Page 1

September AA 2010 $7.50


*Dakar El Jamaal x Majalis

Arabian Senior Stallions Breeding 6 & Over

1

Argent Farms proudly presents its

Contenders

Andy Sellman 92 County Road F, River Falls, WI USA 54022 Office - 715-425-9001 www.ArgentFarms.com

Photos by Stuart Vesty


Pyro Thyme SA x Jullye Jones JCA

*Emigrant x Elcantara

Jackpot Yearling Fillies

Arabian Senior Mares Breeding 6 & Over

9.

Pstrategy x LV Markelle

Jackpot Yearling Fillies

2

*Marwan Al Shaqab x Palitrina *Al Lahab GASB x Om El Beneera

Jackpot Yearling Fillies

Arabian Junior Stallions Breeding 3-5 Years

10.

3

11.


Falcon BHF x GF Simply Magic

Arabian Junior Mares Breeding 3-5 Years

*Marwan Al Shaqab x Ames Mirage

Jackpot Yearling Colts

*Marwan Al Shaqab x Crysstal Echo

Arabian Futurity Fillies

Eden C x RD Fabreanna

Jackpot Yearling Colts

MPA Giovanni x Miss America I

Arabian Futurity Fillies

7.

5.

8.

6.


Falcon BHF x GF Simply Magic

Arabian Junior Mares Breeding 3-5 Years

*Marwan Al Shaqab x Ames Mirage

Jackpot Yearling Colts

*Marwan Al Shaqab x Crysstal Echo

Arabian Futurity Fillies

Eden C x RD Fabreanna

Jackpot Yearling Colts

MPA Giovanni x Miss America I

Arabian Futurity Fillies

7.

5.

8.

6.


Pyro Thyme SA x Jullye Jones JCA

*Emigrant x Elcantara

Jackpot Yearling Fillies

Arabian Senior Mares Breeding 6 & Over

9.

Pstrategy x LV Markelle

Jackpot Yearling Fillies

2

*Marwan Al Shaqab x Palitrina *Al Lahab GASB x Om El Beneera

Jackpot Yearling Fillies

Arabian Junior Stallions Breeding 3-5 Years

10.

3

11.


Nadir I x Prima Dona KA

Arabian Geldings AAOTH

Enzo x Donatella Versace

Half-Arabian Jackpot Yearling Fillies

12.

13.


1.

2.

Mazkarade *Dakar El Jamaal x Majalis Owner Doug Dahmen of Santa Maria, CA 2010 Region 10 Champion Stallion

*Euscera *Emigrant x Elcantara Owner Manny Vierra of Brentwood, CA 2010 Region 18 Champion Mare

Arabian Senior Stallions Breeding 6 & Over

Arabian Senior Mares Breeding 6 & Over

6.

Miss Giovanna MPA Giovanni x Miss America I Owners Duane & Patricia Dieckman of Osseo, WI 2010 Region 10 Champion Mare 2010 Canadian National Champion Futurity Filly

7.

Sir Marwan CRF *Marwan Al Shaqab x Ames Mirage Owner Cedar Ridge Arabians of Jordan, MN 2010 Region 6 Champion Yearling Colt Arabian Jackpot Yearling Colts/Geldings

Arabian Futurity Fillies Breeding

Contenders

Andy Sellman 92 County Road F, River Falls, WI USA 54022 Office - 715-425-9001 www.ArgentFarms.com


3.

4.

Om El Al Azeem *Al Lahab GASB x Om El Beneera Owner Om El Arab International of Santa Ynez, CA 2010 Arabian World Cup Champion Senior Breeding Stallion 4-Year-Old

RD Fabreanna Falcon BHF x GF Simply Magic Owners Claire & Margaret Larson of Tea, SD 2007 U.S. National Champion Yearling Filly 2009 U.S. Reserve National Champion Futurity Filly (tied for first)

Arabian Junior Stallions Breeding 3-5

Arabian Junior Mares Breeding 3-5

8.

Fabian TRF Eden C x RD Fabreanna Owner David Ross of Lancefield, Australia 2010 Region 10 Champion Yearling Colt

9.

WC Jasmine Pyro Thyme SA x Jullye Jones JCA Owners Claire & Margaret Larson of Tea, SD 2010 Scottsdale Champion Junior Yearling Filly 2010 Region 10 Champion Yearling Filly

5.

Forever Fleurtatious *Marwan Al Shaqab x Crysstal Echo Owner David Ross of Lancefield, Australia 2010 Scottsdale Champion Three-Year-Old Filly Arabian Futurity Fillies Breeding

10.

Psolitaire Pstrategy x LV Markelle Owner Belvedere Farm of Dallas, GA 2010 Region 14 Reserve Champion Yearling Filly Arabian Jackpot Yearling Fillies

Arabian Jackpot Yearling Colts/Geldings Arabian Jackpot Yearling Fillies

11.

12.

Pamila *Marwan Al Shaqab x Palitrina Owner The Baahir Group & Michael Byatt of Houston, TX 2010 Region 18 Champion Yearling Filly

For The Record KA Nadir I x Prima Dona KA Owner Angela Larson of River Falls, WI 2010 World Cup Supreme Gold Champion Gelding 2010 Region 10 Champion Gelding Open & AAOTH

Arabian Jackpot Yearling Fillies

Arabian Gelding In Hand AAOTH

13.

Dionea PA Enzo x Donatella Versace Owners Claire and Margaret Larson of Tea, SD 2010 Scottsdale Supreme Champion Half Arabian 2010 Region 10 Champion H/A Yearling Filly H/A Jackpot Yearling Fillies


September 2010 AA

Contents 2010 AMATEUR

18AA

Cover Story: Marwan Al Magnifficoo by Colleen Scott

SNAPSHOTS 76AA

2010 U.S. Nationals Preview—Tulsa Rocks! Part II by Linda White

126AA 126AA 174AA

2010 Amateur Snapshots, Part II The Evolution Of An Arabian Horseman—Gordon Potts by Mary Kirkman

210AA

The Arabian Horse In History—Captain Sadleir’s Reluctant Odyssey, Part II by Andrew K. Steen

218AA

The Black Stallion Literacy Project: Inspiring Kids To Love Reading by Linda White

222AA

222AA

Paul Heiman—Impossible Dreams Come True by Linda White

232AA

Vicki Humphrey’s Africa by Linda White

242AA

Leaders Of The Times—Maddox Van Ryad And Gemini Acres by Colleen Scott

244AA

Poland And Horsefly Films by Jen Miller and Sophie Pegrum

254AA

Buying And Selling Horses 101, Part I by Joe Alberti

232AA

On The Cover:

Marwan Al Magnifficoo (Marwan Al Shaqab x Miraga WA), owned by David Zouch Ross, Australia. 8AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES

258AA

Times For Amateurs by Keri Schenter

260AA

A Leg Up by Heather Smith Thomas

263AA

Handy Horse Tips by Lee Bolles

264AA

Calendar Of Events

272AA

Looking Ahead

274AA

Index Of Advertisers


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www.arabianhorseinsurance.com 800-714-6773 Mortality

Medical/Surgical

Farm/Ranch Packages

Equine Liability

Excess/Umbrella Liability

SEP TEMBER 2010 | 9AA


ѱѱѱȝɄȨȽȝȘɄɑɜȣȐɜɑȨɉȵȐȃɑɄɬȽȨȽPɤȵɕǸѳ

2010 Scottsdale Grand Champion Stallion AOTH 2010 Scottsdale Reserve Champion Stallions Six & Seven Year Old 2010 Region 15 Champion Stallion Open & AAOTH

10AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


2010 Canadian National Champion Stallion AAOTH with Michelle Amrick 2010 Canadian National Top Ten Stallion with Joe Alberti

2010 U.S. NATIONAL STALLION CONTENDER OPEN WITH JOE ALBERTI & AAOTH WITH MICHELLE AMRICK

Proudly owned and offerred at stud by Windridge Equestrian Centre • St. Mary’s, PA Standing at and trained by Chestnuthill Arabians – Joe Alberti • Gilbert, PA voice 610.972.9628 • fax 610.681.8063 • www.chestnuthillarabians.com *Magnum Chall HVP x Pretty Tricky, by Padrons Psyche 2004 Purebred Stallion • Sweepstakes Nominated Sire • SCID & CA Clear

&KHVWQXWKLOO HVWQXWKLOO HVW WQXWWKLOOO Arabians SEP TEMBER 2010 | 11AA


ICE

U.S. National Contenders

+

(Premis, by Promotion+ x Sultan’s Summer Breeze)

and Leslie Garvis 2009 U.S. National Top Ten Half-Arabian Show Hack Open 2010 Scottsdale Top Ten Half-Arabian Show Hack ATR 2010 Region 15 Reserve Champion Half-Arabian Show Hack ATR 2010 Region 15 Top Five Half-Arabian Show Hack Open 2009 Scottsdale Top Ten Half-Arabian Country AOTR 2009 Region 12 Top Five Half-Arabian Show Hack Open 2009 Region 15 Top Five Half-Arabian Show Hack Open 2009 Region 15 Top Five Half-Arabian Show Hack ATR U.S. National Top Ten Half-Arabian Show Hack AAOTR

Competing in:

Half-Arabian English Show Hack AAOTR Half-Arabian English Show Hack Open

Trainer Steve White 1001 West Hwy. 316, Citra, Florida 32113 352-595-4265 • Fax 352-595-1738

12AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


U.S. National Contenders

(Khat+++ x Mount Joy’s Miss Rhetta)

and Leslie Garvis

2010 Region 15 Top Five Half-Arabian English Pleasure AOTR 2009 Scottsdale Top Ten Half-Arabian English Pleasure AOTR 2009 Scottsdale Top Ten Half-Arabian Pleasure Driving 2009 Region 12 Top Five Half-Arabian Pleasure Driving 2009 Region 15 Top Five Half-Arabian English Pleasure Youth National Top Ten Half-Arabian Park Horse Scottsdale Top Ten (3rd) Half-Arabian Park Horse

Competing in:

Half-Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over

Trainer Steve White 1001 West Hwy. 316, Citra, Florida 32113 352-595-4265 • Fax 352-595-1738

SEP TEMBER 2010 | 13AA


14AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


SEP TEMBER 2010 | 15AA


16AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


SEP TEMBER 2010 | 17AA


MARWAN AL MAGNIFFICOO

Cover Story: y:

by Collen Scott

Marwan Al Magnifficoo (Marwan Al Shaqab x Pacific Echo, by Echo Magnifficoo)

From his home in Victoria, Australia, David Zouch Ross is scouring the ends of the earth to locate the best Arabian pedigrees with the intention of building a legendary breeding program. Lucky for Arabian enthusiasts on this side of the pond, he has chosen to house many of his prized Arabians in the United States at Shada, Inc., Elk River, Minn.

18AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES

A long-time student of bloodlines and already a breeder of highly successful ponies abroad and in the U.S., Ross began his foray into the Arabian world several years ago with the acquisition of Marwan Al Magnifficoo. Should anyone wonder how and why a breeder of Welsh Ponies, English Riding Ponies and Australian stock horses would become interested in Arabians, one needs only


MARWAN AL MAGNIFFICOO

remember how influential the Arabian breed has been in the development of all horse breeds, including those in which Ross was already intimately familiar. He says, “Most of the horses I’ve bred over the past three decades have Arabian blood in them already.” So, when Ross decided he was ready to add Arabians to his breeding repertoire, he did so like he began his other breeding programs—by carefully studying bloodlines. Searching websites, he eventually landed on Marwan Al Magnifficoo (Marwan Al Shaqab x Pacific Echo), whom he viewed via video as a yearling over the Internet. Ross requested additional footage of the colt with specific requests to see him moving toward and away from the camera at different gaits. Then owners Milton and Leanne Davis complied with Ross’ requests and produced the video with trainer/handler Jeff Schall. They sent it to Ross, who was immediately sold. “He has the bloodlines I was looking for, had very correct conformation at all gaits, and had such a beautiful neck—probably the prettiest I’ve ever seen,” he says. Ross’ evaluation was right on the money, and the colt began proving it quickly for his new owner. He was Top Ten at the 2007 U.S. Nationals in the Arabian Yearling Colt/Gelding Breeders Sweepstakes Championship Class. Then in 2008, at Scottsdale, he won the Arabian 2-Year-Old Colt Class and then took the Reserve title in the junior championship. Schall wasn’t particularly surprised, as he knows the stallion has the makings of a great one. “He is unique. It is so rare to have one horse embody such scope, stretch and elasticity combined with incredible beauty.” Since then, the highly acclaimed and handsome stallion has been quite busy producing winning offspring. They’ve been proving themselves already in the show ring with Princess Grace C (x Amazing Grace C) capturing a Scottsdale Top Ten in the Arabian Breeding Yearling Fillies of April 16 - July 31 class as well as the Region 8 Champion Arabian Yearling Filly title. Signiffico (x SW Regalia Rose) was named Region 11 Arabian Champion Yearling Colt/Gelding, and Magnifficoos Joy VA (x LLC Joyful) was in the ribbons at Region 10 in the Arabian Yearling Fillies class. This is quite good considering his first foal crop numbered

just a handful in the U.S., and there were so many champions among them. The stallion’s appeal is not only here, but also abroad. According to Ross, he has covered more than 60 mares this year, and there is progeny expected in the Middle East, Australia, Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, and Qatar. “We’re very excited about the breeders that have selected Marwan Al Magnifficoo as a sire,” says Schall. “Sometimes, when you breed, you have to give something up in order to get something else, but not with this stallion. I think you have a chance to get everything with him.” Ross continues amassing his own group of mares and has searched high and low to find them. He is especially intrigued with the Ali Jamaal line and believes it will cross well with his stallion. Just recently, he acquired the lovely Scala El Jamaal (Ali Jamaal x SS Marietta), a former Austrian Senior National Champion, and Lolah El Javier (Javier El Jamaal x Lara El Ludjin) from LaMovida Arabians in Austria. He has also purchased the colt Armando El Aryes (Aryes El Ludjin x Anais El Bri) from LaMovida. All three will be arriving on U.S. soil in the very near future. Ross says of Armando El Aryes, “He combines some of the most successful and proven bloodlines from around the world. His pedigree boasts no less than four crosses to the immortal Ali Jamaal, two to the legendary Bey Shah, and two to the charismatic El Shaklan. His dam was recently crowned Austrian National Champion Mare, gaining the highest points of the entire show.” Ross is bringing the mares from halfway around the world to the U.S. to be bred to Marwan Al Magnifficoo, and Armando El Aryes will be bred to future Marwan Al Magnifficoo daughters. The results, he firmly believes, will be nothing short of fantastic. “I’ve always had a passion for Marwan Al Magnifficoo and his pedigree, as well as a great fascination with Ali Jamaal offspring. I think we have a winning combination that will produce the kind of Arabian horses that will be highly sought throughout the world,” Ross concludes. ■

SEP TEMBER 2010 | 19AA


Noonday Moon

+/

(Rohara Moon Storm+// x Vallejo Cashmere)

& Laurie Husband CONTENDING IN U.S. NATIONAL HALF-ARABIAN WESTERN PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & OVER Unanimous Champion Region 1 HA/AA Western Pleasure AATR Champion Region 1 HA/AA Western Pleasure AOTR OWNED BY: Laurie Husband & Sharon Ames TRAINED BY: Chris Culbreth www.culbrethequine.com

20AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


SEP TEMBER 2010 | 21AA


M U LT I - N AT I O N A L C H A M P I O N

(KRA Afire Afi W Works k x Dorian D i Vogue) V )

2009 U.S. National Champion H/A Country English Pleasure Junior Horse 2010 Canadian National Reserve Champion H/A Country Pleasure Driving 2010 Scottsdale Reserve Champion H/A Country Pleasure Driving 2010 Region 9 Unanimous Champion H/A Country Pleasure Driving

Owned by 5G&M Limited Partnership

H/A Country Pleasure Driving with Jason Krohn

www.OakHavenArabians.com 22AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


(Afire Bey V x RAH Ghaza)

2010 Region 9 Reserve Champion Arabian English Pleaasure

Owned by Winding Creek Arabians, Inc.

