellc@gmail.com http://www.guzzoat.com Description of Services/Specialties: Guzzo assists clients worldwide in marketing their horses, building their breeding programs, and showing their horses to the highest show ring honors. Our job is using each horse’s maximum potential for conditioning and training to obtain the highest performance possible in the show arena. 234 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

HAZLEWOOD ARABIANS Trainer: Greg Hazlewood 30812 N. 148th Street Scottsdale, AZ 85262 (Regency Cove) 602-549-8726 hazearabians@aol.com www.hazlewoodarabians.com Description of Services/Specialties: International marketing, sales, showing, training and breeding services.

KIESNER TRAINING Trainers: Joel & Ashton Kiesner 3418 Miser Station Road. Louisville, TN 37777 865-984-5245 ashton@kiesnertraining.com http://kiesnertraining.com Description of Services/Specialties: Training.

KRICHKE TRAINING CENTER Trainers: Keith & Maureen Krichke 11695 Sprinkle Road Vicksburg, MI 49097 269-649-1282 info@krichke.com http://www.krichke.com Description of Services/Specialties: Stallion standing services, training, boarding, and more.

LISA MARKLEY ARABIANS Scottsdale, AZ 480-220-3100 lisa@lisamarkleyarabians.com http://lisamarkleyarabians.com

Description of Services/Specialties: Breeder.


MAPLE VIEW ARABIANS 22422 Serenity Lane NE Poulsbo, WA 98370 360-779-6321 krholt1@embarqmail.com http://mapleviewarabians.com Description of Services/Specialties: Our goal at Maple View Arabians is to produce a stunning, yet highly versatile Arabian. It is our belief that with the proper breeding program, we can produce the classic Arabian “type” combined with remarkable athleticism. We also stress the importance of one-on-one contact through every stage of a foal’s development, and in believing so, have elected to produce no more than 3 foals per year.

MIDWEST STATION II, INC. Trainers: David Boggs, Dagmar Gordiano, Alcides Rodrigues P.O. Box 10 Rogers, MN 55374 763-441-6466 midwest@sbwireless.net http://www.midwestarabian.com Description of Services/Specialties: Training, breeding, marketing, horse insurance and contract and form preparation.

MORNING SUN ARABIANS Box 208 Crossfield, Alberta, Canada 403-946-5292 morningsonarabians@gmail.com http://www.morningsunarabians.com

Description of Services/Specialties: Training, conditioning and breeding.

OAK HAVEN ARABIANS Trainers: Blake Krohn, Jason Krohn, Lauren Grabski 17645 C.R. 4104 Lindale, TX 75771 903-882-5205 genna@oakhavenarabians.com http://oakhavenarabians.com/ Description of Services/Specialties: Oak Haven has branched into a full-service farm where breeding, training, and marketing are all well within our range of abilities.

RAE-DAWN ARABIANS Trainer: Claudinei Machado 11249 E. Arabian Park Drive Scottsdale, AZ 85259 & Box 5A, RR#5 Saskatoon, SK Canada 306-241-1199 mpopp@rdarabians.com http://rdarabians.com Description of Services/Specialties: Breeding.

RANDLE PERFORMANCE HORSES Trainer: Sally Randle 30200 Magic Dog Circle Kiowa, CO 80117 951-551-5861 sallyrandle@gmail.com http://randleperformancehorses.com Description of Services/Specialties: Specialize in all areas of Arabian and Half-Arabian performance training. Along with National caliber open horses, Sally has a very successful amateur and youth program. Fitting clients with the right horse for both enjoyment and success in the show ring is our goal.

RIVERO INTERNATIONAL Trainer: Ricardo Rivero 5752 North 105TH Lane Glendale, AZ 85307 480-619-0166 riverointernational@yahoo.com http://www.riverointernational.com Description of Services/Specialties: Training, show and breeding.

ROHARA ARABIANS Trainers: Joe Alberti, John Rannenberg, Katie Showers 9300 NW 193rd Street Orange Lake, FL 32681 Joe: 610-972-9628 John: 352-266-6446 Rohara@windstream.net http://rohara.com Description of Services/Specialties: Full service breeding and training with numerous national championships in every major division. Volume 44, No. 12 | 235


R.O. LERVICK ARABIANS Trainer: Dennis Wigren P.O. Box 699 Stanwood, WA 98292 360-652-0108 cytosk@whidbey.net http://www.rolervickarabians.com Description of Services/Specialties: Training and breeding services.

RUSHLOW’S ARABIANS Trainers: Marggie Rushlow-Roberts, Sally Rushlow, Chad Roberts, & Louis Rushlow 29242 Bredow Rd. Romulus, MI 48174 734-782-1171 rushfarm2004@yahoo.com www.rushlowsarabians.net Description of Services/Specialties: Rushlow’s Arabians offers horse boarding and training, and riding instruction to the general public. Services have been broadened to include Pony Parties for small children, Birthday Party Horseback events, and Day Camps for both adults and children interested in learning more about horses.

SHAFER ARABIANS 5865 Oak Hill Dr. West Farmington, OH 44491 330-979-9717 nshafer851@aol.com

Description of Services/Specialties: Breeding.

SHEA STABLES 1925 Bartlett Road St. Clair, MI 48079 810-329-6392 sheastable@aol.com http://www.sheastables.com

Description of Services/Specialties: Shea Stables raises, trains, and sells the finest English performance Arabians in the world. Our services include: stallion services and sales.

236 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

SHOWTIME TRAINING CENTER Trainers: Tish Kondas & Carla Schiltz 493 Boone Rd. Newnan, GA 30263 770-252-3300 showtimetc@charter.net http://www.showtimetrainingcenter.net Description of Services/Specialties: Performance and halter training, conditioning, lessons and other services.

SIEMON STABLES Trainer: Matt Siemon 9311 Lower Valley Pike New Carlisle, OH 45344 937-849-1487 www.siemonstables.com

Description of Services/Specialties: We are a full service Equine facility including, training, marketing, breeding, and showing of Arabian, Half-Arabian and National Show Horses. We value our clientele and their horses. It is our policy to educate horses to reach their full potential in the show ring.

SMOKY MOUNTAIN PARK ARABIANS 1558 Muddy Creek Road Lenoir City, TN 37772 865-816-0700 865-816-2406 jacque@SMPArabians.com http://www.smokymountainparkarabians.com Description of Services/Specialties: We breed, train, and show the finest Arabian English pleasure and park horses.

STACHOWSKI FARM, INC. Trainers: Jim Stachowski, Peter Stachowski, Sharon Blendinger, Jonathan Ramsay, Ashley Roberts 12561 St. Rt. 44 Mantua, OH 44255 330-274-2494 info@stachowski.com http://stachowski.com Description of Services/Specialties: Overseeing operations, consulting, and employee education, marketing stallions, breeding and training.


STONEGATE ARABIANS 31460 Silverado Lane Waukee, IA 50263 515-371-7407

Description of Services/Specialties: Breeding.

