Page 1


Brazilian Nationals

Fasario

LLC


Fasario

LLC

A new tradition of excellence! Presented By rInaldo longuInI

S R l

w


Fasario Gazal al Shaqab

Marwan al Shaqab

little liza FaMe

aria iMpreSario

echo MaGniFFicoo

Gc echlectica

Gc natori

LLC

2010 bay colt bey Shah

Falcon bhF

bey Serenade SF

rd Fabreanna

MaGic dreaM cahr

GF SiMply MaGic

GF providence


South American representative: Rinaldo Longuini longuiniht@yahoo.com.br www.longuInIht.com.Br

Fazenda Floresta • Itu, BrazIl www.FazendaFlorestaaraBIans.com

United States representative: David Boggs midwest@sbwireless.net www.mIdwestaraBIan.com


Fasario

LLC


6A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Volume 43, no. 4 | 7A


Contents Volume 43, No. 4A & 4AA 10A

Comments From The Editor

52A

Cover Story: Claire Larson—Businessman, Arabian Horseman, Grandfather by Kara Larson

66A

2012 U.S. Nationals Preview by Linda White

80A On The COver:

Valori TRF

(DA Valentino x Satin Chall LL), owned by Claire and Margaret Larson of Tea, S.D. For more information, see page 52A.

Midwest: The Power Of A Dream—The Power Of A Team

24 Midwest Fazenda Floresta—The Beautiful Story Of This Special Colt 160A

Presenting The Personalities—Becky And Bob Nash by Mary Kirkman

212A

2012 Amateur Snapshots, Part I

256A

Leaders Of The Times: Cedar Ridge Arabians’ Leah Beth Boyd And John Golladay by Linda White

260A

A Leg Up by Heather Smith Thomas

160A

263A

Calendar Of Events

269A

Looking Ahead

270A

Index Of Advertisers

6AA

Cover Story: Miss Marwan PA by Mary Kirkman

16AA

Arabians International by Mary Kirkman

244AA

96AA

Faces & Places

112AA

Reversing The Trend

184AA

2012 Amateur Snapshots, Part II

234AA

In The Spotlight—Emily Moore

244AA

The Evolution Of An Arabian Training Team—Rob Bick And Caralyn Schroter by Mary Kirkman

262AA

My Ever Broadening World As A Horsewoman—Endurance Has Come To Mean So Many Things by Martha Murdock

268AA

2012 Arabian Breeder Finals—The Preview

270AA

HL Infactuation (1993-2012) by Linda White

272AA

A Leg Up by Heather Smith Thomas

On The COver:

Miss Marwan PA (Marwan Al Shaqab x Miss Amerika), owned by Al Shahania Stud, Doha, Qatar. For more information, see page 6AA.

8A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

273AA

Calendar Of Events

279AA

Looking Ahead

280AA

Index Of Advertisers


Photography by: Gigi Grasso Design by: mickĂŠandoliver

The magical World Champion Mare, CR Jasmeenah. See her for yourself in Tulsa, where she will grace the U.S. National Championships with Michael Byatt. by WH Justice ex Fforget Me Not by Ffatal Attraction

Contact: info@aljassimyafarm.com

Volume 43, No. 4 | 9A


Publisher Lara Ames Editor Kevin Ludden Contributing Writers Linda White Mary Kirkman Kara Larson Advertising Account Executive Tony Bergren Sales & Marketing Eric Mendrysa Production Manager Jody Thompson Senior Designer Marketing Director Wayne Anderson Print & Web Design Tony Ferguson Jennifer Peña Leah Matzke Michael Knepprath Editorial Coordinator Proofreader Charlene Deyle Production Assistant Christa Ferguson Office Manager Robin Matejcek

Sales/Editorial Assistant Accounts Receivable Karen Fell Operations/Interactive Manager Barbara Lee © Copyright AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Articles or opinions published by the AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times are not necessarily the expressed views of the AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times. AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times is not responsible for the accuracy of advertising content or manipulation of images that are provided by the advertiser. ARABIAN HORSE TIMES (ISSN 0279-8125) Volume 43, No. 4, September 2012, is published monthly by AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times, 20276 Delaware Avenue, Jordan, Minnesota 55352. Periodical postage paid at Jordan, Minnesota 55352 and at additional entry offices. Single copies in U.S. and Canada $7.50. Subscription in U.S. $40 per year, $65 two years, $90 three years. Canada $65 one year, $125 two years, $170 three years, U.S. funds. Foreign Subscriptions: $95 one year, $185 two years, $280 three years, payable in advance, U.S. funds. Sorry, no refunds on subscription orders. For subscription and change of address, please send old address as printed on last label. Please allow four to six weeks for your first subscription to be shipped. Occasionally ARABIAN HORSE TIMES makes its mailing list available to other organizations. If you prefer not to receive these mailings, please write to ARABIAN HORSE TIMES, Editorial Offices, P.O. Box 69, Jordan, MN 55352. The publisher is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographic materials. Printed in U.S.A. • POSTMASTER: Please send returns to Arabian Horse Times, P.O. Box 69, Jordan, MN 55352; and address changes to Arabian Horse Times, P.O. Box 15816, North Hollywood, CA 91615-5816. For subscription information, call 1-855-240-4637 (in the U.S.A.) or 952-492-3213 (for outside of the U.S.A.) Arabian Horse Times • P.O. Box 15816, North Hollywood, CA 91615-5816 • Tel: 952-492-3213 • Fax: 952-492-3228 1-800-AHTIMES • www.ahtimes.com

10A | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

Comments From The Editor

For the past several years, anyone who has been in the Arabian horse industry has been aware of the general downturn in the market. Actually, in these uncertain economic times, this has been a reality for the entire equine industry. For us, however, what counts is its affect on Arabians. It has been disheartening.   Imagine what it has been like the past few weeks, as we at AHT have received response after response—positive, uplifting emails and letters— to our August story “Reversing The Trend,” which addressed how we can improve conditions in the Arabian marketplace and introduce a whole new generation to the breed. At the Times and in other venues, I’m feeling a buzz of excitement as Arabian enthusiasts have opened a floodgate of suggestions, intelligent comments, and ideas of all kinds. More people are involved, and the can-do spirit is stronger, than at any time I’ve known in my 19 years in Arabians.   Even though the problems we face are deep and comprehensive, many of us have hope—and that feels good. The determination I’m seeing is a great indicator of how much the love of the Arabian horse really means.  

  Kevin N. Ludden Editor


Possibilities at stone Ridge aRe Fantastic!

Foxford

sra

Sired by 2011 bay colt • out of Magnums Glamourgirl C

Stone Ridge ARAbiAnS dan and Maureen grossman FOR VIDEOS CONTACT: mogrossma@aol.com

www.MidwestArabian.com

Volume 43, No. 4 | 11A


Intoxicating.

2012 U.S. National English Pleasure Futurity with Chris Wilson Proudly owned by The Hagale Family • Trained by Chris Wilson: 417.761.2031 • www.ChriShanPark.com

Moonshine, also called "White Lightning," is known for its pure strength and intoxicating characteristics. The word is derived from early distillers who clandestinely produced and distributed this high proof concentrate by the light of the moon. 12A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Today’s talent and quality began generations ago. Sired by Vegaz, out of a daughter of Toi Jabaska, by Matoi.

Volume 43, No. 4 | 13A


zt

there is exotic ...

*Marwteyn Marwan Al Shaqab x ZT Ludjteyna, by Ludjin El Jamaal

14A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


and then there is exotic

by Marwteyn 2012

colt by

Zt Marwteyn

M i c h a e l B yat t A r a b i a n s 7716 Red BiRd Road, New Ulm, Texas 78950 | PhoNe: 713-306-8345 | Fax: 979-357-2613 |

www.michaelByaTTaRaBiaNs.com

conformation unaltered

Volume 43, No. 4 | 15A


U.S. National Contenders Af i r e s s u n s et (Afire Bey V x Vee Gates) Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure Junior Horse with Mike Miller

Chief Premonition smP (PS Afire Chief x Read My Mind) Arabian Country English Pleasure Junior Horse with Mike Miller Available for purchase

t e m PA n i s m P (A Temptation x PS Alympia) Arabian Country English Pleasure Junior Horse with Jessica Clinton

Rod & Jacqueline Thompson • Lenoir City, TN • 865.388.0507 Trainer Mike Miller • Mike@smparabians.com • cell 608.332.0701 Visit us on the web at: www.SmokyMountainParkArabians.com

16A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


A r i o c h T rG r (Allience x LA Athena) Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR Maturity with Jacque Thompson Available for purchase

D e s e rT J A D e G s A (Desert Heat VF x Victoria Clasix) Arabian Mares 8 & Over with Mike Miller and AAOTH with Jacque Thompson

Volume 43, No. 4 | 17A


U.S. National Contenders

Qu i n t e s s e n t i al F i r e (Baskghazi x Afires Quintina) Arabian English Pleasure Futurity with Jessica Clinton

p s a C h i e F s ran s oM (PS Afire Chief x PS Babylove) Arabian Country English Pleasure Open with Mike Miller and AAOTR 55 & Over with Jacque Thompson Available for purchase

C h i e F i n s p i r at i o n s M p (PS Afire Chief x S A Pasafire) Arabian English Pleasure Junior Horse with Mike Miller

Rod & Jacqueline Thompson • Lenoir City, TN • 865.388.0507 Trainer Mike Miller • Mike@smparabians.com • cell 608.332.0701 Visit us on the web at: www.SmokyMountainParkArabians.com

18A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


ar i as s M P (PS Afire Chief x HF Ariana) Arabian Country English Pleasure Futurity with Mike Miller Available for purchase

B a s kg h a z e l l e s M P (Baskghazi x Read My Mind) Arabian English Pleasure Futurity with Mike Miller

Bas k ad o n i s s M P (Baskghazi x HF Ariana) Arabian Yearling Colts with Mike Miller

Volume 43, No. 4 | 19A


Andy & Angie Sellman 715.425.9001 www.argentfarms.com


Marwan Al Shaqab x HC Echos Splendor U.S. National Futurity Fillies with Andrew Sellman 2012 Canadian National Reserve Champion Futurity Filly Owned by Tangle Ridge Farm

Besson Carol x Embra U.S. National 2-Year-Old Fillies with Andrew Sellman 2012 Arabian Celebration Champion 2012 Region 10 Champion Owned by Hennessey Arabian, LLC

HDT Prince Of Marwan x Imann

U.S. National 3-Year-Old Mares with Andrew Sellman Multi-National Champion, Uruguay Owned by Carlos & Christiane Roizner


Pryme Thyme x Holly Onfire JW U.S. National Stallions 8 & Over with Andrew Sellman U.S. National Champion Scottsdale Supreme Champion Owned by Claire & Margaret Larson

DA Valentino x Satin Chall LL U.S. National 4&5-Year-Old Mares with Andrew Sellman 2x U.S. National Champion Scottsdale Junior Champion Owned by Claire & Margaret Larson

Marwan Al Shaqab x Za U.S. National Mares 8 & with Andrew Se

2012 Canadian National Cham 2012 Region 10 Cham

Owned by Charles Ste Jo Rae Richa

Pryme Thyme x WCA Perfectiming U.S. National 3-Year-Old Fillies U.S. National Mares AAOTH with Grant Krohn 2012 Canadian Reserve National Champion Mare AAOTH 2012 Region 9 Champion Owned by Oak Haven Arabians


Marwan Al Shaqab x Ames Mirage U.S. National Futurity Colts with Andrew Sellman 2012 Canadian National Champion Futurity Colt 2012 Scottsdale Champion 3-Year-Old Owned & bred by Cedar Ridge Farm

agrobla & Over ellman

mpion mpion

eger & ardson Vegas DPA x Raherra U.S. National Yearling Colts with Andrew Sellman

2012 Canadian National Champion Yearling Colt Owned by Carlos & Christiane Roizner

Contact Andy Sellman 715.425.9001 www.argentfarms.com


Baske Afire x Haute Chocolate U.S. National Half-Arabian 2-Year-Old Geldings with Andrew Sellman Owned by Strawberry Banks Farm

DA Valentino x Tequila Rose MTC U.S. National H/A 2-Year-Old Fillies with Andrew Sellman & Half-Arabian Mares AOTH with Jay Krusentjerna 2012 Region 10 Champion 2012 Iowa Gold Star Champion Owned by Barb Sink-Krusentjerna DA Valentino x Tequila Rose MTC U.S. National Half-Arabian Yearling Fillies with Andrew Sellman 2012 Region 10 Champion 2012 Iowa Gold Star Champion Auction Filly Owned by Barb Sink-Krusentjerna


We value what is important while never forgetting the importance of value! This time of the year, everyone is thinking about roses! We are proud to win them year after year for owners who have started their horses with us. We believe the beginning of your horse’s training experience is important and worth every penny. We also understand in today’s times, it is important to watch your spending.

ferrara phtos

This year, we are offering a large discount with our Fall Training Special. When you enroll by November 1st, receive the months of November, December and January at $725/month! Whether your plan is to show, sell or are simply seeking a solid, honest evaluation, Jody and the staff at Strand’s will help. Limited enrollment ~ due November 1st Janice & Jody Strand Assistant trainer Jen Schmitt 319.393.4816 • mobile 319.360.5997 info@strandsarabians.com www.strandsarabians.com

Volume 43, No. 4 | 25A


exxPectations

(A Temptation x EA Candy Girl)

Arabian Pleasure Driving Open with Brian Murch

Princess of Baske

(Baske Afire x Berry Fancee)

Arabian Country Pleasure Driving Open with Brian Murch 26A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

Strawberry Banks Farm


C o N t e N d e r S

rejoiCe rejoiCe

(A Temptation x Rumina Afire)

U . S

AEPA Arabian Saddle Seat Futurity with Brian Murch

N a t i o N a l

Brian

Barbara Chur, owner ~ Brian Murch, trainer ~ cell: 716-983-3099 716.652.9346 ~ East Aurora, New York ~ info@strawberrybanksfarm.com

www.StrawberryBanksFarm.com

Volume 43, No. 4 | 27A


ExxpEctations

(A Temptation x EA Candy Girl)

Arabian Pleasure Driving ATD with Barbara Chur

Strawberry Banks Farm 28A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


BarBara PrinceSS oF BaSke

(Baske Afire x Berry Fancee)

Arabian Country Pleasure Driving ATD with Barbara Chur

Barbara Chur, owner ~ Brian Murch, trainer ~ cell: 716-983-3099 716.652.9346 ~ East Aurora, New York ~ info@strawberrybanksfarm.com

www.StrawberryBanksFarm.com

Volume 43, No. 4 | 29A


Hey Its My toI

(Hey Hallelujah x Jatoi)

Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over with Lissa Tehan

Strawberry Banks Farm 30A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Lissa ROL FiRe MiSt

(Baske Afire x Firelight DGL)

Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 with Lissa Tehan Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR Maturity with Lissa Tehan

Barbara Chur, owner ~ Brian Murch, trainer ~ cell: 716-983-3099 716.652.9346 ~ East Aurora, New York ~ info@strawberrybanksfarm.com

www.StrawberryBanksFarm.com

Volume 43, No. 4 | 31A


Janet TempTing Tango

(A Temptation x CP Beyberry Tango)

Arabian Country Pleasure AAOTR 18-35 with owner Janet Wojcik Available for purchase

Strawberry Banks Farm 32A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

Barbara Chur, owner ~ Brian Murch, trainer ~ cell: 716-983-3099 716.652.9346 ~ East Aurora, New York ~ info@strawberrybanksfarm.com

www.StrawberryBanksFarm.com


S ta c h o w S k i Fa r m is opening their

e l a d s t t o c S

facility

for

training conditioning and marketing.

Last year was a record-selling year with 28 horses sold during Scottsdale! Contact Stachowski Farms NOW – the horses that arrive early are the best prepared to market and show.

Call to reserve your spot in our line-up

Stachowski Farm— Your Scottsdale Source STACHOWSKI FARM, INC Mantua, OH • ScOttSdale, aZ • San MarcOS, ca • 330-274-2494 • JiM StacHOwSki: 330-603-2116 Peter StacHOwSki: 330-620-0194 • JOHnatHan raMSay: 724-413-2061 • Gabe deSOtO: 520-668-9552 www.StachowSki.com

Volume 43, No. 4 | 33A


All Char isma Half-Arabian English Pleasure Open with Kevin Price Half-Arabian English Pleasure 40 & Over with Pam Gaffney

.

.

.

Price Performance Horses Kevin Price Dr. Kenneth Price New Berlin, Wisconsin 612-418-8401 priceperformance@yahoo.com www.priceperformancehorses.com 34A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

.


Sheza Drama Queen Arabian Country Pleasure Open with Kevin Price Arabian Country Pleasure 55 & Over with Pam Gaffney Arabian Country Pleasure Select with Jessica DeBack

Winsome Mobility Half-Arabian Country Pleasure Open with Kevin Price Half-Arabian Country Pleasure 55 & Over with Joe Burich Half-Arabian Country Pleasure Driving with Kevin Price Half-Arabian Country Pleasure Driving Amateur with Joe Burich

ER A Lil Wayne Arabian Country Pleasure Jr. Horse Arabian Country Pleasure Maturity with Marie Jones

Available for Purchase

.

.

.

Price Performance Horses Kevin Price Dr. Kenneth Price New Berlin, Wisconsin 612-418-8401 priceperformance@yahoo.com www.priceperformancehorses.com

.

Volume 43, No. 4 | 35A


Beg For Mercy Arabian Country Pleasure Jr. Horse with Kevin Price Arabian Country Pleasure Maturity with Chelsea Knoop

Available for Purchase

IMA Golddigger Half-Arabian English Pleasure Open Half-Arabian English Pleasure 18-35 with Chelsea Knoop

Temptafir e Arabian English Pleasure Jr. Horse with Kevin Price Arabian English Pleasure Maturity with Chelsea Knoop

Available for Purchase

.

.

.

Price Performance Horses Kevin Price Dr. Kenneth Price New Berlin, Wisconsin 612-418-8401 priceperformance@yahoo.com www.priceperformancehorses.com 36A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

.


Wonder Boy Arabian Country Pleasure Driving Open Arabian Country Pleasure Driving Amateur with Dave Hutter

Temptastic Arabian Country Pleasure Jr. Horse with Ken Price Arabian Country Pleasure Maturity with Carrie Cada Arabian Country Pleasure Driving

What A Palooza BWF Arabian Country Pleasure Driving Arabian Country Pleasure 36-54 with Gretchen Price

.

.

.

Price Performance Horses Kevin Price Dr. Kenneth Price New Berlin, Wisconsin 612-418-8401 priceperformance@yahoo.com www.priceperformancehorses.com

.

Volume 43, No. 4 | 37A


2012

Sales List

Kevin Price Dr. Kenneth PRice New Berlin, Wi 612-418-8401

priceperformance@yahoo.com www.priceperformancehorses.com

Beg For Mercy

Temptafir e

CA Time Machine

Big and Rich SCA

Baske Afire x Mattamercie 2007 Arabian Bay Gelding • Country

D A Napitov x Time to Zip 1999 Half-Arabian Grey Gelding • Hunter

Afire Bey V x Two To Tango SCA 2007 Arabian Bay Stallion • English

ER A Lil Wayne

Smarty Ames++++//

Temptastic

Bogota SCA

Triften x KRA Runaround Sue 2007 Arabian Bay Gelding • English/Country

Millennium LOA x Alpha Phi 2004 Half-Arabian Bay Gelding • Hunter

A Temptation x Beyberry Charades 2007 Arabian Bay Gelding • Country

Afire Bey V x Brilliance V 2006 Arabian Bay Gelding • Country

A Temptation x Cinnamon Afire 2007 Arabian Grey Stallion • English

Not Pictur ed Pandomonium Pandoerava x Razeela 2005 Half-Arabian Bay Gelding • Show Hack/English/Driving

Tomage

Glor ious Rhythm

Proper English

Matio x Trifirette 1999 Arabian Bay Gelding • Country/Show Hack/Costume

Chaparral DGL x Great Glory Days 2008 Half-Arabian Bay Mare • Country/English

HF Mister Chips x Jewels Lemon Scent 2008 Half-Arabian Chestnut Gelding • Country

38A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Making Dreams

A Reality ‌ Prince of Ames (Baske Afire x Toi Jabaska)

and

Rachel Ginter At U.S. Nationals 2011 U.S. Reserve National Champion Arabian Country Pleasure AAOTR 18-35 2012 Scottsdale Champion Arabian Country Pleasure AATR 18-35

Good luck,

Rachel! www.rosstarkingtonstables.com McKinney Texas, 214-405-7710 Volume 43, No. 4 | 39A


Andy & Angie Sellman 715.425.9001 www.argentfarms.com


Marwan Al Shaqab x Zagrobla

2012 Canadian National Champion Mare Owned by Charles Steger & Jo Rae Richardson

Magnum Psyche x Halana

2012 Canadian National Champion Stallion

Owned by Carlos & Christiane Roizner


Marwan Al Shaqab x HC Echos Splendor 2012 Canadian Reserve National Champion Futurity Filly Owned by Tangle Ridge Farm

Kordelas x Im Fabulous SF 2012 Canadian National Top Ten Yearling Filly Owned by Shamrock Farms

Pryme Thyme x WCA Perfectiming 2012 Canadian Reserve National Champion Mare AAOTH Owned by Oak Haven Arabians


y

Vegas DPA x Raherra

2012 Canadian National Champion Yearling Colt Owned by Carlos & Christiane Roizner

Marwan Al Shaqab x Ames Mirage 2012 Canadian National Champion Futurity Colt 2012 Scottsdale Champion 3-Year-Old Owned & bred by Cedar Ridge Farm

Marwan Al Magnifficoo x XC Xceptshahnal 2012 Canadian Reserve National Champion 2-Year-Old Filly Owned by Claire Larson and Greg Jacobs

Couturier x Armana KA 2012 Canadian National Top Ten Yearling Filly Owned by Karija Arabians, Michael & Valerie Resch


visel

Andy, Angie, Grayson & Saige Sellman 715.425.9001 www.argentfarms.com


Creating Winning Excitement at U.S. Nationals!

GUZZO

RIVERO

Arabians Worldwide

training

•

marketing

•

c o n s u lt i n g

ScottSdale, arizona Ricardo Rivero (480) 619.0166 riverointernational@yahoo.com

Rodolfo Guzzo Brzil: +55 (19) 8139 9739 USA: (619) 200.6464 guzzoat@gmail.com

Natalia Nieves (760) 443.4853 Office: (480) 361.6926 nataliaarabians@gmail.com

Johnny Downing johnnyjoed@aol.com

www.guzzoat.com Volume 43, No. 4 | 45A


GUZZO

RIVERO

Arabians Worldwide

GiGiGazal

Gazal Al Shaqab x Sonora Sunset WF

Arabian Yearling Fillies

with RicaRdo RiveRo M.A. Shatila 8124 E. Lone Mountain Road, Scottsdale, AZ 85266 Tel: (480) 471.0005 • Fax: (480) 471.0060 • info@shatilaarabians.com www.Shatila Arabians.com

www.guzzoat.com 46A | A r A bi A N Hor se T i mes


GUZZO

RIVERO

Arabians Worldwide

Don El Chall x Sabah El Kair RB

Owned by Regan and Renae Rohl

D onna Fantastykah

RB

Arabian Mares 6-7 Years Old with Rodolfo Guzzo

www.guzzoat.com Volume 43, No. 4 | 47A


GUZZO

RIVERO

Arabians Worldwide

Ambario Arabian Yearling Colts

with RicaRdo RiveRo

Aria Impresario x Psyches Amber Dream

www.guzzoat.com 48A | A r A bi A N Hor se T i mes

The Sloan Family


Gazsi

PA

Standing at Guzzo /Rivero Arabians Worldwide

Gazal Al Shaqab x Memphis NA

For breeding information call Guzzo/Rivero Arabians Worldwide, LLC Phone: (480) 361.6926

NA Gazsinka (PA Gazsi x PA A-Magic Moment) owned by Norika Arabians, Chicago, IL.

Owned by Pannonia Arabians Dr. Istvan and Agnes Merchenthaler www.paarabians.com

Ghazalat Al Khalediah (PA Gazsi x Argentinna SS) owned by Al Khalediah from Saudi Arabia. National Reserve Champion Yearling Filly in 2011 at the Salon de Cheval, Paris and Unanimous Junior Champion in France and Aachen, Germany.

www.guzzoat.com Volume 43, No. 4 | 49A


 Y. O H-A F F

Hot Stuff FF

(MAGNUM PSYCHE X GOLD GALORE) WITH RODOLFO GUZZO

CHAMPION

REGION 2 & 7 Available at U.S. Nationals - Contact Johnny Downing at Guzzo ~ Rivero

P  S P ..

.TPS. S@SP. 50A | A r a bi an Hor se T i mes

..


H-A Y F

I Believe FF

(DA VALENTINO X PF JUST PEACHY KEEN) WITH RODOLFO GUZZO

CHAMPION REGION 7

P  S P ..

.TPS. ..

S@SP. Volume 43, No. 4 | 51A


Claire Larson:

Businessman, Arabian Horseman, Grandfather by Kara Larson

In the distant year of 1933, Claire Larson, my grandfather, was the fourth-born son in a family of eight children. He was born to Norwegian parents living modestly in Garretson, S.D., a small town on the rolling South Dakota prairie. Growing up in this inevitably trying environment, Claire had a beginning so unfamiliar to me that I was absolutely delighted at the opportunity to chronicle his story in the upcoming pages. A truly self-made man, Claire has been a great influence in my life. A fixture of my earliest and most recent horse memories, he has changed my life and the lives of so many others in the Arabian horse industry—and beyond. My grandpa and I have always shared something very special. Our common love for the Arabian has brought us closer than anything else ever could—I have loved horses from the day I was born, but my grandfather is the reason that I love the Arabian! Nearly every conversation we have relates to his extensive breeding knowledge, his show string for the season, or his great interest in my riding endeavors. His support and passion for Arabians, and his reassuring presence in the stands at nearly every one of my horse shows, is something that is hard to put into words. He has been an incredible inspiration for me, both in and out of the show ring, and I hope that someday I am able to share the same experiences that he and I have shared together with my children and grandchildren. Words do not describe how fortunate I feel to have our bond—the same bond that I know he shares with many others. As these great Arabian horse stories often do, my grandpa’s journey started with an unabridged passion for horses, and then, like a vine up a wall, his love spread and grew into something so extensive, so overcoming, that life as he knew it was changed forever.

The Early Years

After moving around a bit when Claire was a child, the Larson family settled in Pipestone, Minn., when he was 10 years old. The boy basically grew up in a barn, always willing to help his dad with the horses and other farm duties, and by the time he was 13 or 14, his love for horses had really taken off. In a couple of wearing summers at a local racetrack, he worked from 4 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily and then slept in a stall every night, earning a mere $1 a day wage. “I soon realized that wasn’t the smartest thing I could have done, but I just loved the horses,” he explains. With his brother Vern, he joined the Air Force at 17 and spent the next few years in the Philippines, serving in the Korean War. Upon his return to the States, he was set up on a date with a spirited girl named Margaret, and he fell for her in a big way. As many in the Arabian community know, this girl would become his wife and the mother to their six boisterous boys. Margaret Larson offers the story of their beginning as a couple. “It was on a blind date that Claire and I met. A friend of his and a friend of mine were going together and set us up, and we’ve been together ever since. He was really clean-cut and polite and quiet, and we immediately hit it off. I knew right away that he was it.”

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Where in this wide world can man find nobility without pride, Friendship without envy, Or beauty without vanity? Here, where grace is served with muscle And strength by gentleness confined. He serves without servility; he has fought without enmity. There is nothing so powerful, nothing less violent. There is nothing so quick, nothing more patient. ~Ronald Duncan, “The Horse,� 1954

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his beginning an Arabian business. “That’s really how I got started—through Chuck and Kitty,” he says. “They lived up in Tyler, Minn., and I got to know them in 1965. A couple years later, I bought my first Arabian mare. I had a few Half-Arabians before that, but Chuck and Kitty had some really special stallions and mares.

Kara Larson (the author of this article) pictured with her grandparents, Claire and Margaret Larson.

As the proud parents of six rowdy, and today successful, boys, Claire and Margaret certainly had an interesting— and exhausting—situation on their hands. “I was a tomboy myself, so I really enjoyed my boys,” says Margaret. “Claire was gone a lot, trucking, when the boys were growing up, so I tried to spend a lot of time with them. If they were doing chores out in the barn, I was right there with them. In 1965, we moved out to the farm to keep those boys out of trouble because an older neighbor was complaining that they were taking crabapples off his tree. So, we decided to get the boys out of town. They had a lot of room to play out there and they always had each other, which makes a huge difference.” The farm was in Pipestone, Minn., and one of the best options for not only keeping the boys busy but teaching them some life lessons by involving them with horses. “The first horse we brought home to ride was a Morgan mare with a big, broad back, so the boys wouldn’t get hurt,” says Margaret. “She could ride three at a time. We had a Shetland as well who was just a rotten little thing, biting the boys in the pants and always being naughty. So Claire traded him off and got a Half-Arabian.” “When I bought my first Half-Arabian mare, she was a 2-year-old and her name was Lady, and we would also own her full sister, who was named Rusty,” Claire tells me. “Your dad used to ride Rusty a lot, and she bucked him off more times than I care to remember. She ended up living 34 years, and she was pretty enough to be a purebred. Such a nice mare to be around.”