Arabian English Pleasure with Jason Krohn

www.OakHavenArabians.com SEP TEMBER 2010 | 23AA


M U LT I - N AT I O N A L C H A M P I O N

( Toskabi x Dolly)

2010 Canadian National Champion H/A Pleasure Driving AAOTD 2010 Canadian National Reserve Champion H/A English Pleasure AAOTR 18-39 2010 Region 9 Champion H/A English Pleasure AOTR 40 & Over

H/A English Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over and H/A Pleasure Driving AAOTD with Martha McCollough

H/A Pleasure Driving with Blake Krohn

MULTI-NATIONAL CHAMPION

(Pryme Thyme x Gladys Brown)

2010 Canadian National Champion Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 18-39 2009 Canadian National Reserve Champion Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 18-39

Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 18-39 with Lauren Grabski

www.OakHavenArabians.com Owned by 5 G & M Limited Partnership

24AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


M U LT I - N AT I O N A L C H A M P I O N

(Alimah JJustice x Breezy Dolly)

2010 Unanimous Canadian National Champion H/A Park Horse 2010 Scottsdale Champion H/A Park Horse 2010 Youth National Reserve Champion H/A Park Horse JTR

Owned by Double R Ranch

H/A Park Horse AAOTR with Laurin Remphrey

H/A Park Horse with Jason Krohn

www.OakHavenArabians.com SEP TEMBER 2010 | 25AA


N AT I O N A L C H A M P I O N

(Afire (Af fi B Bey V x Tosk T kB Bey))

2010 Canadian National Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure Junior Horse

Owned by Blake Krohn and Nancy Branch

Arabian Country English Pleasure Junior Horse with Jason Krohn

www.OakHavenArabians.com 26AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


( Toskabi x Chow)

2010 Scottsdale Top Ten H/A Country English Pleasure Junior Horse

H/A Country English Pleasure Maturity with Martha McCollough

H/A Country English Pleasure Junior Horse with Jason Krohn

(ZZ Bop x Mi Contessa Bey)

H/A English Pleasure Futurity with Blake Krohn

www.OakHavenArabians.com Owned by 5 G & M Limited Partnership

SEP TEMBER 2010 | 27AA


M U LT I - N AT I O N A L C H A M P I O N

(IXL Aroundofaploz A d f l x Bey B Melodye) M l d )

2010 Youth National Reserve Champion Arabian Country Pleasure Driving JTR 17 & Under 2010 Youth National Reserve Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure JOTR 2010 Region 9 Reserve Champion Arabian Country Pleasure Driving ATD

Owned by Silver Wind Arabians

Arabian Country English Pleasure 55 and Over with Donna Hughes

Arabian Country Pleasure Driving with Jason Krohn

www.OakHavenArabians.com 28AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


(Baske Afire x Certified Gold)

2010 Region 9 Top Five H/A Hunter Pleasure Junior Horse

Owned by Jacquelyn Bailey

H/A Hunter Pleasure Maturity with Jacquelyn Bailey

H/A Hunter Pleasure Junior Horse with Blake Krohn

www.OakHavenArabians.com SEP TEMBER 2010 | 29AA


( Toskabi x BES Baskin Glory)

2009 Region 9 Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure JTR

Arabian Country English Pleasure Junior Horse with Jason Krohn

Arabian Country English Pleasure Matruity with Jayne Krohn Owned by Trey Kendrick and Blake Krohn

( Toskabi x BES Baskin Glory)

Arabian English Pleasure Futurity with Blake Krohn

Owned by Billy Stanfield and Blake Krohn

www.OakHavenArabians.com 30AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


SEP TEMBER 2010 | 31AA


32AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


SEP TEMBER 2010 | 33AA


34AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


SEP TEMBER 2010 | 35AA


36AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


Master Jullyen V

Marwan Al Magnifficoo

Odyssey SC

MPA Giovanni

Marjestic WA

Brixx IA SEP TEMBER 2010 | 1AA


Jeff and Roxanne

Jerry, Anissa and Felicia

Dave and Sheila

Jessica Stylski Austin Miller

2AA 2 • SHADA | AR ABIAN | AR ABIAN HORSEHORSE TIMES TIMES


Expanding Excellence... The Arabian Community has come to expect only the best from Shada—beginning as talented amateur handlers, memories of the “Spectacular Events” in the 90’s, numerous show stopping National achievements, service unparalleled, and complete with an “all hands on deck” family commitment! With the beginning of a new decade, there is an extra level of excitement and energy this year,

which has seen the expansion of their already functional and stunning facility to ever better serve their clientele. A key addition to the familiar joyful faces at Shada; Dave and Sheila, Jeff and Roxanne, Jerry and Anissa, and Austin Miller is breeding manager Jessica Stylski. Born and raised in Minnesota, Jessica joined the Shada “Red Zone” following a four-year position in Texas. Impeccable timing, given the demand for the incredible roster of stallions at Shada is forever growing!

Shada, Inc. • Elk River, MN 55330 Ph: 763-441-5849 E-mail: sshadainc@aol.com • www.ShadaArabians.com

SEP TEMBER SEP TEMBER 2010 | SHADA 2010 | 3AA •3


G N I S O P C OM

y r a r o p Contem S ...

Princess Grace C

IM AGE

Just Cause

LL Mailan Infallible Artistry Of Marwan

Signiffico Mia Magnifficoo IA

WC Ciao Al Magnifficoo

S Shada, Inc. • Elk River, MN 55330 Ph: 763-441-5849 P E-mail: sshadainc@aol.com • www.ShadaArabians.com E

4AA 4 • SHADA | AR ABIAN | AR ABIAN HORSEHORSE TIMES TIMES


MARWAN AL SHAQAB X PACIFIC ECHO, BY ECHO MAGNIFFICOO

Multi Program Nominated Sire CA and SCID Clear

Owned by David Zouch Ross Lancefield, Australia Ph: 011-613-5429-1467

SEP TEMBER SEP TEMBER 2010 | SHADA 2010 | 5AA •5


Exxperience the Exxtreme...

National Champion

*Gazal Al Shaqab x Bella Versace

Multi Program Nominated Sire CA and SCID Clear

Shada, Shada, Inc. Inc. • Elk • Elk River, River, MN MN 55330 55330 Standing at Shada, Inc. • Elk River, MN 55330 5 • Ph: 7 763-441-5849 Ph: Ph: 763-441-5849 763-441-5849 E ilsshadainc@aol.com sshadainc@aol.com h d i @ l • www.ShadaArabians.com • www.Shada Sh d A Arabians.com bi m E-mail: E-mail: www.ShadaArabians.com

6AA 6 • SHADA | AR ABIAN | AR ABIAN HORSEHORSE TIMES TIMES


Brixx IA x Kaiynda Special 2010 Filly

Owned H River, B Arabians Shada, Inc. •by Elk MN 55330 John Hilliard and Christine Bruce • Austin, TX and Santa CA Ph:Ynez, 763-441-5849 E-mail: sshadainc@aol.comwww.HBArabians.com • www.ShadaArabians.com

SEP TEMBER SEP TEMBER 2010 | SHADA 2010 | 7AA •7


E MERGING AS THE MOST

EXOTIC AND BEAUTIFUL IN ARABIAN TYPE ...

Audacious PS x Amareea, by Echo Magnifficoo

2009 U.S. NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION STALLION 2010 LAS VEGAS ARABIAN BREEDERS WORLD CUP SUPREME SILVER CHAMPION SENIOR STALLION S Shada, Inc. • Elk River, MN 55330 Ph: 763-441-5849 P E-mail: sshadainc@aol.com • www.ShadaArabians.com E

8AA 8 • SHADA | AR ABIAN | AR ABIAN HORSEHORSE TIMES TIMES


Owned by Multi Program Nominated Sire CA and SCID Clear

Noel Bosse • Olalla, WA • ntalltimber@aol.com Ph: 253-853-6444 • 253-853-4024

SEP TEMBER SEP TEMBER 2010 | SHADA 2010 | 9AA •9


U.S. National Champion Junior Stallion with Jeff Schall

MCA

MARWAN AL SHAQAB X MCA ETERNAL SECRET, BY ETERNETY CA and SCID Clear

Shada, Shada, Inc. Inc. • Elk • Elk River, River, MN MN 55330 55330 Ph: Ph: 763-441-5849 763-441-5849 E-mail: E-mail: sshadainc@aol.com sshadainc@aol.com • www.ShadaArabians.com • www.ShadaArabians.com

10AA 10 • SHADA | AR ABIAN | AR ABIAN HORSEHORSE TIMES TIMES


OwnedInc. by Mountain Classic Arabians Shada, • Elk River, MN 55330 Gary Debra Buxton Ph:and 763-441-5849 Eden, UT E-mail: sshadainc@aol.com • www.ShadaArabians.com

SEP TEMBER SEP TEMBER 2010 | SHADA 2010 | 11AA • 11


2010 U.S. National Futurity Contender

Marwan Al Shaqab NYN Hisani NYN Imara Versace GH Maryn GH Venture Enjoue Bey Chante

Shada, Inc. • Elk River, MN 55330 Ph: 763-441-5849 E-mail: sshadainc@aol.com • www.ShadaArabians.com

12AA 12 • SHADA | AR ABIAN | AR ABIAN HORSEHORSE TIMES TIMES

2010 Regional Champion Stallion Open and AOTH 2010 Canadian National Top Ten Futurity Colt Multi Program Nominated CA and SCID Clear


All Great Stallions Have A

Moment ...

DEFINING

Zhanna Marie

GH Maryn x Emmelyne, by First Cyte+ Arabian Breeders Sweepstakes U.S. and Canadian Halter Futurities 2011 Minnesota Breeders Auction Filly

Owned by Daly Pride Arabians, LLC Standing at Shada, Inc. • Elk River, MN 55330 • Ph: Edward and763-441-5849 Sarah Truitt E-mail: sshadainc@aol.com • www.ShadaArabians.com Loomis, CA

SEP TEMBER SEP TEMBER 2010 | SHADA 2010 | 13AA • 13


Shada, Shada, Inc. Inc. • Elk • Elk River, River, MN MN 55330 55330 Ph: Ph: 763-441-5849 763-441-5849 E-mail: E-mail: sshadainc@aol.com sshadainc@aol.com • www.ShadaArabians.com • www.ShadaArabians.com

14AA 14 • SHADA | AR ABIAN | AR ABIAN HORSEHORSE TIMES TIMES


Jullyen El Jamaal x Misti Morn V, by Audacious PS

Yearling Colt Sweepstakes Contender with Jeff Schall

Owned Lone Tree Farm Shada, Inc. •by Elk River, MN 55330 David and May Ph:Teresa 763-441-5849 Oconomowoc, WI E-mail: sshadainc@aol.com • www.ShadaArabians.com

SEP TEMBER SEP TEMBER 2010 | SHADA 2010 | 15AA • 15


Shada, Shada, Inc. Inc. • Elk • Elk River, River, MN MN 55330 55330 Ph: Ph: 763-441-5849 763-441-5849 E-mail: E-mail: sshadainc@aol.com sshadainc@aol.com • www.ShadaArabians.com • www.ShadaArabians.com

16AA 16 • SHADA | AR ABIAN | AR ABIAN HORSEHORSE TIMES TIMES


orn to be a Champion, Bred to be a

Sire.

Marwan Al Shaqab x Mirage WA, By Desert Heat VF

Multi Program Nominated SCID and CA Clear

Owned by LisaMN K. East Shada, Inc. • Elk River, 55330 Arabians of Qiran Al Sa’Dain, LLC Ph: 763-441-5849 215-620-7977 • •www.MarjesticWA.com E-mail:Ph: sshadainc@aol.com www.ShadaArabians.com

SEP TEMBER SEP TEMBER 2010 | SHADA 2010 | 17AA • 17


Shada, Inc. • Elk River, MN 55330 Ph: 763-441-5849 E-mail: sshadainc@aol.com • www.ShadaArabians.com

18AA 18 • SHADA | AR ABIAN | AR ABIAN HORSEHORSE TIMES TIMES


Shada, Inc. • Elk River, MN 55330 Ph: 763-441-5849 E-mail: sshadainc@aol.com • www.ShadaArabians.com

SEP TEMBER SEP TEMBER 2010 | SHADA 2010 | 19AA • 19


(Magnum Psyche x MA Unique, by Bey Shah)

U.S. National Stallion Contender wtih Jerry Schall

by Ford Farms, LLC Shada, Inc. • Elk River, MN 55330 Shada, Inc. Owned • Elk River, MNBrook 55330 Jerry & Heidi Bauer • Ramsey, MN Ph: 763-441-5849 Ph: 763-441-5849 612-812-6184 • jbauer@msn.com E-mail: sshadainc@aol.com • www.ShadaArabians.com E-mail: sshadainc@aol.comPh: • www.ShadaArabians.com

20AA 20 • SHADA | AR ABIAN | AR ABIAN HORSEHORSE TIMES TIMES


AA S Sabotaj b t j x LC Sinfonia, Si f i b by M Magnum Psyche P h

Multi Program Nominated Sire

U.S. National Futurity Colt Contender wtih Jerry Schall

Managed by

Zimmerman, MN Ph: 763-856-2190 arbucklearabians@aol.com

Owned by Lady Georgina Pelham Buenos Aries, Argentina Ph: 011-54-11-4-743-1571 cosufi@house.com.ar Standing at Shada, Inc. • Elk River, MN 55330 Ph: 763-441-5849 E-mail: sshadainc@aol.com • www.ShadaArabians.com

SEP TEMBER SEP TEMBER 2010 | SHADA 2010 | 21AA • 21


The Power Of Love Scottsdale Champion

DA Valentino x Bey Amore

Owned by Milestone Arabians Shada, Inc. • Elk River, MN 55330 Standing Stan aanndi ding ng aatt Sh Shada, haadda, Inc. • ElkSteve River,and MNDarla 55330 Miles • Ph: • Basehor, 763-441-5849 KS Ph: 763-441-5849 E-mail: EE --ma mail ma ilsshadainc@aol.com : ss ssshadainc@aol.com sha hada dain aiinnc@ao cc@ @ao aol.com m •Ph: www.ShadaArabians.com 816-769-7172 • www.MileStoneArabians.com E-mail: • www.ShadaArabians.com

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Shada, Shada,Inc. Inc.••Elk ElkRiver, River,MN MN55330 55330 Ph: Ph:763-441-5849 763-441-5849 E-mail: E-mail:sshadainc@aol.com sshadainc@aol.com••www.ShadaArabians.com www.ShadaArabians.com

SEP TEMBER SEP TEMBER 2010 | SHADA 2010 | 23AA • 23


Shada, Inc. • Elk River, MN 55330 Standing at Shada, Inc. • Elk River, MN 55330 • Ph: 763-441-5849 Ph: 763-441-5849 E-mail: sshadainc@aol.com • www.ShadaArabians.com

24AA 24 • SHADA | AR ABIAN | AR ABIAN HORSEHORSE TIMES TIMES


His Allure Has No Boundaries

Ajman Moniscione x Torrifficoo, by Echo Magnifficoo

Owned by Equine Associates Peter and Sheila Stewart • Port Angeles, WA Ph: 360-802-0346

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(Falcon BHF x Heiress Cometera, by Dream Quest)

2010 U.S. National Futurity Filly Contender with Jeff Schall

S Shada, Inc. • Elk River, MN 55330 Ph: 763-441-5849 P E-mail: sshadainc@aol.com • www.ShadaArabians.com E

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Owned by Luxemere Arabians


Pursuit of History— Seven Time National Champion

Returns To Tulsa 

Owned by Shuster Arabians, LLC Jason and Devon Shuster Inver Grove Heights, MN

Shada, Inc. • Elk River, MN 55330 Ph: 763-441-5849 E-mail: sshadainc@aol.com • www.ShadaArabians.com

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Sultry...

Maserati M ti WR x DAR Fire Fi BiAli

2009 Black Filly

Available for your consideration

Owned by Avalon Crest Shada, Inc. • Elk River, MN 55330 Standing at Shada, Inc. • Elk River, MN 55330 • Ph: 763-441-5849 9Andrew and Christine Steffens Ph: 763-441-5849 www.AvalonCrest.com E-mail: sshadainc@aol.com • www.ShadaArabians.com

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Maserati WR x Alora Gold

I was told I was a beautiful baby...

Take a Look at Me Now!

2010 Iowa Gold Star Reserve Champion Colt 2010 MN Breeders Auction Colt Owned by Prairie View Farm Ann and Punch Benson Maple Plain, MN

Shada, Inc. • Elk River, MN 55330 Ph: 763-441-5849 E-mail: sshadainc@aol.com • www.ShadaArabians.com

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Jullyen El Jamaal x Misti Morn V

U.S. U .S. N National ational FFuturity uturity FFilly illy C Contender ontender wwith ith JJerry erry SSchall chall

Shada, Inc. • Elk River, MN 55330 Ph: 763-441-5849 1-5849 E-mail: sshadainc@aol.com adainc@aol.com • www.ShadaArabians.com

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Owned by Lone Tree Farm David and Teresa May Oconomowoc,, WI W


Austin Miller There is always a fi ne balance when something works well. Indeed that is the case with Shada trainer Austin Miller. Austin has a special blend of professionalism and kind-heartedness that is admired by the Schall Family and Shada’s clients as well as their horses. As Albert

Einstein once said, “Strive not to be a success but rather to be of value.” Austin is of such great value that his success is eminent. You are welcome to join Austin and everyone who has become a part of the Shada “Red Zone.”

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The New VOGUE!

Armando El Aryes (Aryes El Ludjin x Anais El Bri) 2008 G 20 Grey S Stallion Sta alli llion Arabian Breeders Sweepstakes Minnesota Medallion Stallion Scottsdale Signature Stallion

Aryes El Ludjin

Anais El Bri

Bred by La Movida Arabians • Gerlinde and Ferdinand Huemer • Austria B Owned by David Zouch Ross • Lancefield, Australia • Ph: 011-613-5429-1467 O S Shada, Inc. • Ph: 763-441-5849 • E-mail: sshadainc@aol.com • www.ShadaArabians.com

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2010 U.S. Nationals Preview

Tulsa Rocks! Part II

by Linda White All systems are go for the 2010 U.S. Nationals, as the countdown has started. As noted in Part I of AHT’s U.S. Nationals Preview, there are several changes in the works for the show this year. From the shape of one of the arenas to procedure for showing halter horses, Tulsa exhibitors can expect to see more of the tweaks and alterations that have annually improved this end-of-theseason highlight.

experience, rather than the horse’s. Riders are eligible to compete in Select classes if, in the performance division in which they are competing, they have never won an AHA regional top five or better; an AHA national top ten or better; two AHA regional top fives in a Select class; or an AHA national top ten in a Select class. For complete information, see pages 124-126 of the 2010 U.S. Nationals Prize List.

As if all the popular old standard events aren’t enough of an attraction, this year’s Nationals boasts a new draw: the Select Rider division. With the ever-escalating level of competition in the amateur ranks, AHA has introduced a new, novice-friendly schedule of classes to make it easy for any Arabian enthusiast with an equine partner to get into the ring.

John Ryan, one of two Arabian Professional and Amateur Horseman’s Association liaisons with AHA’s National Show Commission, is optimistic about the reception that awaits the new classes. He notes that at Canadian Nationals this year, Select class participants accounted for 15 and 16 entries in many performance classes, a respectable showing for many disciplines. “Here at U.S. Nationals, I expect the Select classes to be very well attended this first year,” he says. “One of my customers is here with three horses, two of which she bred and raised herself, to show in several different Select classes. She’s happy because she will be competing against her peers, not against amateurs with more experience, mounted on well-known, ring-wise veteran show horses.

The requirements are simple. Select AATR classes are open to amateur riders on Arabians, Half-Arabians and Anglo-Arabians; the trick is, entry is based on the rider’s

“Terri Deering (The Hat Lady) and my wife, Christine, have both worked very hard to

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TULSA ROCKS

get sponsorships and support for the Select classes,” he adds, “and to encourage older and less experienced riders to give these classes a try. The Select concept is a great way of getting more people involved, and for creating a level playing field where these riders can succeed against more appropriate opponents. Professionals are prohibited from showing in the Select classes. This will also be a great way to extend the careers of experienced older show horses whose amateur riders may wish to move on or to try another discipline. Instead of ‘What are we going to do with this horse?’ there will be large numbers of less experienced Select-eligible riders looking for veteran campaigners who can teach them a thing or two. It’s a win-win situation.”