VARIAN ARABIANS 1275 Corbett Canyon Road Arroyo Grande, CA 93420 805-489-5802 http://www.varianarabians.com/

Description of Services/Specialties: Breeding and training.

WESTRIDGE FARMS Trainers: Jenna Bell & Alisoun Turner 523 Westridge Circle River Falls, WI 54022 715-426-9640 www.westridgefarms.com Description of Services/Specialties: Westridge Farms offers a complete range of training, showing and boarding services for you and your horse. We specialize in hunt, western and saddle seat, and enjoy working with riders of all ages and abilities.

WHELIHAN ARABIAN FARMS, LLC Trainer: Michael Whelihan 6620 320th Street East Eatonville, WA 98328 253-875-5033 bwhelihan@msn.com http://whelihanarabianfarms.com Description of Services/Specialties: Specializing in all divisions with an emphasis on country and English pleasure, as well as driving. We have strong amateur and youth programs as well.

VICKI HUMPHREY TRAINING CENTER Trainers: Vicki Humphrey, Jessica Clinton DeSoto, Gabriel DeSoto 734 Roper Road Canton, GA 30115 770-740-8432 vicki@vickihumphrey.com http://vickihumphreytrainingcenter.com Description of Services/Specialties: Whether it’s riding lessons for your children, training your horse for the national show circuit, or marketing your sale horses, VHTC’s dedicated staff is ready to focus on your priorities.

Contact us to be included in the Farm/Trainer Directory on the AHT website! 1-800-248-4637 www.ahtimes.com/directory Volume 44, No. 12 | 237


In Memoriam Ruthann Grace Rinehart (1947-2014) Ruthann Grace Rinehart leaves behind a legacy of dedication, hard work and generosity. She was highly respected and loved by many. She was a woman in a man’s world, running the union construction company Carrier Construction. She always motivated people to pursue their dreams and never give up. You get out what you put in. And as a horse show mom, to always have safety pins in your pocket! She was a best friend and the biggest fan one could have. Lindsay shares one of her favorite memories, “It was Canadian Nationals in 2007. I was incredibly sick and we were headed home on an early flight the next morning. Instead of going back to the hotel to rest and pack, Ruth informed me the best remedy for a cold was to drink screwdrivers. And that is exactly what we did the entire night, telling stories and laughing, and we ultimately missed our flight the next morning!”

Bey Amore (1996-2014) It remains indelible in my mind the first time I laid eyes on Bey Amore. She had the softest doe eyes I had ever experienced; she seemed to peer deep into your sole when she looked at you. She, of course loved to frolic and put on a show, head and tail held high toward the heavens while snorting and blowing with the best of them. As enjoyable to watch as that was, the time spent in close proximity to her beautiful face and those eyes always melted you and put you in a great mood no matter the moment or place. Her regal image and grace will live on through her special sons and daughters. I was touched by Bey Amore—even though we are saddened by her loss, our lives were enriched and blessed by her presence! Forever in our hearts, —Jeff Schall, all at Shada and owners, Renee and Kevin Holt

Silks (1987-2014) Hesten Park Trainer, Larry Hoffman, shares, “It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of one of the greats of our breed. Multi-National English Pleasure Champion Silks+// (Barbary x Scimsation) was laid to rest today at 27 years of age. Known for his talent and presence, he trotted into the heart of Mrs. Wanda Mitsch and all of us who loved him. He spent the final years of his life enjoying the freedom of the pasture and a life of leisure. His final resting place will be that pasture where he will always be treasured.”

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25

Things You Don’t Know About Me … Wendy Potts

1. The f irst horse I ever rode or handled was … Zurraq++. 2. My happiest moment with a horse was … winning my first national championship in 1978 in hunt seat equitation. 3. The f irst ribbon I ever won was … when I was 8 at a small, one-day show in Walnut, California. 4. My f irst influence in the horse industry was … Eldona Reasoner Arns, who gave me lessons in the beginning. 5. The f irst breed of horse involved with was … Arabians. 6. The age I got involved with horses was … 6 years old. 7. The f irst thing I do when I get to the barn is … say good morning to NDL Pericles. 8. The last thing I do when I leave the barn is … say goodnight to NDL Pericles. 9. The greatest horse I’ve ever ridden is … NDL Pericles. 10. The most gratifying part of my job is … teaching horses and people. 11. My favorite restaurant is … Ruth’s Chris Steak House. 12. My favorite non-horse hobby is … relaxing on a tropical beach (or anywhere for that matter). 13. My favorite genre of movie is … romantic comedies. 14. When someone asks me, why Arabians, I say … because they’re the smartest and most beautiful! 15. My favorite division to show in is … hunter over fences (even though I don’t do it anymore). 16. In my free time, I like to … hang out with family and friends. 17. Horses have taught me … almost everything I know about living life happily. 18. My top vacation spot is … anywhere I haven’t been that’s interesting. 19. Few foods make me happier than … cookies and ice tea. 20. Without horses, I would be … lost. 21. The piece of tack or equipment that I can’t live without is … a German martingale! 22. My childhood dream job was … to be a jockey. 23. My favorite breeding bloodline is … Bask. 24. My biggest pet peeve is … people that don’t take ownership for their actions. 25. The most influential person in my life is … my mom. Volume 44, No. 12 | 239


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UNIQUE JEWELRY & ACCESSORIES

www.ahtboutique.com info@ahtboutique.com Volume 44, No. 12 | 241


- essay & photo contest -

Why do you have the best Arabian horse in the world? In another AHT Year of the Horse Contest, we asked our readers, “Why do you have the Best Arabian Horse in the World?� And in return, we received some incredible photos and essays. Go to our Facebook to like, comment, and share your favorites!

www.facebook.com/ahtimes

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“Year of the Horse” Volume 44, No. 12 | 243


Self-Awareness And Mental Focus:

Conquering The Show Ring With Yoga by LINDSAY SMITH

Both casual riding and intense competition place significant demands on the amateur equestrian. Not only must we manage our horses’ bodies, positions and dispositions, we must remain aware of our own. However, we often become so focused on our horses—their headset, cadence, ring position, attitude—that we completely lose track of ourselves. The situation is exacerbated when adrenaline and show ring jitters enter the fold, further distracting and fragmenting our concentration. There are so many foreign things to focus on and try to control, that we become overloaded. We lose track of ourselves and our rides suffer. This critical flaw is a hallmark of most amateur equestrians. Our body position and awareness is directly responsible for the state of our horses’ frames, pace and temperament. We may not always be aware of what our body or riding position is telling them, but they most certainly are. Whether confused and disjointed or measured and well managed, body position directly influences every aspect of our horses’ performance. Imagine how sensitive a horse must be to detect a tiny fly on their back. Consider how loud our physical cues must seem in comparison, then compound the issue with increased adrenaline and muscle tension that often accompanies show ring jitters. Think about how confusing those messages must be, if we can’t even keep track of what our bodies are doing. Quite simply, by losing track of our bodies we set ourselves and our horses up for failure. To lay the foundation for success in and out of the show ring, we must remember these sensitive animals look to our bodies for guidance. We must train ourselves to remain in control of both mind and muscles, to bring conviction and clarity to the cues we provide our mounts. By focusing on what we can control most readily (our selves), we can simplify communication and remove the haze of uncertainty between horse and rider. 244 | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


While such self awareness and control can seem daunting, a few simple stretches can help prepare both mind and body and begin to build the awareness essential to a successful horse and rider relationship. In last month’s AHT, we introduced yoga as an activity that can help conquer the physical and mental gauntlet of bending our

bodies into the proper position, communicating clearly with our mounts, and vanquish our pre-ride nerves. The following yoga poses are designed to improve the muscle tone/control and mental focus necessary for riding and competing at a high level.