Arabian Beginnings

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“She was a retired schoolteacher and had just about every Arabian horse magazine ever printed,” he remembers. “She was a real Arabian horse person. She’s the one who really taught me about everything I ever knew about pedigrees. She knew every pedigree, and had all of the Arabian horse registries from the very first horse up until they quit doing it that way—it’s like an entire library of Arabian books. She’d go to a horse show and sit there from the time it started until it was done that night, no matter what time it was, back when the stands used to be full. They had no kids, so Margaret and I took care of them to the end. They were very good friends of ours. They were life members of the Arabian horse, and, well, so am I.” Claire’s first purebred Arabian was a 6-year-old mare named Kalari, “a gorgeous dark bay” purchased in 1972 with a filly at side. Not long after, he and his two oldest boys, Gary and Greg, took a few horses to North Dakota for one of their first horse shows. “I took our blue International pickup with a topper on the back up to North Dakota, Valley City, I believe it was,” he says. “We all slept in the back of the pickup on a box spring mattress. I showed Kalari in the mare class with the filly at her side, and I ended up winning the mare class. And then I came back and won with the filly too. That was our first big win.” He laughs. “I kept that mare and she raised me a few more foals, but she colicked and died in the pasture when she was very young.” Since this humble beginning, Claire’s relationship with the Arabian horse has blossomed into something that he could never have anticipated. As he bought and sold fine Arabian horses year after year, his passion was stirred by their unmistakable beauty. “I’m always searching for the best horse I can find, and that’s what makes it exciting,” he says. “I truly enjoy buying and selling Arabian horses because I like the idea of selling a horse to someone who will enjoy the horse more than I do. Whoever I might sell the horse to, I just want to make sure that they will enjoy the horse more than I


do—and that’s not saying I don’t love the horse. I just like selling a beautiful animal to someone who truly appreciates the horse as it is. “I’ve always looked at the Arabian horse like a work of art,” he continues. “It’s just like when somebody buys a picture worth $10 million because they think it’s the prettiest picture they’ve ever seen. Most people on the halter side want to buy an Arabian horse for the same reason—because they think it’s the prettiest horse they’ve ever seen. It has everything to do with how it shows and how beautiful it is. I think the best Arabian horses have quality and they all have reasons that they should win. I also believe that they can have a pretty head and a pretty neck, but if they don’t have a body, what do they have going for them, really?” As I continue to speak with my grandpa about his extensive background in breeding and buying horses, he continues to stress that it really is much easier to buy a national champion than it is to breed one. So, because my grandpa still does quite a bit of breeding to this day, I had to ask the question, “Even though breeding isn’t as easy as simply buying a horse, you keep breeding—what’s your rationale there?”

He laughs before responding, “I just like to see where they go. You always think you can get one better than somebody else. It’s the fun of having them. I only have three babies right now; we’ve had tough luck this year, because I lost two. But I got them halter broke, and worm them and take care of them all the time. They’re really just fun to work with.” And then my grandma, Margaret, chimes in, explaining just how much he loves his babies at the ranch. “He goes out with his gator and feeds the babies,” she says. “Yesterday, we went out on the gator and those colts came a running towards us. And then he said—he made me want to cry—he said what a joy they are to have and raise. They know he feeds them every day and they love him too.”

Spreading the Love I know how much my grandpa has sparked my own interest in the Arabian horse, and that of a great number of people in my family and beyond. My cousin and Claire’s granddaughter, Angie Sellman, has also been greatly influenced by the man who introduced the Arabian horse to the Larson family. However, his influence on my mom’s appreciation of the Arabian horse

Claire Larson, Andy Sellman, Angela (Larson) Sellman, and Margaret Larson.

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still surprises me, because it took a while for her to warm up to the idea (and the smell) of horses. “When I’m sitting by him in the stands and we’re watching a class, whether it be performance or halter, he can tell me the sire of nearly every horse that comes into the ring,” says my mom, Terri. “I’ve never known anybody who can do that. He truly loves the Arabian horse, and it’s a genuine love. When he’s looking at a horse, it becomes apparent just how knowledgeable he is about conformation, breed standards and everything in between. It’s really fun to sit by him at a horse show.” From the very beginning of Claire’s involvement with the Arabian horse, he has met people who became great friends and business partners. One of his oldest friends is none other than a fellow self-made man, Dick Ames. “I can’t remember the first time I met Claire,” Dick says. “I can only assume that our first meeting was related to an Arabian horse event, but I do remember that our conversation led to each of our chosen professions and how we got started. He was in the trucking business and I was in the construction business, and of course, if you’re in the trucking business, you have trucks, and in the construction business, trucks are a big part of your fleet of equipment.” Longtime friends Dick Ames and Claire Larson.

As Dick continues with his connection to my grandpa, he shares a story I have heard about many a time. “We got started in business right around the same time,” he says. “And in South St. Paul, Minn., on Concord St., there was a guy by the name of Irv Lowment who sold used trucks. He’s the guy that I bought my very first white Mack® truck tractor—not very fancy, but it did the job. Claire informed me that his dealings with Irv were also very similar.”

Kara, rides and shows at our farm. Anyway, our relationship has been going on over some time, and I hope it continues. We aren’t as young as we used to be, but we pretend that we are. Simply put, our paths still cross quite often, and I look forward to seeing Claire down the road in the near future at lots of horse shows coming up. Claire and Margaret Larson are just class act people with a great family.”

As Dick and Claire’s friendship branched further beyond the Arabian horse business, the two found more and more connections. “Besides both having family businesses, our friendship has spread much further than the Arabian horse,” Dick says. “Andy Sellman met Claire and Margaret when Andy was working for me at Cedar Ridge. Claire now has many horses with Andy at his own farm, and of course, Claire and Margaret’s granddaughter, Angie, is now married to Andy. Another granddaughter,

Another longtime friend who knows my grandpa exceptionally well is Greg Gallún. “I have a lot of memories of Claire from many, many years of friendship, but I guess the thing that sticks out more about Claire than anything is that he and Margaret have been so good to so many people. They’re always friendly, always have a smile on their faces—well, almost always for Claire,” Greg jokes. “There’s a short list of people that are the real genuine ones, and I’d have to put Claire

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right at the top of that list. He’s a good man and a good person. I respect him more as a gentleman and a human than I do in any other capacity. I mean, his roles as a horseman and a horse breeder are just secondary things, because he’s a true gentleman. You want to see him succeed, you want to see his farm succeed, because of what a genuine person he is.” When I asked Greg how long he’s known Claire, he lets out a big sigh. “Oh, that is tough,” he says. “You know, I’d have to think about that because I feel like I’ve known him forever. He’s one of those people that you feel like you’ve known since you were able to know who someone was. It had to be sometime in the 1980s, Scottsdale I would guess.” Although Greg and Claire haven’t engaged in many horse deals, Greg remembers one in particular. “He bought Pershahn El Jamaal sight-unseen when [Pershahn] was a yearling down in Brazil. I remember when they brought him out and the colt walked around the corner, I said, ‘Well, he’s sold.’ Then they asked who was buying him and I said, ‘I don’t know, but I’ll find somebody when I get home.’ I called Claire, and he said, ‘If you like him, let’s do it.’ It was right up his alley, and I think he was excited about having this colt. “It was just a few months after Pershahn got here that Mr. [Harold] Green saw him and fell in love with him,” Greg continues. “And then Claire, being such a smart man, gave me the greatest line I’ve ever heard, and I’ve used it a million times since: ‘You don’t go broke making a profit.’ The Greens offered him more than he had paid, and it was a good business transaction. He’s a smart guy. A lot of people wouldn’t have done that; they would have let their pride get in the way. But those words are the truest words I’ve ever heard. He knew it was a good deal and the Greens were satisfied with it, and it really worked out for them too. So

even though it was a short project with Claire, that was really a fun one. I’ve had so few business dealings with him, not because I haven’t wanted to, but it’s been more of a personal relationship than a professional one. We’ve truly enjoyed knowing Claire and Margaret over the years. The Arabian industry needs people like Claire Larson.” Family friend, horse trainer, and now husband of granddaughter Angie, Andy Sellman has offered a special talent with the horses and a bond that has brought Claire and Margaret so much joy. He admires the vision and hard work that enabled Claire to go from driving trucks to owning world class Arabians. “It’s through hard work and knowledge and perseverance that he made it all happen,” Andy says. “As a person, I love him. He’s made an amazing family and I feel like he’s responsible for helping to shape so many people into who they are today. He’s greatly responsible for me being where I am today. I didn’t know if I was ready to start my own farm, and I talked to him about it. He told me that I was, and he wouldn’t say that if he didn’t think that was the case. He gave me the encouragement to get into the business for myself, and I seek his counsel all the time on things. He’s made such an impact on so many people’s lives—his family, the people who work for him. Everyone has a great amount of respect for the man he is.”

Andy Sellman with U.S. National Champion RD Fabreanna. Volume 43, No. 4 | 57A


Mare of the Moment: Valori TR F As the trainer of 4-year-old mare Valori TRF, Andy Sellman not only knows the mare on a deep level, but the man behind the mare as well. “Claire has a 40-plus year history with Arabian horses,” Andy says. “He got into it because he loves them, and here he is with likely one of the best Arabian mares that there’s ever been,

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and she’s going to compete in Tulsa. There was a time at which it was easier to do it, a time when people were more comfortable spending discretionary money, but he’s stuck with it through thick and thin. Claire and Margaret are wonderful people who have been supporting Arabian horses for a long, long time, and they have a great crack at winning national champion mare, and I want them to enjoy that.”


Claire knows what Valori TRF has been able to prove in the show ring. Through September 2012, she has been named Scottsdale Junior Champion Filly, Region 13 Champion Yearling Filly, Region 18 Champion Mare, and U.S. National Champion Futurity Filly. Now, he looks forward to her future potential. “She’s a mare that anyone really would love the chance to own,” he says. “She truly is a superstar; she’s just kind of the perfect Arabian horse. She’s pretty in the head, she’s got a nice neck, she’s got such a topline (it’s just a tabletop), she looks like what an Arabian horse is supposed to look like, and she’s got a wonderful pedigree. She’s not only an American horse, but also she’s got enough quality to be a European horse as well. She just seems to get better every year, which is hard to come by. Some horses have the tendency to get coarse or a little round here or there, but she just seems to be one of those horses that improves with age.” Thinking back to his first encounter with Valori TRF, Claire remembers having a gut feeling about how special this filly could be. “The first time I saw her was at Scottsdale, and she had already been sold to Stuart

Larsen by my friend, Greg Jacobs,” he says. “She was there to be shown as a yearling filly and he was actually looking to sell her, so I bought her, and she won the Scottsdale show as a yearling. Then she went back to Andy’s and we didn’t show her much after that, because we were kind of saving her for the futurities. She went on to win the futurities—actually, every time we’ve shown her, she’s been champion.” Through the years, Claire has owned quite a few Arabian horses who have left their mark on the industry, but with Valori, he senses a real air of greatness in her future. “I remember walking into Andy’s barn two or three years ago and seeing RD Fabreanna, and thinking that she was truly the best mare I ever owned,” he says. “But then Valori came along, and now I think it’s really too close to tell. Between Fabreanna, who was also champion as a yearling, and Valori, I don’t know which one would beat the other. That’s just the kind of quality Valori is. But even with how good a mare Fabreanna was, she was beatable in the halter ring. And with Valori, I’m going to the Nationals with the idea that she is still not going to be beat.” n

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National Champion

Pryme Thyme x Holly Onfire JW Returning to Center Ring at the U.S. National Championships in stallion halter with Andrew Sellman Owned by Claire & Margaret Larson

Andy & Angie Sellman 715.425.9001 www.argentfarms.com


*Marwan Al Shaqab x HB Bessolea 2012 Scottsdale Reserve Champion Stallion 2012 Scottsdale Champion 4-Year-Old Stallion 2009 Scottsdale Unanimous Jr. Champion Colt Owned by The Baahir Group

U.S. National Futurity Colts with Andrew Sellman Marwan Al Shaqab Ă— Ames Mirage, by Brass 2012 Canadian National Champion Futurity Colt 2012 Scottsdale Champion 3-Year-Old Colt Owned & bred by Cedar Ridge Farm


Alfabia Damascus Ă— JA Ultima 2012 Scottsdale Champion 4&5-Year-Old Stallion 2012 Scottsdale International Reserve Champion Stallion Owned by David Zouch Ross

Contact Andy Sellman 715.425.9001 www.argentfarms.com

Vegas DPA x Raherra

U.S. National Yearling Colts with Andrew Sellman 2012 Canadian National Chapion Yearling Colt Scottsdale Signature Champion Auction Colt Owned by Carlos & Christiane Roizner


Marwan Al Magnifficoo x WC Xceptshahnal Owned by Robert, Anna & Rosanne Wiechmann

Legacy Of Fame x SC Psavannah Australian Triple Champion Stallion Sire of all 3 Australia National Champion Yearlings Owned by Mulawa Stud Greg, Julie & Jane Farrell


Her 2012 colt by *JA Urbino

Ryad El Jamaal x Van Strike Owned by Anna, Robert & Rosanne Wiechmann

Her 2012 colt by *JA Urbino

Marwan Al Shaqab x Crysstal Echo U.S. National Reserve Champion Futurity Filly Owned by David Zouch Ross


Paul Glans SaleS Director 480.861.7412

Best wishes to the Marino family and their beautiful mare‌

Luxemere Jizette

NatioNal champioN

Volume 43, No. 4 | 65A


Following in tHeir Footsteps

2012 U.S. Nationals Preview

October 19-27, 2012 by Linda White

At last count, the U.S. National Show Commission had added 23 new classes to the 2012 schedule. Wow! Twenty-three new

classes! That may be an all-time record. The new offerings

include all kinds of classes for hunter pleasure, western pleasure and working western horses, both purebred and Half-Arabian,

in the AAOTR, rookie, non-pro, primetime non-pro and junior horse categories. To add to the riches in this year’s U.S.

Nationals treasure chest, the AEPA $100,000 Arabian Saddle

Seat Futurity and AEPA $50,000 Half-Arabian Futurity up the ante so high that it topples off the dealer’s table. 66A178 | A|r A R biAABI nAHor N HOR se SE T i mes T I MES


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Following in tHeir Footsteps more smoothly. The show’s biggest challenges are having a facility that will handle so many horses, and keeping the show running on schedule. “In Ford Truck Arena the biggest complaint has been the long rows of seats on the rail without easy access, but they have come up with a solution to that problem, just for us.”

Forgive the poker analogy, but let’s face it. Showing Arabian horses is a gamble, no matter how well you play your cards. The U.S. National Championship Show illuminates, in their best light, the results of all those chances everyone takes, from selecting a stallion for that particular mare, to whether or not little Missie is ready to compete with the big dogs. The U.S. National Show Commission took a calculated risk when they moved the show from its LouisvilleAlbuquerque rotation. Tulsa, Okla., ain’t exactly Glamour Central, some folks griped, but Tulsa’s Expo Square facility is matchless, and the city has welcomed the Arabian crowd with open arms. Not only that, but for convenience’s sake, Tulsa is smack-dab in the middle of the country. Really. Look at a map. “Tulsa’s central location makes it more accessible for people from all parts of the country,” Show Commissioner Tim Moerbe points out. An Arabian owner for more than 35 years and an AHA member since 1971, he has been involved with the national show since 1993. “Having the show in Tulsa also makes it better because not only are there more covered work areas; we have three show rings. In Tulsa we have the Mustang Arena for all the working western classes, which makes it a much more effective showcase for those classes. I will be handling that ring this year. Three show rings allow the show to run on time, and much

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U.S. Show Commission Chair Bill Hughes explains how that dilemma came about. “Ford Truck Arena’s ring was narrow, with square corners. Exhibitors didn’t like going down the rail into a f lat wall, so in 2010 we got Expo management to make the ends oval, and add to the ring’s size by reducing the space around the rail to three feet, which widened the turns and gave us 10 to 15 feet more space. That brought a lot of complaints about how you now had to climb over 40 people to get to the rail. Well, this year they have added three new aisles on each side of the ring, so that people can get to the rail more easily—like trainers who want to get down there to coach their riders. The Expo Center management has bent over backwards to work with us.” “In the Mustang Arena they now have a solid concrete wall around the ring, instead of the cattle pen panels that were there before,” notes Moerbe. “We can dress this up a little more and create a classier ‘show ring’ feel. Judy Kibler and other volunteers are setting up a curtained area to make a more attractive place to take class winners’ pictures. “The Jumbotron has been good for showing class sponsors’ banners and the videos that go up of horses as they win,” Bill Hughes adds. “We’re trying to get the city to put up promotional videos and stills of restaurants, museums, golf courses and other things Tulsa has to offer. Most of us never get off the show grounds, but when we do, there is plenty out there to enjoy.” “In the last two site visits, in 2011 and 2012, we met with city officials and tried to get it across to them that they need to show off Tulsa’s ‘big city’ aspects,” says Arabian Professional and Amateur Horsemen’s Association liaison Mary Jane Brown. “They’re out there, and the Arabian crowd will shop and patronize the nice places if they know they exist.”


Vicki HumpHrey And2012 JessicA U.S. clinton Nationals Pat Webb, 2012 Show Manager, agrees. This will be Webb’s third year at her post. She has served on many a show committee over the years, however, and has assisted with U.S. Nationals preparations for at least 15 years. “People can always find something to complain about, but for me, the biggest difference is that the people in Tulsa want us here. As Bill says, the Expo Center management bends over backwards to fill our requests. They even come up with new ideas we hadn’t thought of yet.”

Five Card Draw

The facility isn’t the city’s only asset. This old town has plenty of history. And Tulsa is the Oil Capital of the World! With the notice of sticky black stuff seeping from the ground and discovering that it would burn, the first oil well was recorded in 1859. After that, “up for grabs” hardly begins to describe the phenomenon that ensued. Between 1889 and 1895, hopefuls from as far away as Poland rushed in to stake their claims. The flat, oil-rich land also proved to be suitable for crop farming. The population grew and Tulsa was incorporated on January 18, 1898. Despite a few bumps and false starts along the way, modern-day Tulsa’s colorful cultural history adds

a prosperous, boomtown flavor to the sprawling city of nearly a million people. Part of that culture is the iconic Route 66 (those of a certain age will recall the rhythm and blues hit “[Get Your Kicks On] Route 66,” recorded by everyone from Nat King Cole to Chuck Berry to the Rolling Stones). Also called the Mother Road, Route 66 was born in Oklahoma in 1926 when Tulsa resident Cyrus Avery and a buddy from Springfield, Mo., had a brainstorm. Avery convinced the U.S. Congress to build Route 66, a 2,450-mile national highway linking Chicago with Los Angeles. Oklahoma has 400 miles of the original highway, more than any other state. The road was decommissioned when interstates swooped through town, but in 2003, Tulsa County set aside $15 million to revive Route 66, which is now 11th Street, a couple blocks north of Expo Square, within walking distance. Tulsa Vision 2025 project members are renovating vintage buildings, revitalizing landscaping along the historic byway, and creating Route 66 gateways east and west of town. Depending on how fast things get done in Tulsa, U.S. Nationals tourists can enjoy a sculpture of Cyrus Avery’s family in a Model T Ford, meeting a horse-drawn carriage coming east from the oil fields.

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Following in tHeir Footsteps

Bringing Back The

Glamour

This all came about because of the Facebook® page, ‘Promoting Positive Change for the Arabian Breed,’” says Arabian horse owner Lester Martin. “Many of us on Facebook® agreed that there was a perception that U.S. Nationals lacks a lot of the glamour it used to have, so we began throwing out ideas of what might work to create a red carpet event at Tulsa this year. I subscribe to the philosophy that if you’re not doing something better, you’re doing it worse. “I contacted a friend in the high fashion shoe industry, who contacted a friend at Saks Fifth Avenue, and the idea grew. We presented it to AHA and the U.S. National Show Commission, and they loved the concept of having a red carpet event; we would stage it 30 minutes before and 30 minutes after the final Friday and Saturday evening sessions. We asked Brittany Birget, a journalist who loves Arabian horses, to be our spokesperson. She is very glamorous! We are going to dress to the nines, and we’re are asking everyone who can do so, to dress to the hilt on Friday and Saturday nights. “Why are we asking them to dress up?” he asks rhetorically. “To honor the horses and to honor the occasion. Saks Fifth Avenue will be hosting a U.S. Nationals lounge at Utica Square, which is five minutes from the show grounds, with all sales to benefit the Horsemen’s Distress Fund. Saks will be decorating a set of stairs in the northwest corner of the Ford Truck Arena on Friday night, where there will be live ‘Red Carpet’ interviews from 5 to 7 p.m., as part of the Wine Walk to benefit the Horsemen’s Distress Fund. On Saturday night, Saks will be decorating the southeast corner of Ford Truck Arena so that people coming in will see it. Also in the southeast area, down by the show office, Saks will have an ‘Enthusiasts’ Lounge’ (which will look a little like a jazz club), where everyone is welcome to come in, meet Brittany and cheer for their favorite horses. “We believe this will add energy and excitement, and bring back a little glamour to the show.

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You might also want to have a bite to eat at Kicks 66 Diner, or the Blue Dome Diner and Route 66 Mother Roadhouse, at 313 E. 2nd Street. Treat yourself to a drive along 11th street. And should the horse show grow tedious, which is highly unlikely, there are all kinds of off-campus adventures to entertain oneself with in town.

One-Eyed Jacks

One addition is likely to make everybody feel spoiled. The Show Commission and AHA are installing large monitors in each work ring, so that riders schooling and warming up horses can check the progress of the classes in the ring. “Video screens in the work arenas. What a concept!” horse show veterans marvel. Julie Stewart is the Arabian Horse Association’s National Events Coordinator. She also helps with Youth and Canadian Nationals, and is happy to discuss this year’s upgrades and changes. “We purchased 18 new television monitors to replace our old ones. That included 42-inch screens to hang in the work arenas. That should be a real convenience for trainers and exhibitors. We do as much as we can afford to do every year, and the changes the facility has committed to are fantastic. “We move in the day their state fair ends, so getting the old dirt out and the new dirt down in the QuikTrip Arena, so that stalls can be set up, is our first priority,” she continues. “Last year was the first year we had Patrons’ staging at the east end of the Pavilion. That went over well, and this year they’re building steps so that people can get down into the ring more easily to present awards.” The Pavilion, Mustang Arena, and Ford Truck Arena are the three buildings that hold U.S. National show rings. Tulsa’s Expo Square is a multi-use facility with hundreds of thousands of square feet of space, both indoor and outdoor, acres of stabling, and enormous parking lots. Sure, there is a lot of walking, but what’s new? This is a horse show. Bring comfortable shoes. The vast QuikTrip Center, which runs along 21st Street on the south side of the campus, is one of the world’s largest single-span buildings. In the past, temporary stalls were set up on the top level, with work pens on the lower level. Dust was a problem and traffic could become congested, Arabian exhibitors groused.


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Following in tHeir Footsteps Problem solved, says Glen True, now in his 12th year as barn manager, his ninth to oversee both stabling and grounds, and his third to serve on the U.S. National Show Commission. “We were limited in what we could do because of the utilities in the floor, and a concern was that there wouldn’t be enough time to work up the footing in the work rings,” he begins. “The work arenas were on the lower level, and we had been setting up 1,200 temporary stalls, most of which were on the upper level. This year we will bring the dirt in on both levels, start working it up for the work arenas on the upper level, and smooth it down on the lower level, where most of the stalls will be. Then, we have widened the aisles between the stalls so we can get vehicles in there to keep the dust down. The building is climate-controlled and we are still working to adjust it by leaving the climate control on for so long, and off for so long, to improve the overall ventilation. “The Oklahoma State Fair ends October 6th, the day we get the facility,” he continues. “That gives us until October 13th, when the horses start coming in, to get everything in the QuikTrip the way we want it, and fiddle with the ventilation until it suits us. We’re moving the temporary stalls a little closer to the perimeters so we can widen the aisles, which will allow the water trucks to come in. Trying to place 1,800 horses isn’t easy! The ratio works out to be about two stalls—one tack stall and one horse stall—for every horse.” Mary Jane Brown has served as a U.S. National Show liaison for the last 10 years. “No other breed has the number of specialized disciplines this breed does,” she points out. “This means that this show’s physical needs are greater than any other breed’s national championship show. This affects everything from how we prepare the footing to the number of work arenas—and stalls—we require. Our breed has become increasingly specialized, and good at those specializations. That makes moving it anywhere a tough job. “The move to Tulsa was controversial initially, but having three show rings has made a huge difference. The Pavilion is now configured so that the halter people have an attractive venue that suits them, with the amenities they want, and set up so the crowd is able to get closer to the horses. The working western division has soared in the last few years, and having the Mustang Arena

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specifically tailored for those classes’ needs is great, even to the addition of a new concrete wall to replace the cattle pen panels. And dedicating the Ford Truck Arena to the other performance classes is working out perfectly. “At the present time, this could have been accomplished nowhere else,” Brown says. “A few other facilities come close—but at triple the cost. And in this tough economic climate, we have to be financially responsible as never before.”


U.S. Nationals Vicki HumpHrey And2012 JessicA clinton

Texas Hold ’Em

One topic everyone brings up is the effort being put forth to upgrade the footing. “Johnny Ryan recommended Bob Kiser, of Kiser Arena Specialties, to us,” Julie Stewart says. “Kiser is familiar with the facility, and understands that the dirt has to replace what the Oklahoma State Fair uses in time for us to work it up for what we need. He will oversee the setup, and then come back mid-week to check out how everything is holding

up. He invented the drag we use in the Mustang Arena; it has a water tank. We also have a Fast Track drag, which has no water tank. We bring our own equipment and our own crew of three, for national events. When it’s not in use, the drag equipment is stored with Glen True in Raymore, MO. “There has been a huge effort to upgrade the footing,” agrees Mary Jane Brown. “I was at the site visit when

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Following in tHeir Footsteps number of years. Class order is critical, and all kinds of other things can be almost as important. For example, we are bringing back separate in- and out-gates this year to improve traffic flow. A real bottleneck is created when one class is trying to exit the ring while another class is trying to get in. Having two gates can shave a few minutes off class transitions. “Something else that always creates a problem is continually dressing the ring with green shavings. Adding all those extra shavings changes the footing— and not for the better. Golf courses in Arizona and other desert areas spray non-toxic green lawn paint

Kiser joined us, and we explained to him why the dirt in all the arenas under cover has to be the same. You need two kinds of material for the footing because you cannot make a base out of the same material you use for the surface. What you use for the base is denser, and packs solidly, while the dirt on top needs to be lighter, so it doesn’t pack quickly. This is not something we have tried before, as several people have suggested. This will be the first time we have tried this, and we believe it will make a tremendous difference.” “I did some research,” offers Ryan, “and Bob Kiser is one of the world’s leaders in his area of expertise. He came to our June site visit and has been working with us. We explained to him why footing is so critical to maintaining our horses’ soundness. If it’s too hard, they get footsore; if it’s too deep, they get suspensory problems and bowed tendons. Adding wood shavings to the top mixture gives it more spring.” Ryan, who is also an APAHA liaison, brings up another factor that can be key to a show’s success. “Scheduling is something the APAHA has been involved with for a

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on their fairways and greens to give them a better appearance. The paint is harmless, and has been used successfully for years with no complaints. It occurred to me that spraying the surface of our show rings with that non-toxic green lawn paint, rather than always adding green shavings, might be a perfect solution. We are going to try it this year, and will welcome everyone’s feedback. Something else new this year will be a designated APAHA contact person for each one of the three show rings. That way, people won’t have


Vicki HumpHrey And2012 JessicA U.S. clinton Nationals to try to track down somebody to talk to or answer their questions.”

Royal Flush

“There is a positive ‘buzz’ this year,” says Julie Stewart. “Everybody seems to be thinking positively. Wednesday evening is the exhibitors’ party in the Exchange Building, hosted by the Show Commission. There will be free food, entertainment, and an open bar. Wednesday evening is a ‘dark’ night, so lots of people go into town. Last year around 1,500 people came to the exhibitors’ party. “The final Thursday is ‘Jersey Day’ to go with the televised football, basketball and especially hockey games on Thursday nights,” she continues. “Exhibitors will be encouraged to decorate their stalls with jerseys and other fun items that day to go with those sports. We did this at the last minute last year, but this year we hope everybody will look forward to getting into the ‘jersey spirit.’” In 2011, APAHA member Christine Ryan took on the job of beautifying the show. “All I do is add some decorations,” she says modestly, but everyone knows differently. Last year Ryan and her helpers transformed Plain Jane into, well, maybe not a runway model, but definitely a more attractive date. “This year we have more sponsors,” she states, “and AHA will again supply most of the plants. Our 2012 colors are blue and gold.” What a difference some well-placed plants and f lowers, a few strings of twinkle lights and a little colorful bunting can make! “There is another new project we’re working on. At Scottsdale this year, Pepper Proffit and I noticed that the Scottsdale Arabian Youth were throwing hats into the crowd during gate holds. What a great idea that would be to do at Tulsa! We’re always trying to help the show’s vendors, so we thought, ‘What about attaching coupons and gift cards from the various vendors to the hats? That would create an incentive for people to sit in the stands to watch the show, instead of watching the live feed back at their stalls.’ We still need volunteers to throw hats. “There is a great group of at least 120 volunteers that help with the national show,” she adds. “Many of them have been helping for years. People may not realize that all the Show Commission members are volunteers, too. They don’t get paid for the thousands of hours they spend year-

round, working on the national show. We get questions about why the same people seem to be on the commission, year after year. Well, it’s because nobody else steps up to take their place. I don’t think people appreciate the countless hours volunteers devote, year-round, year after year, to putting this show together. AHA pays the Show Commission members’ lodging and travel expenses to this show, but the endless time they devote is truly a labor of love. The local Tulsa area club schedules its volunteers to sell programs and set up trail courses.” That would be the Green Country Arabian Horse Association. Members were excited when they learned that the U.S. National Show was coming to Tulsa. “We’re into our fifth year, and we’re still having fun,” allows Art Byrd, his club’s liaison with AHA. “When they were in the process of deciding where to relocate the show, they met with us and asked if we would be interested in helping, and of course, we said that we would. Our club members are set up at all three show arenas, with two people at each table selling programs. The dollar AHA gives us for selling each program goes into the club’s general fund. “Two club members, Vicki Carnahan and Tammy Pickens, organize those volunteers,” he adds. “Our club owns trail equipment, which AHA leases from us for the show. We set up the trail course, and re-set it when an entry knocks something down. I also have two FFA groups that help with the show, one from Sand Springs, west of Tulsa, and a second club from Inola, which is east of town.” What is the biggest challenge the U.S. National Show Commission faces in putting the horse show together each year? “Trying to make sure we’re listening to everyone’s concerns,” says Bill Hughes. “With the Internet, Facebook®, Twitter®, this new group Promoting Positive Change, and the other social media, we’re trying to maintain a positive attitude. Our challenge is to put out accurate information so people can understand what’s happening. The APAHA is a great sounding-board. “It is our ongoing desire to address people’s concerns and deal with the main issues, within the parameters of the money and time we have available,” Hughes says. “Our goal is to make this show the best it can be. We will start working on next year’s show almost before this year’s show is over.” 