Getting The Timing Right Scheduling is another bugaboo that needs constant refining and re-thinking, as class offerings and immediate circumstances change. John and Christine Ryan, with input from Mary Jane Brown, handle most of the scheduling. This is a touchy, hard-to-do chore, and only individuals who have long show ring experience,

coupled with a grasp of the big picture, can or should tackle class scheduling. “We are a breed that has many talents,” Mary Jane Brown says. “Arabians can do a lot of things, and every one of those talents or gifts requires different footing. You have to separate the working western classes from the rail classes, for example, because of the incompatibility of their footing needs. For example, the Mustang arena has permanent dirt that can be dressed out to perfectly accommodate each working discipline. The other arenas have dirt over asphalt, which is perfectly workable if you keep in mind what’s under the dirt, what happens if it rains, and if you use the correct amount of dirt for each division.” Tulsa’s Expo Square is a year-round, multi-use facility. It has acres of stabling and hundreds of thousands of square feet of both indoor and covered outdoor space, as well as a variety of buildings that are constantly being improved to better accommodate the many divisions and disciplines to which Arabian horses lend themselves. The facility’s management remains eager to do what it takes to fulfi ll this horse show’s kaleidoscope of ongoing, ever-changing needs. For now, it works well, perhaps not perfectly, but very well.

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TULSA ROCKS

Bill Hughes

“It is what it is,” says Bill Hughes. “We’re getting closer to having it just what we need. It has more going for it than anyplace else we looked at. We aren’t perfect and neither is this facility; we will be here for awhile. We have a contract—but we always keep an eye open for something better, with more to offer. Being adequate for this horse show is a tall order.”

Can Good Shopping Right A Multitude of Wrongs? This will be the third time the U.S. National Arabian and Half-Arabian Championship Show has been held in Tulsa, and as Hughes says, each year’s show has been an improvement over the previous year’s. The likelihood of the 2010 show’s being more trouble-free than 2009’s is almost a sure thing. “Cooperative” and “conscientious” best describe the relationship between show planners and officials, and facilities management. Horse show visitors find more to do, more good restaurants, clubs, tourist attractions and great shopping opportunities every time they come to town. Arabian horse people may spend lots of money, but their insistence on “finest quality” and “most effective” pervades whatever they plan, purchase or undertake. Th is fits comfortably with the city’s mission and goals. Tulsa’s Visitors and Convention Bureau uses every possible means to fulfi ll the show committee’s and exhibitors’ desires. Most of Tulsa is glad to have such a large, revenuegenerating event in town, and this has boosted the horse shows credibility even with local skeptics. The noisy naysayers among the Arabian constituency have backed off, grudgingly conceding their approval. How can they not? They see happy people and positive improvements everywhere they look. Arabian horse folks will soon saddle up and head for their sport’s most prestigious annual event, knowing they need to get there well before October 22 to 30, when the event officially opens, no matter whether they’re a trainer with

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TULSA ROCKS

five performance horses, a commercial exhibitor with five above-ground pools to sell … or a strictly-spectator dad who has brought along three of his four kids and their grandmother. As two of the three children almost knock Grandma down, shoving their way past her into the motel room, he begins to doubt the wisdom of bringing this family combo with him to Tulsa—or anyplace else. His anxiety builds. All of Spectator Dad’s apprehension vanishes when he pulls into Expo Square’s gigantic parking lot. He sees that throngs of other spectators, exhibitors, trainers, and vendors are already on campus. As he looks for a parking place, he notices that the crowd seems to have taken on an almost ethereal glow. Spectator Dad understands intuitively that the glow is a natural consequence of the occasion. This Tulsa experience is forever going to distinguish them all. Hereafter, they can say proudly, “We attended the 2010 U.S. Nationals. They were held in Tulsa, Okla.” “This is what we work hard all year for!” says a jubilant John Ryan. “This is our Super Bowl!” ■

SEP TEMBER 2010 | 79AA


WITH STANLEY WHITE III Scottsdale Reserve Champion Western Pleasure Open Region 9 Top 5 Region 12 Top 5

WESTERN PLEASURE OPEN

At Nationals Watch For ... TA OCALA Purebred Western Pleasure Junior Horse MD DYNASTY OF FAME Purebred Western Pleasure Junior Horse and Western Pleasure Maturity VALLEJO CARAMEL CHIP Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Amateur 40 & Over DLC TOTAL ECLIPSE Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Amateur 40 & Over TAL LEXINGTON Purebred Hunter Pleasure Amateur 55 & Over

80AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


WITH STANLEY WHITE III U.S. National Top Ten HA Western Pleasure Open Region 9 Champion Region 12 Reserve Champion Youth National Champion HA Western Pleasure JO 14-17 HA WESTERN PLEASURE OPEN

Argyle, Texas

817.845.1065 Dennis & Linda Clark, Owners Stanley White III, Trainer

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5051 State Route 12 • Elma, WA, 98541 • 360.701.7176 www.lambshowhorses.com

SEP TEMBER 2010 | 103AA


Eqynox x Night Of Hope

Half-Arabian English Pleasure Junior Horse with Mike Lamb AAOTR Maturity with Andrew Smith Owned by North by Northwest LLC Dan & Sandy Smith • Houston, TX

www.lambshowhorses.com 104AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


Pension x Misunderstood

Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure Open with Mike Lamb AAOTR 18-39 with Andrew Smith Owned by North by Northwest LLC Dan & Sandy Smith • Houston, TX

360.701.7176 SEP TEMBER 2010 | 105AA


Hucks Heritage V x PA Poetry

Purebred Country English Pleasure AATR Select with Michele Ziemer Owned by Lamb Show Horses Elma, WA

www.lambshowhorses.com 106AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


For your consideration

Baske Afire x MWF Iluminacja

Purebred Country English Pleasure Junior Horse with Mike Lamb Owned by Roger & Stephanie McMahon Cashmere, WA

360.701.7176 SEP TEMBER 2010 | 107AA


Bridgette White Training Presents For Your Con sideration Her

2010 U.S. NATIONALS CONTENDERS

Levitation

TM

(Baske Afire x CY Spring Fire)

 Arabian Gelding 2010 Region 1 Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure Junior Horse Competing in Arabian Country English Pleasure Junior Horse Proudly owned by: Eric and Lucinda Gardner RA

Indigo Bey

(Alada Baskin I x Mikaelaa)

 Arabian Gelding 2010 Region 1 Reserve Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure AATR and AAOTR 40 & Over 2010 Region 1 Top Five Arabian Hunter Pleasure Open Competing in Arabian Hunter Pleasure AAOTR - with Marlene Leichtfuss and Open with Bridgette White

Carangi

(Versace x Giavanna)  Arabian Gelding 2010 Region 1 Top Five Arabian Hunter Pleasure AATR 40 & Over

Competing in Arabian Hunter Pleasure AAOTR - with Amy Johnson and Open with Bridgette White

ALL THESE EXCEPTIONAL HORSES ARE FOR SALE LE Please contact Bridgette for more information regardingg these and other exciting sales prospects!

951-805-3103 bridgette_bianca@hotmail.com or mjandaj1@msn.com 108AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


VHTC Heads To Tulsa...

ith E W D

I R

P

PRIDE of Ownership

PRIDE of Accomplishment

PRIDE in the Talent we bring

PRIDE in the Spirit we share Vicki Humphrey Training Center ~ Canton, GA ~ 770.740.8432 Trainers: Vicki Humphrey • Jessica Clinton • Ashley Roberts VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com ~ www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com SEP TEMBER 2010 | 109AA


W

PR ith ID E Vicki Humphrey Training Center ~ Canton, GA ~ 770.740.8432 Trainers: Vicki Humphrey ~ Jessica Clinton ~ Ashley Roberts VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com ~ www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com 110AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


Arabian English Pleasure Junior Horse with Vicki Humphrey

Owned by L.A. Flynn

ith E W D

I R P

Vicki Humphrey Training Center ~ Canton, GA ~ 770.740.8432 Trainers: Vicki Humphrey ~ Jessica Clinton ~ Ashley Roberts VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com ~ www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com SEP TEMBER 2010 | 111AA


Hucks Connection V +/

W

PR ith ID E

Arabian Park Horse AAOTR with Lisa Giovanniello Arabian Pleasure Driving with Vicki Humphrey Owned by Diamond Hill Arabians LLC

Vicki Humphrey Training Center ~ Canton, GA ~ 770.740.8432 Trainers: Vicki Humphrey ~ Jessica Clinton ~ Ashley Roberts VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com ~ www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com 112AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


Voodoo Child

ith E D Half-Arabian English Pleasure Junior Horse with Jessica Clinton W

I R P

Owned by Vicki Humphrey Vicki Humphrey Training Center ~ Canton, GA ~ 770.740.8432 Trainers: Vicki Humphrey ~ Jessica Clinton ~ Ashley Roberts VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com ~ www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com SEP TEMBER 2010 | 113AA


SA

W

PR ith ID E

Rapid Fire

Half-Arabian English Pleasure with Vicki Humphrey Half-Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR with L.A. Flynn

Owned by L.A. Flynn Vicki Humphrey Training Center ~ Canton, GA ~ 770.740.8432 Trainers: Vicki Humphrey ~ Jessica Clinton ~ Ashley Roberts VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com ~ www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com 114AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


BonďŹ re ROF

Arabian Country English Pleasure with Vicki Humphrey

ith E W D

I R P

Owned by L.A. Flynn Vicki Humphrey Training Center ~ Canton, GA ~ 770.740.8432 Trainers: Vicki Humphrey ~ Jessica Clinton ~ Ashley Roberts VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com ~ www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com SEP TEMBER 2010 | 115AA


Baske AďŹ reball

W

PR ith ID E

Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR with L.A. Flynn Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure with Vicki Humphrey Owned by L.A. Flynn

Vicki Humphrey Training Center ~ Canton, GA ~ 770.740.8432 Trainers: Vicki Humphrey ~ Jessica Clinton ~ Ashley Roberts VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com ~ www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com 116AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


Shaken Rattlen Rollen

Half-Arabian Pleasure Driving with Ashley Roberts Half-Arabian Pleasure Driving AAOTD with L.A. Flynn

ith E W D

I R P

Owned by L.A. Flynn Vicki Humphrey Training Center ~ Canton, GA ~ 770.740.8432 Trainers: Vicki Humphrey ~ Jessica Clinton ~ Ashley Roberts VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com ~ www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com SEP TEMBER 2010 | 117AA


Mr Gs Ringmaster +/

W

PR ith ID E

Arabian English Show Hack AAOTR with L.A. Flynn Arabian English Show Hack with Vicki Humphrey Owned by L.A. Flynn

Vicki Humphrey Training Center ~ Canton, GA ~ 770.740.8432 Trainers: Vicki Humphrey ~ Jessica Clinton ~ Ashley Roberts VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com ~ www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com 118AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


ERA

Madusa

Arabian Park Horse with Jessica Clinton Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR with Tracy Dowson

th E i JTR Watch for Jakyra showing in Arabian English Pleasure FuturityW D with Vicki Humphrey

I R P

Owned by Black Tie Ranch • Tracy, Dean & Roy Dowson Vicki Humphrey Training Center ~ Canton, GA ~ 770.740.8432 Trainers: Vicki Humphrey ~ Jessica Clinton ~ Ashley Roberts VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com ~ www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com SEP TEMBER 2010 | 119AA


Excels High Fashion

W

PR ith ID E

Half-Arabian Park AAOTR with Apryl Hughes Half-Arabian Park with Jessica Clinton Owned by Apryl Hughes

Vicki Humphrey Training Center ~ Canton, GA ~ 770.740.8432 Trainers: Vicki Humphrey ~ Jessica Clinton ~ Ashley Roberts VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com ~ www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com 120AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


JCP

Northern Fire

Half-Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR with Haydon Raybourn Available for purchase at U.S. Nationals

ith E W D

I R P

Owned by Susan & Steve Raybourn Vicki Humphrey Training Center ~ Canton, GA ~ 770.740.8432 Trainers: Vicki Humphrey ~ Jessica Clinton ~ Ashley Roberts VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com ~ www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com SEP TEMBER 2010 | 121AA


Mandalay Bay

W

PR ith ID E

Arabian Park AAOTR with Cathy Vecsey Arabian Park Open with Vicki Humphrey Owned by Hawk Haven Farms LLC

Vicki Humphrey Training Center ~ Canton, GA ~ 770.740.8432 Trainers: Vicki Humphrey ~ Jessica Clinton ~ Ashley Roberts VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com ~ www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com 122AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


HL

Sanction

KRA

Dammage

Arabian A Ar ab bia ian nM Mounted oun unte ted Na N Native attiiv ivvee C Costume ostu os tume me O Open pen pe with Jessica Clinton Arabian Mounted Native Costume AAOTR with Cathy Vecsey

Hot Diggity HHF Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR with Cathy Vecsey

HL

CopperďŹ eld

(Not Pictured) Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR with Cathy Vecsey

Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR with Russell Vecsey

ith E W D

I R P

Owned by Hawk Haven Farms LLC Vicki Humphrey Training Center ~ Canton, GA ~ 770.740.8432 Trainers: Vicki Humphrey ~ Jessica Clinton ~ Ashley Roberts VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com ~ www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com SEP TEMBER 2010 | 123AA


FSF Loaded Gun+

W

PR ith ID E

Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR with Art Bartlett Owned by Art Bartlett

Vicki Humphrey Training Center ~ Canton, GA ~ 770.740.8432 Trainers: Vicki Humphrey ~ Jessica Clinton ~ Ashley Roberts VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com ~ www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com 124AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


To Tulsa...

With PRIDE

VickiHorseback Humphrey Adventures Training Center ~ Canton, ~ 770.740.8432 Vicki Humphrey ~ Safaris on GA horseback Trainers: Humphrey ~ Jessica Clinton ~ Ashley Roberts Departures: January 2011,Vicki August 2011 and January 2012. 770.740.8432 VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com ~ www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com SEP TEMBER 2010 | 125AA


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2010 AMATEUR SNAPSHOTS

JOREEN GIVENS Kennewick, Wash. Trainer affiliation: Ron Copple Training Stables What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring?

Being competitive in the show ring requires the right opportunity with the proper level of preparation. Your horse must be ready to show and you must find the judge or panel of judges that compares your horse favorably to the competition you are showing against. Much of the pleasure class competition (especially at the higher levels, where all horses are good ones) is largely subjective judging. If you want to compete favorably at regional and national levels, I would recommend joining a good training barn. It’s tough to do it yourself, although some do. What is your most embarrassing show experience? It was probably

the time at a regional show while riding side saddle that a large and powerful friend offered me a lift up into the saddle. At the end of her lift I found myself on the ground on my back on the other side of the horse in the warm-up ring, covered with arena dirt. Or, once during a regional competition a friend told me I could put my side saddle clothes in the dressing room of her trailer and change in them just prior to the class.

Fifteen minutes before the class I walked to her trailer to put the outfit on, only to find that her husband had just left the grounds with the trailer and all my clothes. What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? Overcoming the nerves

of being an amateur rider in the show ring when the stakes are high! Remembering that my horse relies on me to provide proper direction through my hands and legs when we are competing. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home? That’s easy—money or my

credit card. Like the commercial says, “Don’t leave home without it.” My husband thinks it’s probably him, so I hope he doesn’t read this. Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? Scottsdale for sure! I love

the winter break during the cold weather in the Northwest. I always go with my girlfriends. We watch, shop and eat till we drop for about 10 glorious days in the desert. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

I love the showgrounds in Nampa, Idaho. I think they have it right. They make you feel like you are the most important customer in the world to them. Providing personal attention to every detail and every exhibitor is

their standard of performance. If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? I am

privileged to have two friends who at one time owned the multi-talented and great National Champion Arabian Western Pleasure and Ladies Side Saddle horse, GS Khochise. I would have loved to have ridden that proud stallion during his prime, on a side saddle, down the entry way and onto the green shavings at the U.S. Nationals. In my mind, he will always be a living legend. What is your routine before you compete in an important class?

I get dressed and then like to go off by myself for a few minutes to just sit and focus on the task before me. It helps to calm me and get my thoughts together. I often say a prayer, but not about winning as much as asking that I be given the opportunity on that day to go out and do the best I can, and not allow myself or my horse to do anything that might spoil the ride of someone else. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without?

Absolutely—my horse! Without him, I’m afoot and non-competitive. Seriously, I’m privileged, as are most people showing with training barns, to have a large support group at every

JOREEN GIVENS

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2010 AMATEUR SNAPSHOTS

show. They are there for me and me for them. It’s almost like a family reunion at every show. You get very close to your friends (and eventually you make many) at horse shows. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? How

about at age 65! I told my husband, “Baby, it’s now or never.” I’m starting to creak when I walk. LINDA HACKETT Holt, Mo. Trainer affiliation: Liberty Meadows Training Center What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring?

Select a horse that complements your riding abilities. What is your most embarrassing show experience? There were so

many embarrassing show experiences riding my quite spirited, now retired Half-Arabian English pleasure horse, Sir George RL, that it would be difficult to name the most embarrassing. George taught me valuable lessons about myself, about riding, to never give up, but most of all he taught me humility. George was the highest of highs and the lowest of lows!

What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? Learning to use the snaffle

and curb independently. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

My fake hair bun. Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? Ohio Buckeye. It

is exhibitor-friendly and highly competitive. Our first Buckeye experience was in 2009, and we will continue to make this a part of our show schedule. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

Healthy food vendors. If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? Afires Heir. What an

incredibly beautiful, athletic horse. What is your routine before you compete in an important class? I

like to spend some quiet time alone and focus on the ride. I also remind myself the reason I enjoy the sport—I love the horses! Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without?

Definitely my husband, Ralph. He has supported my horse habit from the beginning and always seems to say the right thing, no matter the outcome of my ride. He is a great confidence booster, and it would just not be the same without him.

LINDA HACKETT

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BETSY HALAT

When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready?

My show career started at the grass shows, a long way from U.S. Nationals. When I joined Ryan Strand and the Liberty Meadows team, I had competed at the class A level and shown at one regional. Ryan set our goals higher, pushed us out of our comfort zone, and began preparing me and our horses for Nationals. I don’t know if there was ever a moment that I thought I was ready to compete at that level of competition. You just have to live through the first-time Nationals experience in order to improve. BETSY HALAT Madison, Wis. Farm: Talah Arabians Trainer affiliation: Price Performance Horses What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring?

Dream big! Even if you are starting out small, set goals for yourself and try to reach them. Take opportunities to learn from other people (trainers, other competitors, and friends), as well as by riding different horses. With time, patience, hard work and passion, anyone can achieve anything.