Child’s Pose and Child’s Pose with a Lateral Side Stretch Kneel on the floor. Bring your big toes together. Separate your knees hips width, then sit on your heels. Bend forward, bringing your torso down between your thighs, stretching your spine. Extend both arms in front of you, with shoulders relaxed and away from your ears. Hold this pose for several cycles of breath, allowing the mind to tune-in to the task ahead. Focus on relaxing your entire body. Then, walk your fingers to the right and shift your hips slightly to the left for a side stretch. Focus on stretching out the left side. Hold for 30 seconds and switch sides, walking your fingers to the left and shifting your hips to the right. Hold again for 30 seconds. Benefits: Child’s Pose gently stretches the back, hips, thighs, ankles, and tops of the feet. This is a resting pose that relieves stress and fatigue while calming the mind, heart rate and breath. These features make Child’s Pose an ideal posture to help reduce pre-competition nerves. Adding a side stretch lengthens the entire torso allowing more flexibility in the spine, room for deeper inhales, and improved posture. This allows for a more grounded seat in your saddle and a more fluid movement with your horse. Most importantly, a calm mind and smooth breath translates to a focused and confident rider who is able to instill the same properties into their horse. Modifications: If the quadriceps or knees are tight, place a blanket or block between the back of your thighs and calves. Rest your forehead on a block if it doesn’t reach the ground. Having your forehead in contact with the floor, block or hands increases the pose’s calming aspect.

Dynamic Cat and Cow Start in tabletop pose (hands and knees), making sure hands are stacked under shoulders, and knees are stacked below hips. Begin with a neutral spine (neither arched, nor hunched). Inhale, dropping your stomach as you lift your chest and seat bones to the sky. Exhale, press your hands against the ground and round your upper back, tucking your chin towards your chest. Repeat ten times. Benefits: Dynamic Cat and Cow stretches the entire front and back of your torso and neck muscles. It will help you maintain a supple spine, and proper posture. In addition, it will aid in spinal shock absorption when riding and core stability for balance. This shock absorption is especially important to maintain spinal and hip joint health of riders who sit their jog/trot often. In addition, the better your posture is, the more your field of vision increases allowing you to see the entire arena/field, other horses or obstacles.

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Low Lunge Series Step 1: From standing, release your hands to the ground, step your right foot back, and drop that knee to the floor. Keep the left knee stacked above your left ankle. Reach both arms up. Step 2: Add a hamstring stretch by releasing the hands down to the ground and shifting your hips back to straighten your front leg. Flex the front foot. {Repeat Step 1 & 2 two more times} Step 3: Release both hands down, reach your left arm towards the sky twisting to the right. Keep your hips as still as possible so the twist comes from the spinal column and ensure your knee stays pointed straight forward. Step 4: Release the left arm down to the inside of the front foot and twist in the opposite direction, reaching the right arm high. Outer left foot, knee, and hip should all line up with the knee pointing forward and stacked over the ankle. Step 5: Add a quadriceps stretch by first returning to a Low Lunge. Then twist to the left, reaching your arm back to grab the top of the foot or ankle, stretching your quadriceps. Right hand reaches to the floor or knee. Benefits: Low Lunge stretches out the hip flexors, which can be shortened from posting or holding a two-point position. The hamstrings and quadriceps stretches are important for strong, yet malleable muscles. This helps keep a deep, balanced and quiet seat. The quieter you are in the saddle, the more clear your cues will be to your horse. Modifications: For sensitive knees, cushion with a towel. For tight quadriceps, wrap a towel around your back foot.

Upward Facing Dog Start lying on your stomach with your legs stretched back. Press all 10 toenails into the ground. Bend your elbows 90-degrees and spread your palms on the ground next to your floating ribs. Press down to straighten your arms and simultaneously lift your hips and thighs off the ground. Keep your thighs firm while you slide your shoulders back and down. Lengthen your lower back, as if you were trying to reach your tailbone to your heels. Try to draw your belly button in. Lift through the top of your chest, pressing the shoulder blades against your spine. Benefits: Upward Facing Dog stretches your chest, lungs, abdomen and shoulders. This stretch will increase lung capacity allowing for a rhythmic breath. The spine, core and arm muscles are all strengthened, improving posture, which is imperative to balancing on your horse. The more balanced you are as a rider, the more balanced and cadenced your horse will become. Modifications: For lower back sensitivities, practice Cobra Pose instead. Leave a bend in your elbows and keep your hips and thighs on the floor. Keep the legs firm and draw your chest forward to gather length, just as in Upward Facing Dog. 246 | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


Garland Pose (Yogi Squat) Squat with your feet as close together as possible, keeping your heels on the ground. Bring your arms to the inside of your thighs. Press your palms together so your elbows push out against the inside of your knees. Add a small inner thigh contraction squeezing into the elbows. Benefits: Yogi Squat provides a huge stretch for the ankles, inner thighs and lower back muscles. It also tones the lower belly. The deep hip stretch and inner thigh flexibility provides a more natural and easy turned out leg, allowing you to “hug� your horse easier. By pressing the inner thighs into the arms, and the arms resisting that squeeze, the inner thigh muscles also gain strength and stamina required to remain in the saddle for extended periods of time. Modifications: If your heels don’t reach the ground, place a folded blanket underneath to support.

Tree Pose Start standing with your feet together, arms by your side. Shift your weight onto your right foot, keeping all four corners of your foot rooted to the floor. Bend your left knee and place your left sole onto your right calf or inner thigh (NOT on the knee joint). Stretch your torso tall, lengthening both sides towards the sky. Press your hands together at the center of your chest. Pick a focal point to help maintain your balance. Benefits: Tree pose improves balance by centering and focusing the mind. It also strengthens the core, thighs, calves and ankles. The inner thighs, chest and shoulders are stretched. These are all important components to finding a grounded and stable seat.