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The The Next Next Chapter Chapter

Announcing Announcing ourour 2012 2012 U.S.U.S. Nationals Nationals Contenders Contenders 76A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Region Region 18 Unanimous 18 Unanimous Champion Champion

Arabian Arabian Western Western Pleasure Pleasure Junior Junior Horse Horse

DA DA Severance Severance Pay Pay

(Sundance (Sundance Kid V xKid DA V Peace, x DA by Peace, Padrons by Padrons Psyche)Psyche) 2007 Bay 2007 Purebred Bay Purebred Gelding Gelding

Owned Owned by: by: Danny and Danny Amanda and Amanda Wolfe Wolfe 12250 St12250 Rt 61 St E Rt 61 E Berlin Hts, Berlin OH Hts, 44814 OH 44814

ConCteondteinngdin ing: in:

Arabia Arnab Wia esnteW teea rnesPl rnsu Plre eaJu suni reorJuHo nirs oreHorse wi wi th Dann thyDa Wonn lfey Wolfe

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Horaldo WH Horaldo WH (Horal x PF Fancy That) (Horal x PF Fancy That) 2005 Half-Arabian Black Gelding 2005 Half-Arabian Black Gelding

: n i g n i : d n i n e tg ATR ContCenodnin e ASTeRlect A surA

er ePSleealect Mutusschelknaus Hlu anstu e n P a i r sa na b e t a r n Hbaialfn-AHu th MeliswsiathMMuetslicshelk a r A f l wi Ha re Open u s a n e e l p P O r olfe nr H PluenatseurewitW ia Dlafenny W e b t h a n r o u A H y f l nn Hbaian with Da Half-Ara

Recent wins: Recent wins: 2010 Region 14 Champion

2010 Region 14 Champion Half-Arabian Hunter Pleasure Select Half-Arabian Hunter Pleasure Select

Owned by: Owned by: Darrell and Melissa Mutschelknaus Darrell and Melissa Mutschelknaus 6451 Harmony Valley Rd 6451 Harmony Valley Rd Newcomerstown, OH 43852 Newcomerstown, OH 43852 E-mail: hafarrier@aol.com E-mail: hafarrier@aol.com


Gaibrialla Gaibrialla

(Khadraj NA x Gai Fantasha) (Khadraj NA 2008 x GaiArabian Fantasha) Bay Mare 2008 Arabian Bay Mare

Contending Contending in: in:

Arabian Hunter Pleasure Arabian Hunter Pleasure Horse JuniorJunior Horse with Danny Wolfe with Danny Wolfe

Recent wins: Recent wins: 2012 Region 13 Champion Arabian 2012 Region 13 Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure Junior Horse Hunter Pleasure Junior Horse 2011 Scottsdale Signature Stallion 2011 Scottsdale Signature Stallion Top Ten 3-Year-Old Filly ATH Top Ten 3-Year-Old Filly ATH 2010 Iowa Gold Star Top Five 2010 Iowa2-YearGold Star Old Top FillyFive 2-Year- Old Filly

Owned by: Owned by: Jennifer Langhals Jennifer Langhals Holland, OH Holland, OH

Volume 43, No. 4 | 79A


Don Morse

Our 2012 United States National Show is dedicated to

He showed us all, one by one, how to live life "all the way", never expecting tomorrow, and thanking God for each day he gives us.

Team Midwest

And because of you Don, we do !


Power Dream The

Of A


Power The

Of A Team

The love of the Arabian horse has been a lifelong passion for internationally acclaimed horseman, David Boggs, and his greatest joy is sharing that passion with those he loves—his family and friends. “The Arabian horse has enriched my life in countless ways, most significantly, through my family,” says Boggs. “My father and mother shared their love of the horses with my siblings and me, and now I am able to share that same love with my own family. Terry Anne and I are fortunate that our children Lyndsey and Courtney, who are twins, our daughter, Emma, and our son Jake, all enjoy the horses. The special friends we have made and the wonderful people we have met, the beautiful places we have visited and the exciting adventures we have had, are all because of the Arabian horse. Words cannot describe how God has blessed us. I want to share that with others.”

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David Boggs’ heartfelt desire has become his life’s work. Over the past 30 years, he has traveled the world from Paris, France, to Pewaukee, Wisc., from Dubai City, Dubai, to Des Moines, Iowa, from Sao Paulo, Brazil, to Santa Inez, Calif.; David has visited every continent where Arabian horses live. Along the way, he has met members of royal families, rulers of nations, aristocrats, titans of industry, movie stars, and rock stars. However, his favorite people are those who love the Arabian horse—breeders, trainers, grooms, those who own Arabian horses and those who dream of the possibility, especially the children.

“I love everything about the Arabian horse,” states Boggs. “To me, it is one of the most perfect creatures on earth. The beauty of the Arabian is incomparable, and their spirit, kindness, intelligence, courage, heart, gentleness, and love of people captivated me when I was just a boy. That connection has never diminished; every day I find something new to love about the horses. To work with them is a dream come true.” David Boggs’ passion for the Arabian horse is the key to the success of Midwest Training Centre. His passion created his vision, it provides his energy, and

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it sustains his commitment to search out and find, acquire, transform, and showcase the crème de la crème of the breed. Thirty years of experience has trained David’s eye to see what others miss—potential. His ability to see beyond the immediate, and visualize the possibility, is not a skill. It is a gift. “In my search for truly great Arabian horses, I keep an open mind,” continues Boggs. “When a small breeder comes to me and tells me they have a superstar, I listen. Many of the most influential horses in history are the result of small breeders’ programs. I believe these dedicated people are the backbone of our industry. I totally appreciate their commitment and respect the importance of their contributions. There is an indescribable thrill when I see a special horse that comes from a small breeder. I can see their pride in their accomplishment – it’s very rewarding! “Generally, if I see a horse that really impresses me, I am confident that I can find a buyer for it. If it’s a horse I would want to own for myself, then I know I can work with it—even if it’s not conditioned or trained. For me, finding a diamond in the rough is often the most exciting opportunity. Taking a horse that has unrealized potential and developing it into a show ring superstar is a fantastic experience. It really doesn’t get much better than that.”

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As people took notice of David’s accomplishments, more and more of them turned to him for his expertise. This swell of interest brought some very special horses into his life. Some people describe a horse that has a profound influence on them as their “once-in-a-lifetime” horse. David met a “once-in-a-lifetimehorse” when he was introduced to the great stallion *Padron. Together they made history and shaped the future of the Arabian horse breed. David showed *Padron to the Arabian “Triple Crown”—the Scottsdale, Canadian and U.S. National Championship titles. Then, in 1983, David syndicated the stallion for a record breaking $11 million dollars. He completed the unimaginable feat in just 90 days. Equally important, David created and implemented the plan that enabled *Padron to become one of the most successful and influential sires in the history of the breed. Throughout the years, hard work and talent proved to be the keys to success for David Boggs. It seems that each of his accomplishments created new opportunities. Year after year, with each show ring win and satisfied client, David Boggs built Midwest Training Centre into a thriving business. His success David Boggs and *Padron

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in the show ring attracted the best of the best in the breed, and people from around the world brought their superstar horses to Midwest to be shown and marketed. People everywhere want to be associated with excellence, and in the Arabian horse industry, the pinnacle of excellence was found at Midwest. Strolling along the pristine aisleways and looking into the sunlit stables was like walking into Tiffany’s. Each filly and colt, each mare and stallion were glittering gems among the breed. Access to great horses like these created a market that brought buyers from around world to

Midwest. By the end of the decade, the names of David Boggs and Midwest were synonymous with the highest levels of show ring and marketing success in the Arabian horse industry. David’s success with *Padron was not a one-time stroke of luck. David marketed Padron’s son, Padrons Psyche as a 3-yearold, showed him to the title of 1991 U.S. National Reserve Champion Stallion (the youngest horse in the history of the breed at the time to win that title), and then marketed the stallion again—all the while promoting him as a sire and helping to

Magnum Psyche, David Boggs and Fernando de Santibanes.

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create the next generation of Arabian horse superstars. It takes an owner with a deep passion, as well as the resources to care for a world-class stallion and sire of influence such as Padrons Psyche. David found the perfect match with Dixie and Bob North of North Arabians, who owned and cared for Psyche for more than 10 years. Under their stewardship, Padrons Psyche was able to achieve his ultimate destiny as one of the leading sires of the Arabian horse breed on a global basis. Following in the success of Psyche came his very special son, Magnum. A stallion as incomparable as Magnum Psyche deserved an owner who understood his potential, who could accept the

responsibility and embrace the experience of owning and caring for one of the most important Arabian stallions of our generation. The father and son team of Fernando and Joaquin de Santibanes possessed the desire, the dedication, and the ability to provide every opportunity for Magnum Psyche to achieve his full potential. It, too, was a perfect match. Magnum Psyche proved his show ring potential with his stunning physical excellence and earned five National Championship titles in halter. However, his most important achievement took place in the breeding barn. Magnum Psyche’s amazing ability to sire offspring of exceptional beauty and in his likeness Volume 43, No. 4 | MW 7


earned him a ranking among the Arabian Horse DataSource’s Top Leading Sires of the World. The list of Magnum sons and daughters, grandsons and granddaughters, that have been shown to national and international championships, who have been marketed for record breaking prices through Midwest Training Centre, and gone on to become the foundation for successful breeding programs around the world has significantly increased the influence of Magnum Psyche and the account of David Boggs’ achievements. The foundation of Midwest’s success was built like that of a great monument—one that endures the test of time—one stone at a time, or in the case of Midwest, one horse at a time. It took years of endless effort, focused attention to detail, and a

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keen understanding of the importance of customer service to establish and build the Midwest that we know today. These efforts are sustained by the inspiration of this enterprise—David Boggs’ passion for the Arabian horse. This is the fuel that provides the energy and commitment to provide excellence on every level to the clients of Midwest. “The horses come first at Midwest,” says Boggs. “After all, they are the reason this business even exists. We’re all here because we love the Arabian horse. Really, I can’t imagine my life without them. But the clients make it all possible. Believe me; I never underestimate the importance of my relationship with our clients and the importance of first-class customer service.


“We strive to provide the absolute best, the most comprehensive services, the most positive experience, and the most fun possible for our clients. For example, if we have a great horse to sell, we offer to care for the horse, guide the owner and the horse through its career in the show ring, and then plan for its future breeding career. If it’s a stallion, we offer to stand and manage the horse, market his semen, and promote his offspring. If our client buys a mare, we will help them to achieve her highest potential in the show ring and then guide them in selecting the stallion with the greatest potential to ‘nick’” with her to produce a great foal. We will keep and care for the mare, have her bred, and foal her out. Basically, our clients can enjoy all of the wonderful benefits of owning one or even 100 world-class Arabian horses without the cost or effort of maintaining

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a farm. For some owners, our farm has become their farm, and in the process, our family becomes like their family. We enjoy so much together—the horses, the foals, the shows, picnics, and parties! It’s a lot of fun! “I have the most amazing job in the world!” continues Boggs. “Sure, it’s a lot of work, but I wouldn’t have it any other way. My father told me that if something is worth having then it’s worth working for. He also taught me, by his own example, the honor of a hard day’s work. It’s a principle I never forgot and one that I live by each day. At our farm, we offer five-star services to our clients and their horses. We are available to them 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. That’s

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what it’s all about—surrounding ourselves with the very best horses and offering the absolute best services. I believe that’s what has made Midwest the best farm in the business.” David is correct when he says that hard work and customer service have positioned Midwest as a leader in the industry. However for his clients, David’s consistent track record of success in the show ring and in the marketplace are highly motivating reasons to choose Midwest and to stay with them. Dan and Maureen Grossman have been involved with Arabian horses for over 30 years and have owned and bred some of the most noteworthy individuals of the breed, including the great sire, Bey Shah. David


The Boggs kids—Courtney, Lyndsey, Emma and Jake.

sold $1.5 million in Bey Shah breeding packages. Several years later, in 2003, David brought another superstar stallion into the lives of Dan and Maureen Grossman—the breathtaking, bay, yearling colt named DA Valentino. David saw the potential and believed wholeheartedly in the possibility of this colt. The Grossmans knew they could depend on David’s expertise, and they were not disappointed. DA Valentino earned six national championship titles. Then tragedy struck, and we had to mourn our loss of this great stallion and all that he meant to the Arabian breed. At just 8 years old, DA Valentino was already one of the most successful sires of his generation. Another example of long-term success is Fernando and Joaquin de Santibanes, the owners of the international superstar, Magnum Psyche. David facilitated the sale of Magnum Psyche to Fernando and Joaquin in 1997 and sold an unheard of number of breedings to the colt when he was still just a yearling. Since that time, Volume 43, No. 4 | MW 11


Annual Kids Day at Midwest.

David has been instrumental in guiding Magnum’s show career to five national championship titles and, perhaps more importantly, guided his breeding career that resulted in over 1,200 registered offspring and hundreds of national and international champion get and grandget. David Boggs has shown national and international champion Arabian horses throughout the United States, Canada, South America, Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and Australia. Midwest’s show record is unmatched. When you consistently show the best horses, it’s not surprising to consistently win the top awards. Reviewing the list of past national and international champions presented by Midwest would be like a trip to the Arabian horse Hall of Fame: *Padron, Bask Calonett, *Kaborr, NH 12 MW | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

Love Potion, Amber Satin, La Duquesa, Almaden, JBK Mystic Fawn, Magnum Psyche, Magnum Chall HVP, LD Pistal, Maggdalina, JJ La Estrella, JJ Apharina, DA Valentino, Vitorio, Aria Impresario, *JJ Baronesa, and so many more—too many to name and most of them with multiple championship titles. The number of awards earned by Midwest, their clients and horses, add up quickly; from 2004 through 2012, the Midwest team earned 96 U.S. National and Reserve National Championship titles and four Scottsdale Supreme Halter Championship awards! Add to that impressive number, the amount of championship titles from Canada, Brazil, Argentina and all of the other national and international shows they have attended and you get an idea of the consistency this team delivers and the quality of the horses they present.


That same level of consistency and quality carry over from the show ring to the marketing department of Midwest. Wherever excellence is appreciated, there is the desire to acquire and breed for the best. The market for the top Arabian horses has no bounds. Over the past 30 years, David estimated that Midwest has marketed more than $30 million dollars’ worth of international champion mares and over $40 million dollars in stallions with those same credentials. That is why owners, breeders, and trainers look to Midwest as the leader in the industry for marketing top quality Arabian horses. ■Volume 43, No. 4 | MW 13


LaBaronesa

United States National Contender Arabian 4-Year-Old Mares with David Boggs

JJ

Magnum Psyche x NV Angelica

2012 Scottsdale Unanimous Grand Champion C hampion Mare

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Haras Mayed Fernando and Joaquin de Santibanes Buenos Aires, Argentina


Better than ever ... at 17 Years Young!

Padrons Psyche x A Fancy Miracle

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Aria Impresario Marwan Al Shaqab x GC Echlectica

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United States National Contender Arabian Senior Stallions With David Boggs Arabian Celebration Unanimous Grand Champion Stallion United States National Champion Two-Time Scottsdale Supreme Champion Halter Horse

The Impresario Partners

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the Sire

5-Time National Champion

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DA Valentino x Sol Natique


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the Sire

Oak Ridge Arabians Freeport, Illinois www.OakRidgeArabians.com

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On lease to David & Terry Anne Boggs & Midwest Jeff Sloan & the Sloan Family Bred by Stadnina Koni Jan贸w Podlaski, Poland

QR Marc x Petla

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Special thank you ... to all 150 mare owners that booked their finest to *Pogrom.

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The Beautiful Story of This Special Colt

Some things in life mark you forever.

Twenty-five years ago, I heard of Lenita Perroy and her incredible stallion Ali Jamaal. This stayed with me for all these years as more than just a goal, but a big dream. It started to become reality when I met all these wonderful people in the Arabian horse world, who would then lead me to my Elishahh! This was more than love at first sight! It was a combination of all the most wonderful feelings one can possibly have, but most of all, being so very grateful, because of how many people in the world spend their whole life looking for this wonderful feeling and never, ever experience something like this.


“I am very excited and proud to be presenting AAS-Elishahh at the U.S. Nationals for our friend Luciana Fasano and her beautiful Fazenda Floresta of Brazil. Elishahh has it all. His beauty and charisma are what we imagine the ideal Arabian horse to be. As a young stallion, his conformational quality and fantastic pedigree make him a breeder’s dream. Elishahh is already a two-time National Champion, and now we have set our sights on Tulsa and winning another title and crown!” — David Boggs “AAS-Elishahh! Not much more can be said about this fantastic 3-year-old stallion that has already earned two U.S. National Championships! We can’t wait to see his success in the breeding arena as well. We wish Luciana the very best success with Elishahh and all of her wonderful horses!” — Fernando and

Joaquin de Santibanes, Haras Mayed, Argentina, Breeders and Horsemen “I was quite impressed by AAS-Elishahh when I judged him at the 2011 Las Vegas Breeders World Cup, and the stallion remains in my mind. I remember him as if it was today—a very correct and refined horse with that very special “look-at-me attitude!” Some time after seeing Elishahh at the show, I spoke to Luciana Fasano and told her that I would like to breed most of my best mares to him. These mares come from a very diverse genetic pool, yet they had complementary backgrounds and would cross nicely with him. I believe that Elishahh can make a difference in one’s breeding program. He is very solid. He has most of the qualities I am seeking for my breeding program: Type! Type! Type! Plus attitude! And correctness! He has a well-set neck, a very strong body with beautiful proportions, and huge black eyes with the clean look we are striving for. I am proud to say I was one of the first supporters of this young stallion in Brazil, and we are looking forward to seeing the babies with our wonderful mares!

— Fabio Amorosino, Haras Serondella, Brazil, 2011 ABWC Judge “Take my word for it, this young stallion is the “Real Deal!” Fads come and go. AAS-Elishahh has a breeder’s pedigree as illustrious and enduring as the melting of great genetics could possibly allow. AAS-Elishahh already has more National Championships and major wins than most stallions dream about, and he accomplished this by impressing the most elite of international judges. AASElishahh is truly a horseman’s horse with a breeder’s pedigree. Don’t take your eyes off of him!” — Richard Adams, 2011 ABWC and U.S. National Judge

“Elishahh is one of the most correct and typey stallions that I have seen in a long time. I saw him as a yearling and judged him as a 2-year-old at the U.S. Nationals. He won both times by a mile. I just saw him recently, and he definitely is one of the truly great young Arabian stallions that will impact our industry for many years to come. I love him and can’t wait to see the incredible foals he will produce! And, I ‘tip my hat’ to Luciana for doing great things for a great horse. Well Done!” — Terry Holmes,

2011 U.S. National & International Judge “When I first saw AAS-Elishahh, beauty, presence and style poured out of him. Not only was he spectacular, he had that special quality that draws people to him. At the time, I was searching for a national champion quality colt for Luciana Fasano and her beautiful Fazenda Floresta in Itú, Brazil. My good friend Michael Byatt suggested I consider AAS-Elishahh. When I saw Elishahh I knew he was the right horse. I called Luciana and told her about Elishahh; she didn’t hesitate. Later, Luciana told me, ‘I never doubted you, Guzzo.’ I knew it was the right thing to do. So, I did it and never looked back. “Elishahh went on to win U.S. National Champion Yearling Colt, Las Vegas Breeders World Cup Supreme Gold Champion Junior Stallion and U.S. National Champion Two-Year-Old Colt. Now Elishahh heads to his third U.S. National Championship as a 3-year-old. He is an amazing show horse and certain to be an amazing sire.” — Rodolfo Guzzo, International Expert Training and Marketing Arabian Horses “The first time we heard about AAS-Elishahh was at the 2010 U.S. Nationals. The whole show was abuzz about the beautiful bay yearling colt that Michael Byatt was going to present. AASElishahh was named U.S. National Champion Sweepstakes Yearling Colt and his sire, Eden C was named U.S. National Champion Junior Stallion. AAS-Elishahh is following in Eden C`s footsteps in the show ring and we are sure he will follow in those footsteps as a sire too. We feel Elishahh will continue on his path to fame under the guidance of his gracious owner Luciana Fasano.” — Rhoda and Rhonda Coleal, Coleal Arabian

Horse Farm, Breeders of Eden C “When I showed AAS-Elishahh to his title of 2010 U.S. National Champion Yearling Colt and to his title of 2011 Arabian Breeders World Cup Supreme Gold Champion Junior Stallion, I was impressed with his superior beauty, quality, and attitude. I knew this was a colt that would accomplish great things.”

— Michael Byatt, Arabian Breeder and Horseman


I loved everything about him, His character

A Golden Pedigree

His beautiful attitude His balance His pedigree,

Patron

Precious as Gold

Padron

silken sable

bey shah

rd bey shahmPane

Fame VF

Padrons Psyche

el shaklan

enzo

tulle el Jamaal

ruminaJa ali

eden c

heritaGe memory

talal

ali Jamaal

Luciana Fasano and AAS-Elishahh as a yearling.


AAS-Elishahh and Luciana Fasano


Laheeb x The Vision HG


AL

N at i o N a l C h a m p i o N

Hadiyah

AA

South American representative: Rinaldo Longuini longuiniht@yahoo.com.br Fazenda Floresta • Itu, BrazIl

www.fazendaflorestaarabians.com

United States representative: David Boggs midwest@sbwireless.net Judi Anderson for breeding information judimidwest@sbwireless.net www.midwestarabian.com


OFW Magic Wan x OFW Jewelee


A portrait of

Perfect Beauty

ofw

Wan and Only Thank you, Dolly Orr, for breeding Wan And Only. We all know how difficult it is, and he is v ery spe cial. — Luciana

2012 United States National Yearling Colts with David Boggs

Fazenda Floresta • Itu, BrazIl

www.FazendaFlorestaaraBIans.com

www.MidwestArAbiAn.coM


LuxemerJizette

United States National Contender Arabian Futurity Fillies With David Boggs

KM Bugatti x TA Jihana Bey

2012 Region 12 Champion Mare 2012 Region 14 Champion Mare Anthony, Denise, Brittany & AJ Marino Birmingham, Alabama

W W W. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m 34 MW | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


2012 Canadian National Champion Futurity Filly

W W W. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m Volume 43, No. 4 | MW 35


Shariff

United States National Contender 2-Year-Old Colts With Midwest

RCA

Aria Impresario x Crysstell

Canadian National Champion 2-Year-Old Colt Arabian Celebration Unanimous Champion 2-Year-Old Colt Iowa Gold Star Champion 2-Year-Old Colt Scottsdale Reserve Champion 2-Year-Old Colt Shariff RCA Partnership

W W W. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m 36 MW | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Like father, Like son . . National Champions Together!

Volume 43, No. 4 | MW 37


United States National Contender Arabian Senior Stallions With Midwest

*J

usta Magnum Magnum Psyche x S Justatinkerbell

Ur u guayan N ation al Cha mpion Br az il i an N ation al Cha mpion Unit e d States N ation al Top Ten Region al Cha mpion

HLP Faraon Justa Magnum x Mars Simbayeva HEC

2011 Colt Justa Magnum x Alexia Four

2011 Filly Justa Magnum x Aquir Janera

J u s ta M a g n u M . . . J u s ta g r e at s i r e !

Available for sale at private treaty

Franco Vara • Uruguay w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m 38 MW | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Volume 43, No. 4 | MW 39


Spartacus United States National Contender Arabian Yearling Colts

RA

Da Vinci FM x WH Julliet

The Vasconcelos Family

of Belo Horizonte, Brazil

Bred by Doug Verheul of Rapture Arabians

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m 40 MW | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Arabian Celebration Unanimous Champion Junior Colt Iowa Gold Star Champion Junior Colt Region 14 Champion Yearling Colt

Volume 43, No. 4 | MW 41


Star of Justice United States National Contender Arabian Yearling Fillies

ORA

WH Justice x Star Of Gaishea

WH

Justice

Magnum Psyche x Vona Sher-Renea

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m 42 MW | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

Star of Gaishea WN Ultimate Star x Gaishea (Bey Shah x Gai Dream)

Saud Abdulaziz Altajel


2012 C a na dia n n at i o n al C h am pi on Y e ar li n g F i llY a r a b ia n C el e b rat io n U n an i m oU s C h am pi on Y e ar li n g F i l lY a ra b ia n C e l eb rat i on r e s e rv e J U n i o r C h am pi on F i llY

W W W. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m Volume 43, No. 4 | MW 43


Vegas

Always the Champion. ... now a Mega Star Sire! dpa

EF Kingston x Angelina DPA

Sultan ORa Vegas DPA x Raherra 2012 Canadian National Champion Yearling Colt 2012 Iowa Gold Star Champion Auction Yearling Colt 2012 Scottsdale Signature and Auction Champion Yearling Colt 2011 Arabian Breeder Finals Champion Weanling Colt

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m 44 MW | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

Oak Ridge Arabians Freeport, Illinois www.OakRidgeArabians.com


TributeThyme

United States Natonal Contender Arabian Stallions AAOTH with Blake Messerli 4-5 Year-Old Stallions with Midwest

Pryme Thyme x Diamond Tribute

2011 United States National Champion Stallion AAOTH 2010 Canadian National Champion Stallion 2012 Scottsdale Liberty Champion Blake Messerli Lees Summit, Missouri

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m Volume 43, No. 4 | MW 45


Victorious

United States National Contender Arabian Futurity Colts with Midwest LD

DA Valentino x Queen Adiamonds

Region 14 Unanimous Champion Yearling Colt Iowa Gold Star Champion 2-Year-Old Colt Region 18 Unanimous Champion 2-Year-Old Colt Iowa Gold Star Champion 3-Year-Old Colt Iowa Gold Star Stallion Scottsdale Signature Stallion

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m 46 MW | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

Les and Diane Van Dyke Chandler, Minnesota


Khasanova Presenting

MS

DA Valentino x MS Khandi

Mystic Sands Arabians Ken and Donna Topp ~ 616-399-2109 West Olive, Michigan

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m Volume 43, No. 4 | MW 47


United States National Contender Arabian 3-Year-Old Fillies with Midwest

2011 United States National Champion 2-Year-Old Filly Arabian Celebration Unanimous 3-Year-Old Champion Filly Iowa Gold Star Grand Champion Mare

Festywa

Canadian National Reserve Champion Mare

ALSA

FA El Shawan x Festyna SA

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m 48 MW | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

Franco Vara Uruguay


Kharalisa

United States National Contender Arabian Futurity Fillies with Midwest BPA

Khadraj NA x Rhapsody In Gold

United States National Reserve Champion Yearling Filly

Daniel & Fabiana Pastorino Punta Del Este, Uruguay

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m Volume 43, No. 4 | MW 49


Beni

United States National Contender Half-Arabian Yearling Fillies with Midwest

TG

DA Valentino x Rohara Mademoiselle

Canadian National Champion Half-Arabian Yearling Filly Scottsdale Supreme Champion Half-Arabian Region 14 Champion Half-Arabian Yearling Filly Iowa Gold Star Champion Half-Arabian Auction Yearling Filly Arabian Celebration Champion Half-Arabian Mare

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m 50 MW | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

Todd and Glena Weegens Freeport, Illinois


The Godfather

United States National Contender Half-Arabian Yearling Colts With Midwest Region 14 Champion Half-Arabian Yearling Colt Iowa Gold Star Reserve Champion Yearling Colt

ORA

Vitorio TO x SH Sebella

Richard and Justine Goodrow Manchester, New Hampshire

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m Volume 43, No. 4 | MW 51


Imperatore LC

Offering ...