2010 AMATEUR SNAPSHOTS

What is your most embarrassing show experience? My most

embarrassing experience would probably be the one and only time I showed halter. My horse was completely full of herself and did a whole lot of jumping around and rearing throughout the class. Thankfully, we were the only entry and we won. But at that moment I decided that I’d just stick to riding and leave the halter stuff to the professionals.

turned into a perfect horse show dog, considering the rough start he had to his life. He has brought me lots of luck this season, so I can’t imagine a show without him. Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? Region 11 has always

been one of my favorite shows. The competition is always great, there is adequate warm-up, and everyone is very friendly. I look forward to that show every year.

What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? I think overcoming nerves

If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? I would

and doubtful thinking have been a big challenge over the years for me. There were times I remember getting stage fright while entering a class, which only made me forget key elements of my riding and resulted in an average performance. I now have a better understanding of how to prep myself mentally before a class, which has greatly improved my outlook before, during and after each ride. I feel confident each time I enter the ring and know that I have all the tools I need to make that ride a success.

What is your routine before you compete in an important class? My

What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home? My dog! Hopefully I’d never

Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? My

forget him at home, but I would be lost if he wasn’t with me. He has

probably choose Ericca. I remember that one of the first Arabian Horse Times magazines I ever bought had pictures of her in it, and I was in awe. To me, she is the epitome of the Arabian horse—beautiful, versatile and full of heart.

routine is probably similar to what other people do—get my hair done, put on some make-up, get changed into my show clothes, and spend time with friends. I usually check in on my horse to see how she’s doing and give her a quick scratch on her face.

mom! She has never missed a show and is my biggest supporter. She introduced me to the wonderful

world of horses and I am forever grateful for her help, understanding and love. She is the best cheerleader! When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? I

started showing when I was 12 years old, and I can honestly say I had no clue what was out there in terms of shows and competition. Once I realized just how far you could go, I always kept larger shows like U.S. Nationals in my mind and knew it was a goal to make it that far someday. Even though I have shown some wonderful horses in the past, I haven’t felt 100 percent ready until this year. With a very special horse, a fantastic trainer and the support of many people, I knew the 2010 show season was destined to be a successful one, and I am glad to end it with a trip to U.S. Nationals! PAM HARRIS Galax, Va. Trainer affiliation: Showtime Training Center What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring?

If you can afford it, try to affiliate yourself with a trainer even if it is just for one season. They can help you develop confidence in your

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ability and help you become a team with your horse. If that is not an option, try to meet people who live in the same vicinity and travel to the shows together so you have a support system. What is your most embarrassing show experience? It would have to

be when my bun came off during a class. It was lying in the middle of the ring like a dead animal, and the ringmaster picked it up and handed it back to me. That leads to the answer for the question about what you would have sent to you if you left it a home—it would be the helmet head hairspray to be sure the bun stays in place! What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? My biggest challenge has

been to believe in my riding ability and myself. Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? My favorite show would

have to be Canadian Nationals. I have only attended one time, but everyone was so supportive of each other and there was such a feeling of camaraderie there. It seems to me like the older shows, where it is not so much about winning as having a good time with our horses. If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? Huckleberry Bey. All

Huck hanging on the wall to inspire me to finish. Upon graduation I purchased my dream horse, a Huck daughter, and I am still showing her offspring after all that time. What is your routine before you compete in an important class? My

greatest fear is that I will miss a class, so I get ready early and then have time to compose my thoughts and mentally prepare for the class. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? There

are several friends at the shows that I can’t imagine being without—that is what is so great about horse shows. You make so many friends who are always supportive of each other. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? When

I first started showing Arabians, I had no idea about attending Nationals and didn’t even know how to qualify. I was lucky enough to participate when the show was in Louisville a couple of times with the Huck daughter I mentioned above, but have had the most success in the last several years. My first top ten was two years ago, and that was a dream come true. Now I have to dream about being in the top two!

through school, I had a picture of

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KARI KEMPER-HICKAM Kansas City, Mo. Farm: Cedar Crest Farm Trainer affiliation: Clanton Performance Horses What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? I

would recommend to “put the miles” on your horse. Practice, practice, practice! If you know your horse inside and out, you have an advantage over a lot of the competition. What is your most embarrassing show experience? I was showing

a halter gelding for the first time at U.S. Nationals, and I swiped one of the judge’s faces with the whip! He started yelling at me and I was apologizing profusely, while the other two lady judges made jokes out of it and saying that I shouldn’t injure him because they still needed him to judge for several days! Luckily, he forgave me and I earned my first top ten in halter. What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? My nerves are usually

what bothers me. I have been showing since I was 9, but like everyone else, I want to do well. I put so much blood, sweat and tears into breeding, showing, conditioning, cleaning stalls, upkeep of the farm— you want the pay off to be competing well at the shows.


2010 AMATEUR SNAPSHOTS

What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home? My western show outfit. You

consistent show horses I have ever seen, and she truly loved to show!

just can’t go get one anywhere that would fit perfectly or look good on your horse.

Whoa! I don’t know if I can expose my secrets. I will tell you that I do like to find a quiet place for a few minutes before I ride, to visualize my class. An adult beverage is usually part of the routine. However, it does look a little funny when it is an early morning class!

Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? My favorite show

to compete at and watch is the Iowa Gold Star!! I love this show. I competed in it last year and had a total blast. I think I only went out to eat once the entire time I was there. I am going this year to watch which tells you how much I like it because I have to ration my vacation for regionals and U.S. Nationals. You see some of the top breeding, halter and performance horses there. It is one big party! If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be? I

think a complimentary spa. However, I would probably never leave! If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? This is a

tough question. I think my top horse would be “Honey,” Second Editions Debut. I remember when Shan Wilson brought her out to her first show. She was so vibrant, ears forward, confident, and went somewhere with ease. She was breathtaking and she never lost that look. She was one of the most

What is your routine before you compete in an important class?

Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? I can’t

imagine being at the show without all my horse show friends. That is what makes it fun! We have a good core group from the Kansas City area that just lights up the show. Partner that with the Iowa clan, and you are sure to have some pretty good times. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? I knew

if I put the hard work into my horses and practice that someday I would compete at a national level. I decided I was ready when I started winning top fives at the regional shows. If you can’t cut the mustard at the regional level, then you probably know how you are going to stack up. My first U.S. Nationals was in 1994 and it was a dream come true. The whole family went and we took so many pictures

of the event, we probably looked like tourists! I always aspire to get my horses that I raise to that level. Now, I might take my camera but forget to take pictures! ANDEE HOLLAND Miami City, Fla. Trainer affiliation: Christy HigmanClements What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? Find

yourself a great trainer and a great horse and have a lot of patience. What is your most embarrassing show experience? Luckily I haven’t

yet had an embarrassing show experience, and I hope to keep it that way. Fingers crossed. What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? Finding the right horse or

horses. I finally feel like I click with these horses and we are a good fit. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

I would say my boots, because I forgot them when I showed in Canada and I realized how much I need them to walk around the showgrounds. Although I bought new ones, they weren’t broken in and gave me blisters.

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Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? Canadian Nationals is

nice because it’s like a quaint U.S. Nationals.

decide that I was ready, maybe six months after returning to riding and purchasing a horse. DONNA SUE HUGHES

If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

Starbucks®. If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? I’ve been in

love with Adams Fire since he hit the show ring. I think he’s a fabulous creature and would love to ride him, and love watching him in the ring.

Kyle, Texas Trainer affiliation: Silver Wind Arabians/Oak Haven Arabians What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? Just

It’s nice if my class isn’t too early, so I can get a workout in; it makes me much more relaxed. Besides that, it’s just the usual process of one step at a time—hair, make-up, pants, make sure my number is on, that I have my gloves, etc. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? My

trainer, Christy Higman-Clements. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready?

Yes, I planned on showing at U.S. Nationals from the time I returned to riding. I showed as a junior and never went, so I was very excited to show at Nationals my second time around. It didn’t take long for me to

could not imagine ever being able to ride that well. It took me eight years to get there.

ride and have fun.

NATALIE HUNT Schomberg, Ontario, Canada Trainer affiliation: Garlands What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? Ride

What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? Learning to ride and

compete at 50. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

My prayer coin. Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? Region 9. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

A cafeteria. If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? Indecent Proposal—

he’s awesome. What is your routine before you compete in an important class? Say

a few prayers and take deep breaths.

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daughter. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? No, I

What is your most embarrassing show experience? My horse refusing

to move in the show ring.

What is your routine before you compete in an important class?

Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? My

for yourself. What is your most embarrassing show experience? Bucking in a side

saddle class! I stayed on both times, but embarrassing nonetheless. What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? I grew up riding hunter

and saddle seat. My mother wanted a western horse. It was a tough transition for me. Tommy is an excellent instructor. I enjoy riding and showing western more than I ever thought I would. I love it! What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

A blanket my grandmother made me for Christmas two years ago. It’s the best gift I’ve ever received.


2010 AMATEUR SNAPSHOTS

Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? The Buckeye. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be? A physiotherapist and

LAURIE HUSBAND

compete in an important class? I

don’t really have a routine. I just make sure I have enough time so I can get ready at a leisurely pace.

If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? Apollopalooza. He

Scottsdale, Ariz. Trainer affiliation: Chris Culbreth, Culbreth Equine Services and Christine Johnston, Iron Horse Farms What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? Don’t

looked like so much fun to ride. My brother and I were big fans.

take it too seriously and have fun! Always easier said than done.

What is your routine before you compete in an important class?

What is your most embarrassing show experience? Which one? I

massage therapist.

I like to get ready early, so I never feel rushed. I brush my teeth before my mum makes my bun. Then I get dressed. I find it relaxing to be around my mum and friends before I show in an important class. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? My

mum! I am fortunate enough to be showing her horses. She calls me her catch rider. It’s very special to be able to share the love of the Arabian horse with your mum and best friend. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? I always dreamt of showing

at the U.S. Nationals. I’m blessed to have the parents, the trainer and the horses that have made my dreams come true!

have many! What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? Getting nervous before a

class. I still get butterflies sometimes, but I am able to calm myself. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home? My show clothes. Can’t show

without them! Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? My favorite is the

Scottsdale Show. It is in my backyard and my family is all together. We have a great time. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

Foot massages! If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? Toi

Jabaska—amazing horse! What is your routine before you

LAURIE HUSBAND

Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? My

sister and best friend, Ellen. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? I

had hoped I would compete there someday. That was my goal. I am not sure I am ever completely ready. AMY JOHNSON San Pedro, Calif. Trainer affiliation: Bridgette White Training What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? Keep

your humility. Always remember that it is about the horse, not just you or a ribbon! What is your most embarrassing show experience? I was showing a

junior western pleasure mare at the Buckeye when she spooked and ran backward. I spurred her forward and she bucked. The DJ changed the song that was being played to “She’s a Buckaroo Girl.” What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? I tend to override my

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horses. I have yet to completely overcome this, and work on it every time I ride. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

It’s a tie between my horse hair necklace made from two of my very special horses’ hair, and my Droid.

husband, Matt, and my friend, Mona. Neither are able to come to many of my shows anymore, but I know they are always there in spirit. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? I

overcome those challenges; it’s a work in progress! What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

My iPhone®. Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? This will be the first U.S.

began dreaming about showing at Nationals in the early 1980s. I knew I was ready a long time ago, but the stars have to be aligned just right for it to happen. I am honored and excited to be showing there this year!

Nationals in many years in which I will compete, although I’ve watched for several years. I enjoyed Canadian Nationals this year and always enjoy watching online the World’s Championship Show at the Kentucky State Fair.

More show clothes vendors.

ROBYN JOHNSON

If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? Cool Night. He

Wayzata, Minn. Trainer affiliation: Cedar Ridge Arabians, Eric Krichten What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? As I am sort of just getting

If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be? I

Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? Region 15. I showed there

for 10 years before moving last year. It is a fantastically fun show! If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

is owned by my best friend Mona Mulford and her mom, Toni. He is just a phenomenally honest and talented horse and an incredible amateur horse. What is your routine before you compete in an important class? I

started myself, I’ll defer to the recommendations of others with more Nationals experience!

make sure I am dressed and ready very early, as I do not deal with being rushed very well. I also read Jane Savoie’s book That Winning Feeling, which I have highlighted many sections of. I create a catch phrase for each ride that becomes my mantra for that ride. I am already working on my catch phrase for Nationals!

at a trot in a country class, my right stirrup fell completely off my saddle, and I made a less than graceful halt and dismount.

Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? My

sitting back. I guess I really haven’t

What is your most embarrassing show experience? Exiting the ring

What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? Slowing down and

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have not been to the grounds in Tulsa before, so am just looking forward to the experience. If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? I have been fortunate

to ride a few retired champions at Cedar Ridge, including Matoi, which was very cool. I would love to ride Revelation JF—he has been such a top competitor for such a long time and looks like a blast. What is your routine before you compete in an important class? I

have no particular routine. I just try to relax, think through the class in my head as I want it to go, and not focus on the competition.


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Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? Two: my horse and my trainer.

What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? Learning to deal with very

When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? I

smart and challenging horses in the show ring. I must say I’ve had quite a few in my day, but am happy to now have a horse who loves his job.

competed at the U.S. Nationals a few times as a youth rider, but stopped riding when I went to college. After many years off, I started riding again in Cedar Ridge’s lesson program with the goal of returning to national competition. I decided to try and step it up this year, and hopefully can continue to compete at this level in the future. JENNIFER JUNKER

Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? I would have answered

this question differently 10 years ago, but now it would have to be any show in which my children are riding. The 2010 Region 10 show was particularly special, as it was my older daughter’s first regional experience.

Region 9, air conditioning at all class A shows! If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? This is a tough one,

Make sure you select a horse that is well suited to you. He or she should be honest, and you should be neither under nor over mounted. I believe the overall picture is key.

shown as long as I have, there are simply too many experiences to choose just one.

My suit of course!

If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be? In

Austin, Texas Trainer affiliation: Chase Harvill Training Centre What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring?

What is your most embarrassing show experience? When you’ve

What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

but I would have to say Hucklebey Berry. I was riding with Bob Battaglia during part of the time he had him. This horse was beautiful, ears up, and to me, was the epitome of an English pleasure horse. What is your routine before you compete in an important class?

This year, thanks to Chase and Mandy, I’ve learned that I should

JENNIFER JUNKER

have no routine and just ride like I do at home. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? I

have shown a long time “on my own.” However, I’m always very happy when my best friend, Christy HigmanClements, can be at a show with me, which rarely happens. I’m excited that she will be at U.S. Nationals. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? I

started showing when I was 9 years old and it was a natural progression that led me to the U.S. Nationals, where I was top ten in a deep equitation class when I was 16. I then took a long break from the Nationals, and decided that as an adult, paying my own way, I wasn’t ready to show until 2008. I am excited to be returning again this year with my very special country horse. RENEE KRAMER Elk Mound, Wis. Farm: Red Tail Arabians Trainer affiliation: Liberty Meadows Training Center What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? Keep

breathing no matter what, and don’t over-think.

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What is your most embarrassing show experience? Standing in

center ring at Scottsdale and having my trainer yell: “Renee show your *** horse!” I did start showing then! What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? Time. Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? Non-Arabian, the local

open shows with my part-time girls. As for Arabian shows, the Buckeye. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

Decent food. If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? Gotta Wear Shades. What is your routine before you compete in an important class?

Wait until the last minute to get dressed, then start walking and make a trip or two to the ladies room. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? My

dog, my mom and almost everyone at Liberty Meadows. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? No,

and not sure I am ready yet.

JOYCE KRUSEN Bordentown, N.J. Farm: Acorn Acres Arabians Trainer affiliation: Adandy Farm What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring?

Practice, be dedicated and listen to your trainer. What is your most embarrassing show experience? My husband

sent me into a mare class with our stallion. What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? To pace myself and

the horse. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

My pants and saddle. Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? The regional level. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

Dry cleaners. If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? Matoi. He’s a very

talented and gifted individual. What is your routine before you compete in an important class? To

be at the stalls at least an hour or two before to dress. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? My

husband, Jeff.

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ANGIE LARSON

When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? No.

When the trainer said “it’s time.” ANGIE LARSON River Falls, Wis. Trainer affiliation: Argent Farms What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? I

recommend to any amateur that they remember to have fun! What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? Nerves. Showing and

competing should be fun, and I’ve learned that it’s better to enjoy the experience instead of letting my nerves get the best of me. Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? I absolutely love

Scottsdale and the Arabian Breeders World Cup. In addition to those, I experienced the Iowa Gold Star for the first time last year and it was so much fun. The classes had high attendance, and judges were able to compare their favorite horses by pulling them off the rail and lining them up side by side, which led to great excitement and energy from the crowd!


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If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? There are many, but

the first one that comes to mind is Gotta Wear Shades. He looks like he enjoys his job and is so super talented. Whether you are showing a halter horse or riding a performance horse, it is so refreshing to be around those horses that love to show—the ones that enter the arena and are game every time. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready?

Actually, I have been showing since I was 8 years old in performance and halter. Most people would assume I have shown at the U.S. Nationals before; however, this is my very first time to compete there. I have a great horse that I know will be a blast to show, and I can hardly wait for Tulsa! LORI LAWRENCE Rancho Santa Fe, Calif. Farm: Starline Arabians Trainer affiliation: Kiesner Training What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? I

would recommend that you find a talented trainer with happy clients, happy horses, and an understanding of how to train the horse and rider

to their maximum potential. Spend some time with him/her, ride a few of their horses and see how you get along. Then, with their guidance, find the best horse you can afford. It costs the same to keep them all up.

If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? I love our horses so

much, I cannot imagine wishing for any more than we already have; I am so blessed.

What is your most embarrassing show experience? A couple of years

What is your routine before you compete in an important class?

ago, when they called the reverse at the Canadian Nationals in the HalfArabian Country English Pleasure class, I went through the middle on Barbarry Coast behind two other horses, and we all ended up going the same way! Barbie and I were still named national champions, so I guess it was not as bad as it felt!

My routine is pretty much the same for every class. Whether at a class A show or Nationals, I spend some time while I am getting dressed to show, reflecting on the things I need to remember to have the most successful ride on the horse I am about to show. I try not to get nervous, instead focusing on what Joel has taught me about the horses. Joel gives amazing pep talks, which intensify as the year goes on! The warm-up is the hardest time for me. I wish I could just show up and go in! My daughter, Nicole, is always there for me, calming my nerves or pumping me up, and staying with me until I am headed in the gate!