Easy Cross Leg Pose Sit on a thickly folded blanket or block. Cross your legs at your shins, stacking your ankles under the opposite knee. Your legs should make a triangle shape, shins parallel to the front of your mat. You can rest your palms, or the back of your hands on the top of your thighs. Sit for a few minutes visualizing your ride ahead. Focus on calm, unhurried breaths as you envision transitions, gates, jumps, or whatever your ride will include. Benefits: Easy Cross Leg Pose strengthens the back while stretching the ankles, knees, hips and thighs. Sitting tall, allowing your spine to align, can reduce anxiety and stress. This in turn, allows your muscles to properly support the spinal column, reducing unnecessary torque or pulling, an bringing an overall calmness to the pose. Modifications: Sit with your back against a wall. If your inner thighs are tight, place a block or blanket between the outer thigh and the ground for support.

Dedicating a few minutes before you ride to the key yoga exercises shown above can help open your muscles, improve balance, and focus your mind making the transition from ground to saddle more smooth. Taking small steps to

integrate yoga into your training program can create a rider who is balanced in body, mind and spirit. These are all attributes required to instill confidence, symmetry and focus in your horse. Happy riding! n Volume 44, N o . 12 | 247


Calendar Of Events Items for the calendar are run FREE of charge on a space-available basis. Calendar listings are subject to change; please confirm dates and locale before making your plans or reservations. MAIL notices to Arabian Horse Times, Attention: Charlene Deyle, P.O. Box 69, Jordan, MN 55352; phone 612-816-3018 or e-mail: charlened@ahtimes.com. *Due to the intrinsic nature of these shows, Arabian Horse Times cannot be held accountable for their validity.

SEMINARS/CLINICS/SALES/ OPEN HOUSE/AWARDS

June 26-29, 2014, Saddle Seat Riding Clinic, William Woods University, Fulton, Missouri. Contact: Gayle Lampe, 573-592-4395. August 2-3, 2014, Varian Arabians Diamond Jubilee, Celebrating 60 Years, Arroyo Grande, California. Contact: 805-489-5802. August 7-10, 2014, Saddle Seat Riding Clinic, William Woods University, Fulton, Missouri. Contact: Gayle Lampe, 573-592-4395.

REGIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS

May 25, 2014, Region 1 Hunter/Jumper Offsite Championship, Temecula, California. Contact: Nancy Harvey, 626-355-9101. May 28-31, 2014, Region 9 Championship, Ft. Worth, Texas. Contact: Melanni Hershberger, 480-443-3372. May 29-June 1, 2014, Region 1 Championship, Del Mar, California. Contact: Jean Beck, 559-642-2072. May 29-June 1, 2014, Region 11 Dressage, Hunter/Jumper & Sport Horse Offsite Championship, Springfield, Illinois. Contact: Region 11. May 30, 2014, Region 4 Dressage 4th Level & Up Offsite Championship, Auburn, Washington. Contact: Kaye Phaneuf, 503-651-3037. May 31-June 1, 2014, Region 5 Sport Horse Offsite Championship, Spokane, Washington. Contact: Kaye Phaneuf, 503-651-3037. June 5-7, 2014, Region 8 Championship, Denver, Colorado. Contact: Jo Anne Read, 303-648-3261. June 8, 2014, Region 14 Hunter/Jumper Offsite Championship, Aiken, South Carolina. Contact: Lynn Daniel-Glover, 478-955-3030. June 11-15, 2014, Region 10 Championship, St. Paul, Minnesota. Contact: Mary Tronson, 763-755-1698.

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June 13, 2014, Region 10 55-Mile Endurance Championship Ride, Preston, Minnesota. Contact: Dianne Schmidt, 507-545-9937. June 14, 2014, Region 1 50-Mile Endurance Championship Ride, Descanso, California. Contact: Jennifer Bishop, 760-518-7065. June 14, 2014, Region 10 30-Mile Competitive Trail Ride Championship, Preston, Minnesota. Contact: Dianne Schmidt, 507-545-9937. June 14-15, 2014, Region 13 Dressage/Sport Horse Offsite Championship, Edinburg, Indiana. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039. June 18-22, 2014, Region 13 Championship, Springfield, Ohio. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039. June 20-22, 2014, Region 2 Championship, Santa Barbara, California. Contact: Sharon Richards, 916-645-2288. June 20-22, 2014, Western Canadian Breeders Championship, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. Contact: Cheryl Sproule, 306-752-4240. June 21-22, 2014, Region 10 Sport Horse/ Dressage Offsite Championship, Waukesha, Wisconsin. Contact: Candy Ziebell, 262-363-3640. June 24-28, 2014, Region 4 Championship, Nampa, Idaho. Contact: Patricia Ann Hough, 253-847-8842. June 26-29, 2014, Region 14 Championship, Lexington, Kentucky. Contact: Jean Hedger, 937-434-6114. June 28, 2014, Region 18, 100-Mile Endurance Championship Ride, Finch, Ontario, Canada. Contact: Laila Forget, 613-294-0105. June 28-29, 2014, Region 3 Sport Horse Offsite Championship, Elk Grove, California. Contact: Annette Wells, 530-344-1706. July 3-5, 2014, Region 6 Championship, Douglas, Wyoming. Contact: Claude Clark, 406-388-3364. July 3-6, 2014, Region 11 Championship Show, Springfield, Illinois. Contact: Dave Waggoner, 309-338-5128. July 3-6, 2014, Region 15 Championship, Lexington, Virginia. Contact: Marilyn Norton, 715-514-5478. July 8-12, 2014, Region 3 Championship, Reno, Nevada. Contact: Sharon Richards, 916-645-2288. July 8-12, 2014, Region 5 Championship, Monroe, Washington. Contact: Patricia Ann Hough, 253-847-8842. July 9-12, 2014, Region 16 Championship, Syracuse, New York. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039.

July 17, 2014, Eastern Canadian Breeders Championship, Burlington, Ontario, Canada. Contact: Dan Cross, 519-483-2239. July 18-19, 2014, Region 18 Championship, Burlington, Ontario, Canada. Contact: Dan Cross, 519-483-2239. July 21-26, 2014, Region 17 Championship, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Contact: Marion Enders, 403-227-0538. August 1-3, 2014, East Coast Championship, Lexington, Virginia. Contact: Pamela McDermott, 770-728-4383. September 7, 2014, Region 18 Sport Horse and Dressage Offsite Championship, Campbellville, Ontario, Canada. Contact: Dan Cross, 519-483-2239. September 18-21, 2014, Region 8 Working Western Offsite Championship, Castle Rock, Colorado. Contact: Jo Anne Read, 303-648-3261. September 21-22, 2014, Region 9 55-Mile 2 Day Competitive Trail Ride Championship, Decatur, Texas. Contact: Jean Green, 580-351-9301. October 4, 2014, Region 12 50-Mile Endurance Championship Ride, Hefflin, Alabama. Contact: Tamra Schoech, 770-554-1545.