2012 bay colt

Legacy Of Fame x LA Macarena HDM (Abakan x Ytadella ‘F’, by Psytadel US)

La Macarena HDM

Lady Georgina Pelham Buenos Aires, Argentina

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m 52 MW | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Supreme Justice

Offering an exciting colt sired by "The Champion Maker"

ORA

WH Justice x LL Albufera

Scottsdale Reserve Champion Yearling Colt - European Classes Arabian Breeders World Cup Reserve Champion Yearling Colt

Oak Ridge Arabians Freeport, Illinois www.OakRidgeArabians.com

WH Justice w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m Volume 43, No. 4 | MW 53


VictoriaPrincipal United States National Contender Arabian Yearling Filly With Midwest

Vitorio TO x Diamond Of Versace

M

Canadian National Reserve Champion Yearling Filly Scottdsale Signature Stallion Champion Yearling Filly ATH

Anthony, Denise, Brittany & AJ Marino Birmingham, Alabama

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m 54 MW | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Kharisma

United States National Contender Arabian 2-Year-Old Filly with Midwest

DA Valentino x Kharmel BR

M

Scottsdale Champion 2-Year-Old Filly ATH w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m Volume 43, No. 4 | MW 55


United States National Contender Arabian 4-5 Year-Old Mares with Midwest Arabian Mares AAOTH with AJ Marino

Arabian Celebration Champion Mare ATH Canadian National Champion United States Reserve National Champion

AnnaMarie

BHF

Marwan Al Shaqab x BHF Anna Tevkah

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m 56 MW | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

Marino Arabians Anthony, Denise, Brittany & AJ Marino Birmingham, Alabama


United States National Contender Arabian Geldings Open & AAOTH with Terry Anne Boggs

Magnum Storm DC

Magnum Psyche x Rohara Eclipse

Arabian Celebration Champion Senior Gelding Arabian Celebration Champion Gelding ATH Canadian and United States National Champion Scottsdale Champion Gelding Open & JTH Available for purchase

David and Terry Anne Boggs w w w. M i d w eElk s tRiver, A r aMinnesota bian.com Volume 43, No. 4 | MW 57


Seraphina

Midwest welcomes the exquisite beauty of Champion

ER

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m 58 MW | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

Bey Jullyen x Pretty Trickey

Halbrook Arabians Pam Halbrook and Pam Bauerlein Tucson, Arizona


Falcons Promise

Iowa Gold Star Reserve Champion Auction Filly

ORA

Falcon BHF x LL Albufera

Oak Ridge Arabians Freeport, Illinois www.OakRidgeArabians.com

LL Albufera

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m Volume 43, No. 4 | MW 59


Felicity ofLaman HLP

United States National Contender 2-Year-Old Fillies with Midwest

Laman HVP x Fellicity Serondella

Arabian Breeders World Cup Reserve Champion Filly

Faraon HLP

Justa Magnum x Mars Simbayeva HEC

2012 Region 11 Champion 2-Year-Old Colt

Franco Vara Uruguay

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m 60 MW | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Lathifa

HEM

HSE Dalakhani x Badiia

Oak Ridge Arabians Freeport, Illinois www.OakRidgeArabians.com

Offered for sale. In foal to The Champion Maker ... WH Justice.

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m Volume 43, No. 4 | MW 61


Colt

The Magnum x Ames Mirage Legacy Continues ...

2012

Magnum Psyche x Ames Mirage

Filly 2012

Magnum Psyche x Ames Mirage

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m 62 MW | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

Cedar Ridge Arabians The Ames Family Jordan, Minnesota


An Angel Dances

Aliethya Magnum Psyche x JR Burmagny

Canadian National Reserve Champion 2-Year-Old Filly Region 14 Champion 2-Year-Old Filly Iowa Gold Star Champion 2-Year-Old Filly Offered at private treaty. Joy Horses Belgium

w w w. M i d w e s t A r a b i a n . c o m Volume 43, No. 4 | MW 63


Team Midwest


The Dream Team!

Nate White alcides RodRigues Judi aNdeRsoN RiNaldo loNguiNi dagmaR goRdiaNo

maRgaux RodRigues aNdy caRRoll meagaN KatzaKiaN sammy oJeda heRb heldt


U.S. NatioNal CaoNteNderS te der d a N d y fa r m

P.O. Box 2016, Greenwood, Delaware 19950 • 302.349.5116 • Cathy Vincent • 302.236.6665 Asst. Trainer, Tim Phelan • 585.943.4333 www.AdandyFarm.com Volume Volume 43, 43, No. No. 44 || 147A 147A


Scarlet O Butler Arabian Country English Pleasure and Arabian Country Pleasure Driving with

Cathy Vincent

Gitar MF x AF Ellenai Owned by: Merrilee Lyons and Cathy Vincent 148A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Citationn Arabian English Pleasure with

Cathy Vincent

Unanimous Region 14 Champion Unanimous Buckeye Champion National Reserve Champion

Afire Bey V x Kaz Baskteena Owned by: Merrilee Lyons Silver Stag Arabians Volume 43, no. 4 | 149A


Vibrato G NATiONAl ChAMPiON

Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR Maturity with

Jeffrey Allen

Arabian Country Pleasure Driving with

Cathy Vincent

2011 U.S. National Reserve Champion Country Junior horse 2012 Youth National Champion Country Driving

Gitar MF x Starlite Flite Owned by: Jeffrey Allen

150A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


AEPA Arabian Saddle Seat Futurity with

Cathy Vincent

Gitar MF x Ghazis Flaminstar Proudly owned by: Melissa Campbell Jones and Barbara Campbell Volume 43, no. 4 | 151A


RGT BReaThin afiRe Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure Futurity with

Cathy Vincent

Afire Bey V x Styling Time Owned by: Merrilee Lyons

152A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Lady angeLina Half-Arabian 2-Year-Old Fillies with

Phillip Wolfe

The Firelord x AE Town Token Owned by: Merrilee Lyons

Volume 43, no. 4 | 153A


License To ThriLL PF Half-Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR Maturity and Half-Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 18-39 with

Arielle Fisher Half-Arabian English Pleasure Open with

Cathy Vincent

Baske Afire x Callaway’s Marguerite Owned by: Wendy and Arielle Fisher 154A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


PF Double o Seven Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 18-39 with

Alicia Mala

Doubletrees Classic Design x RMR Amber Lace Owned by: Alayna Mala

Volume 43, no. 4 | 155A


Town Treasure Half-Arabian Mares 6-7 with

Phillip Wolfe

Emerald Afire AA x AE Town Token Owned by: Congressional Farms

156A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Available For Purchase

AF Eddievanhalen

AA Noble Savita

AF Jimmy Page

Air Gitar AF

Independence G

AA Noble Savita

(IXL Noble Express x Sanjivani, by Justafire DGL) 2008 Purebred Country Pleasure Mare. Region 15 Top Five Country Pleasure Junior Horse. East Coast Championship Unanimous Reserve Champion Country Pleasure JTR. Perfect kid’s mount; wonderful for Youth walk/trot. Priced to sell! Stratocaster AF

Tabitha AA

AF Eddievanhalen

She Be A Rockstar

(Gitar MF x Callaway’s Epiphany) 2010 Half-Arabian Mare. This mare rocks! Started in lines— motion to burn! Willingness and quality. Would be a great prospect for the 2013 Half-Arabian English Pleasure Futurity.

Stratocaster AF

AF Jimmy Page

Tabitha AA

Air Gitar AF

Talk Ofthe Town AF

(Gitar MF x Callaway’s Epiphany) 2012 Half-Arabian Colt. Don’t miss out on this exciting opportunity! This Half-Arabian colt IS going to be a superstar, just like the name suggests.

Independence G

Justawalk In The Park

Dansing Queen

Pretentious CA

(Gitar MF x Strawberry Lace) 2012 Half-Arabian Colt. This long-necked Gitar baby is fabulous—a MUST see and a MUST have!

(Gitar MF x Starlite Flite) 2005 Bay Gelding. Cream-of-the-crop SUPERSTAR! Fabulous Open and Amateur horse; many Regional wins in open, amateur and JTR.

Young And Hot

Keltic Fire

(Gitar MF x Young and Hot) 2011 Half-Arabian Gelding. This is one smoking hot youngster!

(Gitar MF x AE Town Token) 2009 Half-Arabian Gelding. Well started under saddle and has a show career in halter. High-necked and long legged, he would be a great prospect as a Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure Junior Horse for 2013. Can be seen at U.S. Nationals! Talk Ofthe Town AF

Justawalk In The Park

(Gitar MF x Witch, by Wisdom) 2006 Purebred Mare. High-necked and willing to please, would be suitable for any amateur or youth mount. A proven winner in the show ring. (Gitar MF x AE Town Token) 2012 Half-Arabian Filly. The name says it all. Definitely a halter and performance prospect.

FAMILY AFFORDABLE UNDER $10,000 Young And Hot

(Young MC x W S Hot Pursuit) 2001 Half-Arabian Mare. She would be a great addition to anyone’s lesson or breeding program. Many wins in JTR Country and Saddle Seat Equitation. A proven broodmare.

Dansing Queen

(Justafire DGL x SWF Central Park) 2005 Half-Arabian Mare. RED HOT! Loaded with talent. Region 15 Reserve Champion JTR and is ready to go on and win BIG!

(Gitar MF x Music Music Music) 2003 Purebred Mare. This mare is ready for a new dancing partner as her owner is off to college. She would be suitable for any amateur or youth rider in Country or Show Hack.

Keltic Fire

Kool Expressions

(Afire Bey V x Kranberrie Bey) 2011 Purebred Colt. Region 16 Reserve Champion Yearling Colt. Halter quality with a performance pedigree. Absolutely beautiful! Can be seen at U.S. Nationals!

Opininated AF

(Gitar MF x AE Town Token) 2007 Half-Arabian Gelding. Regal gelding well started under saddle as a country horse and broke to drive. Has a great future in the show ring.

(Kool Fire x Bey Fire Express) 1997 Purebred Mare. Cool-as-a-cucumber experienced show mare. Suitable for any amateur or child. Would be a great asset to anyone’s lesson or breeding program.

CTC Felicity

(Sunstone Bey x JR Katherine) 1999 Purebred Mare. A rare opportunity. Regional halter champion who is producing English performance prospects.

Pretentious CA Kool Expressions

(Gitar MF x Precocious AF) 2006 Purebred Mare. Exciting English Pleasure mare— beautiful and easy. Multiple Regional wins in English Pleasure Open and Amateur.

P.O. Box 2016, Greenwood, Delaware 19950 • 302.349.5116 • Cathy Vincent • 302.236.6665 Asst. Trainer, Tim Phelan • 585.943.4333 www.AdandyFarm.com CTC Felicity

Volume 43, no. 4 | 157A


158A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Volume 43, No. 4 | 159A


Presenting The Personalities

Becky A nd BoB nAsh by Mary Kirkman

Becky, Bob, and dogs Willie and Joseph, with some of their Arabians.

“We have to stop Bob from just about being killed all the time,” observes trainer Josh Quintus of his client and friend Bob Nash. He cites an example. “He and Becky go to Jackson Hole every year, and Bob is a daredevil. They were riding bikes down a mountain trail, and he went past Becky saying, ‘Becky, you can go faster! You can go faster!’ She got down to the bottom of the hill and he wasn’t there, so she went back up—and he’d flown off the edge.”

stories on Nash and has plenty of material. “At 72 years of age, there is nothing that Bob won’t try,” he says. “If you don’t step in there and tell him he can’t do this, he will try. Bob definitely has a good time.” Thankfully, Nash’s wife of 25 years, Becky, exercises more caution, so the pair balance each other out. They have been in Arabian horses since 2000, more seriously since their retirements a few years later.

The dry humor in Quintus’ voice, and his practiced, delayed-action delivery, is evidence that he loves telling

That vignette is a fairly accurate look at the couple. As personalities go, Bob’s is sketched in broad, bold strokes;

160A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Becky, while no one would accuse her of being either silent or shy, is more gently colored. However, like any bone fide southern lady (she was born and raised in Texas), she can hold her own anywhere. While they do not appear to be much alike—Bob is tall and obviously athletic, while Becky is petite and girl-next-door pretty— they are in fact very similar. Both were driven and accomplished in their business careers, and neither likes sitting still for very long. They both grew up in Houston, neither had horses until their Arabian venture, and they now count their friends in the breed as some of their closest. Their extraordinary accessibility may be part of the reason for those friendships. Ask a question and you will get an honest, and often revealing, answer.

Biographies 101

There is little in Becky and Bob Nash’s backgrounds to suggest that they would ever be as deeply involved in owning and showing Arabian horses as they are. Becky loved animals, but she wasn’t horse crazy as a child, she says, because she knew that having one was not financially possible. What her parents could not give her materially, however, they gave her in initiative. “My dad used to always say that education was the most important thing in life,” she remembers, and she got a whiff of what it could do for her when she was sent to a school for “the gifted and talented” in a more privileged area of town. From then on, she refused to recognize limitations. “I just thought you could do anything if you set your mind to it, and I worked

really, really hard in high school and college so that I could achieve those things. I had big ideas and I always would figure out a way to make them happen.” Bob’s parents were not wealthy either. “They struggled,” he recalls. “And when I went through junior and high school, I wasn’t the smartest kid in the world. Actually, I thought getting in trouble was the way to success, rather than studying.” He went to college “pretty much because everybody else did,” settling into a role as hell-raiser at three colleges before he finally just quit school—and found that, at age 20, he was up for the draft. His parents took action. “The bottom line is they threw me out of the house,” he says. One thing you find out quickly about Bob Nash is that he is not afraid to show his emotions when he cares deeply—and his gratitude now for what his parents did remains one of the cornerstones of his life. “The single greatest thing that my parents did in raising me was to throw my butt out of the house,” he says, “because all of the sudden, I went, ‘I don’t want to go into the army! I got to get back in school. I got no money and nobody is helping me.’” He returned to college and held down three jobs to stay there. The first semester, he earned a straight

Volume 43, No. 4 | 161A


weeks later, when Becky’s boss offered her tickets to a George Strait concert, she remembered that the guy she’d interviewed had seemed nice. “So I asked him out and we started dating, and we never quit dating,” she smiles. Two and a half years later they were talking marriage, and Bob, unfettered as he may be about challenging life physically, was prudent about a third marriage—not because he didn’t love Becky, but because he did. “I just wanted to be sure that I didn’t make another mistake,” he says, “and I didn’t want to make a mistake with Becky. Frankly, I had been through two divorces, and if I went through a third, it was not going to devastate me. But I was not willing to make Becky go through that kind of thing.” B average, and every semester after that, his grades went up. In 1964, he graduated from Texas A&M with a degree in civil engineering and went to work for Shell Oil in the construction of refineries and chemical plants. He also went through two marriages. By the mid-1980s, however, he was single again and working at Shell’s Wood River, Ill., plant when he was selected to be interviewed for the company’s newsletter. One of the advertising and public affairs people, Becky Doreck, was assigned to interview him. Becky was 24 at the time, just a couple of years out of the University of Texas, where she had earned a degree in journalism with a minor in petroleum land management. But the terminology of the industry was still new to her, so she brought a tape recorder to the interview, and as a result, packed somewhere in their possessions today, they have a recording of that first conversation. While a future together was not in anyone’s mind at the time, each experienced that human radar alert that the other was attractive and pleasant to be with. However, a 21-year age difference and the recognition that personal relationships weren’t smart in a corporate setting dampened any possibilities. Still, two

162A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

So they went to counseling—but only after making lists of everything they thought could possibly go wrong in a marriage and discussing each one. “When we went to meet with the counselor,” Bob recalls, “he just looked at us and said, ‘Y’all have covered everything that could go wrong in a marriage.’” After another visit or two, the counselor called a halt. “Look, you’ve covered all this stuff,” he said. “Just get married. If it doesn’t work, get divorced.’” Bob and Becky still laugh about it today. They were married in 1988, and so far, it appears to have worked. Over the next decade, both Nashes enjoyed rewarding careers with Shell, ultimately returning to Houston. The


rewarding part did not change, but eventually, the company affiliation did. Bob retired and went with Kellogg, Brown & Root, and then Becky, targeting more international exposure, joined an ad agency that was working on Walmart’s expansion into Europe. Later there would be stints with the internet start-up Glow Bug and the power giant Duke Energy, but it was the ad agency that changed their lives. It was located in Austin, so one of them had to commute; Bob agreed to hit the road, and the couple purchased a house in an Austin neighborhood called the Polo Club. From home, they could see a nearby equestrian center, and that is where Arabians entered the picture: the barn was home to Battaglia Farms. For the next few years, Bob and Becky Nash remained in the corporate world, with Arabian horses just a growing but pleasurable pastime. Then, in 2002, Bob’s mother died, and he was left reexamining his life. At the age of 62, he was ready for a change. They both retired and for three years, they owned and ran a bed and breakfast in

Fredericksburg, Texas, the heart of the state’s beautiful Hill Country. But in the end, that wasn’t quite right either. Their commitment to Arabians had increased, and casting around for a new home base, they chose Fort Worth, reasoning that since their horses were all in that area, riding would be more convenient. One thing led to another, Becky recalls, and before long they were looking for property with Josh and Jennifer Quintus. Arabian horses would be center stage in their lives.

Volume 43, No. 4 | 163A


Saying Yes To Arabians It was a desire to be together that brought Becky and Bob Nash to Arabians. One of their priorities always has been to spend time together, and in the beginning, they thought they might give trail riding a shot. There were a few false starts; initially, although they thought Battaglia’s Arabians were beautiful, they weren’t envisioning show horses—or spending the kind of money it took to buy them. So there was a learning curve as they tried first an inappropriate Quarter Horse and then an Arabian colt who wasn’t quite right. The colt, however, resulted in their introduction to Josh Quintus; when he needed to be retrained, Battaglia recommended that they enlist Quintus to do it. And although another trainer told him that he would never get the horse into the ring, Quintus did not only that, but won a top ten in Canada on him and got him sold as well.

After that, he had no real business dealings with the Nashes for awhile, Quintus relates, but of course there is a story involved. “I was the only one who had actually made any money for them in the horse business,” he says, Youth Nationals 2011: Champions Prescott and Sarah Porter with Becky and Bob Nash. “so I sent them a bill for $1 million and wrote a note that said, ‘Just because you don’t have horses spend so much time with them. In our barn, we’re all very with me doesn’t mean I can’t send you a bill.’ Bob close; it’s about what’s going on in their lives. We have sent me back a check for $1 million. I keep telling him, watched these kids doing it for 10 years, showing and ‘I’m going to cash it someday.’” Bob wasn’t as crazy as growing up and going to college. This was our first year that sounds; the check, of course, was on a closed bank that we were not at Youth Nationals just to watch.” account. But that was a harbinger of the in-your-face friendship the two enjoy today.

After a few other missteps, the Nashes found their place in the Arabian community. They figured out what it would take to buy the right horses and began showing, Bob in western pleasure and Becky in western and hunter. “We just loved it,” says Becky. “It was something where we could compete, it was something with animals, it was something where we were together, and we have just made such really, really great friends.

Last year, when Quintus rider Sarah Porter needed a mount, the Nashes lent her one of Becky’s horses, Legion of Supreme Honor winner Prescott—and the pair won the Youth National Championship in Hunter Pleasure Walk/Trot 10 and Under, as well as went top ten in Western Pleasure Walk/Trot 10 and Under. (When Prescott recently had to be put down, Josh Quintus accorded the gelding one of his highest compliments: “He was a good guy.”)

“It’s not just showing,” she clarifies. “Most of our really good friends now are our horse show friends, because we

At the moment, the Nash equine population numbers, somewhat unexpectedly, nine. “When Bob complains

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about money,” Josh says drolly, “I remind him that he keeps telling me, ‘We’re not in it for money, we want a lifestyle.’” The lifestyle means, virtually, that their family has grown. When Quintus wanted to relocate Colonial Wood, the Nashes were part of the project. Their house now is across a field from the training facility, in Pilot Point, Texas, so close that the Quintus family and the Nashes have dinner together often. (Becky and Josh are the designated cooks.) For Bob and Becky, taking riding lessons and seeing their horses is as easy as going next door, although they are careful to respect that Colonial Wood is a business. They try not to go there and hang out. “We don’t interfere,” says Bob. “Every now and then I’ll throw out my two cents—‘Would you like some help with this?’ ‘No.’ Josh is a smart guy. He knows what he’s doing.” As the years have gone by, the friendship between Bob and Josh—who during evenings in hunting season have been known to sit on the porch with a glass of wine and a shotgun, firing at the doves flying overhead—has deepened. That, however, is not always obvious. “There’s a vet clinic about 200 yards up the hill from us,” says Bob, “and the vet came over one day and said, ‘You had a lesson yesterday didn’t you?’ and I said ‘Yeah,’ and he said, ‘I know, I could hear Josh screaming at you all the way up the hill.’” Josh just grins. Bob can be a fairly intense guy, and he has a strong desire to be a better rider; he can handle criticism, and has been known occasionally to give as well as he’s taken.

I’ve ever met in my life,” Josh continues. “He’s so active; balance-wise, all that stuff, that’s all there, that’s all good. The worst part about it is he can’t hear.” They use wireless transmission for lessons, but on the rail at a show, communication is another matter—and the hilarious stories are multiplying. (At one show, the judge walked up to Bob in the line-up and inquired, “Didn’t you hear Josh telling you, you were on the wrong lead?”) So far, Bob has come off a horse only once with any particular consequences (cracked ribs). “I could tell you 10 things that I did wrong in getting on the horse,” he says ruefully. “The horse didn’t do anything.” It didn’t faze him. “Things don’t scare me; they concern me. If you have a challenge in front of you, you take the challenge, you do what’s best to do.” He hesitates and then adds with scrupulous honesty and more than a hint of humor, “Of course, Josh will say I don’t always know what’s best to do.” He laughs that Josh’s standard line is, “Don’t kill the Bob. We need his money.” “All the funny weird stuff, Bob does, which is good, because at this point, we can only handle one,” Josh says. “We can always count on Becky to be right there, and we know everything will be just right. “Becky is completely different from Bob,” he notes. “She’s kind of a passive rider; she’s not very aggressive, which is

“I always give him a hard time about how particular he is on everything,” the trainer elaborates. “He analyzes it to death. When he rides, he wants to know exactly what’s supposed to be done from A, B and C, and I keep telling him, ‘It’s a horse. I’m trying to teach you feel. You can’t just say, I do this, so this is going to be the result.’ It’s not a machine. “Bob acts like he’s the youngest 72-year-old person I think

Becky with her beloved hunter pleasure horse, Prescott.

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fine, but she has increased by four times from the time we started working with her. She’s gotten to be more and more comfortable being aggressive with her horse and making things happen. “She’s the most positive person about every situation I think I’ve ever met in my life,” he adds. “Very rarely will she ever be down about anything. And if there’s a situation that you’re looking at, going one way or the other with it, she’s always trying to help out, trying to help you make a positive decision.” Ironically, it has been Becky, riding more carefully, who has taken the falls. She has always gotten back on, however, and now is forging a career with San Souci V, who after trying western pleasure with Bob, made it clear that he wanted to go into hunter pleasure with Becky. In July, the pair notched two reserve championships at Region 11. The Nashes’ results in the show ring speak for themselves. Ask Bob for the best time of his life—apart from the obvious choices of marrying Becky or being there for the adoption of his daughter Heather, in his first marriage—and he’ll cite winning at Scottsdale when he was 67. Once again, his voice chokes with emotion. “To have never ridden horses, to think that I could do something like that at that age just blew my mind,” he says. “And last year too; now I have three Scottsdale wins.” The first was the 2008 Western Pleasure Championship in AAOTR 40 and Over on MC Picasso, and then on Mateo BPA, 2010 and 2012 Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Championships in the amateur division. He clears his throat. “Haven’t made that level at Nationals yet, but I’ve made top ten several times. Maybe this year—to me, I have the horse, if I can just ride him right. To be a national champion or reserve at my age would be amazing.” He smiles. “Another highlight would be Region 11 this year. Becky and I went into a Half-Arabian western class with some very good riders and horses, and we were unanimous champion and reserve.” (Bob was on Mateo BPA, while Becky rode Rock Em All.)

Who They Are

So what was it, all those years ago, that drew Bob and Becky Nash together—and keeps them together still?

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“He’s very kind and very caring,” Becky says of her husband. “You know, he’s one of those people that is pretty much gung-ho to do anything in the world. Don’t get me wrong; he’s not a patsy, and anyone who knows him will tell you that. I have to talk him into a lot of stuff. But, he’s willing to try things. And he’s a people person. I think one reason we’ve made so many friends in the horse show world is because of Bob; he never meets a stranger.” “The bottom line is, I like being with her,” Bob reflects. “That’s the answer. I just like being with her, and we are now together 24/7. She doesn’t like it when I go off on my high school guys’ weekend and I don’t like it when she goes off for a girls’ weekend, but that’s part of life. Yes, we have our disagreements, no question, in any marriage you do. But I like being with my wife.” Given the degree of success they have enjoyed, we ask each what lesson in their lives has been the most


important. Becky cites a thought from a former colleague. “He said that there are doers and there are dreamers, and there are no in-betweeners. In a way I disagree with him a little bit, because I don’t think you can do it if you don’t dream it. So, I think you have to have big dreams, but you’ve got to be willing to go after them and work hard to get them.” For Bob, the lesson was profound, and speaking of it reveals one of his basic tenets: he considers even the negative events learning experiences, and this one was too. But it was painful. “My family was not an ‘I love you’ type family,” he relates. “My dad got lung cancer and ultimately died, and I was with him the night he died, and I had known for a couple weeks that he was going to die. But he was still optimistic. The biggest mistake I have ever made in my life, but the biggest learning experience, was to say I love you—because I didn’t say it to him. Two things that I regret is that I never told my daddy I loved him and I never thanked him for throwing me out of the house.” He acknowledges that there were extenuating circumstances; had he said anything, his father would have understood the timeframe of his mortality, and that might not have been good, but he stands by the message. “That is the low point in my life—not being able to tell him that—but it’s a high point in that he, in dying, taught me to say ‘I love you’ and respond to people that are in trouble. Now I say what I think.”

completed it. She got her new suit—but she also sustained a stress fracture in her hip. With Nationals on the horizon, she is now following a regimen of swimming and biking and soon will be adding yoga, because, she says, “We have got to have strength, and we have to have balance in order to show these horses. It’s not just sitting there!” “Sitting there” is not on their priority list. Simply put, they have too much to do and too many people—and horses—to enjoy. “Well, we are having fun,” Bob nods. He sounds serious—true to the bone, as he does when he talks about his parents or Becky or his favorite horse, MC Picasso. And then a sly undertone signals upcoming blarney (sometimes you have to wonder if Jennifer Quintus and Becky Nash are rare islands of sanity in their husbands’ lives). “My plan was to die early and Becky could go on and get a new life,” he deadpans. “The bad news is that I didn’t die, and therefore we are spending money. We joke that all of a sudden one day, I will be on my death bed, and I’m going to look at Becky and say, ‘I love you, we had a great life, but you’re broke.’” n

They are honest to a fault, Josh Quintus observes quietly, dead earnest this time, no jokes. “When you’re talking to them, there is no grey area,” he says. “There is nothing underlying in what they are saying.” Not everything that has happened to Becky and Bob Nash has been champagne and roses. In 1997, Becky was diagnosed with thyroid cancer, certainly a scare, but the tumor was removed and she has been cancerfree ever since. Typically, they both have moved on and focus on more positive things. She does work on maintaining her fitness, however; in January, she ran her first halfmarathon, cheered on by her support team of Josh, Jennifer and Bob. Bob even added the incentive of a brand-new riding suit if she

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2 0 1 2 U . S . N at i o N al C o N t e N d e r S S H oW t i M e t ra i N i N g C e N t e r

w w w. S h ow t i m e t r a i n i n g C e n t e r . n e t

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S h ow t i m e

t ra i n i n g

Center

Royal Heir

VJ

Afires Heir x MA Ghazta Trot

Competing

in

AepA

S A d d l e S e At F u t u r i t y With tiSh KondAS

Owned by Southern Oaks Farm - Kelli Aguirre - Jupiter, Florida

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2012

U.S.

N at i o N a l

CoNteNderS

493 Boone Road, newnan, Ga a 30263 • BaRn R 770-252-3300 • Tish Kondas 678-427-0595 • CaRla Rn R sChilT Rla hil z 253-380-0853 hilT Volume 43, No. 4 | 171A


S h ow t i m e

t ra i n i n g

Center

Lady Marmalade

rta

Phi Slama Jama x OFW Elyzabeth

Competing in Half-arabian englisH pleasure open witH

tisH Kondas

Owned by Southern Oaks Farm - Kelli Aguirre - Jupiter, Florida

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2012

A

U.S.

N at i o N a l

CoNteNderS

Noble Pass

IXL Noble Express x SA Passing Fancy

Competing in ArAbiAn Show hACk open with

CArlA SChiltz

Owned by Jeanne Marie, Anna Boylan and Colleen Cooper - Andover, Massachusetts 493 Boone Road, newnan, Ga a 30263 • BaRn R 770-252-3300 • Tish Kondas 678-427-0595 • CaRla Rn R sChilT Rla hil z 253-380-0853 hilT Volume 43, No. 4 | 173A


S h ow t i m e

t ra i n i n g

Nobles Diva

Center

IXL Noble Express x Quintara Afire

And

Competing in ArAbiAn pArk open

ArAbiAn pleAsure driving with tish kondAs

Owned by Jeanne Marie, Anna Boylan and Colleen Cooper - Andover, Massachusetts

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2012

U.S.

N at i o N a l

CoNteNderS

Tonka Toi

PF

Matoi x PF Emotion

Competing in Half-arabian

park open witH tisH kondas

Owned by Jeanne Marie, Anna Boylan and Colleen Cooper - Andover, Massachusetts 493 Boone Road, newnan, Ga a 30263 • BaRn R 770-252-3300 • Tish Kondas 678-427-0595 • CaRla Rn R sChilT Rla hil z 253-380-0853 hilT Volume 43, No. 4 | 175A


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t ra i n i n g

Center

Double Platinum Afire Bey V x Evitaa

Competing in Half-arabian Country pleasure aaotr 36-54 witH elizabetH tyler

Half-arabian Country pleasure open witH tisH Kondas Owned by Elizabeth Tyler & Shirley and Walter McNeely - Elberton, Georgia

w w w. S h ow t i m e t r a i n i n g C e n t e r . n e t 176A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


2012

RGT

U.S.