What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? My biggest challenge is to

live up to Joel’s high standards. He puts so much into finding us the right horses and preparing them perfectly, so I want to make sure I bring my “A game” every time! What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

My suits! Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? Canadian Nationals. I love

the camaraderie, the atmosphere, and the friendly, local people. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

Starbucks®.

Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without?

Nicole and, of course, my hubby and my mom! When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? It

took me six months from the time we purchased our first Arabian

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performance horse, Carry On, until I competed at U.S. and won my first top ten! I didn’t really have that in mind when I got him, but after that, I was hooked! SHERRY LAYNE Henderson, Nev. Trainer affiliation: Battaglia Farms and Laurie Martin Show Horses What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? Buy the best horse you can

afford. Then after the purchase of your horse, you must pay the same amount of money for boarding, training, entries, travel, etc. What is your most embarrassing show experience? Being excused from the U.S. Nationals on my HalfArabian country English pleasure mare, SS Steppin Out. But the most exciting experience was coming back the next year on the same horse and being National Champion. Never give up! What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? My nerves. I still have

them after riding for 25 years. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be? I would love to be

able to be “beamed up” from the showgrounds to home and back to the showgrounds when scheduled

classes are eliminated or changed. It can become an extremely long show because of finessing the horse numbers and changing the schedule. What is your routine before you compete in an important class? Try

to find a quiet spot and spend some time focusing on my ride and on harnessing my nerves! Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without?

Unfortunately, I had to learn to live without a true friend when Russ Vento passed away. I miss him on every ride and at every show. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? The

U.S. Nationals were never in my wildest dreams—competing at class A shows and traveling out of town were big events for the first three to five years after I decided to show my Arabians. It took finding and buying a Nationals-quality horse, and then I was ready to think about competing at Nationals. AMY MADIGAN Livonia, Mich. Trainer affiliation: Rooker Training Stable What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring?

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Remember why you love riding in the first place. That’s important, because you can’t win them all. What is your most embarrassing show experience? I don’t think

I have one that’s any worse than anyone else’s. Everyone has a story, I think, about ripping pants or being dumped. What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? My reaction times and

letting the horse do his job. I always wanted to do too much. I’ve gotten a lot better. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home? My pillow; no hotel pillow

can compare! Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? I love Buckeye. It’s my

overall favorite show. People just seem genuinely happy to be there. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

Food delivery. Sometimes I just don’t want to walk, and I’m too impatient to wait for pizza. If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? I know a lot of people

say this, but Apollopalooza. He’s my horse’s sire, and passed down some great characteristics that I see in her personality and physical traits. It takes an amazing animal to produce

AMY MADIGAN


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such great quality horses, with great minds, time after time. What is your routine before you compete in an important class? I

have absolutely no routine and I like it that way! Who needs the stress? Just go have a good time. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? Laura

and Dan Cross. I don’t think they’ve ever missed a class at a show we were both at. They’ve always been extremely supportive. I’ve been riding with Laura for years, and it’s so nice to have somebody that you go back years with. Of course it wouldn’t be the same without my mom, my best friend Maria, or the Cortese girls. They make every show interesting. I have met amazing people through horses. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? When

I first started showing, it was always a dream of mine to go. As a youth rider, my parents always told me I could pick a year to go, but I never ended up going. This will be my first time showing at any Nationals, and I just feel blessed to even go! I finally decided it was time to go because of the Maturity.

ALICIA MALA Killingworth, Conn. Trainer affiliation: Adandy Farm What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? I

would tell them that showing is about doing what you love to do. I have been showing Arabians since I was 11 years old and it never gets old for me. It’s as if I’m constantly challenging myself and doing what I love best. Everyone, of course, likes to win, but truthfully that’s just extra. If you put your passion and effort into something, you in return will feel like you’ve done your best whether you have won a ribbon or not. What is your most embarrassing show experience? My most

embarrassing show experience would have to be one year at Region 16 when I had a pretty bad fall right before a class. Unfortunately, I ripped my suit and was not on top of my game; I still showed, however. To me it was embarrassing to have to get up and still compete when I knew that I was not in the right mental state to do it. What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? I put so much pressure

on myself when I show my own horse. I have always felt like I need to prove something. However, I do much better when I am riding

a horse that isn’t mine. So, to overcome this, I try and pretend I’m showing someone else’s horse and keep my mind focused on the most important factors. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

My horseshoe lapel pin. I just can’t show without it. I don’t know if I truly consider it lucky, but I have been showing with it for four years and I’m not about to stop now. Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? This year we went to the

Region 13 Championship Show. It was fun to see a new show facility and show with different stables. The show facility in Indianapolis was clean and accommodating, and it was fun to be around nice people and great competition! If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

I would love to have a spa on the showgrounds to get manicures and massages—although finding the time to enjoy this service would definitely be a challenge. If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? I would love to ride

Revelation JF. Revelation JF is a great performance horse because he loves to show, and you can tell he does by watching him. He always gives all he’s got no matter what, and

ALICIA MALA

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to me, when a horse gives it his all, it’s your job as the rider to give it your all too. Revelation JF has been rewarded with multiple national championships, and each time he still puts out all his effort. What is your routine before you compete in an important class?

Normally, I get myself dressed early and then, unfortunately, have to suffer what I like to call “hurry up and wait” syndrome. When it actually comes time to warm up and show, I like to focus on my horse and how she’s warming up. I always keep in the back of my mind that every ride is a new ride and to work with the energy my horse is giving me. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? My

sister, Alayna. She is not only my best friend, but she is always there to help me out and tell me the truth. Alayna calls it how she sees it and I love that about her. Alayna and I have been showing horses together for a majority of our lives. We work great together and I couldn’t imagine showing at Nationals, or any show for that matter, without her there. Even when we are on different ends of the country showing, we always get that live feed going to show our support for each other. I thank Alayna for always being there for me, and I can’t wait for more memories and experiences together.

When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? I

started riding horses when I was 7 years old, but I didn’t ever imagine owning my own horse. My parents, however, allowed me to have that opportunity. So having the opportunity to show at U.S. Nationals seemed like a farfetched dream for me. I feel that qualifying for Nationals my first year as an amateur is winning already. I don’t know if I can say that I am fully ready, but I have prepared all the right ways, have a great trainer, and I’m going to give it my best. I couldn’t thank my parents enough for what they have given me, and no matter what, letting me follow my dreams.

LESTER MARTIN Lawson, Mo. Farm: L & B Farms Trainer affiliation: Liberty Meadows Training Center and Strands Arabian Stables What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? Strap

in—it is going to be a bumpy ride. What is your most embarrassing show experience? Too numerous

to count!

LESTER MARTIN

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What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? Trust my training

and experience. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home? My show clothes. Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? Buckeye. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

A full-service spa, with a built-in wine bar. If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? Starr Llight. Leah Beth

knows she is my favorite. Love that mare’s rear end. What is your routine before you compete in an important class?

Warm up and get on as late as the trainer will allow. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without?

Brian, and of course, my dogs, Darby included. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? Never

in a million years, but here I am.


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DAVID MAY Oconomowoc, Wis. Farm: Lone Tree Farm Trainer affiliation: Dan Lynch, Jeff Schall, Jerry Schall, Keith Krichke, Maureen Krichke What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? Getting started. Keith

Krichke was incredibly patient in training me in halter, and I appreciate his time and patience. Morning Glory V and I went out to Scottsdale and took the reserve championship in the Scottsdale Signature Stallion 2-Year-Old Filly ATH class, and it was my first time in the ring. Clearly, Keith had gotten Morning Glory V and me ready for the event. Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? Scottsdale is such a

wonderful place to observe, learn and participate. It’s always fun to be able to see so many horses compete and be able to soak up the experience as meaningful and memorable. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? My

wife, Terri. At Scottsdale this year, we had purchased the full brother to two of our champion mares, Master Jullyen V. My daughters flew out to Scottsdale to watch Master become the champion of the Scottsdale Signature Stallion Yearling Colt ATH class, but my wife was not

there to enjoy the moment with us. I don’t want that to ever happen again. We missed her on the WestWorld grounds and at the celebration party we had the evening that Master won. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? We

jumped in head first after we bought our first two mares at Sheila Varian’s 2008 Spring Fling, Morning Glory V and Shimmering Silk V. Glory took the championship at Region 18 with Keith Krichke that year, and then placed 11th at the U.S. Nationals with Maureen Krichke—just missed top ten by a couple of points. Silk was always going to be held back to participate in the Western Pleasure Futurity, so this is her first year at the U.S. Nationals, and we are incredibly excited to see Dan Lynch, her trainer, show her in this year’s class. Mikayla Jullyen V, full sister to both Morning Glory V and our colt Master Jullyen V, was reserve champion at Region 18 last year and will be getting ready to show in the 2011 futurity. Then there is Master, who will be showing in this year’s yearling colt class. He has been just a ton of fun to watch grow and develop, ever since we met him at Jeff Schall’s place out in Scottsdale this past February. Terri and I are so grateful to those who

DAVID MAY

have mentored us and brought us along with these wonderful horses. We’d like to take this opportunity to thank Dan and Judy Lynch, Sheila Varian, Keith and Maureen Krichke, and Jeff and Jerry Schall for all their support along the way. Jeff will be showing Master for us this year in the yearling colt class, and Jerry will be showing Glory in the halter futurity. What fun! DON MORSE Freeport, Ill. Farm: Oakridge Arabians Trainer affiliation: Midwest What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? Find

a good horse and a good trainer. What is your most embarrassing show experience? Canadian

Nationals—my clothes were lost by the airlines, and I wore a pair of pants that were too big. When I trotted my horse, I had to use one hand to keep my pants up. What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? Running fast enough

to make the horse look good while trotting away from the judges. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

My wife.

DON MORSE

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Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? Scottsdale or the Iowa

Gold Star. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

A large, big-screen television in the arena for halter. If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? *Padron. The videos

of him showing are awesome, and I really loved the horse. What is your routine before you compete in an important class?

Last minute schooling. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? Janey. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? No.

Two years. SUSAN L. DRESCHER-MULZET Paradise Valley, Ariz. Trainer affiliation: Battaglia Farms What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? I

would strongly recommend that an amateur rider select the best possible trainer that he or she can find for themselves and their horse, and practice, practice, practice. I also recommend that an amateur spend

time getting into the best possible physical condition he or she can. What is your most embarrassing show experience? I’ve had far too

many embarrassing moments. Most of them involve being unable to canter in the practice and show rings. What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? My biggest challenges

have been overcoming my childhood fear of falling off a horse, and becoming a confident and relaxed rider. I’m still working on that.

What is your most embarrassing show experience? Going around the

ring on the wrong lead, even though my barn mates were yelling “No!” (I heard “Go!”) What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? Learning to ride

saddle seat and showing my new country horse while undergoing chemotherapy.

Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? My second favorite show

What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

is Scottsdale in February.

My credit card.

If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be? I

Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? The Buckeye! If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

wish the Tulsa showgrounds offered healthy, tasty dining options. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? My

husband is my best friend, and his physical presence at any show gives me comfort and joy. TANIQUE PLAXEN Clarksville, Md. Trainer affiliation: Cathy Vincent, Adandy Farm What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring?

A masseuse. If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? Adams Fire. Does that

answer really need an explanation? What is your routine before you compete in an important class? I go

to the ladies room at least seven times before a class. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? Bruce,

my husband.

Select a trainer you trust, as close to you as possible. Ride as often as you

SUSAN L. DRESCHER-MULZET

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can; the better you know your horse, the better you will be able to show that horse.

TANIQUE PLAXEN


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When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? Yes. I

attended Nationals my second season of showing at the class A level with a trainer. I can’t say that I felt ready; it was more like a Hail Mary. This will be my fifth year showing at U.S. Nationals. I’m ready. ROBIN PORTER Weatherford, Texas Farm: Crescent Creek Farms Trainer affiliation: Rooker Training Stable and Colonial Wood Training Center What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? I

would highly recommend that any amateur starting out take the time to find a good trainer with a good reputation. A good trainer will be able to help them succeed in the show ring by finding the right horse, deciding on the right discipline for the horse and rider, and helping them to achieve their goals. What is your most embarrassing show experience? I can’t seem to

remember any real embarrassing moments. It seems that my brain has blocked it out of my mind.

What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? The biggest challenge that

establish a routine. A lot of times I just have to go with the flow and ride by the seat of my pants.

I have overcome is finally winning a U.S. National Championship last year in the Half-Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over class. Yeah!

Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? There

What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

If I were to ever leave my show clothes behind, I would have to have them sent to the show. I don’t have the average figure, so it makes it hard to borrow clothes. Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? I would have to say

that my favorite show, besides U.S. Nationals, would be Scottsdale. The show is a nice break from the winter blahs. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be? A

chiropractor would be a lovely service to add to the show. I don’t know how feasible that would be, but it would be nice. If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? I would love to take a

trip on Revelation JF. Whenever I see him show, he looks like he is having the time of his life. What is your routine before you compete in an important class?

My show horses are with different trainers, so it makes it really hard to

ROBIN PORTER

is definitely one friend that I can’t imagine being at Nationals without. Tanya Volkmer has been there through the bad times and the good times and everything in between. She keeps me sane in the midst of it all. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? I

have always seen myself going to Nationals. I had to wait until I was 15 before I went, and even then I had to groom my way there. Today, we own our own farm, with lots of young stock, so hopefully we will continue to go to Nationals indefinitely with exciting new horses. AMANDA PURDIN Baton Rouge, La. Farm: Boisvert Farms, LLC Trainer affiliation: Joel Gangi, and Michele Betten at Blackwell Stables What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring?

Practice makes perfect, or at least as close as possible.

AMANDA PURDIN

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What is your most embarrassing show experience? I dropped my

curb rein at Canadian Nationals at the trot. Rather than stopping to pick it up, I kept trying to grab it while trotting. Needless to say, it wasn’t a pretty moment. What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? Lack of coordination, but

I’m not sure I’ve really overcome that. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

I just wanted to be around horses. It didn’t take me long to decide I was ready for Nationals. I showed at Youth Nationals a year after I started taking riding lessons. MARY RYAN Rochester, N.Y. Trainer affiliation: Adandy Farm What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? My

Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? Scottsdale. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

recommendation to other amateurs just beginning to show would be to work with a reputable trainer that can bring you and your horse together as a team. Always stay focused on the positives, not the negatives. Make it about what is going right, not what has gone wrong. School your horse in the show ring like you are riding at home and have fun!

I think a full-service spa or a gourmet restaurant.

What is your most embarrassing show experience? My most

I’m pretty good at doing without most things, since I’m usually pretty forgetful. The only thing I can think of that I would have to have shipped would be my saddle suit.

If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? *Prowizja, National

Champion Park Horse as well as the dam of many national champion park horses. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? When

I first started riding, I never even imagined that I would be showing.

embarrassing show experience was when I was a junior exhibitor. As the class was being pinned, I did not know my number or the horse’s registered name. Needless to say, I did win the class! What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? The biggest challenge

I have overcome in my riding and handling is to have confidence in myself and my abilities, while recognizing my limitations.

MARY RYAN

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What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

The one thing I would have sent to a show if I forgot it at home would be my riding boots. Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? National Show Horse

Finals. Kudos to Cindy Clinton and everyone at NSH for putting on such a fun show. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

A large selection of adult beverages, margaritas included! If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? SA Sophisticated Lady.

How could you not want to ride a horse that is that exciting to watch? What is your routine before you compete in an important class? My

routine before I compete in any class is to try to relax and chill out! If I cannot walk on a loose rein, I cannot expect the horse to do so either. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? The

friend that I could not imagine being at a show without would have to be Miss Alayna Mala (aka “Broom Hilda”). Just one of the great members of Team Adandy I can’t do without! When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals?


2010 AMATEUR SNAPSHOTS

How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? When

I first started showing, I always knew I wanted to compete at a national level, and I have qualified in years past. I was born ready for just about anything, so this year, it’s game on! KERI SCHENTER Mobile, Ala. Trainer affiliation: John Power Arabian Show Horses What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? Get

trustworthy professional help. That doesn’t mean you have to train full time with a professional, or even that you have to go out and spend a lot of money on a fancy horse. Get the most benefit you can out of whatever scenario you are able to afford and have available. If you aren’t comfortable in any situation, always remember that it’s you and your horse in the end, and you have to do what is best for you. What is your most embarrassing show experience? Probably the time

I got bucked off in the middle of a hunter pleasure class at a hand gallop. I can still hear that hoof landing on my helmet. What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? Probably the financial

aspect, but also living so far away

from my horse/trainer. Thankfully, through career advancement my pay has increased, easing the financial strain. As to being so far away, I just go and ride whenever I can, and get the most I can from each session. I also try to take lessons closer to home when I can, just to get my horse fix. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home? I probably wouldn’t have

that luxury, so I’d have to either do without or (gulp!) buy a replacement. Careful packing is a necessity in my preparation. Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? Canadian Nationals,

but after that it’s a toss-up between the AHAF Thanksgiving Show and Region 12. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be? More warm-up space! Also, I

wish more shows would offer lighter food options rather than the typical burgers and hot dogs. A veggie sandwich or a salad that doesn’t cost a mint would be a welcome offering. If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? There are

a few. Le Masquerade is one, and strangely enough, John (Power, my trainer) rode and showed her long before I met him. She always struck me as elegant and friendly. Capt

Jack Sparrow PGA is another—I am amazed by him, and he’s simply lovely. But since I already own and ride a Half-Arabian western pleasure horse, I would have to say a purebred, and that would be Sunsational Kid. Not only is he a lot of fun to watch, he’s just a cutie pie, and since he was stabled behind my horse in Tulsa last year, I know he’s a very quiet stallion and a pleasure to be around. What is your routine before you compete in an important class?

Actually, it’s a routine I’m working to break, because I tend to get wound up and tense. I’m trying to work on stretching and relaxation exercises, taking more time to get the hair and make-up done so I’m not feeling anxious about that, and just not worrying. One of my “must-do’s” however, is to go to Country before he comes out of the cross ties, touch his nose and remind him we’re going out to have fun, and promise him carrots and peppermints when we get back. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? John

and Shari Power. There are a ton of others, but without John and Shari, I’d have given up this horse show gig a while ago. Really!