SHOWS MAY May 14-16, 2014, Zia Classic A and B, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Contact: Lois Seibel, 505-345-2244. May 15-18, 2014, Diablo Arab Spring Show, Elk Grove, California. Contact: Melanni Hershberger, 480-443-3372. May 16-18, 2014, AHACO Arab Show A and B, Eugene, Oregon. Contact: Patricia Ann Hough, 253-847-8842. May 15-18, 2014, NYS Horse Breeders Show, Syracuse, New York. Contact: Tari Weston, 315-695-1332. May 16-18, 2014, ARK Arab Victory Challenge A and B, Texarkana, Arkansas. Contact: Alan Harmon, 501-330-2272. May 16-18, 2014, NJ HAHA A and B, Allentown, New Jersey. Contact: Joan Mitch, 610-914-7008. May 16-18, 2014, Parkland Spring Show I, Red Deer, Alberta, Canada. Contact: Marion Enders, 403-227-0538. May 17, 2014, Utah AHC May Madness One Day Show, South Jordan, Utah. Contact: Dayle Dickhaut, 208-234-0157.


Calendar Of Events

May 17-18, 2014, Northern Minnesota Arab Horse Show, Sauk Centre, Minnesota. Contact: Janice Barington, 320-587-5825. May 17-18, 2014, Old Dominion Arab Summer Fun Show, Doswell, Virginia. Contact: Marie Taylor, 804-314-5216. May 18-19, 2014, Parkland Spring Show II, Red Deer, Alberta, Canada. Contact: Marion Enders, 403-227-0538. May 22-25, 2014, IEAHC Memorial Day Classic Show 1 and 2, Spokane, Washington. Contact: Lisa Joy Kolke, 360-687-2256. May 22-25, 2014, Buckeye Sweepstakes, Columbus, Ohio. Contact: Jean Hedger, 937-434-6114. May 23-25, 2014, SCHAA Arabian Show, Temecula, California. Contact: Nancey Harvey, 626-355-9101. May 23-25, 2014, CAHC Spring Show A and B, Denver, Colorado. Contact: Jo Anne Read, 303-648-3261. May 23-25, 2014, Spindletop Spring Arab A and B, Katy, Texas. Contact: Charlene Lynch, 214-403-0460. May 23-25, 2014, The Badger Classic, Jefferson, Wisconsin. Contact: Pamela Scoggins, 217-369-7753. May 23-25, 2014, AHC Of CT Horse Show, West Springfield, Massachusetts. Contact: Beth Barnes, 860-302-2061. May 24, 2014, MAHA Spring Show I One Day Show B, Billings, Montana. Contact: Becky Mcallister, 406-861-4929. May 25, 2014, MAHA Spring Show II One Day Show B, Billings, Montana. Contact: Becky Mcallister, 406-861-4929. May 24-25, 2014, Road Runner Sport Horse Show I, Tucson, Arizona. Contact: Rosemary Gordon Panuco, 520-797-6921. May 24-25, 2014, Iowa Memorial Weekend A and B, Des Moines, Iowa. Contact: Region 11. May 28-29, 2014, Region 1 Pre-Show, Del Mar, California. Contact: Jean Beck, 559-642-2072. May 28-June 1, 2014, Desert Wine Horse Show, Las Vegas, Nevada. Contact: Vleonica Roberts, 702-721-6610. May 28-June 1, 2014, Illinois/Arab Inc. All Arab Show, Springfield, Illinois. Contact: Region 11. May 29, 2014, Showtime 18 One Day Show, East Lansing, Michigan. Contact: Sally Epps, 920-992-3293. May 29-30, 2014, Arabian Sport Horse Celebration, Auburn, Washington. Contact: Kaye Phaneuf, 503-651-3037.

May 30, 2014, Aurora 他 Qualifier A and B, Ponoka, Alberta, Canada. Contact: Marion Enders, 403-227-0538. May 30-June 1, 2014, Showtime 2014, East Lansing, Michigan. Contact: Sally Epps, 920-992-3293. May 30-June 1, 2014, VAHA At The Meadow Show, Doswell, Virginia. Contact: Robin Lohnes, 540-347-2975. May 30-June 1, 2014, Aurora Arabian Show, Ponoka, Alberta, Canada. Contact: Marion Enders, 403-227-0538. May 31-June 1, 2014, NC PAHA Arab A and B, Hughesville, Pennsylvania. Contact: Patricia McQuiston, 570-924-4836. May 31-June 1, 2014, Comstock Spring Fiesta A and B, Carson City, Nevada. Contact: Shannon Johnson, 775-750-0237. May 31-June 1, 2014, SAHA Spring Icebreaker, Moose Jaw, Saskatoon, Canada. Contact: Chantelle Dawn Rutledge, 306-483-2434. JUNE June 2-7, 2014, Egyptian Event, Lexington, Kentucky. Contact: www.pyramidsociety.org June 4, 2014, AHA Region 8 Lead-In Show, Denver, Colorado. Contact: Jo Anne Read, 303-648-3261. June 5-8, 2014, WA Midsummer Classic A and B, Monroe, Washington. Contact: Bonny Braden, 425-338-1431. June 6-8, 2014, Gold Coast Classic, Watsonville, California. Contact: Nancy Goertzen, 559-625-2631. June 6-8, 2014, The Alberta Classic A and B, Ponoka, Alberta, Canada. Contact: Aldona Tracey, 780-986-6731. June 6-8, 2014, Palmetto Sport Horse Classic, Aiken, South Carolina. Contact: Lynn DanielGlover, 478-955-3030. June 6-8, 2014, Eastern Classic, Hamburg, New York. Contact: Lindsey Hager, 716-481-4907. June 6-8, 2014, The Alberta Classic A, Ponoka, Alberta, Canada. Contact: Aldona Tracey, 780-986-6731. June 7, 2014, NCAHA/HAHA Summer Sport Horse One Day Show A and B, Raleigh, North Carolina. Contact: Marie Taylor, 804-314-5216. June 7-8, 2014, The Summer Sport Horse Spectacular, Apopka, Florida. Contact: Carlie Evans, 352-215-0710. June 7-8, 2014, Medallion I A and II B, Wilmington, Ohio. Contact: Jean Hedger, 937-434-6114.