N at i o N a l

CoNteNderS

Major Tom

AA Apollo Bey x Showtime's Shanghai Lilly

Competing in Half-arabian

englisH pleasure Junior Horse witH

tisH Kondas

Owned by Elizabeth Tyler & Shirley and Walter McNeely - Elberton, Georgia 493 Boone Road, newnan, Ga a 30263 • BaRn R 770-252-3300 • Tish Kondas 678-427-0595 • CaRla Rn R sChilT Rla hil z 253-380-0853 hilT Volume 43, No. 4 | 177A


S h ow t i m e

t ra i n i n g

Center

Roundabout Midnite Sir Fames HBV x KA Dream In Color

KA

Sir Fames HBV x KA Dream In Color

Competing in Half-arabian

Western pleasure Junior Horse WitH

Carla sCHiltz

Owned by Southern Oaks Farm - Kelli Aguirre - Jupiter, Florida

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2012

U.S.

Mythical Fire

N at i o N a l

A

CoNteNderS

WS Beyonette x Sweet Myschief

Competing in ArAbiAn Western pleAsure Junior Horse WitH tisH KondAs Owned by Pam Harris - Galax, Virginia

Chixx Dig Me Exxpectation x Tradition N Ebony

Competing in HAlf-ArAbiAn Western pleAsure Junior Horse WitH tisH KondAs Owned by Alvey Performance Horses - Newnan, Georgia 493 Boone Road, newnan, Ga a 30263 • BaRn R 770-252-3300 • Tish Kondas 678-427-0595 • CaRla Rn R sChilT Rla hil z 253-380-0853 hilT Volume 43, No. 4 | 179A


S h ow t i m e

VF

t ra i n i n g

Center

Playing WithFire Bask Flame x VF Elegant Miss

Competing in ArAbiAn Country pleAsure AAotr 36-54 with betsy hAAs ArAbiAn Country pleAsure Driving with tish KonDAs Owned by Betsy and Steve Haas - Ingleside, Illinois

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Pictured: Benedito Bey SMA with Katie Garland up and Resstitution with Tommy Garland

Tommy, Dawn & Katie Garland 915 Dorset Road, Powhatan, VA 23139 • 804.598.3657 w w w . T o m m y G a r l a n d . c o m

Volume 43, No. 4 | 181A


Bravado Bey V x CA Rufflesnlace

WESTERN PLEASURE OPEN WITH TOMMY GARLAND 2012 East Coast Champion Western Pleasure Regions 12 & 15 Top Five Western Pleasure U.S. National Top Ten Halter Stallion Breeders Sweepstakes Nominated Proudly owned by Kathy & Steve Polcsan For breeding information contact Garlands

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Besson Carol x Ekkatarina

WESTERN PLEASURE JUNIOR HORSE WITH TOMMY GARLAND AAOTR MATURITY WITH NATALIE HUNT 2012 Buckeye & Region 15 Champion Jr. Horse & Scottsdale Champion Western Pleasure AAOTR 2011 National Champion Western Pleasure Maturity 2010 National Champion Western Pleasure Futurity Proudly owned by Barbara Lynn Hunt

Tommy, Dawn & Katie Garland www.TommyGarland.com 804.598.3657


Brandon Bey JCA x Onapar

WESTERN PLEASURE AAOTR MATURITY & SELECT AATR WITH NAN WALDEN

janson photos

2012 East Coast Championships Reserve Champion Western Pleasure AAOTR

WESTERN PLEASURE JUNIOR HORSE WITH KATIE GARLAND 2012 Region 7 & 15 Champion Western Pleasure Jr. Horse Proudly owned by Nan & Dick Walden Rancho So単ado LLC Amado, Arizona & Santa Ynez, California

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Eden C x S Just Dream On

WESTERN PLEASURE FUTURITY WITH TOMMY GARLAND 2012 Region 12 Champion Spotlight Western Pleasure Futurity Proudly owned by Ron & Becky Rash

Tommy, Dawn & Katie Garland www.TommyGarland.com 804.598.3657


janson photo

CN Jericho x Mellow Yellow

HALF-ARABIAN WESTERN PLEASURE SELECT RIDER WITH BRUCE MILLER OPEN WITH TOMMY GARLAND 2012 Region 15 Champion Western Pleasure Open & Select AATR Proudly owned by Bruce Miller

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Cytosk x DG Serinett

For your consideration

HUNTER PLEASURE SELECT AATR WITH LUCINDA MILLER 2012 Buckeye Champion Hunter Pleasure Select AATR 2012 Scottsdale Reserve Champion Hunter Pleasure Select AATR 2011 Region 15 Champion Hunter Pleasure Select AATR Proudly owned by Lucinda Miller For sale information contact Garlands

Tommy, Dawn & Katie Garland www.TommyGarland.com 804.598.3657


Jullyen El Jamaal x Sweet Sanadika V

For your consideration

WESTERN PLEASURE FUTURITY 2013 MATURITY WITH JESSIE SZYMANSKI Proudly owned by Jessie Szymanski For sale information contact Garlands

188A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Jullyen El Jamaal x Anastasia Cristal

WESTERN PLEASURE FUTURITY WITH KATIE GARLAND Proudly owned by Judy Getter

Tommy, Dawn & Katie Garland www.TommyGarland.com 804.598.3657


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(Pension x Heir To Love) Showing in

h/A Country English Pleasure Junior horse with Mike whelihan h/A Country English Pleasure AAoTR Maturity with Beth whelihan owned by whelihan Arabian Farms, LLC | Mike and Beth whelihan 6620 320th Street East, Eatonville, wA 98328 | 253-875-5033

2012 U.S. National Contenders

Inheiritance WAF

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2012 U.S. National Contenders

Jumping Jack Flash BF (MHR Nobility x Movie Maker) Showing in

h/A Country English Pleasure AAoTR 55 & over and h/A Country English Pleasure AAoTR Maturity with Deborah haug owned by Eric and Deborah haug

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Starlite (Aploz x Firelite DGL) Showing in

Arabian English Pleasure AAoTR 40 & over with Deborah haug owned by Eric and Deborah haug

2012 U.S. National Contenders

SV

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AvA il Ab l E foR PuRch A SE

2012 U.S. National Contenders

Apassionata (Fabricius x Oolah Lah) Showing in

h/A English Pleasure AAoTR 40 & over and h/A Park AAoTR with Deborah haug owned by Eric and Deborah haug

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(Vegaz x Starr Llight) Showing in

AEPA Arabian Saddle Seat Futurity with Mike whelihan owned by Eric and Deborah haug

2012 U.S. National Contenders

Showgirl SKF

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2012 U.S. National Contenders

ERA

Thrillicious

(Baske Afire x Koriene) Showing in

h/A English Pleasure AAoTR 40 & over with Diane Franklin owned by Diane Franklin

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Beyond The Glor Glory +// (Cologne x Admirals Supreme Glory) Showing in

h/A Country English Pleasure with Mike whelihan h/A Country English Pleasure AAoTR 55 & over and h/A Country Pleasure Driving ATD with Diane Franklin owned by Diane Franklin

2012 U.S. National Contenders

SF

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2012 U.S. National Contenders

Rascal Thyme SA (Pryme Thyme x Chance To Dazzle) Showing in

Arabian Country English Pleasure AAoTR 55 & over with Diane Franklin owned by Diane Franklin

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Lord Of The Dance (KF Mark’s Majesty x River Dance NA) Showing in

h/A Country English Pleasure AAoTR 36-54 with gail Leavitt owned by Leavitt Arabians LLC

2012 U.S. National Contenders

KF

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AvA il Ab l E foR PuR ChA SE

2012 U.S. National Contenders

Eros Premier Status

(Hucks Premier V x Halstead’s Rita) Showing in

Country English Pleasure Select AATR and AAoTR Maturity with Eric Rosa owned by Eric Rosa

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Congratulations To Pension’s Recent National Champions!

Pension Matrifik x Aristo Amy AHA Breeders Sweepstakes NSH Nominated Sire SCID Clear

Mike and Beth Whelihan 253-875-5033

www.WhelihanArabianFarms.com

Premonition GA (Pension x Treemonisha)

National Champion H/A Mounted Native Costume AOTR Owned and ridden by Stephanie Reitter Trained by Lisa Jo White

Skyway

(Pension x Sky Chime)

National Champion H/A English Pleasure JOTR 17 & Under

Owned by Donna & Fran Kavanagh Ridden by Brennan Kavanagh Trained by Donna Kavanagh

Charrmed Im Sure

(Pension x Misunderstood)

National Champion H/A Country English Pleasure AAOTR 18-35 Owned by North By Northwest Ridden by Andrew Smith Trained by Mike Lamb

Toi Money

(Pension x Toi Jabaska)

National Champion Park AAOTR Owned and ridden by Teal Dowling Trained by Kevin Price

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Av a i l a b l e F o r P u r c h a s e

Apassionata

Blazn Star

Wonder Woman WAF

Prominent Bey

Park/English PlEasurE apassionata (Fabricius x Oolah Lah) 2002 H/A Mare. Shown successfully in Park and English. Very pretty mare with lots of quality. Showing in Tulsa—see her here at the show! Danceaway WaF (Pension x Misunderstood) 2005 H/A Mare. Shown successfully in English Pleasure. Full sister to National Champion Charmed Im Sure and multiple Scottsdale Champion Miss Pension. Great mover, great mind, broke to drive, and amateur ready. Lots of show ring time left in this spectacular mare. 4 white socks. Blazn star (Pension x Jeweled Spirit) 2007 H/A Gelding. 2012 Region 4 Unanimous Champion Junior Horse. Game mover, great mind, ready to step into the amateur or open division and win right now. Broke to drive. Full brother to National Reserve Champion and Scottsdale Champion Miss Jewely. Wonder Woman WaF (Pension x Promises PR) 2007 H/A Mare. Maternal sister to multiple National Champion Spiderman D. Great mover, GREAT mind, and kind—an easy horse to be around. Well broke and amateur ready. Priced to sell. Great deal! Country PlEasurE Eros Premier status (Hucks Premier V x Halstead’s Rita) 2006 H/A Gelding. Flashy black bay with 4 white socks. Great head carriage, great expression, and a great mover. A very sporty show horse. Wonderful amateur or junior rider horse. Showing in Tulsa—try him here at the show! CW steppenwolf (Pension x Baby I’m A Star) 2005 H/A Gelding. Shown successfully in open and amateur. Nice mover, flashy trot, great minded. Broke to drive. Many regional championships! Maternal brother to National Champion Shaken Rattlen Rollen. BF top gun (Pension x Tall Dark Lady) 2008 H/A Gelding. Incredible neck, great mover, well broke, and ready for Scottsdale. This horse is sure to be a SUPERSTAR—roses are in his future for sure! Suitable for open or amateur riders. This is a beautiful horse with tons of potential! Cs swingtown (Cytosk x ROL Kirsty Allie) 2004 Purebred Gelding. Flashy mover, great trotter, and ready to take you to the winners circle! 3/4 brother to multiple National Champion Cygn Of The Zodiac. He is a sporty horse with tons of potential. Shown lightly and won both times! Great horse! Reasonably priced. 210a | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

Memory Maker HPF

Eros Premier Status

CW Steppenwolf

Prominent Bey (Bravado Bey V x Vallejoprominence) 2000 Purebred Gelding. Great horse suitable for any level rider. Would excel in Show Hack, Country, Equitation or Costume. Very safe horse that would fit beautifully into any youth program, or a great first horse for the new rider as well. Many National wins, including Canadian National Reserve Champion AAOTR, as well as Scottsdale wins. All-around great horse. Eros Palevela (Hucks Premier V x Maple Hills Fantasy) 2006 H/A Mare. Strong, sound, great trotting horse. Shown successfully in the amateur divisions. Will make a super amateur or youth mount. Broke to drive. huntEr PlEasurE out Crucyn (Out Of Cyte x Moonlightting) 2001 H/A Gelding. Big, pretty, nice mover. Hunter Pleasure horse shown successfully in the amateur division. Could do western also, and would be great for equitation. Would fit nicely into any youth program. Video available. Memory Maker hPF (SJ Mikhail x Afire Lily) 2006 Purebred Mare. A stunning mare with four white socks. Shown successfully in Hunter Pleasure and lightly in Western Pleasure. GREAT mover, GREAT mind, very nice show horse with a lot of showing left in her! This mare is an exceptional mount for any level rider. Don’t miss this opportunity to own your next champion. ProsPECts Battman (Baywatch V x Promises PR) 2006 H/A Gelding. Country English. Big and beautiful. itsybitsy spider (Pension x Promises PR) 2008 H/A Mare. Park/English. Beautiful. superman WaF (Pension x Promises PR) 2009 H/A Gelding. English. Big and pretty. Cash (Pension x Mataleste) 2009 Purebred Gelding. English. Great mover, great markings. Malaysia CC (The Arssonist x Gypsy Bey Genie) 2011 H/A filly. Full sister to multi-National Champion Bombey CC. Mike and Beth Whelihan 6620 320th Street East, Eatonville, WA 98328 253-875-5033

www.WhelihanarabianFarms.com


SILVER BUCKLE SHOW 9 CHAMPIONSHIPS & 10 BLUE RIBBONS Amado, Arizona & Santa Ynez, California

Breeze V

1st place Western Pleasure Open with Courtney Spicer Champion Western Pleasure Open with Courtney Spicer Champion Western Pleasure AAOTR with Dick Walden

Agracie Girl V +++/

1st place Arabian Western Trail ATR with Nan Walden Champion Arabian Western Trail ATR with Nan Walden 1st Place Sport Horse In-Hand ATR with Nan Walden Reserve Champion Sport Horse In-Hand Open with Lorna Giovanelli Champion Sport Horse In-Hand ATR with Nan Walden

Stars And Stripes SF+/

1st place HA/AA Western Trail Horse Open with Courtney Spicer Champion HA/AA Western Trail Horse Open with Courtney Spicer Champion HA/AA Western Trail Horse ATR with Nan Walden

Dedicated to the talent & beauty of the Arabian Horse and all its splendor!

For Goodness Jakes RS

1st place Arabian Sport Horse Under Saddle Jr. Horse with Sarah Shawcroft

Romance V

1st place Arabian Sport Horse Under Saddle Futurity with Sarah Shawcroft 1st place Arabian Sport Horse In-Hand Open with Lorna Giovanelli 1st place Arabian Sport Horse In-Hand ATR with Nan Walden

V Sundance Kid V x Balakarta V

U.S. NATIONALS OPEN WITH COURTNEY SPICER & AAOTR 55 & OVER WITH DICK WALDEN

Calypso PE

1st place HA/AA Sport Horse In Hand Open with Lorna Giovanelli 1st place HA/AA Sport Horse In Hand ATR with Nan Walden Champion HA/AA Sport Horse In Hand Open with Lorna Giovanelli Champion HA/AA Sport Horse In Hand ATR with Nan Walden

Al-Marah Dizzy Duke Proudly Owned by Nan & Dick Walden

1st Place Arabian Reining Horse ATR with Catherine Ferandelli

Contact us for Quality horses for your consideration Courtney Spicer, Trainer/Manager (520) 398-8328 Office • Cell (520) 990-8763 courtney.ranchosonado@greenvalleypecan.com Volume 43, No. 4 | 211A


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2012 AmAteur SnApShotS

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Name: Farm:

Trainer Affiliation:

Kelli Aguirre

Southern Oaks Farm Showtime Training Center—Tish Kondas and Carla Schiltz

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was introduced to Arabian horses as a child. My parents have always bred horse, and I have shown my whole life.

Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? Their spirit, talent, extreme intelligence and beauty. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? “I would rather you ride hard—all out and make mistakes possibly, than ride conservatively.” If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? My stallion VJ Royal Heir with my mare Lady Marmalade RTF. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? VJ Royal Heir, my English stallion. He is goodminded, beautiful and extremely talented. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? I have so many; I don’t want to embarrass myself again repeating them! What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? My husband, two children (a son at the University of Alabama, and a daughter who is a sophomore in high school), and I enjoy boating and sports activities.

Jeffrey Allen

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Adandy Farm How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? As a kid, the neighbors had Arabians. At the age of 7 I used to ride my dirt bike over there and watch and ride the horses. Eventually, they let me show one, and for the past 35 years I have been hooked. As a teenager I was sent to Adandy Farm rather than boarding school to work, and my passion grew even more. I think any boarding school would have been easier but not as rewarding. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I love the classic style of the Arabian. Plus I have made many good friends over the years that keep me coming back. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? “That won’t get published!” Second best, “Ride the ride, and if you get in trouble don’t dwell but move on.” If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I love Gitar babies! Their attitudes and ability are the best! I wish I could bring back to life Starlight Flight, the Apollo mare If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur that is the dam to my two geldings—the Apollo competition, who would you pick, and why? Magic Moment. bloodlines seem to cross really well with Gitar. This horse captured me in the ring and I was fortunate 214A | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


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enough to take some lessons on him at Trowbridge’s. What a horse—I would have loved to show him. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Too many to pick one, but with good friends they make for good laughs and memorable times in the future. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian

horses? My five kids are my life. I used to sleep, eat, and breath the Arabian horse, but it has now taken a second place to me being a dad. I am fortunate that three of the five are into horses. Sydney, 15, won her first national championship this year, and to watch Devon and Blake at the age of 5 start riding is the thrill of my life.

Lara Ames

Name: Farm: Cedar Ridge Arabians, Inc. Trainer Affiliation: Leah Beth Boyd and John Golladay How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? My parents have owned Arabian horses since I was a little girl. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I love everything about the people I meet and the wonderful horses we have. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? “Do the best job you can do and don’t get caught up in who you are showing against.” If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Kajora, as I thought she was the most beautiful halter horse, and Orans Adagio under saddle—he was so ahead of his time! What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? My first national championship I got dumped for the photo and after 15+ years of showing, I did not get to make a victory pass out. horses? I’m a sports junkie—college basketball is my What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian favorite, and I can hardly wait for March Madness!

Deborah Baker

Name: Trainer Affiliation:

Siemon Stables—Chuck Siemon

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? As a child I lived in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and was

exposed to the Arabian and Half-Arabian National Championship Show held there every other year. My parents got me my first Arabian horse 34 years ago. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I love the Arabian’s intelligence and beauty. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? To put God first in my life, and to trust in God’s sovereignty. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? My current mare, Hey Bey Be (Hey Hallelujah x Scarlets Swirling Ember), because she is big, beautiful, and has a great mind; with the sire, Allience+//, because he produces legs that last forever, beautiful movers, and he produced REA My Allience. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I would choose my current horse, Hey Bey Be she Volume 43, No. 4| 215A


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is beautiful, knows her job, and does it well. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? When I lined up facing the wrong way.

What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? Jogging with my Alaskan Malamute.

Christa Beeler

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Clanton

Performance Horses—Alan Clanton

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was introduced to the Arabian horse by my mother at age 3. Growing up, my mom always wanted a horse, but with five children in her family, it wasn’t possible. When she was 20 she saved up enough money and bought her first horse. Since then, we have always had at least one horse. I am lucky to have a mother that follows her passions in life, and in turn I have gotten to show Arabians all over the country with her. It is an adventure that has taught me a lot about myself, life, how to succeed, and that the relationship I have with my mom is one of the most important things in my life. Now that I have children of my own, I strive to have that same relationship with my kids. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I love the look on people’s faces when you tell them you show Arabian horses—you might as well say, “I’m a lion trainer with the Circus.” It’s nice explaining to them that Arabians are not crazy, just spirited, beautiful animals. Each horse

I have owned has had a distinct personality, something I think is very specific to the Arabian breed. Plus the community of people that I have gotten to be a part of growing up is irreplaceable. It’s the patchwork of my life with the horses, people and experiences intertwined. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? My equitation instructor, Lori Ross, used to say, “Even if something is going wrong, act like it’s not.” Ironically, I have found that this advice applies to many areas of life. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? My horse for my last few years of 13 & under equitation was green broke when we bought her, so patterns were not on her list of things she wanted to do. At National Show Horse Finals, when it was still in Kentucky, we had to do two figure eights at the far end of the arena. I got to the end, pulled into the middle facing center-ring to start my figure eights, and she stretched out her front legs as far as she could and started bowing. As I am trying to hold my best equitation form sitting up straight, hands up, kicking my short little legs, and using my whip, she starts backing up all the way across the arena, blowing my entire class, which had included good rail work. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I am a wife and stay-at-home mom to two little boys. The boys just got a pony named Shrek, and we are working towards winning the candy bar races next year at our local shows. Since I have no girls, I love to shop for anything that has bows, ruffles and lots of “bling” for myself! I also have a real passion for connecting with other moms and encouraging them to find their passion. Too often, moms give up their hobbies and friends once they have kids, and lose the inspired part of themselves. I love to help them find the spark again, and connect them with other people that can help.

Michael Bills

Name: Farm:

Fortunate Ventures North Arabians and Guzzo Training Center

Trainer Affiliation: Shada Arabians, How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was 216A | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

introduced through Wally Wagamon and Jeff and Jerry Schall, through competing at local class A


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and Class B shows. I used to groom and clean stalls for both of them and work off halter lessons. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I love the beauty and intelligence of the horse. I am a competition junkie as well, I love the intensity and performance in the show ring. Feeling a horse respond to your cue and rising to the moment gives me chills. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? I have had the pleasure to work around some of our breed’s greats—The Schall brothers, Don LeFever, Mike Neal, Ted Carson, Bill Bohl, Bob Hart Jr., Jim Lowe, Randy Anderson, Rich Simpkins, Greg Gallún, Steve Heathcott and Rodolfo Guzzo—every one of them took time to share with me ways I could improve and become a better horseman and showman. I took something from every one of them and use it today when I present my horses. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? Sire would be Padron and the dam would be Pianissima. Both exhibit such charisma and beauty. They both stand for what the breed is described as, and the resulting foal could be crossed so many different ways with today’s breeding horses. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and

Name: Trainer Affiliation:

why? Marwan Al Shaqab for his charisma, and the mark he has made as a breeding horse. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Many when I was new. My mom thought tuxes were mandatory for class A shows. Wearing a white tux and getting drug around the ring by a yearling colt was the highlight. Never wore that outfit again. What other hobbies/interests do you have? I am a big soccer fan—I coach my sons traveling team, and spend most of my time now with our new little girl and the family.

Robin Braden

Powell Training Center—Zac and Lisa Powell

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? In 1974, I was in 4-H and looking for a new horse, and a friend of my mother had Arabians. We bought a purebred, Hillcrest Supreme, from her, and he was amazing. He did it all—I have never looked back!

Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? That is easy— they are beautiful, smart and have a soul. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Ride the horse you have (on any given day). If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I would choose El Milagro’s California Capers and MHR Nobility, because I would love to clone my Normin (LBC Noble Ruler) who was forced to retire due to laminitis. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Beetlejuice. I loved his presence in the show ring—he was so powerful. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? It was a long time ago, 1977 to be exact, when I forgot all my riding clothes. I had to borrow a suit from a complete stranger at the Buckeye, while my clothes were being shipped to me on a Greyhound bus! Bill Rodgers has never let me live it down! What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? Running and bragging about my daughter and Michael! Volume 43, No. 4 | 217A


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Name:

Daneisha Brazzle

Farm: Celestial Arabians Trainer Affiliation: Arabians International How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was introduced to Arabian horses by my boyfriend and now business partner, Sean Givens, about eight years ago. I have always loved horses since I was a little girl. Instead of asking for Barbie’s Corvette or Dream House, I asked for her chestnut horse, Dallas. I never thought that one day I would become a horse breeder! Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I own Arabian horses, because they are absolutely beautiful! Their style and grace is incomparable to any other breed I have seen! I have a strict philosophy on only exhibiting horses that appear to enjoy halter showing. Part of the fun and excitement is watching the horses prance around because they enjoy being shown! When I show videos of my horses in the show ring, non-horse people always tell me that the horse appears to like showing off! What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Grooming your horse is one of the most important things you can do for their attitude. They show better when they feel like they look like a million bucks! She listens and responds when you need her to be her If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who usual sweet self or an amped halter show horse. would you choose and why? The sire would be Vervaldee What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? The and the dam would be my 3-year-old Justify filly, first time I showed Saadiya CA was at the Arabian Saadiya CA. They would complement each other very Breeders World Cup, Vegas, in 2010. She won her class well, but also provide an exaggeration of their best and I starting crying … hysterically! When I returned features—refinement, head, neck, body, and movement. to my seat, everyone told me that I wasn’t supposed If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur to cry at a horse show! I was so overwhelmed with competition, who would you pick, and why? Saadiya CA. excitement and joy, that I just couldn’t help myself. As an amateur, I need to feel comfortable with a What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horse, and she knows me as well as I know her. She horses? I am working on completing my PhD, so I doesn’t need much encouragement to “turn it on.” don’t have much time to do anything else these days.

Name:

Melissa Campbell-Jones

Farm: Campbell Arabians, LLC Trainer Affiliation: Adandy Farm—Cathy Vincent How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years convinced me to go look. It turned out to be an Arabian have you been involved with Arabian horses? My introduction horse breeder giving away young mares 2-4 years of age to my first Arabian was the 1986 bay mare T A Toddiah with a right to a breed back. We walked out to a paddock (Almawardy x Gamine C C, by Tomoniet RSI), and it a with six mares, and a bay walked over and stuck her complete accident. I was looking for my first horse, and head on my chest for a scratch. She was green broke, so had tried a few, but nothing really felt right. My mother I tried her. She looked like a hunter and had beautiful found an ad in the Sunday paper for free horses and gaits, but more than that, she was so sweet and gentle. 218A | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


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My trainer agreed we were a fit, and my dad purchased her outright on June 4, 1990, and I owned her for the rest of her life. She is the dam of my first foal, Atallah Ibn Toddiah, by El Hadiyyah and is the second dam of one of my broodmares, Shakhlana’s Grace (Atallah Ibn Toddiah x Shakhlana by El Shaklan), pictured here. I have been involved with Arabian horses ever since. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I own Arabians (currently 13 with two foals on the way) because I love everything about them. I have evolved into a small breeder, so exhibiting Arabians is a way to show and gauge my progress towards my goals. There is nothing like the feeling of winning with a foal you have bred and raised yourself. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Cathy and Team Adandy are an excellent sounding board for my ideas. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? For dams, I love my five fabulous broodmares, but our breed has so many stallions that offer wonderful qualities that complement my mares. As I am a rider first, I always have the goal of producing a beautiful athlete. Eden C has been a good match for my mares as he is beautiful, refined, showy, free moving, intelligent and altogether lovable. I have also been successful with the beautiful and athletic Ali Jamaal son, Jullyen El Jamaal and Armando El Aryes. With my developing interest in English and Country Pleasure, I am venturing into breeding with Kaz Baskteena in foal to Gitar MF for 2013, who consistently produces athletically gifted foals with the hearts of champions. His foals capture the imagination the way that great racehorses do. Lastly, I would be remiss if I did not say that I am dreaming of breeding to Barzan Al Shahania—I am one of his biggest fans! If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Easy, T A Toddiah, my first mare. I miss her every day. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? I showed

on the intercollegiate circuit for 4 years while at NYU. For those who have shown that circuit, you know how it works, you select the name of a horse out of a hat, and that is the horse you ride in the class. You get on, and go. It is a true test of horsemanship. I drew a big, red, 18 HH monster of a horse for the flat class. I watched him go and watched three other riders hit the dirt with him when he reared up. It looked like the horse had a really sensitive mouth. When my turn was up, I was really quiet and light with my hands and we went around very nicely the first direction walk trot, no problems. I cued the canter and this horse leaped into a full-on gallop with no brakes. Touch his mouth, you could feel him start to come off his front end to rear. I got him to the inside of the arena away from the other horses to circle him to slow him down, but he ran right through the bridle, kept going straight on—right into the judge! She got out of the way just in time, but I was so mortified! What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? There is stuff to do outside of Arabian horses? Really? Just kidding … photography, cooking and gardening.

David Carr

Name: Farm:

Carr Arabians Trainer Affiliation: Cotton Performance Horses—Abe Cotton How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? When I was 10 years old, my parents took me to our local fair that had Arabian classes. This beautiful chestnut Arabian stallion with four white socks and a blaze came trotting across the

field, heading for the ring. I couldn’t take my eyes off him, and that image of him has always stuck with me. Ten years later, I was showing Quarter Horses with a friend, and met some people with Arabians. Shortly after that I bought my first Arabian gelding and started showing with them. I Volume 43, No. 4 | 219A


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showed for about 10 years, and then took a 15-year hiatus. I’m now back in the thick of it at 47, and having a blast! Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? All breeds have their appeal and some of those breeds make great crosses with the Arabian. It is the presence and beauty of the Arabian that caught my eye as a kid, and has stuck with me. Beyond that, it is their versatility and talent as performance horses that intrigues me and makes we want to own and show them. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Over the past two years I have had horses with Abe Cotton, it is hard to narrow down, as I have learned so much in that time. One thing he is always telling me right

before I go into a class is, “You have worked hard for this, take a deep breath and have fun. You can do this. Oh yeah, and sit up straight and don’t lean, too!” It is those encouraging words that really help. Words to live by as I am heading to my second nationals. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? Without any hesitation, I would say Sundance Kid V. He has produced some amazing western and hunter horses. Abe has a few of his offspring on his show string and has bred some of his best mares to him more then once. After watching him train and show the Sundance babies and seeing others in the ring, we made a trip to Scottsdale this year and I bought a Sundance son. We will be showing him at nationals this year. Sundance seems to stamp his head and neck on all his babies, so to pick the ideal mare wouldn’t be hard as he crosses well with most mares. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? This may sound corny, but I would choose my Half-Arabian gelding DA Travail. I am so excited about nationals this year. We have put a lot of time and effort into him. I was top ten in the Select and Maturity Hunter classes last year, and will be showing in both those divisions this year as well. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? So far I have been lucky not to have any embarrassing moments, “yet.” I am sure I will have my fair share along the way. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I really enjoy running and competing in Marathons. The running keeps me in shape for riding and gives me a chance to unwind and do a lot of thinking. Funny, but mostly what I am thinking about are my horses and the next show that is coming up or when I am going for my next lessons.