KERI SCHENTER

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When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? I

started showing in the mid-1980s and always dreamed of showing at Nationals. When I started showing Arabians at the A level in the late ’90s, I always hoped I’d get there. When I finally made that first Nationals trip, to Canada in 2005, I wasn’t so sure I was ready. Deb Witty (my trainer at the time) and I will always remember that moment just before we jogged in the ring for that first final. We both knew that moment had come, but neither of us expected me to burst out in (brief ) tears when it actually happened. As far as U.S., that’s an entirely new ball game, and while we’ve been a couple of times now, I’m still not convinced I’m ready for it. COLLEEN SCOTT Kansas City, Mo. Trainer affiliation: Clanton Performance Horses What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? Have fun and set personal

riding goals that can’t be measured by ribbons or placings. Keep in mind that you will get the gate on occasions when you thought you had

a fantastic ride, and you will win on occasions that you shouldn’t. What is your most embarrassing show experience? Reversing in

a one-horse class before the judge called for it. The ring steward politely informed me (when he walked half the arena to get to me) that I wasn’t allowed to reverse before being told to do so. We turned back around and waited for the call. What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? My nerves! But they are

getting much better. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home? Probably my laptop since

I am usually working while at the shows. But in order to ride, I would need some sentimental items such as my great-grandmother’s ring and some mementos of my father, who was always very supportive of my riding and helped me buy my first show horse. Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? Definitely Scottsdale,

because it is such a wonderful break from the winter blahs. Everyone seems to be in a great mood and very excited about the coming season. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be? Massages.

I would say the horse that stands out (because I ride in the hunter pleasure division) would be Berried Treasure. The first time I ever went to U.S. Nationals to watch, I saw him and thought he had the most incredible show ring presence. The other one would be Apollopalooza. But I would have to have one of those sensational national championship rides to go along with it! What is your routine before you compete in an important class? I

like some quiet time to myself. I am usually too keyed up to sit, so you’ll probably see me wandering around! Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? I

really enjoy seeing all my fellow competitors in the 40 and over age group like Karen Lee and Martha McCollough. Even though we don’t see one another but once a year, we all share something in common. I also enjoy meeting all the people I talk to throughout the year in my work with the Times. And the Kansas City contingency is always a lot of fun and a great group of cheerleaders. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? I

first started showing as an adult at

COLLEEN SCOTT

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If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? There are so many, but


2010 AMATEUR SNAPSHOTS

grass shows and didn’t even know the Arabian circuit existed. But once I discovered it, I was hooked and always set Nationals as my goal.

to make him proud of me every time I ride.

BRANDY SHARP

Show! It has beautiful horses and great riders. I also think Scottsdale is such a beautiful place.

Alta Loma, Calif. Trainer affiliation: Battaglia Farms What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? Just

keep riding; don’t give up. It’s hard work, but your hard work will pay off. What is your most embarrassing show experience? At two different

Scottsdale shows I ripped my pants, both in the Half-Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR class! The funny thing is that this year I was reserve champion and nobody noticed, thank goodness! What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? My biggest challenge has

been how often I get to go and ride, having two kids and living in another state. I feel like this year Max and I have become a team, and I just have to remember everything I am told by my trainers. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

That would have to be my lapel pin that says “This ride’s for Russ.” It has a lot of meaning for me, and I want

Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? I love the Scottsdale

If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? It would be Second

Editions Debut. She is a beautiful horse! I remember watching her with all her motion, wishing I had a horse like her. She was so exciting to watch.

Nationals. At the time I had no idea how important Nationals was, and I don’t even know if I was ready, but I know I was just happy to see Patrick Swayze showing his horse! JILL SHERMAN Pleasanton, Calif. Farm: Sherman Ranch Trainer affiliation: The Brass Ring What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? Ride

as many horses as possible.

What is your routine before you compete in an important class?

What is your most embarrassing show experience? When I was a kid

After I get dressed and put my makeup on, I either talk way too much, or listen to my iPod® while thinking about what I need to do in my class.

I walked my *Bask son between two cars and the stirrup hit one of the cars, freaking him out. He kicked the heck out of one of the car doors!

Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? My

friends Kris and Emily Maita. They are great friends and I consider them my family. They have always been supportive in any situation and are fun to be with! We have lots of good memories! When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? I

went to Nationals for the first time when I was 13 or 14, when there was one national show and no Youth

BRANDY SHARP

What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? Still trying to overcome

my weight. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

My cell phone. Who can live without it? Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? Scottsdale—great weather,

great location, great shopping, great food. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

Starbucks®.

JILL SHERMAN

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If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? Countess Vanessa. She

if you accidentally left it at home?

My mom and my lucky socks.

Stay calm.

Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? Scottsdale. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? There

Child care. It is really hard to leave my kids at home.

are far too many to name.

If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? Spotsdale. I have

looked like the thrill of a lifetime. What is your routine before you compete in an important class?

When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? I have

always loved that horse. It just looked so easy and natural. What is your routine before you compete in an important class?

been riding and showing since I was a little girl. Everything just fell into place. It is a part of my everyday life.

Getting dressed at the last minute. Sitting around drives me crazy.

LESLIE DORAN SOMMER

Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? My

Garden Ridge, Texas Farm: Shamrock Farms Trainer affiliation: The Brass Ring What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? Get

with a trainer that fits you and your horse—someone you look up to. What is your most embarrassing show experience? None. I try to

learn from the good, the bad and the ugly. What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? Trusting my horse (really

good things happen when you do). What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show

sister. We have been a team for 25 years and a couple of fingers. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? No!

Four-H shows were big time to me. I knew I was ready when I found Gordon Potts 25 years ago. SARA STAHLER Scottsdale, Ariz. Trainer affiliation: Battaglia Farms What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? Film, film and more film! I

LESLIE DORAN SOMMER

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SARA STAHLER

firmly believe one of the best ways to learn is to see yourself in action. As a result of this practice, my overall riding skills have improved dramatically. But most importantly, I’m able to communicate with my trainers more effectively. Primarily, I have a better understanding of my strengths and weaknesses. Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? Definitely Scottsdale!

It’s been my favorite since I was a little girl. It’s the start of a new show season and anything is possible. The excitement in the air is contagious! What is your routine before you compete in an important class? I

find a quiet place to sit and focus. I take several deep breaths and relax my entire mind and body. For the next 20 minutes or so, I visualize the entire ride. I go through every detail, both small and large. I pay particular attention to transitions and using the ring effectively. Once I’ve finished I maintain the calm and hyper-focused frame of mind, and try my best to go into the ring and create the ride I just visualized.


2010 AMATEUR SNAPSHOTS

DEAN STANKOVIC Longmont, Colo. Trainer affiliation: Flatiron Springs, Diane Underwood What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring?

Patience and perseverance are the keys. Be patient and don’t expect to win right away. There is a learning curve to showing successfully. I have been doing this for many years and this is my first trip to U.S. Nationals. I do think my new horse, HC Boisterous, and I have a chance at doing well.

Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? I love Scottsdale. My first

a native costume exhibition for a “Dancing With Horses” presentation. We were done with practice when the director decided that the horses needed to get used to the spotlights. Instead of saddling and bridling my horse back up, I hopped on him with only a halter and lead rope, thinking he would be fine about the spotlights. Well, I was wrong. The arena went dark, the spotlight hit him, and he took off at a hand gallop around the arena for what seemed like an hour. Luckily, I did not fall off. Scary, stupid, and yes, terribly embarrassing.

psyche myself out before a class. It

What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

My Blackberry®, or as my friends call it, “my lifeline.”

What is your most embarrassing show experience? I was doing

What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? Nerves, for sure! I used to

was Scottsdale 2004 when I stopped getting nervous and really started riding. Now, I get excited about my classes, but not nervous. I ride the arena and try to show my horse off whenever possible.

experience there was in 2004, when I got my first top ten ever on a horse named Tijuana Taxi. February in Colorado is cold and snowy, so it is nice to get away, enjoy the sunshine and watch some amazing horses! If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be? A

what kind of class it is going to be! Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? All

of them. Part of what makes horse shows so much fun is the friends that we get to hang out with. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready?

I always dreamed of showing at Nationals, and this year my dream is coming true. I owe so much of my successes to Gail and Abby Jensen of Jensen Arabians, as they gave me my start with the consummate show horse, Tijuana Taxi. I owe my ability to ride at this level to my trainer, Diane Underwood. In the past eight years, she has taught me so much and made me the showman I am today.

JELL-O® shot bar! If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? Revelation JF. Well,

simply put—he is amazing! Vicki Humphrey, aka “Beyonce,” has made this horse the superstar that he is, and I would give my eyetooth to ride him just once. Did you hear that, Vicki? What is your routine before you compete in an important class? I

check my number a hundred times to make sure it is straight, and then I end up losing a magnet and have to search high and low to find it. The minute I sit on my horse, I can tell

DEAN STANKOVIC

KAREN STULL Scottsdale, Ariz. Trainer affiliation: Battaglia Farms What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring?

Practice riding often and on different horses if possible. What is your most embarrassing show experience? My horse bucked

when I asked for a canter. I thought the judge did not see the episode until at lineup, she said to me, “Nice buck!” I still laugh about this.

KAREN STULL

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What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? Staying calm, which

allows me to manage my horse better in the show ring. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

My horse, of course! Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? Scottsdale in February. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

Starbucks®. If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? Afires Vision, because

he is the total package—beautiful, talented and very honest in the show ring. I can completely trust that he will give me 200 percent. What is your routine before you compete in an important class? I

get dressed early so that I can focus on making sure all the details are in order. I hate feeling rushed because this transfers to my mount. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? My

friend, Debbie. I also miss Olivia, my daughter, who is away at college and has limited riding time. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? When

know there was a U.S. Nationals. When I started showing Arabians about a dozen years ago, I knew I wanted to go to Nationals right away. JASON TACKETT Indianapolis, Ind. Trainer affiliation: Midwest and Liberty Meadows Training Center What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? Have

fun! As an amateur, this is a hobby, not a business! Your trainer will never kick you out of the barn for screwing up a class as long as you pay the bills! Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? I have a few.

Scottsdale, Region 14 and the World Championships are great shows to watch. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

Same day pick-up dry cleaning. If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? I would love to handle

Magnum Psyche; he has been one of the most influential breeding stallions in the history of the Arabian horse. If I could choose one to ride, it would easily be Countess Vanessa. She was the most dominant and impressive Half-Arabian I have ever seen!

I first started riding, I didn’t even

JASON TACKETT

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What is your routine before you compete in an important class? I

like to take my mind off showing, doing things to relax. Beating Steve Heathcott in Golden Tee® has become a common routine this year. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without?

There are many—too many to mention and embarrass, but they know who they are! When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? I

was only 13 when I competed at my first Youth Nationals, so I didn’t really understand the meaning and importance of the show. I won a national championship that year. It then took me four years to win another one. The second one was more meaningful, as I understood how difficult it was to win! Today, I truly recognize and respect the work and how many great horses you have to beat to win a national championship.


2010 AMATEUR SNAPSHOTS

SHARON FANT-TRUE Raymore, Mo. Farm: Glass Horse Farm Trainer affiliation: Liberty Meadows Training Center What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring?

Take small steps and learn as you go, remembering that the best and most gratifying moments we earn in life are not gained overnight. What is your most embarrassing show experience? Almost running

over the judge on a horse that decided to aim directly at her. What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? Being my own worst

critic—I am still working on that. And stress. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

My leopard print Poppy socks and a favorite luck Cavalier pendant. Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? Always, Canadian

Nationals. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

Some type of relaxation therapy— surprise me! If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? Ericca, the

great halter mare.

What is your routine before you compete in an important class? No

particular routine. I tuck my special pendant into my hunter clothes, put my lucky socks on and thank God that I have a chance to ride wonderful horses that fulfill my life in so many ways! Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without?

There are many special people that support me and I appreciate them all, especially the people in my barn. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? No! I had never thought

that I would be competing at the national level. When the time came, the decision was made for me and I almost didn’t get into the gate. Now it is an honor to ride through the gate at a national show. KATHERINE TUTTLE Middleport, N.Y. Farm: Brass Lite Arabians Trainer affiliation: Siemon Stables What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? Be

prepared to work hard; don’t look at what or how other people are doing in the horse world. Everyone has their own way to get to their

SHARON FANT-TRUE

set of roses. Just be patient and be prepared to work hard, for anything worth having requires work. What is your most embarrassing show experience? It would have to

be splitting my pants right before going into my class, and of course, ending up having a victory pass picture to capture the moment forever. It was a really good picture other than having my knee exposed. What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? The biggest challenge

would have to be my balance; it is just terrible. I was in a car accident and had some serious injuries to my foot. It has taken a few years to get where the center of my saddle is. It is still a challenge today, but better. Some might find it funny, since I ride a park horse and my balance is terrible. A lot of hard work and a lot of time in the saddle has proven that you can overcome any challenge, no matter how big or small. Some of us competing have big challenges and others have small things we have to deal with every time we get in the saddle. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

My phone, of course! That would be like not having my right arm.

KATHERINE TUTTLE

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Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? It would have to be the

Buckeye. It’s early in the year and you get to see which young horses are coming out for the season. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be? A

mini Walmart® booth or Walmart® services. How many times do we end up going to Walmart®? Also, a service that had a list and rating of local restaurants would be great. We all get sick of horse show food by the time Nationals comes. If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? I think it

would have to be Adams Fire, who is always a crowd pleaser and looks like so much fun. One of the others I would love to have ridden was Supreme Decision—heart of gold in that horse! What is your routine before you compete in an important class? I

bribe my horse all day long before an important class—I give treats every time I go by my horse’s stall. I get laughed at, but it works, it’s the way to her heart. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without?

Every time they aren’t at a show, I do terrible. They are sort of my good luck charm. I might not win every time, but the show always seems brighter when they are there.

When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? It was

If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? Sufis Fancy

always a dream to show at Nationals, let alone win at Nationals some day. I would study the Arabian Horse Times and be like “someday that is going to be me.” Well, that someday came and it was a dream come true. I am truly blessed. I was lucky to have a trainer and instructor that kept pushing me to reach my dream and to help me compete at Nationals.

What is your routine before you compete in an important class?

DIANE VARLEY Cuba, N.Y. Trainer affiliation: Price Performance Horses What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? Go

to one of the top training barns. What is your most embarrassing show experience? There is one, but

I’ll never tell. What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? My age. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

My suit or part of it. Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? Region 11 or the Buckeye,

depending on the year.

DIANE VARLEY

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CATHY VECSEY

Free. I have a son of hers, my retired park horse.

Meditate to get in the zone. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? My

husband, Randy, and daughter, Lori. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? I first started showing

Saddlebreds in 1959 at the age of 9 and wanted to compete in the AHSA Medal Class at Madison Square Garden, but by the time I qualified, the class was moved to Oklahoma, which was just too far away in those days. With Arabians, I finally got serious about committing to the breed in the early 1990s, and my goal was to compete at U.S. Nationals right from the beginning. CATHY VECSEY Easton, Conn. Trainer affiliation: Vicki Humphrey Training Center What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring?

Video every ride. Be your biggest


2010 AMATEUR SNAPSHOTS

critic and watch the people who are doing well. When you are at shows, watch a lot of classes and learn what sets the winners apart. What is your most embarrassing show experience? The first couple

of years were one big moment when I would slide off in every class when my ring-spoiled horse would reverse and rear. I would walk dejectedly out of the ring. What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? Learning that I was good

enough to be showing and that I belonged in the ring too. That took a while for me to learn. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

No question, my accessory bag. I would be dead without all of the junk that is in there! Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? I love the Buckeye because

it takes me back to my childhood and I have so many lifelong friends there. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

I think food delivery service from grocery stores would make life easier. If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? MHR Nobility for

obvious reasons!

What is your routine before you compete in an important class? I

relax with the process of getting my stuff together—number, tie-downs, collar bars, gloves, hair done. I hate to rush or not know where something is. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? No

question, Russ, my husband. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? In

the ’80s, I thought Nationals would always be above me. Those horses and riders were bigger than life to me. I qualified for the first time in 1983, and my father was ready to load up one horse and drive to New Mexico! Me, not so much. I did show for the first time in 1984, with Mon Bandaid. I was 16. AMY BLANKENSHIP-WILLIAMS Fort Worth, Texas Trainer affiliation: Kiesner Training and Kehilan Arabians What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring? Relax

and ride just like it is a lesson. And have fun—isn’t this why we do this? What is your most embarrassing show experience? When I was

much younger (8 or so) and showing in equitation, I would forget the

patterns in the medal class or championships and would be too scared to ask for them to repeat it, so I would make up my own. I would just do everything I knew, figure eights, serpentines, etc. At one show, the judge politely walked up and stopped me because they would go on forever. Thank goodness I finally got it and started remembering them! What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? I don’t think I have

overcome, but maybe learned to manage sometimes. It’s interesting because as I have gotten older, different challenges have come up, not necessarily physical, but more mental. When you live in another state and have a family and don’t ride as much, it can be a real challenge. It takes a while to get back into a groove. I am also a very assertive and eager rider, so I have tried to temper that, and sometimes I can and sometimes I can’t. We are a work in progress. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

Luckily you can buy them anywhere, but kneepads—the cheap kind you get in the box at the grocery store. I never ride without them. Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? My favorite show would

have to be Scottsdale. I think the atmosphere is great; there is a buzz

AMY BLANKENSHIP-WILLIAMS

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2010 AMATEUR SNAPSHOTS

and excitement that you can’t find at many other shows. And the tough competition doesn’t hurt. If you could add any service to the showgrounds, what would it be?

I would love it if someone would set up a drop-off nanny service—a big trailer full of toddler- and kidfriendly stuff, with experienced nannies, food, video games, and things to occupy their time. Then I could go watch classes. The same concept would work with husbands and dads too! With beer, television and food, they would all be happy and so would I! I think it’s brilliant! If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? No question, Afires

Heir. I think he is the epitome of an English horse, and he is so sweet! Forward movement but light in the bridle, just phenomenal! What is your routine before you compete in an important class?

I don’t really change from show to show. My hair gets done, I do my makeup, and then get dressed and wait, wait, wait! When I was younger I would get really quiet before an important class, but now I just get more anxious and excited. Maybe I should go back to being quiet! Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? My

mom. In all the years of showing, I’ve gone to one show without my

mom, and that was Region 14. We do this as a family; they are my support system and we enjoy doing it together, so we don’t usually do it unless we can do it together! When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? I went

to Nationals for the first time when I was 10 and competed in an Amateur Owner to Ride Park class. I think we figured that I got qualified, so I might as well go. That was a crazy and fun class. I still remember it! I’ve been almost every year since, except for a few years in college and the two times I’ve had my daughters! I still remember getting ready in Tingley during opening ceremonies for my park class. NANCI WILLIAMS New Baden, Texas Trainer affiliation: Chase Harvill Training Centre What is your most embarrassing show experience? I often look like

Chris Farley when showing; we get quite a few laughs going through the show proofs. What is your routine before you compete in an important class?