June 8, 2014, NCAHA/HAHA Summer Dressage One Day Show A and B, Raleigh, North Carolina. Contact: Marie Taylor, 804-314-5216. June 10-11, 2014, Region 10 Pre-Show, St. Paul, Minnesota. Contact: Mary Tronson, 763-755-1698. June 10-14, 2014, Midwest Charity, Springfield, Illinois. Contact: Cheryl Rangel, 847-537-4743. June 12-14, 2014, Hoosier Horse Classic, Edinburgh, Indiana. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039. June 12-15, 2014, Blue Ridge Arab Classic A and B, Lexington, Virginia. Contact: Marie Taylor, 804-314-5216. June 13-15, 2014, NJ HAHA Classic, Allentown, New Jersey. Contact: Joan Mitch, 610-914-7008. June 14-15, 2014, Island Classics Arabian Horse Show, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. Contact: Kathy McDonald, 250-722-2150. June 14-15, 2014, New Brunswick Morgan & Arabian Show, Sussex, New Brunswick, Canada. Contact: Dawn Brown, 506-433-5725. June 14-15, 2014, AHAEC Summer Sizzler, Milton, Ontario, Canada. Contact: Pam Worts, 519-681-3943. June 16, 2014, 4 State Arab Dressage One Day Show, Claremore, Oklahoma. Contact: Stacia Wert Gray, 405-204-3870. June 18-19, 2014, Region 2 Pre-Show, Santa Barbara, California. Contact: Sharon Richards, 916-645-2288. June 18-22, 2014, Region 13 Pre-Show A and B, Springfield, Ohio. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039. June 20-21, 2014, WDHA Dressage & Sport Horse Show, Waukesha, Wisconsin. Contact: Candy Ziebell, 262-363-3640. June 20-21, 2014, Region 12 Youth Jamboree, Pendleton, South Carolina. Contact: Nancy Baker, 828-305-4023. June 21, 2014, Summer Salsa Sport Horse One Day Show, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Contact: Tara Turner, 505-832-6823. June 21, 2014, Summer Salsa Dressage One Day Show, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Contact: Tara Turner, 505-832-6823. June 21, 2014, OVAHA Tulip One Day Show, Richmond, Ontario, Canada. Contact: Theo Hunter, 613-989-3096. June 21-23, 2014, Region 4 Pre-Show, Nampa, Idaho. Contact: Patricia Ann Hough, 253-847-8842.

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Calendar Of Events

June 22, 2014, Summer Salsa One Day Show A and B, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Contact: Tara Turner, 505-832-6823. June 25, 2014, Region 14 Silverama, Lexington, Kentucky. Contact: Jean Hedger, 937-434-6114. June 26-27, 2014, Pacific Coast Arabian Sport Horse Classic, Elk Grove, California. Contact: Annette Wells, 530-344-1706. June 26-28, 2014, AHANE 60th ‘Big Money” Arab Show, West Springfield, Massachusetts. Contact: Lurline Combs, 603-627-8645. June 27-29, 2014, Pennsylvania Arab Junior Amateur Games, Centre Hall, Pennsylvania. Contact: Patricia McQuiston, 570-924-4836. JULY July 2, 2014, Region 6 Pre-One Day Show, Douglas, Wyoming. Contact: Becky McAllister, 406-861-4929. July 2, 2014, Region 11 Pre-Show A and B, Springfield, Illinois. Contact: Nancy Harvey, 626-355-9101. July 2, 2014, Region 15 Pre-Show, Lexington, Virginia. Contact: Marilyn Norton, 715-514-5478. July 4-5, 2014, CAHC Northern Div. Estes Park One Day Show I and II, Estes Park, Colorado. Contact: Jo Anne Read, 303-648-3261. July 4-6, 2014, Flagstaff All Arab Show, Flagstaff Riding Center, Arizona. Contact: Melanni Hershberger, 480-443-3372. July 6-8, 2014, Region 3 Last Chance Qualifying Show, Reno Nevada. Contact: Sharon Richards, 916-645-2288. July 7, 2014, Region 5 Pre-Show, Monroe, Washington. Contact: Patricia Ann Hough, 253-847-8842. July 9, 2014, Region 16 Hunter Jumper Qualifier, Syracuse, New York. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039. July 10-13, 2014, Great Arabian Get Together, Cannon Falls, Minnesota. Contact: Leesa Berhow, 715-294-3092. July 12, 2014, Show Your Horse Sport Horse Challenge One Day Show, Newberry, Florida. Contact: Nannet Read, 352-278-2004. July 12-13, 2014, Road Runner Sport Horse Show II, Tucson, Arizona. Contact: Rosemary Gordon Panuco, 520-797-6921. July 12-13, 2014, OVAHA Summer Sizzler IA and II B, Springfield, Ohio. Contact: Jean Hedger, 937-434-6114. July 12-13, 2014, Sunrise Summer Classic, Sussex, New Brunswick, Canada. Contact: Dawn Browm, 506-433-5725. July 17, 2014, Region 18 Last Chance, Burlington, Ontario, Canada. Contact: Dan Cross, 519-483-2239.

250 | ARABIAN HORSE TIMES

July 17-19, 2014, Working Western Celebration, St. Paul, Minnesota. Contact: Sandy Woerle, 651-288-4330. July 31, 2014, Eastern Arab Horse Show, Lexington, Virginia. Contact: Pamela McDermott, 770-728-4383. July 31-August 2, 2014, Missouri State Fair, Sedalla, Missouri. Contact: Lenard, Davenport, 417-888-0686. July 31-August 3, 2014, NRHA Fall Futurity (Arabian and H/A 4-year-old Futurity), St. Paul, Minnesota. Contact: Sandy Woerle, 651-288-4330. AUGUST August 1-3, 2014, WAHA August Show, Jefferson, Wisconsin. Contact: Jan Lerud, 715-488-2834. August 2-3, 2014, Daffodil Arab Summer Show, Puyallup, Washington. Contact: Linsey O’Donnell, 253-988-4265. August 8-10, 2014, GAHA Summer Classic, Conyers, Georgia. Contact: Jean Buddin, 228-826-1486. August 9-10, 2014, Arabians In Motion Sport Horse Classic, Lake Oswego, Oregon. Contact: Amanda Howell, 503-639-0249. August 9, 2014, Southern Cross Cutting Summer Spectacular One Day Show, Foster, Oklahoma. Contact: Kristina Garland, 940-580-0383. August 15-17, 2014, Erie County Fair, Hamburg, New York. Contact: Charlotte Jatnes, 607-546-7373. August 16-17, 2014, AHAM Summer One Day Show I and II, Mason, Michigan. Contact: Sara Ressler, 248-922-0148. August 22-24, 2014, Heritage Arabian Classic I A and B, Wakefield, Virginia. Contact: Marie Taylor, 804-314-5216. August 22-24, 2014, New York State Fair, Syracuse, New York. Contact: Tari Weston, 315-695-1332. August 23-24, 2014, OHAHA Fall Show A and B, Springfield, Ohio. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039. August 24, 2014, ASAAD Summer Fun One Day Show, Valparaiso, Indiana. Contact: Melanie Schuhmacher Forbes, 219-671-2461. August 28-30, 2014, Minnesota State Fair, St. Paul, Minnesota. Contact: Patty Humphries, 651-288-4480. August 28-September 1, 2014, Iowa Fall Classic, Des Moines, Iowa. Contact: Laurie Persson, 920-568-9073. August 29-31, 2014, WMAHA Fall Classic, Mason, Michigan. Contact: Jean Hedger, 937-434-6114.