Jeanna Clanton

Name: Farm: Clanton Performance Horses Trainer Affiliation: Alan Clanton How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many very loveable and smart. I also like how versatile Arabians years have you been involved with Arabian horses? My are. I love riding English, but I appreciate a great western mom decided to get me a horse when I was 11. We horse or reiner. It’s nice that you can see it all at our looked at a couple of Quarter Horses, then fell in love shows. Plus nothing beats the Arabian community— with an Arabian gelding. He started it all, and now I such a fun-loving and caring supportive group! have owned and shown Arabians for over 20 years. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? “Sit up!” Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I love their and “Don’t stop riding if you have a mistake—you never personality—each is unique in their own way, but usually know what the judge saw or what the rest of the class is 220A | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


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like. Your mistake must be a small one in comparison.” If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? That’s a tough one … probably a Half-Arabian by Undulata’s Nutcracker—I already have a great name for it! If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Sophisticated Lady. She looks like such a rush to ride! What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? I’ve had so many, it would be hard to pick just one! Usually they all involve lots of friends there to make sure I don’t forget them! What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I like to go fishing and to concerts.

Susan Copeland

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Powell Training How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was introduced to Arabians by a friend that worked for Dr. Harrall Haven, IAHA president at the time. I purchased a horse from the Havens, and continued to work there. I have shown Arabians for 30 years. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I love the personality and beauty of the Arabian horse. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? “Don’t make up new cues in the show ring that your horse doesn’t know,” and “Fake it.” If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I want a Kornwall clone to do it all over again. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Laredo. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Showing By Invitation Only in the Half-Arabian English at Nationals, and she lost a shoe. I asked for a time-out, but they didn’t notice before they asked for the lineup, so they made me stay in center ring while everyone else made their final passes. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian

Center—Zac and Lisa Powell

horses? Most of my hobbies and interests revolve around my three girls. We compete in reining, Kaci is on the high school dance team, so we attend events that she is performing at, and Krista keeps us busy exploring everything. Also, my business, Exclusively Yours, keeps us traveling a good portion of the year.

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Kathy Cranford

Name: Farm: Russka Farms, LLC Trainer Affiliation: Colonial Wood Training Center He was talking about my performance. Nowadays, at least at the upper level of showing, everybody has a good horse. There has to be something about your presentation that makes you stand out from the other competitors if you are going to be successful. I’ve heard many judges admit that (at least subconsciously) they place a class from the first pass into the arena. So when you come through that gate, you should have a look that says, “Look no further, here’s the winner!” If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I would re-breed the same stallion and mare that produced my current Half-Arabian hunter, Sundance King R (Sundance Kid V x Shes Bya King). “Sunny D” is still young (4 years old) and relatively inexperienced, but I truly believe he is my ideal show horse. From the praise and compliments I have received from judges, trainers and fellow exhibitors, I’m not the only one who thinks he has the “It” factor! I feel blessed to have him and wish I had a barn-full just like him! If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I am a big believer in being grateful for what you have, and I currently have two of the best horses I have ever owned, Sundance King R (above) and my Arabian western horse, Veniccioo (Versace x Bint Bint How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years Diana). Anytime I ride either of them, I am riding my have you been involved with Arabian horses? I fell in love dream horse. Who could ask for more than that? with Arabian horses in the early 1990s after attending What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Falling a local Arabian horse show. I have been involved with off my western horse while coming through the in-gate. horses my entire life and spent my early years riding and He came jogging quietly in, and then suddenly bolted showing Quarter Horses, but when I saw these beautiful about 20 feet forward leaving me in the dirt. To make Arabians, something in me changed forever and I knew matters worse, I was wearing new white chaps that still I had to be a part of the Arabian horse community. That bear the stain on the back end! I hadn’t worn them since was more than 20 years ago, and I’ve never looked back that incident several years ago, but just this year renor regretted my decision to commit to this breed. introduced them into my show wardrobe. No falls so far Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? Because I am while wearing them, so maybe they aren’t cursed after all. addicted and cannot quit! Aren’t we all? I think What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? there is something in these horses that connects My mind and heart have been filled with nothing but with our heart and soul and if it were removed we horses my entire life; Arabians for the past 20+ years. They would be missing an integral part of ourselves. are not just a hobby, but also my business and my passion. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? “You’ve I don’t really have time for other hobbies and only work at got to sell it!” And he wasn’t talking about a horse! my “other job” to help pay for this one. It’s what I live for.

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Name: Trainer Affiliation:

Sheila Curley

Rock Ledge Arabians—Chris Hall How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? Four years ago we started taking riding lessons at a barn that had mostly Arabian horses. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I really love the Arabian’s temperament and the people are so friendly and fun. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? To relax, it’s not a race to see who does it first when they make the calls in the ring. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? Halan Cairo and Amalfi NL. I own them both and they have been great western pleasure show horses. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Arezzo NL. He is my stallion’s full brother and a national champion. I would love to show him and see if he is like my horse. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Oh that’s easy! I fell off in the lineup at last year’s U.S. Nationals! What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? Mostly horses, but I like to read and shop!

Tammie Dawson

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Siemon How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I grew up showing Morgans and the National Show horse was just starting out when I sold my last one. Someday I knew I would buy a horse again and wanted a National Show horse. Three years ago I decided the time was right— after 18 years without riding—to get a horse again, and I bought my first Half-Arabian/National Show Horse. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I am a HalfArabian girl—I love the beauty and natural ability of the Arabian horse combined with the size and strength of the Saddlebred. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? “Relax, and let your horse do her job.” If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? Undulata’s Nutcracker and a Magnafire daughter. Looking for a park horse with a great attitude and natural ability. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur

Stables—Matt Siemon competition, who would you pick, and why? Huckleberry Bey—he has sired so many great horses. I have owned two of his granddaughters and they have had amazing attitudes and are willing to do whatever is asked of them.

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What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? My first class 2 1/2 years ago, I was so nervous, my face was beat red. My family thought I was going to pass out before the class was over. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses?

Is there anything else? Since I have gotten back into riding, it is my passion and I spend as much time as I can with my horse—wish it could be more. There is no greater stress reliever than spending time with my horse.

Jessica DeBack

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Price Performance Horses—Kevin Price How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? My mom, Pam Gaffney, passed on her love of Arabian horses to me. She got her first Arabian when I was a baby, so I’ve been around them all my life. I showed a little as youth rider, but didn’t start seriously showing until a few years after I graduated from college. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I was born into it. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? After I didn’t make top five at regionals, he told me that my horse is good enough, and I’m a good enough rider, but that I need to show like I know that. He has really helped me improve my confidence and continues to do so. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? Like my mom, I would also use our mare, Sheza Drama Queen. She would breed for a Half-Arabian, but I would breed for a purebred. Hucklebey Berry would have been my choice as he produced great minded horses with athletic ability. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I would choose All Charisma because he looks like a blast to ride! I think my mom will relent and share when I’m 39, since it will be the last year we aren’t in the same age division. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? When I was 15, I had a horse named Wind Dragon who would at least go to the line up when it was called. would be really great the first direction, but would stop What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? wherever we reversed. He would stay there for the rest I love playing with my daughter Ruby, enjoy reading, of the class no matter how hard I kicked him, but he having movie night with friends, and working out.

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Toni Dolby

Trainer affiliation: Cedar Ridge How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? Friends had Arabians when I was in junior high through high school. We did a lot of trail riding. I was reintroduced to them about 12 years ago by other friends, and shortly after that I started taking lessons at Cedar Ridge at the age of 40! Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I love their spirit and their heart. They give 100% to their people! What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Have fun and ride your horse. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I would choose Mi Kaborina as the dam. She is the dam of two of my very favorite horses, my Half-Arabian country horse Juke Box Hero and Mandalay Bay. They both have such wonderful souls and absolutely love the show ring. For a sire I would have to choose Bask for a purebred and Nutcracker Sweet for a Half-Arabian. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Matoi—he’s so talented and loved being in the ring. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? Who has time for other interests? I enjoy reading and spending time with family and friends. I am attempting to learn to golf which has been really fun.

Arabians—John Golladay

Cheryl Doran

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Springwater How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? My father was involved with horses so I was exposed at an early age. He bought me my first pony at age 10, and we boarded her at an Arabian horse farm where we both fell in love with them. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? The bond that

Farms—Johnny and Christine Ryan you get once you own an Arabian is beyond measure. You get back so much more than you give. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Johnny Ryan is not a man of many words but what he does say sticks with me and he always seems to know just when I need to hear it. He always reminds me to have fun and enjoy my horse. That’s what it’s

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all about! As an added bonus, his wife, Christine, is never far behind with words of encouragement! If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I would have to say that I would like a carbon copy of my horse Defying Gravity RGS (Afire Bey V x Ma Nobella). Besides being talented, he loves his job—when he hits the ring, he just lights up, making the ride so much fun. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Wow, far too many to pick. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? As a kid, I was showing my pony in a “break and out” class. When they called for a hand gallop, I started yelling at my pony so loud (to really get some speed) that I missed the halt call. I was the only one galloping full speed around the arena, yelling at the top of my lungs. Embarrassing, but a crowd pleaser! What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I enjoy all kinds of sports and crafts, along with gardening and photography. Lately I have been enjoying a kick boxing class at a local gym. A great workout and stress reliever!

Susan Drescher-Mulzet

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Battaglia Farms—Bob Battaglia How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was introduced to Arabian horses by my friend, Angela Stanley, who brought me to Battaglia Farms to meet her National winner, Benny, at Bob’s barn. That meeting reignited my passion for horses and within two weeks, I had purchased my first Arabians. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? The best advice I ever received came not from Bob, but from Angela. As a newcomer to riding, I frequently became frustrated with my inability to ride up to my expectations. Angela told me I needed to, “Get my miles in.” She was right, as there is no substitute for experience when it comes to developing good riding skills. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Rubie was embarrassing, and it has happened a lot. Slippers, the first horse my husband and I purchased. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of It was for love of Rubie Slippers that I learned to Arabian horses? Cooking, travel, art collecting, and ride. Showing her would be a dream come true. spending quality time with family and friends. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Every time I was unable to canter in the ring 226A | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


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Elaine Finney

Name: Farm: Springwater Farms How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? In 1982 my family and I moved back home to Springwater Farms and were introduced to the beautiful Arabian horses here in New Jersey. Although I live on the farm, it was not until 2003 that I decided to start showing in halter. One horse in particular, Gorgias Georg, led me to the ring and he has earned multi-National Championships. Georg was the best introduction to showing I could have had, he has a personality like no other and has a permanent place here at Springwater. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? The best advice I have had was connived rather than spoken— pay attention to the details. Whether it’s the training, presentation, or personal turn out, the details make all the difference. When you enter the ring, look the part down to the last detail, there is only one first impression. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? The first year I showed, one detail slipped my detection and became my most embarrassing moment. I had left a number on my jacket from the last show and as luck would have it, the number sequence fit the numbers of the next show. I thought one of my sisters lent a helping hand and entered the ring with the wrong back number. I’m not sure my face could be any more red when the error was detected, and it will never be repeated. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian daughter and her family and join them on safari. This horses? Outside of spending time with horses, I garden, Christmas we’ll have three grandchildren under two raise Koi, travel, read, and my grandchildren keep for the holidays that should keep us pretty busy. me busy. We travel to Africa once a year to visit our

Arielle Fisher

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Adandy Farm—Cathy Vincent How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many and under saddle in many types of disciplines. years have you been involved with Arabian horses? My What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? To mother, Wendy Fisher, introduced me to Arabian have confidence when going in the show ring. That is horses; I have been around horses my entire life. such an important characteristic to have when showing This breed has always been my favorite, and I because that can affect how well you do in the class. hope to continue with them in the future. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? The main reason would you choose, and why? I would choose Undulata’s is for their many great qualities that other breeds Nutcracker and Shantillie Lace. Undulata’s Nutcracker don’t have. Some of those qualities include: a great is an amazing Saddlebred with a ton of motion, and connection between the horse and rider, and they are Shantillie Lace for her pedigree since she has pure polish versatile in many ways—they can be shown in-hand bloodlines that would make a great English pleasure horse. Volume 43, No. 4| 227A


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If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? There are so many amazing Arabians, that I would not know where to start with choosing one specific horse. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? When I was showing western as a walk/trot rider, and I was using two hands to hold the reins instead of one and I was yelled at by the judge. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? Hanging out with family and friends, and giving back to my community. I have to also include horses because they have had such a huge effect on my life.

Betsy Fojtik–Haas

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Showtime Training Center How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was born into it—my mom and dad, Ed and Judy Fojtik, were already breeding and showing Arabian horses when I was born. They started me riding at the old age of 2, and still today are cheering me on at the shows. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? It is simply an incurable sickness/obsession. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Ride like you stole him! If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? The stallion VJ Royal Heir, and the mare Starr Llight—they are just both simply amazing! If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? VJ Royal Heir. Just wait until you see him this year at Nationals, you will know why he is the horse I would choose to ride! What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? When your horse trainer says to you when you come out of the ring that your lineup was the best part of your class—Ha! What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I have an amazing husband, and two very cute Pomeranians that keep me busy!

Dr. Lori Foster

Name: Trainer Affiliation: VHTC—Vicki How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? By my family, and have been involved with them my entire life. 228A | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

Humphrey and Jessica Clinton Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I love everything about the Arabian horse and have never considered owning another breed.


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If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? There are so many horses I would love to show—Revelation, Catalyst, Isabeaux, Apollopalooza—they all have the show horse attitude and seem to love their jobs. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Luckily I haven’t had anything too embarrassing that I remember, but my mom does love to tell the story of my first leadline class when I was 18 months old and pitched a huge fit, refusing to wear my boots. (I think this is more of her most embarrassing moment.) What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I don’t know if it’s a hobby, but I love going out for really good food, I also like to travel, hang out on the water, and socialize.

Diane Franklin

Name: Trainer Affiliation:

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? My family has owned horses from the time I was 7 years old, and mine was a Half-Arabian gelding. Fifteen years ago I bought a purebred Arabian from my sister and started showing. I’ve been involved with them ever since. I now own four purebreds and four Half-Arabians. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? The Arabian horse is the most beautiful, talented, and amazing

Mike Whelihan

breed there is. Why would I own anything else? What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? The advice that has helped me the most has been to ride a class the same way I ride in a lesson. I’m so focused on my horse that I don’t feel the pressure and nervousness of competing. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I own Noble Empress, a very talented English mare by Noble Express, and bred her to Vegaz, who is amazing!! I am very excited to show this colt in the future. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I would love to be able to show MHR Nobility in an amateur park class. I have never seen a park horse move the way he could. To show him would be a thrilling experience! What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? When I was pretty new at riding English pleasure, I had a very hot English horse that got so wound up in the show ring, she froze up in the corner and wouldn’t move. Not one of my proudest moments. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I am learning golf, which I enjoy, and I love to travel. I hope to be able to combine the two as I get more proficient at golf. Of course, the Arabian horses are my true passion.

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Pam Gaffney

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Price

Performance Horses—Kevin Price

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? My sister gave me an Arabian mare that was in foal. She was getting rid of her Arabians to get Saddlebreds. At the time I had three young kids, and she said if I didn’t get one, then I never would. That was about 30 years ago and a few years later I began showing with the mare’s foal.

Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I like the versatility of the breed and their willingness to try whatever you ask of them. Each one has its own personality, too. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? That I need to push myself to the next level—not to be content with just winning, but always to ask more of myself and more of my horse. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I would use our mare, Sheza Drama Queen, because she’s beautiful, has great bloodlines and hopefully will pass her disposition and work ethic to her foals. For the sire, I would choose Undulata’s Nutcracker because of his dynamic presence and upright motion. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Showing my Half-Arabian at Buckeye this past year—I froze going into the class and he knew it and tested me. I didn’t pass his test. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I love dancing and playing with my granddaughter, Ruby. I also enjoy gardening, baking and sewing.

Leslie Garvis

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Vicki Humphrey How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? When I was five, and I’d rather not comment on how long ago that was!! Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I’m not sure! My husband says it’s an illness for which he is trying hard to find a cure! What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? They can’t run faster than you can ride. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I’m still banned from biological experiments. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Yet to come! What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? Hillbilly Handfishin’ and watching, “Honey Boo Boo.”

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Rachel Ginter

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Ross

Tarkington Stables—Ross Tarkington

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was introduced to Arabian horses through my family; my aunt and cousin owned and showed. I went to watch Youth Nationals in Oklahoma City when I was 6 years old, and told my mom I wanted to ride too. I started taking lessons about two weeks later at

Fantasia Equestrian Center in Oklahoma City. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I love it. I love to ride, watch classes at horse shows, all of it. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? The important thing is to know you had a good ride and did your best. But I also get lots of good coaching on the rail during classes. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I don’t think I can pick. I like the young horses we have coming up that are by Baske Afire and our Saddlebred broodmare, My Song. I’m really excited to see how they grow up. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? TL Take Control. I got to show TC in equitation when I was a youth rider and he had the best attitude and heart but he could be challenging too. I would have loved to have shown him in pleasure classes as a younger horse. He passed away this year and I know lots of people miss him. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? My first show horse was a Half-Arabian English mare named Jamaica Me Crazy. She was tough to show in equitation and we did a few patterns where we cantered the whole pattern. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I’m in college so I spend a lot of time at class and studying. I also work at the United Way of Greater Oklahoma City and at BCBG, so I stay busy. I like to hang out with my friends, my cat, Huey and my Yorkie, Nicky, when I’m not doing school stuff, working, or riding my horses.

Amanda Golestani

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Bein Performance How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? While I was introduced to horses at the age of 9, a friend of mine from school introduced me to the Arabian breed, specifically, at age 14. I started taking lessons with Jessica, and the rest is history! Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I own Arabian horses because I love the breed and couldn’t imagine my life without my horses in it. I choose to compete because I like setting goals for myself and working to achieve those goals. Every horse and every competition is a new

Horses—Jessica Bein

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challenge. Competing has taught me so much about my abilities, and myself, and for that, I am grateful. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Breathe! If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? If I had my choice of sire and dam for my next show horse, I would breed my mare, Tsimmer Down Now, to my stud, Noble Iceman. It has been a dream of mine for years to delve into the breeding world and I can’t imagine anything more exciting than pairing the two horses I own, show, and love. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Im Destinees Hobby. I’ve had the pleasure of showing this horse since my youth career and it never gets old. She is nothing short

Name:

of amazing. She was my first reiner, my first equitation horse, my first trail horse, and my first national champion. I have been so privileged to show this mare in the past, and I am excited to see what this year has in store for us. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Scottsdale in 2004. I went to lunge my brand-new hunter horse in all my brand-new tack. Minutes later, he got his head caught in his martingale. Somewhere in the struggle to get out of it, our heads met and I ended up walking back to the stalls with a golf ball-sized bump on my forehead. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? Outside of horses I enjoy spending time with my friends and family, seeing movies, going to concerts, and traveling.

Michelle Harris

Harris Arabians Trainer Affiliation: Stachowski Farms (Ohio and California) Farm:

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was introduced to the Arabian horse as a child by my Aunt, Patricia Mills, who bred and showed National winning Arabians (two having won the triple crown in both Halter and English 232A | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

Pleasure). Sadly, she died at a young age, and I missed being mentored by her. After her breeding program was dispersed, at a young age I told myself I would bring her program back. I have been involved with the breeding of Arabian horses for approximately 15 years. I haven’t been showing myself for multiple years—raising a family, developing a breeding program, including getting the youngsters started—I had to wait! This Nationals is my turn, riding as a Select Rider in Country English Pleasure! I feel very blessed to be involved! Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? They’re the most beautiful, athletic, intelligent, and people-loving horses! What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Don’t ever be complacent with your ride; ride your horse every stride! If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? The dam V Justajoy—she is beautiful, and she looks like the old photos of the grey Arabian mares from Poland. She is a National Champion, out of a National Champion dam and sire. Plus she goes back on the dam side to the stallion Chief Justice whose dam, Sey Cherie, my aunt had owned. The sire would be HA Toskcan Sun. He is beautiful, athletic, kind, has length of leg, and is passing this on to his progeny. He is the culmination of my Aunt’s breeding program, going back to the Bask daughter Mi Toska. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Mi Toska. I was present when she was a foal at my Aunt’s farm, and would have loved to have ridden her.


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What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Telling my trainer that I would be nice and relaxed for my class, thinking I’m showing up early for my class, taking my sweet time getting ready, and then thinking the trainer is pulling my leg, when he says, “Where have you been?” It is time for me to go in and

Name: Trainer Affiliation:

Deborah Haug

Whelihan Arabian Farms LLC—Mike Whelihan

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I bought my first purebred Arabian, a Bey Shah son, 25 years ago and have been involved with the breed ever since. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I have been

Name:

everyone has to help me throw myself together. Next time, I’ll get my glasses out to read the schedule! What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? Enjoying time with my family and friends. Meeting new people. Traveling. Spending time at the Lake/Beach boating, hiking and swimming.

fortunate to own some unique horses that deserve the exposure the show ring provides. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? All of Mike’s advice is important and encompasses overall performance, so I would not differentiate any one piece of advice over others. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I am presently breeding my purebred mares, SV Starlite and Showgirl SKF, to Pension. I really like the Bask line and hope to continue Pension’s performance quality in their offspring. We also plan to breed to Vegaz, and are evaluating other stallions as well. I would like to contribute more competitors to the English Pleasure division. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I love my young Half-Arabian country pleasure horse, Jumping Jack Flash BF. He is so well mannered and trainable, and I think the combination of his looks and movement are very winning. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? I had a wardrobe malfunction early in my show career, but finished the class anyway. It was rather comical. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I am a jazz singer and joined a jazz trio early this year called The Champagne Blues. I also play the piano.

Ann Henriksen-Brinkman

Farm: Henriksen Arabians Trainer Affiliation: IIB Farms (performance) and Shada, Inc. (halter) How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years that are five and seven generations of our breeding have you been involved with Arabian horses? My parents, program. My mother has worked very diligently to study Dale and Ruth Henriksen, started breeding Arabian pedigrees and to create the best pairings possible that horses in the 1960’s, so I have grown up in the industry. we could afford at the time. When my mom died in Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I am a breeder of 2004, it was up to me to continue the breeding program. Arabian horses, so exhibiting them is the logical way to Creating that pedigree and foaling out the mare, raising promote the quality of horse that we breed at Henriksen the foal, and seeing it successfully compete in today’s Arabians. In 2012, our show string includes horses show ring is a big thrill for me. Anybody can buy a Volume 43, No. 4 | 233A


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successful show horse, but it takes years to create one. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Relax and trust your horse. Your horse is trained to do its job. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? Well that would take lots of research and thought, so I don’t want to make an off-the-cuff answer. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Well, I am guilty of almost taking out a judge a few years ago. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? A busy family and multiple business ventures make little time for hobbies. When I have downtime, I do like to read.

Name: Trainer Affiliation:

Jordan Hodge

Vicki Humphrey Training Center—Vicki Humphrey and Jessica Clinton

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I’ve been riding and showing Arabian horses for about 15 years. My mom actually went to look at an older horse that her friend was interested in purchasing, a purebred gelding that 234A | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

Mike and Cameron Stewart owned at the time. My mom ended up buying the horse, and it was all over after that. My dad didn’t know what he was getting himself into. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I just love it. You really can’t describe it unless you have the “horse bug.” What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? It’s hard to really pinpoint just one out of all the advice Vicki has given me. One that stands out is that she teaches her riders to conform to their horses, not the other way around. That’s why she can ride anything out there and make it look good—even the crazies! If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? MHR Nobility for sire, no question. My favorite “project horses” and some of my best wins were with Nobility babies. They’re smart, challenging, and incredibly talented. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I would love another go-round with Maximumm Overdrive. I’m also slightly obsessed with MD Aquarius. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Truthfully, probably splitting my pants right before my U.S. Nationals Half-Arabian English final with SA Mandolin two years ago. Jess constructed a duct tape bikini bottom for me just in time. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I love spending time with my family and friends. I’m also currently studying to go to law school.


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Deb Holden

Name: Farm: Cornerstone Ranch How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? Back in 1975 I began taking lessons on Vineyards Annteza, a beautiful Arabian mare who was a granddaughter of Witez II. She was wonderful, and colored just like he was—a black bay with a strip on her face and four white socks. I fell in love with her and when the owner decided to sell her, my dream came true to own an Arabian. I showed her to regional top fives and at Nationals in hunter over fences. I bred her to Campari, by Barbary, and I was blessed with Dandy Natural, a beautiful white stallion. I raised, trained and showed him myself to Reserve National Champion Show Hack Open in 1994. So, I began as a very small breeder, and it grew into a passion that I am very fortunate to be able to continue. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I own Arabians because I love their attitude and beauty. I rode many horses growing up and had a small training barn with different breeds that I worked with. I got along the best with Arabians. For me, they were smart, sincere, and very trainable. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? “Show about everything. He’s enjoyable in the barn and so your class, ride your horse, pay attention to what he/ easy to handle. I do a lot of community things at my she is feeling, and go with it. Enjoy the ride, the farm, and one of the things that is most commonly said ribbons will come. Just ride (or halter) YOUR horse! about him is that people are so surprised at how gentle If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who he is. Folks in other breeds are surprised, I think. would you choose and why? Of course, the stallion I would pick to breed would be the love of my life, Justafire. I What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? My would give anything to have been able to breed him to my most embarrassing moment? Years ago, I was showing sweet Annteza. And as for a national champion contender, in Garrett Coliseum in Montgomery, Ala., on a I really would have loved to breed him to Hallelujah very good western horse. As I was coming down the Bask—what a mare! She was effortless and breathtaking straightaway toward the in-gate, I see my German in the ring. I did get a dream come true in being able to Shepherd trot into the ring right up to the judge—I breed him to Alyaska Bey V. I have the most beautiful, never turned my head, just kept on jogging—thinking, trotty, black bay colt at home that I cannot WAIT to no way am I going to admit that’s my dog! show. He’s handsome, funny, loving, and sweet. I have What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I love to travel our great country—there is so much I done all the ground work and can’t wait to ride him. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur haven’t seen! I love to help at the Red Barn Foundation competition, who would you pick, and why? As an amateur that is located on my farm—it’s for therapeutic riders (and exhibitor, I would pick Justafire to show, because I love able-bodied), and is an exceptional program founded and him, and he is one of the most handsome, talented, and run by Joy O’Neal. As we all know, there isn’t much time wonderful horses I have ever known. He’s thoughtful left for many hobbies, after our family and our Arabians.

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Natalie Hunt

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Tommy Garland our two broodmares to the stallions we own and show. We currently have two foals and a yearling by JF Verrisk. They mean so much to me and it is a blessing to watch them grow up—they have made me love and appreciate the breed even more. We have “Arabian Horse Farm” days on my parents’ farm. We invite my colleagues, friends, and their children. We get a bigger turnout every time. It is a great joy to watch children interact with the mares and foals. I think the horses enjoy it (or maybe all of the treats) just as much as the children. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? ”You know what to do, just go out there and have fun. Ride ‘em like you stole ‘em!” If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? The sire How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years Resstitution, and dam, SF Georgia. have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was introduced If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur to Arabians when I began taking lessons at Marlow competition, who would you pick, and why? Revelation Farms 22 years ago. I fell in love with the Arabian’s unique JF. He is so animated and has an unforgettable personality and beauty. I spent countless hours there presence. He always gives me goose bumps! and have so many amazing memories. I’m the horseWhat other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian crazy girl that evolved into the horse crazy woman! horses? I enjoy spending time with my family and Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? Their unique presence, friends. I go to my family’s cottage in Pointe Au personality, and abilities is what has kept me devoted to Baril, Ontario, in the summer. The days there the breed. My mother, Lynn, and I are currently breeding are filled with water sports and boating.

Rob Janecki

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Rohara How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was introduced to the Arabian horse through Joe Alberti, 14 years ago. I could never truly thank Joe enough for all the lessons and time spent with me. He has helped me become the horse person I am. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I love the Arabian horse. They are beautiful and smart—they simply make me happy. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Never give up! Many times I would want to throw in the towel and give up on things that I found difficult at the time. Joe would push and help me through those times, and it paid off for me in the end. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? AE Excel x Catherdal Bells. 236A | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

Arabians—Joe Alberti


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This cross has been done four times and each and every one of them have been successful show horses. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? SA Sophisticated Lady because she is a freak, and it would be a riot to ride a horse that trots like that! One day I will have a park horse.

What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? I am sure there are many, but I keep drawing a blank. I try not to think about the negative. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? The horses take up most of my free time, but when I am not doing that, I simply like to relax.