Giving the Baby Harvill Belly a good rub before I get on my horse. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without? My

Chase Harvill Training Centre family.

NANCI WILLIAMS

154AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES

MICHELE ZIEMER

MICHELE ZIEMER Enumclaw, Wash. Trainer affiliation: Lamb Show Horses What one recommendation would you make to an amateur rider just getting started who wants to be competitive in the show ring?

I would tell any amateur who is committed to showing to practice as often as they can, and take every piece of information they hear from their trainer seriously. If they say it, do it! What is your most embarrassing show experience? I’ve been absent

from the show ring for several years and I don’t have any recollections of embarrassing moments. I’m hoping not to have any! What is the biggest challenge you have overcome in your riding or handling? I am

constantly working on improving my confidence and timing. What is the one thing you would have to have sent to you at a show if you accidentally left it at home?

My suit! Besides U.S. Nationals, what is your favorite show to compete at or watch? The Saddlebred World’s

Championship Horse Show. If you could ride or handle any past national champion, who would it be and why? This is very hard

to determine, as there are so many to choose from! A horse that first came to mind as I thought about this


2010 AMATEUR SNAPSHOTS

question was Cool Night. He is a big, strong horse, and performs like he has a huge heart and willingness to please his rider. I love the way he trots and his expression in the show ring. I have a soft spot in my heart for grey Half-Arabians, and I would love to know this gelding’s story. What is your routine before you compete in an important class? I

take my time getting dressed so I don’t forget anything, and Mike does

my hair. I will visualize my ride, talk it out with the team, and try to relax. Is there a friend at the show you can’t imagine being without?

I wouldn’t be at any horse show without my trainer, Mike Lamb, or my mom, Diane McNett. When you first started showing, did you ever imagine you would be competing at the U.S. Nationals? How long did it take for you to decide that you were ready? Since

it has been my focus to qualify and show at U.S. Nationals. I have had lessons and shown locally as often as possible. I am extremely fortunate to be able to ride in the Arabian English Country Pleasure Select rider class on PA Into Wishin. I am really looking forward to showing in Tulsa, and I am certain it will be an experience I will never forget. ■

I started riding again five years ago,

Watch for more 2010 Amateur Snapshots in the October 2010 issue!

SEP TEMBER 2010 | 155AA


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U.S. National Reserve Champion English Pleasure Junior Horse U.S. & Canadian National Top Ten English Pleasure Open

Arabian English Pleasure with Cathy Vincent Owned by: SILVER STAG ARABIANS Merrilee Lyons Seaford, Delaware STANDING AT ADANDY FARM www.AdandyFarm.com SEP TEMBER 2010 | 159AA


2010 Region 16 Champion Park Horse



saFlame N Fortune Red Tape x SA Czortanna

Arabian Park with Cathy Vincent Owned by: DR. DIANE STACKHOUSE ~ Cambridge, New Brunswick, Canada 506-488-2181 ~ www.summitarabians.com ~ dsgc@mac.com Red Tape+// frozen semen available.

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2010 East Coast Champion Country English Pleasure Open 2010 East Coast Reserve Champion Country English Pleasure AAOTR



Scarlet O Butler Gitar MF x AF Ellenai

Arabian Country English Pleasure With Cathy Vincent Country English Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 with Tanique Plaxen Owned by: BRUCE & TANIQUE PLAXEN Clarksville, Maryland www.AdandyFarm.com SEP TEMBER 2010 | 161AA


2009 U.S. National Reserve Champion Country English Pleasure AAOTR 55 and over



Tangerine Express IXL Noble Express x RCR Tangerine

Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 55 & Over with Joyce Krusen Owned by: JEFF & JOYCE KRUSEN Bordontown, New Jersey

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2010 Region 16 Reserve Champion Country English Pleasure AAOTR 18-39

 Dansing Queen

Gitar MF x Music Music Music

Arabian Country English Pleasure Select Rider with Alicia Mala Owned by: ALICIA MALA Killingworth, Connecticut www.AdandyFarm.com

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ferrara

Sundance Kid V x Magdalena V

www.RickGaultTraining.com • (336) 861-5644 Proudly owned by Valerie & Megan Brown of Archdale, NC 164AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


+/ 2010 Canadian National Reserve Champion Open 2010 Region 12 Champion Open 2009 Region 15 Unanimous Champion AAOTR 2008 U.S. National Champion Open 2008 Canadian National Champion Open 2008 Region 12 Champion Open 2008 Region 15 Unanimous Champion Open 2007 Region 15 Unanimous Champion AAOTR 2006 U.S. National Champion Jr. Horse 2006 Canadian National Champion Jr. Horse 2006 Region 12 Champion Jr. Horse 2006 Buckeye Champion Jr. Horse

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2010 REGION 15 RESERVE CHAMPION

Purebred Hunter Pleasure Open in tulsa

with Cassie Banks

Magnum Psyche x My Tribute

www.RickGaultTraining.com • (336) 861-5644 • Proudly owned by Eve Isley of Charlotte, NC 166AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


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Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 55 & Over ridden by Linda Fontana Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure ridden by Chase Harvill

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Half-Arabian Park AAOTR ridden by Nanci Williams Half-Arabian Park ridden by Chase Harvill

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Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 ridden by Jennifer Junker Arabian Country English Pleasure ridden by Chase Harvill

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Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR Select Rider ridden by Jessica Everitt Half-Arabian Mounted Native Costume ridden by Jessica Everitt

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Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 18-35 ridden by Nanci Williams Offered for sale at the 2010 U.S. Nationals

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Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 18-35 ridden by Caron Brooke

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The Evolution Of An Arabian Horseman by Mary Kirkman

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earliest memory is of his older sister’s palomino rocking horse. He was just 2, but he was crazy to ride it, and when she didn’t agree, he patiently waited until she went out and then hoisted himself into the saddle. Already, he had made up his mind about horses, and he didn’t mind the storm of his sister’s subsequent objections.

Gordon Potts’

Twenty years later, in the Arabian heyday of the 1980s, Potts was one of the rising stars in Lasma’s corps of assistant trainers, a high-profile group of young horsemen who fairly sparkled with potential. Thirty years farther on, he is one of the headline trainers of the Arabian horse industry, with a long list of national champions and a deep bench of contenders in his chosen divisions. At least, that’s the basic structure of the story. The fuller version reveals a man who is thoughtful about not only his business but his industry, and intensely aware of how important having not just good horses, but good friends and good fortune as well, has been to his success. He is more likely to praise the horses or the people who have helped him than he is to cite his own talent and work ethic; his triumphs emerge only in brief comments or glancing references. As he freely admits that he was “brash” and “aggressive” as a young man, it must be assumed that humility came later, maybe in the difficult times that life inevitably deals even to the successful. But whatever the causes, Gordon Potts now stands at the top of his profession and there is little he would change about his life. “I think we have 70 horses entered for Nationals, which is more than we’ve ever had,” he says. “They may not all get there, but we’ll have at least in the high 50s. It’s a great effort to do it all and do it well, and when people say, ‘I’ll bet you’re dreading that’—well, no, I’m not. I look forward to it. This is what I’ve worked for my whole life, to try to get some proficiency at this. While you never stop learning, when you have some success and you have the client power to keep you well mounted, what’s not to like?”

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The Making Of A Horseman When he was born, Gordon Potts lived in Godley, Texas, which, except for the “e,” would have been an appropriate beginning for the son of a Baptist preacher. But he didn’t stay in Godley and his father didn’t remain a minister. When Gordon was 2, Hal and Jody Potts moved their family to Fort Worth, and five years later, on to Dallas, where Hal sold insurance by the day and attended SMU’s law school at night. It was handy that his father became a very successful attorney, Gordon notes wryly, because the childhood his parents gave him and his older sister was not without cost. Before he was old enough to begin riding for real, he got his “horse fix” watching television. “All I wanted to see was westerns,” he recalls. “I would watch the horses that came on the screen, and I could tell you if the star’s horse was the original or a stand-in.”

relationship with the big gelding; they did everything together. “Joppa would jump anything. You could run him at a gallop into the water, and he’d just go blasting through it and then start swimming. He was cool.” Potts kept Joppa until the gelding died 20 years later. It was through Mayo and some friends of his parents named Jarrell and Judy McCracken that he was introduced to Arabians. The McCrackens’ Bentwood Farms was the largest Egyptian Arabian farm in the country at the time. As a teenager, he was invited to be a groom for their trainer, David Gardner, at a weeklong show at the Tulsa State Fair, and his parents, understanding his commitment, signed a school excuse saying he was sick. That didn’t stop his football coach from benching him for missing practice, but he didn’t care. That trip had given him a vision for his life. He would be an Arabian horse trainer. He signed on to work at Bentwood the following summer, doing whatever Gardner directed, to learn more about Arabians.

Fortunately for Potts, the others in “I knew I wanted to make a living his family liked horses, even if they in horses,” Potts says, “and I knew I didn’t love them as he did. A couple could make a good living in Arabians. of times a month, they would rent They intrigued me because you could mounts for a Saturday morning trail do a lot of different kinds of riding on ride. He recalls his first experience in them, and that’s something that has the saddle: “I was 3, and I rode with always been important to me.” my dad on a black horse with a white star, just like Black Beauty,” he says. During his senior year of high school, “I’m sure it wasn’t a very big horse, Scottsdale Champions Gordon Potts he worked at Dee Whittlesey’s Zodiac but I thought it was—I was screaming and SAR Quinto in 1983. Farm, at the time a leading breeder when they put me on, I was so scared. of primarily Russian bloodlines. We rode out in the woods for about There, he learned from both trainer Dorothy Dunn and an hour, I’d guess, and when we came back, I was crying her boyfriend, Doug Thompson, who also was a trainer. because I didn’t want to get off.” Thompson, now better known as an equine chiropractor, became a lifelong mentor. “By the time I graduated from He began taking riding lessons at the age of 9 from high school, he had left and gone out on his own,” Potts trainer Susan Mayo, who still teaches not far from his recalls. “I worked for him in exchange for my training, facility, The Brass Ring, in Burleson, Texas. Mayo’s barn which is basically how I always did it then. I trained a was a relaxed, informal hunter/jumper atmosphere, he couple of horses for other people too, but not very well.” recalls. Two years later, she helped him pick out his first horse, a Thoroughbred cross that he named Joppa. “I Not surprisingly, his parents were hesitant about his grew up with that horse, and we had a lot of adventures becoming a horse trainer, but rather than try to stop him, together,” he says. “Like most kids, I wanted Joppa to they offered him a deal. If he went to college, he could be like the TV horse Fury, to love me, but he didn’t.” ride on the side, and when he graduated, he could make That assessment doesn’t hold up when he describes his

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his own decision. “They said, ‘Enjoy this time, learn about the world, find what it is you want to do—and then go do it,’” says Potts, who enrolled at Trinity University in San Antonio. “I couldn’t have had two better parents.” After Potts’ sophomore year in college, Doug Thompson arranged for him to spend a year working for Kit Hall in Chino, Calif.—if he could convince his parents to let him go. “My dad was a very good and kind man,” Potts says, “but he was the law in the family and you didn’t cross him. I majored in English in school, so I wrote him what he later told me was one of the best ‘law briefs’ he’d ever read. I outlined all the points why I should go, what his arguments would have been, and my rebuttals. He was a logical person, so he let me go.”

Then the next day, Kit went out of town and left me to break six young horses. I did, but when he came home, I had been bucked off about five times and I had a black eye. I had one mare that was so difficult, I decided not to use a hunt saddle, and put a western saddle on her instead. She bucked me off over the horn, and I was petrified—here I am, and this mare was crow-hopping around one of these pipe round pens. She finally

As usual, his mother provided critical support in convincing his father. She had, in fact, been his mainstay all along; it was she who arranged for his riding lessons, who drove him from one activity to another as he pursued his passion for horses. “She was the one who helped me make sense of things in life,” he says. “She taught me to really dream and be all that I could be. Certainly there was my dad’s influence too, but she was my strength and guidance, from the littlest to the biggest things.” Potts’ 1977-78 tenure with Kit Hall Arabians was a period of intense learning. Back then, most trainers broke horses in a hunt saddle, and Hall directed him to get on a few of the colts for the first time in the stall. “I did that a couple of times, but it was very intimidating,” he recalls. “They were still pretty wild; one I couldn’t get off of, and all this stall stuff was after three weeks of groundwork! So I abandoned that.

Gordon Potts with his mother, Jody.

pitched me into the fence. It was a mess, but I got them all broke and rode and kept on.” Although he had done the opposite of what Hall had told him to do, there were no repercussions.

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When it was time for him to return to school, his experience had grown exponentially, and not just in the training barn. “On my days off, I drove all over southern California looking for horses to buy that I could train and resell,” he recalls. “Don’t think I ever bought one, but I went in every backyard between Chino and Mexico. I remember once looking at a little rusty fence and asking the people, ‘Is this your property line?’ And they said, ‘It’s more than that. Go past that fence, and you’re in Mexico.’

wasn’t a natural, I didn’t have a lot of feel or a great set of hands, or even a real understanding of how to train. I just had to stick with it and try to outlast whatever my obstacles were.” As his final assignment with Hall, Potts worked the U.S. Nationals, in Louisville, where he encountered Walter Chapman, a nationally-known trainer from the San Antonio area. To his astonishment, Chapman, then in the twilight of his career, offered him a job, and so when he returned to Trinity, he began training horses at Chapman’s ranch. “Chappy allowed me to take all the knowledge that I’d learned from Kit and apply it to a bunch of different horses,” he says. “It was very different from what he and others did, but he allowed me the freedom to do that and it was very nice of him.” That was the first instance of what would be a recurring phenomenon in his career: After a period of accelerated learning, he would have a job where he could quietly apply what he had learned, just sorting through his knowledge and understanding it, away from the microscope of observation.

He still smiles when he recalls his time with Chapman. “I asked him, ‘When do you want me to come?’ He said, ‘Whenever you want to.’ I had to initiate the conversation about what he would pay me. He said, ‘Whatever you want.’ So I fumbled through it and said probably the best thing was to be paid by the ride, maybe $4 or $5 per horse, and asked how often he would pay me. He said, ‘When you 1988 U.S. National English Pleasure Junior Horse Champions Salemm and Gordon Potts. need money, just come in.’” Each time Potts asked for a check, Chapman handed him the checkbook and told him to fill out a check, waving aside the lists of horses “I really learned to work hard during those years,” Potts and rides Potts offered. reflects. “It’s nonstop. My parents had taught me, and so had Doug and Susan Mayo—all the people I’d worked “That’s how we did our business,” Potts says, still with. It was an ongoing theme: if you really wanted to be impressed by Chapman’s quiet confidence. What did that successful, you had to outwork everyone. It was especially tell him? “It said to me, ‘Don’t take advantage.’” true for me, because I was not overly-gifted as a rider. I

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In the meantime, he cut a rather controversial figure at Chapman’s barn. He didn’t train like any of the other young trainers there, and by his own memory, he was pretty assertive. “The clients would complain about me,” he reports. “I experimented a lot. But he always had my back. Once in a while, if I really got out of hand, he’d pull me off to the side. But he was just great to me.”

Life In The Fast Lane Potts’ time with Chapman was a pleasant year and half, until, as his last semester began in early 1980, his father died unexpectedly. He returned home to be with his mother, rented stalls in Dallas for his horses, and finished his education at SMU. When the family’s affairs were in order, he called Gene LaCroix to ask for a job at Lasma Arabians in Scottsdale.

ahead of us. Once you knew the game, you could handle it, but it was very much a big boy’s game, which was important to know and valuable, because that is the way the world is. If you didn’t measure up, you were gone— and nobody wanted to get fired from there. We were like star athletes, like the second string quarterback that everybody likes and can’t wait to see come up—and hire. We all got jobs (when we left).” He was luckier than many, he allows. He took seven horses with him, so he knew that if he had to leave, those horses would come with him and he would at least eat. That helped him temper the Lasma decision that he should focus on western when he wanted to build experience in a broader range of training.

Over the years, his appreciation of the organization has not dimmed. “At that time in our breed, in English and western, there wasn’t really a system of training,” he observes. “People just muscled “So many people in the breed have through it. The LaCroixes, come in since there was a Lasma,” especially Gene, understood the Potts says, “and they don’t really fundamentals of how a horse works understand the impact it and the and how you train horses, and LaCroixes had.” Plenty of farms they applied them. That was the have been huge in one part of foundation of their greatness; they the industry or one division of had a method and understanding. competition, he points out, but Not that they couldn’t be tough, no one else has been so dominant because they could, but they looked across the board. In nearly every Gordon Potts aboard Infra Red. at a horse that wasn’t performing, division of the show ring, as identified its problem and said, well as breeding and the ever‘This is what I have to do to fix it.’ escalating market, Lasma was the That sounds so simple, but it is huge. That was probably leader. He went to work there in November, 1980. the single most important thing I learned there.” “It was a true education in every sense of the word, especially in learning the nature of people,” he says. “It was the best of times and the worst of times, but I wouldn’t have traded it for anything. It was a combination of graduate school and boot camp.” Ray LaCroix, now one of the top consultants in the Arabian industry, headed Lasma’s training department, with a staff of five or six assistant trainers at any one time. “We were all friends, because that was our whole world inside those fences,” Potts says. “But it was very competitive; we were each used to motivate the guy

The memories from those years come hard and fast, some profound, many funny and some personally important. There was the time he sent a horse to Lasma’s equine hospital with instructions to geld it immediately, only to have the procedure postponed because Mrs. LaCroix said the “signs were bad.” “You’ve got to be kidding me!” Potts exploded in disbelief at the time (the horse’s owners were due to visit in a few days). Now he laughs at himself. “Here I am, 22 or 23, and I’m thinking, ‘I’m just going to tell this lady this

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is going to happen!’ So I march in there and tell her I have to get it done, and she just says very slowly and calmly, ‘Gordon, it’s going to be fine. The signs are not good today, so we’ll do it tomorrow. It’ll be perfect.’ She completely disarmed me. Well, not only did the gelding go well, but a day or two later when I showed him to the owners, that went well too. … So, I learned to listen to people smarter than me.”