August 29-31, 2014, Silver Spur All Arab, Hamburg, New York. Contact: Lindsey Hager, 716-481-4907. August 30, 2014, CAHC Southern Division One Day Show @ Latigo, Elbert, Colorado. Contact: Jo Anne Read, 303-648-3261. SEPTEMBER September 5-7, 2014, Abu All Arabian, Springfield, Illinois. Contact: Laurie Persson, 920-568-9073. September 6, 2014, Milestone Fall Show, Campbellville, Ontario, Canada. Contact: Cheryl Smith, 905-854-0762. September 11-13, 2014, National Show Horse Finals, Springfield, Illinois. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039. September 12-14, 2014, State Fair of Texas A and B, Dallas, Texas. Contact: Beth Walker, 225-772-6815. September 12-14, 2014, Annual Magnolia Summer Sizzler, Perry, Georgia. Contact: Nancy Baker, 828-305-4023. September 13, 2014, Fun In The Fall Arab & HA/AA One Day Show, Powell Butte, Oregon. Contact: Kyleigh Lamb, 541-548-0313. September 13-14, 2014, Indiana Arab Pro-Am Show, Rochester, Indiana. Contact: Terry Leek, 574-269-2980. September 17-20, 2014, Arabian Horse Celebration, Louisville, Kentucky. Contact: Jean Beck, 559-642-2072. September 18-20, 2014, Autumn Classic Arab Show, South Jordan, Utah. Contact: Dayle Dickhaut, 208-234-0157. September 18-21, 2014, CAHC Fall Show, Castle Rock, Colorado. Contact: Jo Anne Read, 303-648-3261. September 18-22, 2014, American Royal Arab Horse Show, Kansas City, Missouri. Contact: Ruth Charpie, 816-765-5683. September 19-21, 2014, Autumn Classic A and B, Bryan, Texas. Contact: Patty Liarakos, 210-912-8679. September 25-26, 2014, Tulsa State Fair, Tulsa, Oklahoma. Contact: Ruth Charpie, 816-765-5683. September 26-28, 2014, Diablo Fall Fling, Elk Grove, California. Contact: Melanni Hershberger, 480-443-3372. September 26-28, 2014, Arabian Fall Classic, Eugene, Oregon. Contact: Diane Leclere, 541-895-8646. September 27-28, 2014, Ozark Heartland Arab Fall Classic I and II One Day Show, Mt. Vernon, Missouri. Contact: Lenard Davenport, 417-888-0686.


Calendar Of Events

OCTOBER October 3-5, 2014, Dixie Gulf Panhandle Ruff Out, Baker, Florida. Contact: Jean Buddin, 228-826-1486. October 4, 2014, Chile Roast Sport Horse and Dressage One Day Show, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Contact: Tara Turner, 505-832-6823. October 4, 2014, CRAA Fall Finale One Day Show, East Haddam, Connecticut. Contact: Debbi Thomas, 860-526-9526. October 5, 2014, Chile Roast One Day Show A and B, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Contact: Tara Turner, 505-832-6823. October 31-November 2, 2014, Western Carolinas Fall Show, Clemson, South Carolina. Contact: Nancy Baker, 828-305-4023. NOVEMBER November 6-9, 2014, NTAHC Shootout, Glen Rose, Texas. Contact: Sherry McGraw, 903-872-7279. November 14-16, 2014, Music City Arab Show, Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039. DECEMBER December 4-7, 2014, Saguaro Classic, Scottsdale, Arizona. Contact: Melanni Hershberger, 480-443-3372.

ENDURANCE/ COMPETITIVE TRAIL RIDE

May 17, 2014, Region 6 50-Mile Endurance Ride Championship, Winston, Montana. Contact: Amy Palmer, 406-458-8891. May 17, 2014, Canyon Ferry Lake 25-Mile Competitive Trail Ride, Winston, Montana. Contact: Amy Palmer, 406-458-8891. May 17-18, 2014, Indy Run 50-Mile Endurance Ride I and II, Norman, Indiana. Contact: Cindy Young, 502-477-6449. May 18, 2014, Region 6 25-Mile Competitive Trail Ride Championship, Winston, Montana. Contact: Amy Palmer, 406-458-8891. May 18, 2014, Canyon Ferry Lake 50Mile Endurance Ride, Winston, Montana. Contact: Amy Palmer, 406-458-8891. May 19, 2014, High Desert Classic I 50Mile Endurance Ride, Fallon, Nevada. Contact: Suzanne Ford Huff, 775-783-9608. May 24, 2014, Outback Hallelujah Trail 50-Mile Endurance Ride I, Lapine, Oregon. Contact: Anna Sampson, 503-829-6002. May 24, 2014, Grand Island 50- and 75-Mile Endurance Ride, Rapid River, Michigan. Contact: Linda Hamrick, 260-602-9660.

May 25, 2014, NASTR 50- and 75-Mile Endurance Ride, Dayton, Nevada. Contact: Gina Hall, 775-849-0839. May 26, 2014, Outback Hallelujah Trail 50-Mile Endurance Ride II, Lapine, Oregon. Contact: Anna Sampson, 503-829-6002. May 30-June 1, 2014, AHDRA Endure 50-Mile, 2-Day 100-Mile Endurance Ride and 25-Mile Competitive Trail Ride, Chandlerville, Illinois. Contact: Christopher Power, 217-648-2974. June 7-8, 2014, Colorado Trail 40- and 60-Mile 2-Day Competitive Trail Ride, Buffalo Creek, Colorado. Contact: Lin Ward, 303-371-6008. June 13, 2014, SE MN 30-Mile Competitive Trail Ride, Preston, Minnesota. Contact: Dianne Schmidt, 507-545-9937. June 14, 2014, SE MN 55-Mile Endurance Ride, Preston, Minnesota. Contact: Dianne Schmidt, 507-545-9937. June 14-15, 2014, White River 50-Mile Endurance Ride I and II, White Cloud, Michigan. Contact: Linda Hamrick, 260-602-9660. June 21-22, 2014, Hopkins Creek 50Mile Endurance Ride I and II, Manton, Michigan. Contact: Linda Hamrick, 260-602-9660. June 28-29, 2014, Region 18 Local 50- and 75Mile Endurance Ride I and II, Finch, Ontario, Canada. Contact: Laila Forget, 613-294-0105. July 5, 2014, AHAM 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Augusta, Michigan. Contact: Linda Hamricck, 260-602-9660. July 5, 2014, Master The Mountain 55-Mile Endurance Ride, Tionesta, Pennsylvania. Contact: Patricia Stedman, 716-257-5349. July 12, 2014, Mosquito Run 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Rogers, Minnesota. Contact: Peggy Pasillas, 651-450-7959. July 13, 2014, Mosquito Run 25-Mile Competitive Trail Ride, Rogers, Minnesota. Contact: Peggy Pasillas, 651-450-7959. July 19-20, 2014, Grand Island North 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Rapid River, Michigan. Contact: Linda Hamrick, 260-602-9660. August 3-9, 2014, Shore To Shore 50-Mile Endurance Ride I, II, III, IV, V, VI, and VII, White Cloud, Michigan. Contact: Linda Hamrick, 260-602-9660. August 30, 2014, White River 55-Mile Endurance Ride, White Cloud, Michigan. Contact: Linda Hamrick, 260-602-9660. August 31, 2014, White River 100-Mile Endurance Ride, White Cloud, Michigan. Contact: Linda Hamrick, 260-602-9660.