Brandy Johnson

Name: Trainer Affiliation:

Rohara Arabians—Joe Alberti

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? Our very first

Arabian was a Polish racehorse. MY very first Arabian was a Kaiyoum son, Kaiyoum Might. I was 14 years old when I was handed the lead of that beautiful grey stallion. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? Because Arabians are the best! I love the versatility of the breed and charisma they possess. When you see a truly beautiful Arabian—it takes your breath away. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? “Have fun!” along with, “Brandy, put your shoulders back, Brandy, get your butt down in the saddle, Brandy, slow down!” If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? Way to difficult of a question! I see so many different crosses for different disciplines and I’d really love to have a horse from each discipline! If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? DA Valentino, because he was an amazing halter horse and when he hit that pose ... he hummed. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? Professional equine photography and graphic design. I also love to ski, hike, fish … anything outdoors.

Beth Jupp

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Lowe Show Horse Centre—Jim Lowe How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how Lowe, and my horses in attaining those objectives. many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? I have A very good friend of mine, Christena Ferran, had several trainers throughout the years and they have all introduced me to her special Arabian gelding and given me great advice at one time or another, but to stay in I was instantly hooked! That was 17 years ago. the moment and have fun is one piece of advice I always Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? The connection I try to remember. There is so much to think about and a lot feel with my Arabian horses goes far beyond anything of emotional ups and downs when showing, and I never that words can express. Being in their presence is want to lose sight of the gift of just being with my horse. good for my soul. Exhibiting Arabians has provided If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who me with the opportunity to make many incredible, would you choose and why? Because I own the stallion lifelong friends across the U.S. I have also enjoyed Mamage, I guess I have to say I’d like him to be the sire, setting goals and working with my awesome trainer, Jim don’t I? There are so many wonderful sires and mares in Volume 43, No. 4 | 237A


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our breed, that it is difficult to narrow it down to one. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I have been unbelievably fortunate to have the opportunity to show two incredible horses as an amateur, Mamage and Papa Rhazi, but I would have loved to show Apollopalooza. He looked like so much fun and was absolutely stunning! What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? When I was heading for the out-gate instead of the in-gate at the beginning of a class and ended up with my horse and buggy perpendicular to a fence when I tried to turn around. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I enjoy foreign travel, spending time with family and friends, and my beloved dog Hoover.

Ashley Knipe Commissiong

Name: Trainer Affiliation:

Springwater Farms—John Ryan

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? My parents, Ken and Susan Knipe, have owned and bred horses for as long as I can remember. I have been showing them for 25 years, on and off.

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Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I don’t know if God ever made a more beautiful creature. They are graceful and gracious, so generous of spirit, gentle and kind. I love all horses, but Arabians possess an extra intuitiveness that I think makes them easier to bond with. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? When I was growing up, Steve Dady would say, “Ride like you’re winning it,” which I try always to do. More recently, Johnny Ryan has told me to let him worry about how to fix any issues and for me to just ride, which I gladly do. He is an incredible horseman and I am very grateful for him. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I have been campaigning for a couple of years for a Vegaz x Alicia CA baby. Vegaz is powerful, square, beautiful—a sports car. Alicia is graceful, stretchy, and lovely. I fantasize about this foal to the extent that I have it already named. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Isn’t everyone’s answer Countess Vanessa? I consider it an honor that I was able to see her compete, and I can’t even imagine what it would feel like to sit astride her. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? I’m sure I don’t have a single one! What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? Playing with my beautiful daughters, Kennedy and Sophia!


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Chelsea Knoop

Name: Farm:

West Lane Farms Price Performance Horses—Kevin Price and Mike Neal Arabian Center—Katie Beck and Mike Neal

Trainer Affiliation:

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was introduced to Arabians through a lesson program close

Name: Farm:

to my house, Rushlow Arabians to be exact! (Thank you Sally and Marggie for a great start!) I have been involved with these beautiful animals for the past 19 years. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I own and exhibit Arabian horses because they are an incredible combination of intelligence, beauty, and athleticism. I have shown other breeds over the years and although it was fun, it doesn’t compare to the excitement of showing a great Arabian horse. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Ride the horse you have that given day. Don’t override your horse and show your horse in a way that highlights his or her strengths and minimizes their weaknesses. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? If I could select the dam of my next show horse, it would be Expressly Bella. She is such a beautiful, feminine mare with such natural talent. The sire would Amheirican Made. Don’t know him yet? You will! If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I would want to show Apollopalooza. Amateur park is my favorite class to show in and he was such an amazing animal. So square and cadenced, and had that brilliance that is hard to replicate. Truly one in a million.

Grant Krohn

Oak Haven Arabians Blake and Jason Krohn; Argent Farms— Andy Sellman and Angie Larson; and RBC Show Horses—Rob Bick and Caralyn Schroter

Trainer Affiliation:

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I am a fourth generation Arabian horse owner. I have lived and worked on our farm in Lindale, Texas, since I was born. My father started training horses when he was 16 and has trained Arabians all of his professional life. My mother has “Arabian” blood in her veins. Her family has been involved with the Arabian breed since my great grandfather helped establish the first Arabian horse club in California. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I own and show Arabians because that’s what fell in my lap. I focused on sports in high school, but found I really loved the training and showing more. Volume 43, No. 4 | 239A


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What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? My father told me to get as much training from as many of the best Arabian trainers in the industry as I could. I have been so fortunate to have Argent Farms and RBC Show Horses allow me to intern with them. It was the best advice anyone could have given me. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? Choosing a sire would depend on how I felt that day. One day I want an awesome performance horse so I would breed WCA Showthyme (Pryme Thyme x WCA Perfectiming) to Rrapture (SF Specs Shocwave x DD My Dance), an exciting young stallion, whom I think is so talented. Other days I really want a beautiful halter horse. Then I would breed WCA Showthyme to LD Pistal (Magnum Psyche x Halana), who is amazing.

If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I would have loved to show Muskamadia (Bask Flame x Muskadenya). She was twice Reserve National Champion Halter, twice Reserve Champion Country Pleasure Driving and twice National Champion Country English Pleasure! What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? I really don’t want to share this, but my most embarrassing moment happened this year at the Region 9 Championships. My sister, Jayne Krohn Lusty, showed my dad’s Pryme Thyme mare Katrina Thyme SA to Champion Country English Pleasure in the AATR class, and then I took her in the 18-39 class and got the gate! Ouch! What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I love to golf and snowboard and when I’m not traveling, I follow college basketball and professional football.

Regina Kruger

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Cotton Performance Horses—Abe Cotton How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many being bored. I think they retain everything we teach years have you been involved with Arabian horses? When I them so well. My mom has always said that only a true was 13, a good friend saved a very under-fed Arabian “rider” can ride an Arabian and I couldn’t agree more. pony, brought it to me, and ever since then have had What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? As a a love for the Arabian breed. He was deathly afraid ha-ha joke between the two of us and it is the first thing of plastic bags, and was so quick on his feet he would to always come to my mind is: “Don’t screw him up.” dump me off before I realized what even happened. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? There is not a prettier, horse, who would you choose and why? I have fallen more athletic and versatile breed to watch than the in love with the Sundance Kid V get and I would Arabian. I can sit and watch every class without ever love to have been able to breed him to the mare I had shown growing up, Sheiks Shandelle. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? As a youth I fell in love with CMF Victoria, a mare with Lisa Powell. I always loved to watch Lisa ride her in side saddle. She was put together how I like to see a western horse and she seemed to enjoy her job. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? You know, I can’t say that I have anything that I would consider really embarrassing. Hopefully, it stays that way, but once I did perform the 13 & under showmanship championship pattern and I was in the 15-year-old age group. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I am involved in a non-profit group called New Vocations in re-homing ex-Standardbred racehorses. I can’t say that I do anything that doesn’t involve horses.

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Name:

Barbara Larsen Stark

Farm: Cadillac Farms Trainer Affiliation: Clanton Performance Horses regardless of the outcome. But the thing I love the most is when I enter the “horse show bubble,” I feel like I am with my second family. I have truly met incredible people in the Arabian world who I consider lifelong friends. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? “Just have fun!” If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I believe there are many incredible stallions and mares in our industry that are producing great offspring. I have not ventured into the breeding part of our industry, so I have never really thought about who I would select. I do know that I have been very fortunate to have incredible show horses and feel very lucky that the breeders of my animals did such a good job choosing their sires and dams. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? There are so many horses that I admire from different disciplines, I could never name just one. Some horses that have stood out to How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many me are: Amazing Fame, Melody V, Kornwall, Caliente years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was Virtuoso, Revelation, Adams Fire, Vegaz, and Rapid Fire. introduced to Arabians by my mom, Claire Larsen. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? My most In 1985, she purchased her first Arabian, a Halfembarrassing or perhaps funniest moment happened this Arabian/Half Quarter Horse named Shane-Abi year at Scottsdale. I was showing my purebred country that we still own today. He was the beginning of our pleasure horse in the Wendell Arena and my jodphur involvement in this fantastic Arabian horse community, pants started to fall down. My pants were a little big, but and 27 years later we are still going strong. I figured I would be fine once I was sitting in the saddle. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? It’s difficult to put into Oh, was I wrong! Every time I posted, they fell lower words how much happiness my horses have given me. and eventually the waistband was closer to my hips than When I first started riding and showing around the age of my waist. I began riding with one hand and holding 8, I did it because my mom showed. I was going to have to my pants up with the other. My many years of showing be at the shows anyway, so I figured I might as well ride. one handed in western definitely paid off that day. As I have grown older, the horses have become a passion. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of When I am around them, I feel calm. When I go in the Arabian horses? Horses are my only true hobby show ring and have a good ride, it always feels amazing unless you consider shopping a hobby!

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Lori Lawrence

Name: Farm: Starline Arabians Trainer Affiliation: Kiesner Training the most versatile and intelligent breed I have ever encountered. On top of that, they are like living art; I love every aspect of owning them. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Don’t over ride, and stay out there! Is that an oxymoron? If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? Afire Bey V and Ritida— they have been a magical cross and have produced Adams Fire, Eves Fire and Emperors Fire for us, as well as a young up-and-comer, Aidens Fire. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I have to say any of the ones we own—we are lucky girls! I especially love to show Polkapalooza, we have a special synergy. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many Reversing through the middle of the ring and going years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was back the same direction at the Canadian Nationals. introduced by Lynne Miller of Acacia Arabians at What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian around 10 years old. Her lovely little Arabian farm horses? Breeding, showing and judging Whippets around was just a mile down the road from my childhood the world. I love the opportunity it has afforded me to home; I was enchanted with the breed right away. make friends abroad and experience other cultures. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? Arabians are

Gail Leavitt

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Whelihan Arabian How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was introduced to the Arabian horse by my late husband. He had a love for horses and he wanted our son (age 6 at the time) to learn to ride. The two discovered an Arabian show barn not far from our home and we all became fascinated with the breed. We bought a Half-Arabian mare and our son, Joe, showed in walk/trot. When Joe decided he would rather play other sports, I decided I would try some riding lessons. I was 43 years old and had never been on a horse in my life. In a short time, I was hooked, even though I didn’t know how to ride. That was 12 years ago! I was so impressed watching the saddle seat riders, I knew I wanted to learn the discipline. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I was up for the challenge of learning to ride as an adult. I love the beauty and intelligence of the Arabian horse and the excitement of showing. I feel very blessed to be 242A | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

Farms—Mike Whelihan


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able to ride and show such an amazing animal. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? “Keep your butt down!” Mike made me ride bareback until I got my seat. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? There are so many … but at my first visit to U.S. Nationals back in 2004 or 2005, I remember GTF Beetlejuice in HalfArabian English. He was spectacular—so proud and

confident, and that picture still sticks in my mind. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? I have had far too many! The most embarrassing was the judge asking me if I was just getting started showing. It was so obvious! What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I love being a mom to my son, Joe. I enjoy traveling to warm climates, and outdoor activities including fishing and hiking.

Gayle Ledwidge

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Cotton Performance Horses—Abe Cotton Don’t let him flip his head upside down.” If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? Skoraff for the sire and VerJoy Filette for the dam—they were both wonderful minded horses. I would love to have a barn full of Skoraff mares in age. Besides great minds, he puts his stamina on all his get. I chose VerJoy Filette as the dam because she was the nicest, most forgiving horse I ever knew. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? A horse we raised and I trained, MP Rockin Robyn, was a horse that always gave 100%. She loved to show and was willing to try anything. She was a winner in every discipline we tried from country pleasure and show hack to second level dressage. She was a true show horse! What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? I was 9 years old and showing a pony for my aunt and How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how uncle at a Welsh Pony show, and my uncle didn’t many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? like the length of my stirrups. He came into the My aunt and uncle, Vernon and Joyce Nixon. ring while the class was going on, stopped me, and They gave me my first Half-Arabian in 1971. fixed my stirrups. I ended up 3rd out of 3. That was Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? For me, no other something I teased him about for many years! breed can compare to the beauty of the Arabian horse. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Arabian horses? I show my dog in agility, help my “Make sure you get your results and go for finesse. husband with his race cars and snowmobile.

Marikate Matthews

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Rohara How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? Horses have always been a part of my life, and I have been involved with Arabians and Half-Arabians for 48 years. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I love the Arabian/ Half-Arabian for its beauty, intelligence and versatility.

Arabians—John Rannenberg I show because I LOVE to compete and enjoy the camaraderie with all the people I have met over the years. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? “Ride What You’ve Got.” If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? Well, I happen to have Volume 43, No. 4 | 243A


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chosen that already … my multi-national champion mare, Forthe Loveof Thunder, is in foal to the great park horse Allience! We are expecting our next champion in May 2013. Names already picked out! If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I would be honored to have my favorite stallion, Good Thunder, back to ride in the show ring. He was the consummate show horse and was as honest as the day is long. A greater stallion, for me, has never lived. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? When I was in high school and showing in Syracuse, N.Y., at an Arabian show, my bun fell out—not a fake bun—my actual long hair, came out of the bun and was flying everywhere … very embarrassing! What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I really enjoy cooking and interior decorating. I find both very relaxing and comforting.

Name:

Martha L. McCollough

Trainer Affiliation:

Farm: Oak Haven South, LLC Oak Haven Arabians—Blake and Jason Krohn

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was introduced to the Krohns by friends who also raised Arabians. That was in 2001 and I have never looked back. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I have always loved the breed; they are beautiful, athletic, intelligent,

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and versatile. It is a great privilege to own these amazing creatures and take them in the ring. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? They are always working on improving my riding abilities and Blake gives me the best breeding advice. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? We have bred an exceptional stallion, Rrapture, who is by SF Specs Shocwave. I have several wonderful Pryme Thyme mares, and that cross is hard to beat. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I am in love with Afires Heir, he is so gifted and willing. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? I am not that good at halter and at U.S. Nationals in Albuquerque in 2005, I was almost out the gate trying to set my horse up. It was awful. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I love the mountains. I go to Angel Fire, N.M., as often as I can to hike. I also love to travel.

continues on page 184AA


Volume 43, No. 4 | 245A


Afire Bey V x MA Nobella

ENGLISH PLEASURE WITH JOHNNY RYAN

Stine photo

2011 U.S. NATIONAL CHAMPION ENGLISH PLEASURE JUNIOR HORSE 2011 CANADIAN NATIONAL CHAMPION ENGLISH PLEASURE JR. HORSE & AAOTR 40 & OVER 2012 BUCKEYE CHAMPION ENGLISH PLEASURE Owned By Cheryl Doran ~ Kintersville, PA

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ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & OVER WITH CHERYL DORAN


AEPA SADDLE SEAT FUTURITY WITH CHRISTINE RYAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE JUNIOR HORSE WITH CHRISTINE RYAN

A Temptation x Chamorrita Afire

Stine photo

2012 REGION 15 CHAMPION COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE JUNIOR HORSE Owned By Kim & Scott Cook ~ Middletown, DE

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Afire Bey V x MA Nobella

COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR MATURITY WITH CAROL SKEUSE HART COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE JUNIOR HORSE WITH JOHNNY RYAN BUCKEYE CHAMPION COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 36-54 REGION 15 RESERVE CHAMPION COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & OVER REGION 12 CHAMPION COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE JUNIOR HORSE Owned By Springwater Farms ~ Stockton, NJ

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COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AATR SELECT WITH ASHLEY COMMISSIONG

Afire Bey V x Flames Lullaby 2012 REGION 15 CHAMPION COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE SELECT AATR 2012 REGION 15 CHAMPION COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & OVER 2012 BUCKEYE CHAMPION COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 55 & OVER 2012 BUCKEYE FIRST PLACE COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE SELECT AATR WITH ASHLEY COMMISSIONG Owned By Ken & Susan Knipe ~ Palmyra, PA

COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 55 & OVER WITH SUSAN KNIPE

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HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 55 & OVER WITH NANCY MAXIMUCK

+/ Krewe x Sultan’s Final Dawn 2012 CANADIAN NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & OVER 2012 REGION 12 CHAMPION HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & OVER 2010 CANADIAN NATIONAL CHAMPION HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & OVER Owned By Nancy Maximuck ~ Stockton, NJ 250A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


PARK AAOTR WITH NANCY MAXIMUCK

Apollopalooza x Fierina

5X CANADIAN NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION 2012 REGION 12 CHAMPION PARK AAOTR Owned By Nancy Maximuck ~ Stockton, NJ

Volume 43, No. 4 | 251A


COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 55 & OVER WITH NANCY MAXIMUCK OPEN WITH CHRISTINE RYAN

2012 REGION 12 RESERVE CHAMPION COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & OVER 2011 U.S. NATIONAL TOP TEN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & OVER

A Wild Fire x Grace Under Fyre

Owned By Nancy Maximuck~ Stockton, NJ

252A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


H/A MARES S/P AAOTH WITH ELAINE FINNEY 2012 CANADIAN NATIONAL CHAMPION H/A MARE S/P TYPE AAOTH

Owned By Elaine Finney ~ Stockton, NJ

2012 REGION 12 CHAMPION H/A COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE JR. HORSE

H/A COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE JR. HORSE & H/A AEPA SADDLE SEAT FUTURITY WITH CHRISTINE RYAN

Baske Afire x Evangelique

Volume 43, No. 4 | 253A


HALF-ARABIAN GELDINGS S/H OPEN WITH TERRY HOLMES HALF-ARABIAN GELDINGS S/H AAOTH WITH ELAINE FINNEY

Majesteit x Catherine X 12X NATIONAL CHAMPION HALF-ARABIAN S/H GELDING Owned By Elaine Finney ~ Stockton, NJ

254A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


HALF-ARABIAN FUTURITY GELDINGS WITH TERRY HOLMES HALF-ARABIAN GELDINGS S/P AAOTH WITH ELAINE FINNEY

Justify x Whispering Wind Golden Glory CANADIAN NATIONAL CHAMPION HALF-ARABIAN FUTURITY GELDING REGION 15 CHAMPION GELDING REGION 15 CHAMPION GELDING AOTH Owned By Elaine Finney ~ Stockton, NJ

Volume 43, No. 4 | 255A


Leaders Of The Times: September Calendar Feature

Cedar Ridge arabians’ Leah Beth Boyd and John Golladay by Linda White

Once in a great while, if we’re lucky, someone, or in this case two someones, come along whose ability, understanding, commitment and passion for what they do far transcends the ordinary. Leah Beth Boyd and John Golladay demonstrate such gifts every time they bring a horse through the in-gate. Boyd trained and rode Starr Llight (Reign On x Charm Eta, by *Eter) to the 2011 U.S. National Championship in English Pleasure; Golladay and Brass Star (Brass x CB Shining Star, by Providence) were right behind them, earning the division’s U.S. National Reserve Championship. to quote the cowboys, however, this wasn’t their first rodeo. Boyd first saw Starr Llight as a 3-year-old in 2000. “Julie Wrigley had a group of horses at Cedar Ridge for a dispersal sale, she was one of them,” recalls the ames, Iowa, native. “She was the first horse I broke by myself. I took her home and after she was started, I took her back to Cedar Ridge, where Chris Wilson finished her. She won her first two national titles with me at the 2001 Youth Nationals, top tens in English Pleasure JtR and JOtR 14-17. Between 2003 and 2007, Starr Llight and I won six Youth, U.S. and Canadian national championships, a reserve national championship, and 16 U.S., Youth and Canadian National top tens altogether.” For those wins, Starr Llight was in training with Chris Wilson at ChriShan Park. In 2008, Boyd gave up her amateur status and became an assistant trainer at ChriShan Park. Starr Llight, meanwhile, embarked on an impressive career. She accompanied Boyd to the young trainer’s first tri-color in an open class, scoring a national reserve championship in park, and with ChriShan Park youth rider Nicole Ferszt, notched a Youth National Championship in park JtR. Most recently, Starr Llight showed at Youth Nationals with Emily Moore; the pair won the championship in park JtR, the mare’s third such award in that class. “She was also reserve champion in the English JtR 14-17,” Boyd says. “She won the 2011 U.S. National Championship in English Pleasure with me, and Liz Moore rode her to the 2011 U.S. National Reserve Championship in Park aaOtR and a U.S. National top ten in English Pleasure aaOtR 40 and Over.” Liz Moore is scheduled to show the mare at U.S. Nationals this year. “It’s cool how things have come full circle,” Boyd reflects. “Starr Llight gets to end her career back where she started it, here at Cedar Ridge.” In addition to her talent, passion and dedication, to what does Boyd attribute her success? “I was very lucky to have my mom, Sandy,” she states frankly. “She encouraged me and supported me 100 percent, 256A | a R a BI a N HOR SE t I MES

but never pressured me to succeed. My dad came to the shows and supported me too, although he wasn’t involved hands-on like my mom was. I was also very lucky to have great horses along the way. I learned very specific things from each horse, and I call on those lessons now and use them to help teach my youth and amateur riders. “There are a few horses that stand out when I think about great teachers that also went on to win big prizes,” she continues. “I won my first tri-color at Youth Nationals in 1996 in the Walk-trot Hunt Seat Equitation on a horse named Bark Inthe Dark. My mom tells stories of us coming out of the ring with smoke rolling out of our ears—directed toward each other! He was stubborn, but he taught me persistence. “tS High Roller, my first English horse, taught me how to stay one step ahead of a horse. During my first few lessons on him, Lyric Laughlin (now Phillips) would only let me trot a few steps at a time, because he would build and get really strong, really fast. We went on to a national championship in 1997 in the English Pleasure 13 and Under. Sufis Highcommand is another great one; I showed him in equitation and Half-arabian English. We were very successful in both divisions, and he is still showing today. Most recently, at age 23, he was national champion with Wyatt Budd in saddle seat equitation 14-17. He’s an old pro now, but switching gears from pleasure to equitation took a lot of patience and taught me how to ‘fake it till you make it.’ “The horse I grew with the most, though, was Minni Moons Star,” Boyd says. “I showed him Half-arabian English and park. By the time he retired at age 18, we had garnered three national championships and four reserves, but there were a lot of classes where I got the biggest prize of all—the gate. He’s the horse whose lessons come through the most when I’m teaching other people. He required you to ride every single step in the show ring; he taught me how to show a horse on the edge. He is also the sweetest horse I’ve ever been around on the ground, truly a once-in-a-lifetime kind of horse. ‘Mooney’ is now 25 and is retired at ChriShan Park.” “I love training arabians,” she continues. “I love showing, and I enjoy the challenge of working with quirky horses—horses that march to their own drum that you have to go about training in a different way. Boyd continued to ride and show as she attended the University of Kentucky, where she majored in agricultural finance. “I met John Golladay in 2005,” she recalls. “We were friends for several years, and then we began to spend more time together. We started dating at U.S. Nationals in 2008, and after the 2009 U.S. Nationals, I moved to tennessee to be with him. He was working for Joel Kiesner at the time.


John Golladay and Brass Star (Brass x CB Shining Star, by Providence). and Leah Beth Boyd on Starr Llight (Reign On x Charm Eta, by *Eter).

In Tennessee, I was doing marketing videos of stallions and sale horses. I knew the Ames family, and at Scottsdale in 2010, I did some marketing work for them. Then they approached John and me to come and work together at Cedar Ridge. I didn’t know how much training I would be doing. “We all—Lara Ames, Tom Moore, and John and I—look at the 2-year-olds and make preliminary decisions about them. John starts all the young horses, and then we split them up and develop a game plan for each one. If we discover that one of us gets along better with a particular horse, we switch, so that each horse gets worked by the person it gets along with best.” Golladay’s nationals partner, Brass Star, was bred and raised at Cedar Ridge, and already a national titlist when he was purchased by Teal and Jim Dowling in April 2007. Eight months later, Larry Jerome bought the horse, who in 2008 won the Canadian National Championship in Park AOTR with Jerome’s daughter, Moriah Fischer. The pair then added some class A and regional wins and a 2009 U.S. National Top Ten in English Pleasure AAOTR 18-39 to their accolades. When John Golladay came to Cedar Ridge, he began to work the talented bay gelding. “Brass Star is about as brave as any horse I have ever been around,” Golladay says. “He comes to the party.” He and Brass Star won the 2011 Canadian National Reserve Championship in English Pleasure before they headed to Tulsa. “Going into the class, Leah and I never could have imagined what happened. I thought she had a good chance of getting a piece of it, but when I hit the ring, he rose to the occasion. I could just put him wherever I wanted to be. Going out with our ribbons, Leah and I looked at each other like, ‘Did this really happen?’” For Golladay, the horses he trains define how he regards his profession. “With some horses, it’s just a job,” he says, “but with the great ones, it’s

about paying attention to details, molding their energy around the arena, and harnessing—keeping up with—all their energy. It’s the difference between a job and a career, just as it is with humans. If it’s just a job, you’re always looking at the clock. With a career, there is never enough time. “I feel very blessed to have been around horsemen like Joel Kiesner, Tom Moore, [the late] John White, and my dad, Scott Golladay, who gave me ample opportunities,” he continues. “Joel is the guy who opened a lot of doors and taught me what I was striving for. I had grown up with Arabians, but what caught my eye about Joel’s training was the subtlety in it. He taught me to be a good listener; the horses are the ultimate teachers. And Tom Moore was instrumental in our coming to Cedar Ridge. Not only does he continue to develop us as horsemen, he is also a great mentor and friend. “I’m constantly watching, learning, soaking things in, and being attuned to everything,” he adds. “I think that’s the biggest factor. Being patient is another important element. We all have days when we second guess ourselves, or make things more complicated than they need to be, but patience is invaluable, both with the horses and with yourself. It takes a lot of hard work to succeed. When I was in my early 20s and went from college to training horses, I had moments when I asked myself if I was on the right path. If I hadn’t worked for Joel, I would have stayed in school, but you get a little bit hungry when you taste someone else’s success. Watching Joel’s success made me say, ‘That’s where I want to be.’ I wanted to be around people and horses that could do that. “For me, horse training is the big picture,” he concludes. “People come and go, and horses come and go, but Leah Beth and I get to do what we love to do, and every day is different. We have reached a maturity level where we’re coming to understand it’s about taking risks and making lifestyle changes to go about harnessing our potential. Every once in awhile, as human beings, we do a little backpedalling, but I knew from day one I was going to do this.” n Volume 43, No. 4 | 257A


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A Leg Up The Spooky Horse by Heather Smith Thomas Horses are prey animals, and have survived by being flighty— running away from predators before the predators can catch and eat them. They are also herd animals, taking cues from other herd members. If one snorts and jumps, ready to run, they all are ready to jump and run. Some horses are more nervous and flighty than others, but these natural tendencies can be minimized by a conscientious and confident rider or made worse by a nervous rider. The first step in dealing with a spooky horse is to address your own mental state and emotions when working with that horse. Don Ulmer, who raises and trains horses near Sioux Falls, S.D., believes a person can’t really prevent spookiness, because of the natural tendencies of the horse, but there are ways to work around it. “Basically, horses are claustrophobic,” he says. “Most of what they are afraid of would never hurt them. It’s their perception of things, and this relates to their confidence level. This goes back to the beginning of their experience. If their mama was leery and worried about things, the young horse is definitely going to be leery, too.”