August 31-September 1, 2014, White River 50-Mile Endurance Ride I and II, White Cloud, Michigan. Contact: Linda Hamrick, 260-602-9660. September 13, 2014, Tin Cup Springs 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Luther, Michigan. Contact: Linda Hamrick, 260-602-9660. September 20, 2014, Virginia City 100-Mile Endurance Ride, Virginia City, Nevada. Contact: Gina Hall, 775-849-0839. September 27, 2014, Pine Marten Run 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Rapid River, Michigan. Contact: Linda Hamrick, 260-602-9660. October 2-4, 2014, Alabama Yellowhammer Pioneer 50-, 55-, and 75-Mile Endurance Ride, Hefflin, Alabama. Contact: Tamra Schoech, 770-554-1545. October 4, 2014, Red Rock Rumble 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Reno, Nevada. Contact: Gina Hall, 775-849-0839. October 11, 2014, Oak Leaf Run 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Hamilton, Michigan. Contact: Linda Hamrick, 260-602-9660.

NATIONAL EVENTS

July 19-26, 2014, Youth Nationals, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Contact: AHA, 303-6966-4500. August 11-16, 2014, Canadian Nationals, Brandon, Manitoba, Canada. Contact: AHA, 303-6966-4500. September 24-27, 2014, Sport Horse Nationals, Nampa, Idaho. Contact: AHA, 303-6966-4500. October 17-25, 2014, U.S. Nationals, Tulsa, Oklahoma. Contact: AHA, 303-6966-4500.

INTERNATIONAL EVENTS

*Go to ‘www.arabianessence.com or www.ecaho.org for international shows and information. Visit www.ahtimes.com for a calendar view of these dates. CorreCtion: On page 42 of the April (Vol. 44, No.11) issue, Rising Star Jessica Schaeffler’s name was spelled incorrectly.

Volume 44, No. 12 | 251


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Volume 44, No. 12 | 253


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Index Of Advertisers A

M

Acevedo Arabians ................................................................. FC, 30, 31 Adandy Farm................................................................................86, 87 AHT Magazine .................................................................. 4Tutto (122) AHT Subscriptions ...........................................................................252 Ajman Stud ...................................................................................38, 39 Al Maliik LLC ............................................................................ 30, 31 Al Mohamadia Stud .....................................................................26, 27 Al Saqran Stud ........................................................ 20-23MW (70-73) Al Shaqab ...............................10-15MW (60-65), 24-25MW (74-75) Aljassimya Farm ...................................................................................5 Arabian Horse Global ......................................................................254 Arabian Reining Breeders Classic .....................................................32 Arabian Soul Ltd. ..................................................8-11Tutto (126-129) Arabians International ...........................................6-9Tutto (124-127) Argent Farms ........................................................................2, 3, 20-31

Maple View Arabians .........................................................................85 Marino Arabians ...............................................30-32MW (80-82), 83 Maroon Fire Arabians, Inc. ...............................................IFC, 1, 253 Midwest ......................................7-9, 49, 50, 1-32MW (51-82), 83, 84 Morning Sun Arabians.....................................................................107

B

N North Arabians..................................................................7Tutto (125)

O Oak Ridge Arabians ........................................ 16-19MW (66-69), 117

P Pastorino, Daniel & Fabiana ................................... 28-29MW (78-79) Pay-Jay Arabians ...............................................................................253 Perkins, Suzanne & Perry ...........................................................88, 89

Q

Boisvert Farms LLC ........................................................................201 Burkman Centre ...............................................................................230

Quarry Hill Farm .............................................................................252

C

Deor Farm ....................................................................................46, 47 Desert Heritage Magazine .............................................. 25Tutto (143)

R.O. Lervick Arabians ..................................................................... 252 Rae-Dawn Arabians ........................................................................... 33 Randle Performance Horses.....................................................214, 215 Regency Cove Farms .............................................................. 260, IBC Rivero International .....................................................................10, 11 Rohara Arabians ...............................................................................108 Royal Arabians .............................................................................46, 47 Rushlow’s Arabians ..........................................................................229

E

S

Cedar Ridge Arabians ......................................52Tutto (170), 171, 173 Chestnuthill Arabians ......................................................................108 ChriShan Park ......................................................................... 206, 207 Conquest BR Partners LLC ............................................................ BC

D

EAC Equine LLC................................................................... 204, 205 Enzo Worldwide LLC ....................................... 12-13Tutto (130-131)

F Fazenda Floresta ..............................................118, 1-3Tutto (119-121) Four Moore Ranch ...................................................................... 22, 23 Freewill Farm ...................................................................................216 Frierson Atkinson .............................................................................252

G Gallún Farms, Inc ...............................12-13Tutto (130-131), 172, BC Gangi, Inc. ........................................................................................200 Grand Arabians .......................................................26-27MW (76-77) Gropp, Jeanne, Bill & Raven ........................................................... 217 Guzzo Worldwide LLC ...............................................................88, 89

H

R

Sanders, Bert .................................................................................... 116 Schneiders .........................................................................................109 Shafer Arabians ................................................................................181 Sheehe, Jo Ann & Phil .................................................................40, 41 Showtime Training Center ...................................................... 202-205 Siemon Stables, Inc. .........................................................................210 Simeon Stud ........................................................14-21Tutto (132-139) Smoky Mountain Park Arabians LLC ........................................12, 13 Southern Oaks Farm ................................................................ 174, 175 Stachowski Farm, Inc. ......................................................................180 Stone Ridge Arabians...........................................................................7 Stonegate Arabians LLC .................................................................2, 3 Strand’s Arabian Stables .................................................................. 116

T

K

The Hat Lady ...................................................................................253 Trotwood Farm...................................................................................48 Tutto Arabi ......................................................... 22-26Tutto (140-144)

Kiesner Training ....................................................................... 174, 175 Kirby, Katherine ...............................................................................180 Koch, Laura ...................................................................................... 116

V Varian Arabians ........................................................................212, 213 Vicki Humphrey Training Center ........................................... 176, 177

L

W

Larson, Claire & Margaret ............................................. 24, 25, 28, 29 Lazzarini, Steve & Diana ....................................................... 208, 209 Lisa Markley Arabians ........................................10-11Tutto (128-129)

Westridge Farms ..........................................................................24, 25 Whelihan Arabian Farms ........................................................ 178, 179 Wilkins Livestock Insurers, Inc. ......................................................253

Hazlewood Arabians LLC ..................................................... 260, IBC Hegg, Mrs. Mickey ..........................................................................253

Volume 44, No. 12 | 259


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Vol. 44, No. 12 - Arabian Horse Times - May 2014  
Vol. 44, No. 12 - Arabian Horse Times - May 2014  

May Issue