“The first step in dealing with a spooky horse is to address your own mental state and emotions when working with that horse.” The horse is a very social animal, and if the lead mare spooks and takes off, he will do the same. “When I watch horses in the herd, I decide which of them will fit what I want in a horse,” Ulmer says. “You can’t prevent a horse from being afraid of things, because this is built into their nature. In the natural environment, horses don’t have time to think about circumstances. They survived by being able to run fast. (The word horse comes from the Anglo-Saxon word for ‘fast.’) They could outrun their predators. “Personally, I like horses that have an alert instinct. I don’t like a horse that ignores what’s going on. I don’t like horses that people have trained to the point that they are so desensitized, they only rely on the human.” There needs to be a happy medium. 260A | A r A BI A n Hor Se T I MeS

“Basically, I treat horses all the same,” he says. “I think fear is a confidence problem. Any human or animal is afraid of what they don’t understand. If I’m riding a horse that seems to be afraid of something that neither he nor I have any control over, I need to get him to only have confidence in me. I never try to ride a horse up to something he is shying at or spooking at. I just get control of his legs. “Any time a horse shies, his body becomes completely rigid. In that form, you have no control of him. You need to disengage his hind end. The minute you break the rigidity of the topline on a horse, you get control over his legs. I just disengage the hind end and take him away from what he is afraid of, and put his mind back on me. I am telling him that I won’t let him get hurt. “If I am showing a horse, I can’t ride up to the scary thing if he’s spooking at the judge,” Ulmer says. “I can’t say, ‘hold on a minute so I can ride up to you and let him think about you.’ We don’t have time to do those kinds of things. If it’s a bear or a rattlesnake, would I want him to walk up to that? If I had a horse that would walk right up to a bear to check it out, I’d probably shoot the horse and let the bear eat him so I’m alive! You don’t want the horse to be that fearless. “I really don’t care if he finds out that what he’s afraid of won’t hurt him. I am more concerned about whether he has confidence in me. I want him to know that I won’t take him into danger. He needs to trust me. That’s really all we have, when riding a horse. As humans, we can’t force him to do something. (I can’t lift or push 1,100 pounds.) We can’t control him physically, so it has to be a trust situation. When working with people and their horses, I find this is the biggest problem many people have—they don’t trust their horse.” The horse knows this immediately and becomes insecure. “The horse thinks: ‘I must be right; my rider is afraid of this, too,’” says Ulmer. “I tell riders that their pants leak. Your pants tell the horse what you are thinking and feeling.” The horse feels a rider’s tension through the rider’s seat and legs. “If a horse is going around the pen and keeps looking to the outside, the first thing I do is take him to the inside and bend him around my leg and put him to work, mainly putting his


A Leg Up mind back on me. Then I can drop the reins and go right back again. I don’t want him to ever think that I can make him go somewhere. It has to be up to him, to think he can go there. That’s my approach, and it works for me. If it doesn’t work for someone else, I think it’s because they don’t have the confidence that it will work.” When working with horses, people set themselves up for success or failure. “Being as old as I am, I’ve had the chance to make more mistakes than most people,” he says. “We hopefully learn from our mistakes.” He offers an illustration. “Often if a horse spooks at something, the first thing the rider does is tip the horse’s head toward what he’s afraid of. This opens the door to the outside and the horse flies off to the side. Pretty soon the horse learns that’s the biggest door that’s open. Before long, that horse is clear across the arena before you know what happened, and this is really hard to overcome. “You must show the horse that you are confident,” he concludes. If the rider is tense and nervous, the horse will be also. So the rider must be relaxed and calm. “If you are on the ground, it also comes down to respect,” he adds. “If I’m leading a horse somewhere and he decides he’s afraid of something, I don’t want him jumping on me. He has to have enough respect for me that if he wants to attempt to leave, it’s away from me and not onto me. Respect goes back to confidence. “The fear issue is a little different when you are riding than it is when you are working on the ground. You can take a horse on the ground and lead him past things he’s afraid of, but when you get back on him, if you don’t think you can ride him past those things, the horse will become insecure and may not want to go past them. “You can ride a horse wherever you want to go. If you think you can go there, you can. If you don’t think the horse will go there, he won’t. You won’t convince the horse to go there if you don’t think you can. If you think he’ll be afraid of it, he will be afraid of it. “You don’t gain confidence, or respect, in a couple of days,” he states. “This takes time spent with that horse. In today’s world, most people don’t take enough time to develop respect or confidence. If someone gets on a horse and the horse is jumping away from the rail or shying at something, I can get on him and he’ll relax, drop his head, and go wherever I want.” The horse feels more comfortable and relaxed when his rider is relaxed.

“Horses that grow up in an outdoor environment are more confident than horses that grow up in a stall,” he continues. “They are herd animals, and if their mother or herd mates were not afraid of something, even if they were insecure, they followed. This is what we want in a horse—one that follows our direction. I don’t want to make a horse do anything; I prefer to think of myself as a director rather than an enforcer.” The horse should be a willing follower. “I show him a direction, and it’s his responsibility to get there, not my responsibility to make him. This is what works for me, and I think if a person has this approach it will work for them too.” It all goes back to confidence. “When the rider is confident that something will work, it does,” Ulmer says. “Horses sense our feelings. Horse people, as a group, are getting better at trying to figure out how horses think and how they react to environmental factors. In past years there was more of a ‘make them do it’ mind set.” But force and coercion don’t work very well.

“When working with horses, people set themselves up for success or failure. “Being as old as I am, I’ve had the chance to make more mistakes than most people,” he says. “We hopefully learn from our mistakes.” “There are more horsemen now who are willing to try to understand the horse and his reactions in different situations,” he points out. Our culture is different than it was 100 years ago. People today own horses because they want to—because they like horses. In earlier times everyone used horses for transportation and work whether or not they liked or understood horses. Not everyone was suited to handle horses. “Most people today try to get along with the horse as best they can, and I think most horses today have a better life than in the past,” he says. “In terms of riding, also, there’s a lot of difference between abuse and developing respect from the horse. You don’t have to make the horse afraid of you to have him respect you. Pain never accomplishes anything. Every time I hurt a horse, it takes me a month to get his confidence back.” Fear does not build respect, but it takes a long time for some people to understand this. “We think we are superior beings, but what we think and feel is not necessarily true. We have to think about how the horse perceives each situation,” he explains. Ulmer’s passion is cow horses. He feels that training horses to work cattle can help them gain confidence and overcome Volume 43, No. 4 | 261A


A Leg Up being nervous or spooky. Some people ask him how he can put a horse onto a cow so quickly. “I am not doing anything unusual, but just letting the horse do what he does naturally,” he offers. “Horses naturally know how to ‘rate’ another animal. They go alongside their mother from the day they are born. If she trots, they trot. If she walks, they walk. If she lopes, they lope.” They also do this when playing with their herd mates in a pasture. “They work each other, and learn pressure spots. They know that the closer they get to another horse’s pressure spot, the more apt that horse is to leave. If they back off, the other horse will slow down.” Horses do this all the time in their pecking order—the dominant ones making the more submissive ones move away. They instinctively know how to “herd” or “rate” another animal. “Training a cutting horse really has nothing to do with me, the rider. I just enable them to do what they do naturally, and it works—if you allow it to,” he says. “If you demand that the horse be in a certain place—such as the horse’s head between the cow’s head and her shoulder—then you’ll be in big trouble. Every cow is different. Your horse might have to have his shoulder to the cow’s head, or be at her ribcage, to do the same thing. The horse will know, way before you do, how to rate that particular cow.” He feels that the best horses he ever trained on cows were the ones that were actually afraid of cows in the beginning. “They were more aware of that pressure system,” says Ulmer. Those horses are more aware of that cow than most, and really watch its every move. “If the cow looked at them, in the beginning, they were gone, wanting to escape. If the cow turned away from them, that was fine and they’d follow her, until she turned back to them. Once they learned that they could actually control the situation, they were great cow horses. I had some very timid mares, and the best way to get them over that was to work cows.” They gained confidence in their own ability to control the situation. “With stallions that were real aggressive, they could take out their aggression on the cow, and allow you to help them through various situations, because they didn’t think about it as a rote (repeated lesson) situation. They would allow me to move them off a cow, enabling them to learn where that pressure spot was. They were still in control, but not taking advantage of the situation.” The rider can fine-tune, guide and teach the horse. 262A | A r A BI A n HOr SE T I MES

“This has worked great for me, but it still boils down to a fear thing,” he says. So teamwork and confidence between the rider and horse is the key to all of these situations. “I can’t tell anyone the best way to do something, but I feel that if it works, you should stay with it,” Ulmer says. “The whole thing is built on confidence. Any animal is afraid of what they don’t understand.” If you can acquaint them with it, to where they understand something or understand that you are their savior, they lose the fear. They know nothing will hurt them because they trust you. This is the key to dealing with so many things because you don’t have to drill the horse on any specific thing. The blanket trust will cover the unexpected, all the unknowns that you might face out on the trail.

“There are millions of things you could never prepare a horse for at home, but if the horse trusts you, he might wonder about a certain scary situation for a moment, but then realize it is okay because he knows you will keep him safe.” There are millions of things you could never prepare a horse for at home, but if the horse trusts you, he might wonder about a certain scary situation for a moment, but then realize it is okay because he knows you will keep him safe. “Horses are herd animals, and go everywhere the herd leader goes,” Ulmer emphasizes. “They take their cues from the leader. Most herds have two leaders—a dominant and a passive leader. The passive leader is the one everybody follows. The dominant one pushes the herd. If there’s a problem, that horse pushes everybody into a tight group. But the passive leader is the one who decides where they go and when, and the dominant leader brings up the rear. I watch this all the time with our mares out in the pasture. When it’s time to go to water, the passive leader trots through the bunch and heads out, and they all follow.” There is always one in the herd who makes the decisions. “That’s what I want to be when I work with horses—the passive leader,” he says. That is the one they put their trust in. “I don’t want to be the dominant leader; I don’t want to make the horse do anything. I just want to show him a direction and let him do the rest.” This same philosophy applies to helping the spooky horse become more confident in the rider and less prone to explode out on the trail. n


Calendar Of Events

Items for the calendar are run FREE of charge on a space-available basis. Calendar listings are subject to change; please confirm dates and locale before making your plans or reservations. MAIL notices to Arabian Horse Times, Attention: Charlene Deyle, P.O. Box 69, Jordan, MN 55352; phone 612-816-3018 or e-mail: charlened@ahtimes.com. *Due to the intrinsic nature of these shows, Arabian Horse Times cannot be held accountable for their validity.

SeminarS/CliniCS/SaleS/ Open HOuSe/awardS

November 14-18, 2012, AHA Convention, Denver, Colorado. Contact: AHA, 303-696-4500.

SHOwS OctOber October 6, 2012, Chile Roast SH One-Day Show A and B, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Contact: Tara Turner, 505-832-6823. October 6, 2012, Ozark Heartland Arab Classic Fall II One-Day Show, Mt. Vernon, Missouri. Contact: Lenard Davenport, 417-888-0686. October 6-7, 2012, Pacific Rim Arabian Fall Classic, Elma, Washington. Contact: Lanora Callahan, 360-832-6076. October 6-7, 2012, AHANM Chili Roast All-Breed Training Show, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Contact: Tara Turner, 505-832-6832. October 6-7, 2012, Arabian Sport Horse Extravaganza A and B, Lexington, Virginia. Contact: Marie Taylor, 804-314-5216. October, 7, 2012, Chile Roast One-Day Show & All-Breed Training Show, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Contact: Tara Turner, 505-832-6823. October 7, 2012, Ozark Heartland Arab Classic Fall Show I, Mt. Vernon, Missouri. Contact: Lenard Davenport, 417-888-0686. October 19-20, 2012, NC State Fair Horse Show, Raleigh, North Carolina. Contact: Barbara Woodlief, 919-839-4701. October 20-27, 2012, PMHA Annual Morab Championship, Lexington, Kentucky. Contact: Sara Ressler, 248-922-0148. October 26-28, 2012, Halloween Spooktacular Classic, Katy, Texas. Contact: Sherri Re, 281-513-5745. NOvember November 2-4, 2012, Western Carolinas Fall Show, Clemson, South Carolina. Contact: Nancy Baker, 828-817-0359. November 8-11, 2012, NTAHC Shootout, Glen Rose, Texas. Contact: Sherry McGraw, 903-872-7279.

November 9-11, 2012, American Cup Championship A and B, Scottsdale, Arizona. Contact: Jean Beck, 559-642-2072. November 17, 2012, Bluegrass Fall Arabian Challenge, Louisville, Kentucky. Contact: Krystina Firth, 859-684-6952. November 17-18, 2012, Music City Arab Show, Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039. November 21-24, 2012, AHAF 43rd Annual Thanksgiving, Tampa, Florida. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039. November 23-25, 2012, AHASFV 41st Annual Thanksgiving Show, Burbank, California. Contact: Sue Todd, 805-646-5703. November 30-December 2, 2012, Gulf Coast Christmas Show, Katy, Texas. Contact: Sherry McGraw, 903-872-7279.

December December 6-9, 2012, Saguaro Classic A and B, Scottsdale, Arizona. Contact: Melanni Hershberger, 480-443-3372. December 15, 2012, Holiday Hoorah I OneDay Show, Denver, Colorado. Contact: Marlene Kriegbaum, 716-628-2640. December 16, 2012, Holiday Hoorah II OneDay Show, Denver, Colorado. Contact: Marlene Kriegbaum, 716-628-2640. JaNuary January 10-13, 2013, Houston All Arab Sport Horse Show, Katy, Texas. Contact: Kayla Roca, 832-971-0991. January 10-13, 2013, Houston All Arabian A and B Show, Katy, Texas. Contact: Kayla Roca, 832-971-0991. January 11-13, 2013, SAAHA 42nd Annual Arab Charity Show, Tucson, Arizona. Contact: Melanni Hershberger, 480-443-3372. January 12, 2013, Show Your Horse All Arabian One-Day Show, Newberry, Florida. Contact: Nannet Read, 352-278-2004. January 22-23, 2013, Central FL Arab Winter Classic, New Smyrna Beach, Florida. Contact: Carlie Evans, 352-215-0710. January 25-17, 2013, Sierra Empire, Pomona, California. Contact: Janie Fix, 520-508-4063.

enduranCe/ COmpetitive trail ride

October 4, 2012, Alabama Yellowhammer Pioneer 55- And 75-Mile Endurance Ride, Heflin, Alabama. Contact: Tamra Schoech, 770-554-1545. October 5-6, 2012, Alabama Yellowhammer Pioneer 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Heflin, Alabama. Contact: Tamra Schoech, 770-554-1545. October 6, 2012, Red Rock Rumble 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Reno, Nevada. Contact: Connie Creech, 775-882-6591.

October 13, 2012, RAHA Rally 30-Mile Competitive Trail Ride, Ramona, California. Contact: Margie Insko, 760-789-1977. October 13, 2012, Oak Leaf Run 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Hamilton, Michigan. Contact: Linda Hamrick, 260-602-9660. October 13-14, 2012, RAHA Rally 50-Mile Competitive Trail Ride, Ramona, California. Contact: Margie Insko, 760-789-1977. October 20, 2012, Foothills Of The Cascade 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Molalla, Oregon. Contact: Jannelle Wilde, 541-849-2460. October 20, 2012, High Desert Classic I 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Fort Churchill, Nevada. Contact: Suzanne Ford Huff, 775-783-9608. October 20, 2012, Region 8 50-Mile Endurance Championship, Alamogordo, New Mexico. Contact: Marcelle Himanka, 575-491-6297. October 20, 2012, Sand Hills Stampede 55and 75-Mile Endurance Ride, Cheraw/Patrick, South Carolina. Contact: Patricia Lynn Gowen, 803-329-0077. October 21, 2012, High Desert Classic III 50Mile Endurance Ride, Fort Churchill, Nevada. Contact: Suzanne Ford Huff, 775-783-9608. October 26-27, 2012, Spook Run I and II 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Henryville, Indiana. Contact: Lois McAfee, 812-294-1776. October 27, 2012, Region 2 50-Mile Endurance Championship, Inyokern, California. Contact: Jeanine Corzine, 760-371-5830. October 27, 2012, The Haunting 50-Mile Endurance Ride, La Pine, Oregon. Contact: Linda Tribby, 541-475-6199. November 3, 2012, Region 12 50-Mile Endurance Championship, Altamont, Tennessee. Contact: Troy Nelson, 256-614-0277. November 17, 2012, Lead, Follow or Get Out Of My Way 30-, 50-, and 75-Mile Endurance Ride, Fountain Hills, Arizona. Contact: Lancette Koerner, 480-655-9434. November 30, 2012, Blackwater Boogie 25-, 50-, and 75-Mile Endurance Ride, Milton, Florida. Contact: Diane Hawthorne, 850-374-1403. December 1, 2012, Blackwater Boogie 25-, and 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Milton, Florida. Contact: Diane Hawthorne, 850-374-1403.

NatiONals eveNts

October 19-27, 2012, U.S. Nationals, Tulsa, Oklahoma. Contact: AHA, 303-696-4500.

INterNatiONal eveNts

*Go to www.ecaho.org for international shows and information.

Visit www.ahtimes.com for a calendar view of these dates. Volume 43, No. 4 | 263A


R.O. LERVICK ARABIANS Home of Cytosk+++ & Out Of Cyte Halter & Performance Horses For Sale Roger & Linda Lervick Dennis Wigren - Manager/Trainer P.O. Box 699 Stanwood, Washington 98292 360-652-0108 • 800-669-2745 E-mail: cytosk@whidbey.net Web site: www.rolervickarabians.com

Varian Arabians

• Breeder of National Halter Champions • All time leading breeder of English horses • All time leading breeder of Western horses • 70% of the show horses winning today carry Varian blood Arroyo Grande, California (805) 489-5802 | varianarab@aol.com

W W W. VA R I A N A R A B I A N S . C O M

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264A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

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AND

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IrIsh Born & raIsed!

Purebred Arabian Horses Young stock for sale - Reasonably priced Photo: Zygmunt (*Ganges x Zuzanna)

Mrs. Mickey Hegg Bordwin, Mountrath, Co. Laois, Ireland mickeyhegg@aol.com Cell: 353-87-6937634 • Home: 353-57-87-56435

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Volume 43, No. 4 | 265A


Your Run For The Roses Will Be Hard-Earned! adver dver tise your U.s. National winners inners in

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1-800-248-4637 w w w. a h t i m e s . c o m 266A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Volume 43, no. 4 | 267A


268A | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


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v o L . 4 3 , n o .7

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Stallion Issue • 2012 Futurity Roundup Call today for more information on how to be included. 1-800-248-4637 or 952-492-3213

w w w. a htimes.c om Volume 43, No. 4 | 269A


Index Of Advertisers

A ABCCA ........................................................................................... 258A, 259A Acevedo Arabians ....................................................14-15ArabInt’l, 26ArabInt’l Adandy Farm.....................................................................................147A-157A AHT Beautiful Baby Contest Voting ...................................................... 120AA AHT Design .............................................................................................. 66AA AHT Online Horse Auction ..................................................................... 58AA AHT Subscriptions ....................................................................... 268A, 278AA AHT U.S. National Coverage ................................266A-267A, 276AA-277AA AHT Upcoming Features ........................................................................ 150AA Al Shahania Stud .................................................................FCAA, 8AA-12AA Aljassimya Farm .................................................................................. 9A, 57AA Allen, Jeffrey................................................................................................150A Alvey Performance Horses ..........................................................................179A Anderson, Jessica ...................................................................................... 160AA Andrews, Lynn ......................................................................................... 219AA Arabian Park Arabians ................................................................ 34-35ArabInt’l Arabian Soul Partners ....................................... 18-19ArabInt’l, 27-28ArabInt’l ArabianHorseGlobal.com .......................................................................... 13AA Arabians International............................. 16AA, 10-40ArabInt’l (26AA-56AA) Argent Farms ........................................... FCA, 20A-24A, 40A-44A, 60A-64A Aria Arabians ..................................................................................... 16-17MW Aria International ................................................................48A, 14-15ArabInt’l Armir Partners ............................................................................ 14-15ArabInt’l

B Baker, Justin & Deborah .......................................................................... 227AA Bartlet, Art ................................................................................. 102AA, 103AA Battaglia Farms ............................................................................... 272A, IBCA Bein Performance Horses ............................................................146AA-149AA Boylan, Anna .....................................................................................173A-175A

C Calvillo, Julio & Genevieve ...................................................................... 131AA Campbell, Barbara .......................................................................................151A Cedar Ridge Arabians, Inc. ........................................... 62MW, 121AA-142AA Celestial Arabians.............................................................................. 29ArabInt’l Chrishan Park ...................................................................................... 12A, 13A Clanton Performance Horses ......................................................143AA-145AA Colonial Wood Training Center .................................................211AA-220AA Congressional Farm.....................................................................................156A Cook, Kim & Scott .....................................................................................247A Cooper, Colleen .................................................................................173A-175A Cornerstone Ranch .................................................................................... 88AA Cotton Performance Horses ........................................................229AA-233AA Crescent Creek Farms .............................................................................. 215AA Crooks, Sierra ........................................................................................... 131AA Curley, Sheila & Jenna ............................................................................... 61AA

Equus Arabians .................................................................................. 4AA, 5AA Eyad Abdullah Mashat ...........................................16-17ArabInt’l, 23ArabInt’l

F Fazenda Floresta .......................................................IFCA-5A, 30MW-33MW Finney, Elaine ....................................................................................253A-255A Fisher, Wendy & Arielle ..............................................................................154A Flood Show Horses .................................................................... 260AA, 261AA Flynn, L.A. .......................................................... 96AA, 97AA, 108AA, 109AA Foster, Lori ............................................................................................... 100AA Franklin, Diane..................................................................................204A-206A Frierson Atkinson.......................................................................... 265A, 275AA

G Gallún Farms, Inc............................................................................... 8AA, 9AA Garlands ............................................................................................181A-189A Garvis, Leslie.............................................................................. 104AA, 105AA Getter, Judy .................................................................................................189A Ginter, Rachel ...............................................................................................39A Glans, Paul ......................................................................................................65 Goodrow, Richard & Justine ....................................................................51MW Green Acres Ranch, Inc ..............................................................................146A Guzzo/Rivero Arabians Worldwide ..................................................... 45A-51A

H HA Toskcan Sun LLC .............................................................. 282AA, IBCAA Haas, Betsy & Steve ....................................................................................180A Hagale Family, The .............................................................................. 12A, 13A Halbrook Arabians ...................................................................................58MW Hansen, Chuck & Erin ..................................................................... 39ArabInt’l Haras Don Piero ......................................................38-39MW, 48MW, 60MW Haras La Catalina ....................................................................................52MW Haras Los Palmares............................................................................ 16-17MW Haras Mayed ...................................................................................... 14-15MW Harris, Pam .................................................................................................179A Haug, Eric & Deborah......................................................................200A-203A Hazlewood Arabians .................................................................................BCAA Hegg, Mrs. Mickey........................................................................ 265A, 275AA Hennessey Arabian Partners LLC ............................................. 162AA, 163AA Holloway, Sheree & Alex ......................................................................... 214AA Hunt, Barbara Lynn ....................................................................................183A

I Iron Horse Farms ............................................................................. 158A, 159A

J Jerland Farms ............................................................................................. BCA Jones, Melissa Campbell..............................................................................151A Joy Horses ................................................................................................63MW Joyner Arabians ........................................................................................ 183AA

D

K

Dawson, Tammie ...................................................................................... 227AA Dazzo Arabians LLC .................................................................. 36-37ArabInt’l Dolby, Toni & Michael .............................................................. 128AA, 135AA Doran, Cheryl .............................................................................................246A Dumont, Francis & Monica .........................................................................3AA

Kern, David & Olivia ............................................................................... 228AA Kiesner Training ..........................................................................151AA-164AA Klein, Jim ................................................................................................. 218AA Knipe, Ken & Susan ....................................................................................249A Koch, Laura .................................................................................... 94AA, 95AA

E

L

El Nabila Initiative...................................................................... 12-13ArabInt’l

Langhlas, Jennifer..........................................................................................79A

270A | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


Larson, Claire and Margaret ........................................................................FCA Larson, Kara ............................................................................................. 134AA Lau, Vickie ............................................................................................... 106AA Leavitt Arabians LLC .................................................................................207A Liberty Arabians Ltd....................................................................................2AA Longuini Horse Training .....................................................................IFCA-5A Lowe Show Horse Centre.................................................................190A-198A Lurken, Lucky & Raegen ............................................................ 10-11ArabInt’l Lyons, Merrillee .....................................................................148A, 152A, 153A

M Magnum Arabians 85AA Maher, Sean................................................................................................ 86AA Mala, Alayna ...............................................................................................155A Marie, Jeannie....................................................................................173A-175A Marino Arabians ............................................................. 34-35MW, 54-56MW Maroon Fire Arabians ................................................................... 265A, 275AA Maximuck, Nancy .............................................................................250A-252A MC Arabians .............................................................................. 30-31ArabInt’l McNeely, Shirley & Walter .............................................................. 176A, 177A Mengle, John ............................................................................................ 226AA Messerli, Blake .........................................................................................45MW Michael Byatt Arabians................................................. 14A, 15A, 10AA-12AA Midwest .....IFCA-5A, 9A, 14-23MW (94A-103A), 32-64MW (112A-144A), 145A Miller, Bruce ................................................................................................186A Miller, Lucinda ............................................................................................187A Moore, Tom & Liz ................................................................................... 130AA Morton, Janice & Laura ............................................................. 132AA, 133AA Moss, Michele .......................................................................................... 216AA Mulawa Arabian Stud ....................................................................... 40ArabInt’l Murray, Matt .................................................................................. 72AA, 73AA Mutschelknaus, Darrell & Melissa ................................................................78A Mystic Sands Arabians ............................................................................47MW

N New Vision Farm ....................................................................................... 80AA North Arabians ........................................................................... 20-21ArabInt’l

Rohara Arabians, LLC ....................................................................67AA-93AA Rohl Arabians ...............................................................................................47A Rolyn & Judy Schmid ................................................................. 32-33ArabInt’l Rooker Training Stable ...............................................................165AA-182AA Rosa, Eric ....................................................................................................208A Ross Tarkington Stables ................................................................................39A Russka Farms LLC .................................................................................. 217AA

S Sanders, Bert .................................................................................. 94AA, 95AA Shackelford, Don & Kim ......................................................................... 161AA Shafer Arabians ...........................................................................222AA-225AA Shariff RCA Partnership .................................................................... 36-37MW Shatila Arabians ............................................................................................46A Showtime Training Center ................................................................169A-180A Siemon Stables ............................................................................221AA-228AA Silver Aspen Ranch .....................................................................................198A Silver Stag ...................................................................................................149A Smoky Mountain Park Arabians .......................................................... 16A-19A Southern Oaks Farm ..............................................................170A-172A, 178A Springwater Farms LLC ...................................................................245A-255A Stachowski Farm, Inc. .......................................................33A, 282AA, IBCAA Stankovic, Dean........................................................................................ 101AA Starline Arabians LLC ................................................................152AA-159AA Stone Ridge Arabians....................................................................................11A Strand’s Arabian Stables.........................................................25A, 94AA, 95AA Strawberry Banks Farm ........................................................................ 26A-32A Szymanski, Jessie .........................................................................................188A

T Ted Carson At Butler Farms Training Center ...............................IFCAA-5AA The Hat Lady ............................................................................... 264A, 274AA Timberidge Family LLP ............................................................ 212AA, 213AA Tobin, Alyson ............................................................................................. 87AA Tshampagne Arabians .................................................................... 76AA, 77AA Tyler, Elizabeth ................................................................................ 176A, 177A

V

Oak Ridge Arabians ........ 18-21MW, 44MW, 53MW, 56MW, 59MW, 61MW Om El Arabian International ...................................................... 12-13ArabInt’l

Van Dyke, Les & Diane ...........................................................................46MW Varian Arabians ............................................................................. 264A, 274AA Vasconcelos Family, The ..................................................................... 40-41MW Vicki Humphrey Training Center .................................................97AA-111AA

P

W

Pannonia Arabians ........................................................................................49A Paradise Farms ............................................................................................168A Pastorino, Daniel & Fabiana ...................................................................49MW Pay-Jay Arabians ........................................................................... 264A, 274AA Pegasus Arabians ............................................................................... 22ArabInt’l Perkins, Suzanne & Perry..................................................................... 50A-51A Polcsan, Kathy & Steve ...............................................................................182A Powell Training Center ...............................................................236AA-243AA Prestige Farms LLC ....................................................................... 14AA, 15AA Price Performance Horses .................................................................... 34A-38A Price, Ray or Lynn..........................................................................61AA- 63AA

Weegens, Todd & Glena ..........................................................................50MW Weiler, Megan & Carolyn .......................................................................... 60AA West Desert Arabians .............................................................................. 183AA Westridge Farms ............................................................................ 64AA, 65AA Whelihan Arabian Farms ..................................................................199A-210A Wilkins Livestock Insurers, Inc..................................................... 265A, 275AA Wilms Arabians ................................................................................ 38ArabInt’l Winer, Maddy ............................................................................................ 83AA Wolfe Performance Horses .................................................................. 76A-79A

O

Q Quarry Hill Farm .......................................................................... 265A, 275AA

R R. Kirk Landon Trust LLC ..................................... 70AA-75AA, 82AA, 84AA R.O. Lervick Arabians .................................................................. 264A, 274AA Rae-Dawn Arabians ................................................................................. 6A, 7A Rancho Sonado ................................................................................ 184A, 211A Rash, Ron & Becky .....................................................................................185A Regency Cove Farms .................................................................................BCAA Rock Ledge Arabians ......................................................................59AA-63AA

www.ahtimes.com Volume 43, No. 4 | 271A


&On To Tulsa!

HEadEd to FrEEdom Hall

2-t ime n ational c hampion SECOND SIGHT with new amateur owner e lizaBeth p izzonia

W W W. B at ta g l i a Fa r m s . c o m ScottSdale, arizona • 480-585-9112 • cell: 480-748-1609 B oB B attaglia • r uSS V ento J r . (i n

memoria in aeterna )


GOTTA WEAR SHADES with S uSan D reScher -M ulzet

with

CEY HEY g aBrielle S itoMer

AFIRES VISION K aren S tull

DOUBLE VISIONN with S herry l ayne

with

with

INFINITY CSP S uSan D reScher -M ulzet

AGADOR SPARTAGUS with B oB B attaglia

EA GALAXY o livia S tull

with

with

ASTRO MAN S uSan D reScher -M ulzet


Wishing all the Khadraj and Giovanni kids success at the US Nationals

Impacting the breed, one win at a time.

The Larry and Shelley Jerome Family :: 715.537.5413 :: www.jerland.com Larry Jerome - 715.205.0357 - larry.jerome@jerland.com Mike Van Handel - 651.269.2972 - mike.vanhandel@jerland.com

Arabian Horse Times Vol. 43, No. 4A  
Arabian Horse Times Vol. 43, No. 4A  

Volume A September 2012