“So I jumped on Quavado. Sue’s husband, Steve, had always said he had ridden this horse in the mountains— they were from Colorado—and talked about how he could go down a three percent grade. By this time, I’d been riding him for six months and he was my pet; I had a pretty good bond with him. So, I’m thinking, ‘How am I going to save myself here?’ And I realized that I was going to ride him down all those stairs.”

There were also the indelible images of victory, particularly at the 1981 Canadian Nationals, where Lasma fielded a barn of 35 horses, and every one came home at least a top ten. “Several things made the show noteworthy,” says Potts. “For me personally, it was the first national championship I won. That was Half-Arabian western pleasure, on a palomino mare I’d brought with me from Texas named Shadowbrook Sugar.”

When Ray LaCroix and Sue Sidles strolled up to the warm-up ring, they found Quavado and Potts loping serenely among the other contenders as if they had been there for half an hour. “If anyone who worked for me tried anything like that today, I would jerk them away from the horse and beat them to a pulp,” Potts says candidly. “I trusted that horse—but I would never do it again.”

Sidles got on Quavado, won the championship and was euphoric. He was also the primary trainer for Potts led Quavado back to the barn— another horse, Quavado, who won a reversing his route, up all the flights Canadian national championship— of stairs—and kept his mouth shut. It but his most enduring memory of was 15 years before he related the true the class had nothing to do with story to Ray LaCroix. He remained the competition. “Western Pleasure connected with Quavado off and on Amateur was the first class after for a decade; in 1987, the gelding won lunch,” he recalls. “I was young the U.S. National Championship in and pretty wild, and I had taken a Western Pleasure with Stan White girlfriend to lunch and I was late New Fire and Gordon Potts. Jr., and the following year, back with getting back. I was supposed to warm Potts, won it again. this horse up and have him ready for (his owner) Sue Sidles, and Ray was “Some horses are great teachers to us who train them,” going to help. I had a really good groom who took good Potts reflects. “We’re teaching them, but we also learn care of me, and she had the horse all saddled and ready, from them. With Quavado, I will tell you that he was just but she’d kept him hidden and let Ray and Sue think as good the first day I rode him as he was the last day I that I had already gone to the arena. So they had started rode him. He taught me about how a horse carries himself, to walk up there, and when I came in, she said to me, and how a horse can be soft and carry himself on a draped ‘Gordon, you’re dead.’” rein and do it correctly. He was natural that way. The show was in Edmonton, where the barns were on “Back then, we rode with a lot of contact on our western one side of a wide, busy street and the arena was on horses,” he continues, “and over the years, when you talk the other. Exhibitors crossed the road on an overpass, about a drape in the reins, it’s been a very controversial and with a horse, had to walk three-quarters of the way thing. It’s much more accepted now because it’s done around the coliseum to the warm-up area. Without well. I have not always done it well, but this horse taught a horse, a person could take a short cut in the other me how it was supposed to be done. As time has gone on, direction around the building, but it involved several I’ve come to appreciate him even more.” steep flights of stairs.

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A final lesson that Potts took away from his time at Lasma applied to life in general. “Lasma got too big and imploded,” he says of the operation’s end in the mid1980s. “Then the tax laws changed and that was the nail in the coffin, but it was coming down before that. That taught me that when you reach that certain point where you’re happy, stay there.” Despite his success, he felt it was time to move on in March of 1982. “I always knew I was there for an education and I wanted to do my own deal,” he says. “Through the years as people have worked for me, I’ve always known when it was time for them to go. There is a time when you just need to do it for yourself and see what it is like.”

Bassani girls won their championships (Liana in English pleasure JOTR on Infra Red, and Loray in equitation on Scotsmans Bask), and Potts won the open titles in park and reining, which was then called stock horse. He still shakes his head that in the stock horse class, on “a very nice horse” named SAR Quinto, he did not even place in the qualifier. “Greg Harris, who is a good friend and very talented, helped me, and I’ll bet we schooled this horse for three hours the night before the final,” he recalls. “And the late, great Jack Teague suggested a shoeing change—I mean, we made some big changes.” In sand just dry enough to offer a good run, SAR Quinto and Gordon Potts won the championship.

The next day, the last event of the show was open park, and However, before Potts could the chestnut gelding New Fire set up on his own, he received was on fire. “I can remember too good an offer to refuse— on the reverse, coming around head trainer for Elmer and on the last trot,” Potts says, Maxine Bassani’s operation in the impression still vivid in his Edmonton, Alberta. They were mind. “I had cut in and got to assembling a standout group of the inside of Ray (LaCroix, on horses, some of which would the Cognac son, Cutty Water). be shown by the couple’s twin Dick Dady was the judge, and daughters, Liana and Loray. He I could see him standing there, laughs now that his big, real Above and right: 1986 Canadian National Park Horse comparing us as we went down reservation was the climate, and Reserve Champions The Whiz Kid and Gordon Potts. that rail. It was a cool thing, part of the deal he negotiated and to win was unbelievable was control of the thermostat to me.” It was especially pleasant, since at Lasma he had in the barn. (He always knew when the Bassanis came in been regarded as primarily a western trainer. because the temperature went down and he had to turn it up again.) After the Bassani operation, Potts added a succession of positions to his resume: another year with Kit Hall, “We had all kinds of really great horses—much better a period at La Verada, and a brief Texas operation horses in halter than I was qualified to show,” he notes. called Morningstar Arabians, where he created an “It was like a dream come true. I got to show and innovative sale for the owner. Along the way, he and manage them all, and it was a whole lot of fun.” Once trainer Kim Manos got married, and by the time they again, after a period of heavy-duty learning, he had an left Morningstar to work at Karho, their barn numbered opportunity to work on his own, sorting out what he more than 60 horses and had been as high as 80. had learned. It all came to fruition at the following Scottsdale, a show that won a place in history not only for its illustrious horses, but also for the torrential rains which so soaked the old Paradise Park that helicopters hovered over center ring to dry it out. Despite the inconveniences, the

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The auction for Morningstar, as he recalls, was a professional high point of the time. “It was a prize money auction, and all the horses that went through the sale, whether they sold or not, got to go back the next day and compete in a European-type system for significant


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prize money in halter, English and western,” he says. “It was a way to move those mid-priced horses that we were having a hard time selling. A win in each of the three categories paid $12,000 or $15,000 to the winner. I think we had a $2,500 consignment fee, but half went to the prize money; we charged a commission on top of that. In today’s world, you couldn’t charge that much, but you still could use that concept.” The sale is also memorable for its name: He called it The Brass Ring. When he and Kim returned to Texas after the Karho assignment, Potts adopted The Brass Ring as the name of their training and breeding operation, and he has been associated with it ever since.

Some of his difficult times came in that first decade at The Brass Ring. “From 1990 through 1997 or 1998, I was doing well enough, but I didn’t always have it together,’” he says. He credits realtor Talia Lydick, with whom he lived after he was divorced and who remains a friend, as offering insight and support that helped him to get back on track sometime around 1998. What did the adversity teach him? “It teaches you to never stop learning,” he says. “When you stop learning, you stop winning. But more than that, learning is what makes it fun and keeps it fresh. Every year I think I improve as a horse trainer. It’s fun to learn.

“When you’re coming up, I think you’re kind of in a fog,” he adds reflectively. “Then you finally become proficient at something, and A former hunter/jumper facility, the when someone throws something property that has been Gordon Potts’ new at you, it’s very scary because home for 20 years sprawls over 135 you think, ‘I’m already doing well— acres and features 93 stalls and a look, all these people are telling mirrored indoor arena. “The minute I me I’m doing well—and now you’re drove up the driveway to look at it, I telling me I have to do something just knew it was home,” he says. And else?’ Then you realize that what you so it remained even when he and Kim know is not enough, and you have ended their marriage in 1994. to keep pressing and keep learning 1999 Canadian National Half-Arabian to get better. The training now is so Three women clients have played English Pleasure Junior Horse Champions much better than it was 30 years ago Blazin Fire and Gordon Potts. integral roles in the history of The or even 10 years ago, and you have Brass Ring. “There was Julie Wrigley, got to keep learning and working who came with us from Karho,” he hard to be able to stay abreast of things. I think if those says. “Then later, Dru Cederberg helped us buy it; it was a hard times taught me anything, it was that.” bank repossession, and she bought it and we leased it from

The Brass Ring

her with an option to buy. And finally, Joy Adams was the one who was instrumental in enabling me to get it financed. “There have been a lot of very special people here,” he continues. “There were also a lot of hard times and turmoil. There were times—many, many times—that I came close to losing the farm. These three women that were scattered through the first 10 or 12 years were each in their own way special. If they hadn’t helped me, I wouldn’t have this place.” He considers the challenge of carving out his own business in horses and adds, “Any horse trainer that owns his own place has a benefactor in some way or another, someone who was kind enough to help them.”

Over the last 30 years, the list of his champions defines his rising role in Arabians. There was Quavado, Infra Red, New Fire, Salemm (in 1988, the first U.S. National Champion Junior Horse in English pleasure), The Whiz Kid, Duel, JDM Rain Dance and others, and more recently, Americanbeautie, Blazin Fire, Exxpectation, Alerro, and Victim Of Love. “They were all defining horses for me,” he says, “and there were certainly many others.” Some of them have lived out their days in a Brass Ring pasture because he simply thought it was the right thing to do. Since his marriage to Wendy Griffith, the pensioners have been joined by horses of similar importance to her.

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Wendy and Gordon Potts.

The Essence Of Horsemanship Perhaps one clue to evaluating Gordon Potts’ career as a trainer is that he himself takes the time to examine his role in the broader context of horsemanship. He agrees with the prevalent opinion that today’s methods of training are superior to those used when he got into the business, but for him, that does not imply that some of the older trainers—the ones practicing the art when he began—were not incandescent horsemen. He ticks off a quick list. “Bob Hart Sr., Red Beyer, Walter Chapman, Stan White Sr., Tom McNair, Jerry Smola (the guy who was at Lasma in the beginning, who taught Gene)—those guys, and I’m sure there were others, came from a background where people used horses,” he says. “They provided a foundation for what we do as a breed.

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“The Arabian may be the father of all light horse breeds,” he continues, “but as a show horse it is actually very new. Other than reining, the events that we compete in are different from any of the other breeds, but each one of those divisions is a beautiful thing to watch when it is done well. Today, you see that over and over again.” It was those old-time horsemen who set up the Arabian show ring and it is the trainers of today who are taking it forward, he explains, and goes on to elaborate. “In the last 10 years you see more and more trainers who understand that to make a top show horse you have to have body control. You have to have a horse that carries himself, that goes forward to his face and softens off the bridle, and in that journey as he goes forward from his hind end to his front end, he doesn’t ‘leak out’ left or right. It’s an unimpeded journey of impulsion to the face,


GORDON POTTS

and the face softens and yields. When I was coming up, that concept was unfathomable (to me, anyway). Gene LaCroix understood it all; he was the person who took it from that first group of men and developed it to where it fit English, park and western pleasure. And then other people carried it on.”

in front of his face. When he and his horse headed down into the mesquite thickets, he could see even less; he just felt the slap of the branches against his face, and he lay down f lat in the saddle. “I could only trust my horse to get us home,” he says. “That was an adventure I’ll never forget.”

He admires the innate kind of horsemanship that used to be common but is now increasingly rare, and is reminded of it every time he goes hunting in Mexico. It never fails to sharpen his perspective on horse training.

That may be another world, he nods, but the horses are the same—only the world we live in has changed. He looks for ways to bridge the gap, to strengthen his partnerships with the horses in his barn. That is the link between the past and the present in horsemanship.

“One of the ranches I hunt on in Mexico had two “After a class, you hear so vaqueros,” he says. “Those many young trainers say, guys did everything on ‘I got politicked, I should horseback; they had no have won this or that.’ truck, no electricity, Sometimes that’s true, or no guns. They made maybe”—he laughs—“the about a dollar a day, but judge you showed to is their horsemanship was just not very smart. But tremendous. Their life the reality of it is, and the depended on their horse thing that I had to learn being broke and responsive and what I try to pass on, and trustworthy. Those is that there are politics horses were broke and in every form of life. All soft—I know, because I you can do is make your hunted on one of them. horse the very best he can You can get hurt out there be. If you do that, you’ll if your horse makes a win your fair share. Don’t misstep or shies because Gordon Potts aboard NW Awesome. worry about how you got he’s not broke enough. shortchanged; worry about You can get in a wreck what you can do to be better, because I guarantee you, if and no one will find you, because you’re out in the you have any sort of visual documentation of your horse middle of nowhere.” and you’re honest with yourself, you can find something you can do to make it better.” He knows first-hand what he is talking about. “The ranches I hunt are usually 5,000 to 25,000 acres, and Looking over his life, Potts is quick to call attention I’ll be on the other end of one when the sun goes down to people who have made a difference. There are those and I’ve got to ride back,” he says, and recalls one he has already mentioned, and there are others as well. particular experience. “One night, I thought, ‘I’ll just Joe Ogden, for instance, of Circle O Arabians, became go across this couple of ridges and I’ll be home.’ I didn’t like a second father to him after his own father died. realize that my couple of ridges was actually about 10 of And of course, his wife, Wendy. Their decade together them. I figured ‘they have sage on top of them, it’ll be has been a learning experience as well; his pride in easy to get through them,’ but each one had a peak and her accomplishments is evident in any discussion. She a valley, and the valley was filled with mesquite.” basically defined the hunter pleasure division as it is known today, he says, and her ability to teach riders as There was no moon, and in the pitch-black of the well as horses is the best he’s ever seen. remote Mexican night, he could not see an arm’s length

SEP TEMBER 2010 | 187AA


GORDON POTTS

k

“I thank God every day for allowing me to be in this position, to have these wonderful people who pay me to do what I love to do. It can’t be any better than this.”

k

188AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


GORDON POTTS

“For a lot of trainers, teaching others is difficult,” he says, “mostly because they got into the business to work with horses, not people. Many of them think, ‘If I let this amateur ride this horse, they’re going to ruin it’ (when a lot of times, if an amateur can ruin it that quickly, you didn’t train it that well). A lot of times, we don’t know what to tell an amateur—for many years I struggled with that. I’ve gotten better at it, and a lot of it has come from listening to Wendy’s lessons and what she does. She is exactly the opposite of what I just described. She likes to help people and will spend hours doing it.” But it all began with his parents. “One of the things they taught me was that if you make a mistake, own up to it, learn from it, and try not to make the same mistake again,” he says. “Don’t let guilt slow you down.

Gordon and Wendy Potts’ children, left to right: Halle, Grant and Wyatt.

“Both my parents were very worldly people who were very humanistic,” he adds. “They knew how the world ran, especially my dad. But he also knew that the world was a great place, and you just had to find the goodness in it. They really had a great understanding of people and how to get along, and how to follow your dreams and attain them. So, I was very, very fortunate in that, and that is the way Wendy and I try to be with our kids.” Looking back at his own career, he has few regrets. “There isn’t another job I’d want to do and there isn’t anything else I would rather do than what I do,” he says. “I thank God every day for allowing me to be in this position, to have these wonderful people who pay me to do what I love to do. It can’t be any better than this.” ■

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SRW Doalittledance:

Sundance Kid V x Doskatanya V +/

US National Contender in: Arabian Hunter Pleasure AAOTR 36-54

^3LZSPL+VYHU:VTTLY Arabian Hunter Pleasure Open

^:[LWOHUPL:HNL

The Girl Nexxt Door:

Expectation + x Starry Spumoni +/

US National Contender in: Half Arabian Western Pleasure Amateur Maturity

^3LZSPL+VYHU:VTTLY

Half Arabian Western Pleasure Jr. Horse

^.VYKVU7V[[Z

Americanbeautie+//:

AďŹ re Bey V x Kelly Le Brock

US National Contender in: Half Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 36-54

^*HYYPL+VYHU-YP[a

Half Arabian Country English Pleasure Open

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Shamrock F A

R M S


PRESENTS 2010 U.S. NATIONAL CHAMPION

C ONTENDERS

Josh and nd Jen Jennifer n ni nife fer Qu fe Q Quintus u i ntu us  E, P Pil i ot Poin nt, TX      FM  Pilot Point, --   - E-mail: colonialwood@gmail.com o lonialw w ood@gm m ail.com

WWW.COLONIALWOOD L ON I A LWOOD.C COM OM M

SEP TEMBER 2010 | 191AA


U.S. S N National n l

Contender

EL

M ILENIO

Millennium LOA x Miss Moraduke

Arabian Western Pleasure Open with Josh Quintus 2010 Scottsdale Champion Western Pleasure Open 2010 Region 9 Reserve Champion

Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 with Robin Porter 2010 Scottsdale Top Ten AAOTR 2010 Region 9 Reserve Champion AAOTR Owner: Maudi Roe 192AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


U.S. S N National n l

Contender

C ALIENTE V IRTUOSO C A Hermoso+++/ x Crystal Blue Persuasion

Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Horse with Josh Quintus 2009 Unanimous U.S. National Champion Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Horse 2009 Unanimous Scottsdale Champion Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Horse 2010 & 2009 Unanimous Region 9 Champion Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Horse 2010 Scottsdale Champion Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Horse

Half-Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR Maturity with Robin Porter Half-Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over with Robin Porter 2009 Unanimous U.S. National Champion AAOTR 2010 Scottsdale Unanimous Champion AAOTR 2009 Unanimous Scottsdale Champion Half-Arabian Western Pleasure AATR 2009 Scottsdale Champion Half-Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 2009 Unanimous Region 9 Champion Half-Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 2010 Region 9 Champion Half-Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR Owner: Robin Porter SEP TEMBER 2010 | 193AA


U.S. S N National n l

Contender AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE

C ASSINO R OYALLE Odyssey SC x Heartbreaker RA

Arabian Western Pleasure Futurity with Josh Quintus 2010 Champion Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Horse Owner: Robin Porter

194AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


U.S. S N National n l

Contender AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE

E ASTER B ASKET

CCF

Tamar Visionary x Easter Freckles

Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Futurity with Josh Quintus Owner: Robin Porter

SEP TEMBER 2010 | 195AA


U.S. S N National n l

Contender

CSP

H ENNESSY DS Mick Jagger x MHR Martinna

Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR Maturity with Rhonda White Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 with Rhonda White 2010 Canadian National Champion AAOTR 40 & Over 2010 Canadian National Reserve Champion AATR 40 & Over 2010 Scottsdale Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 2010 Unanimous Region 9 Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 2010 Region 11 Reserve Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR Owner: Timberidge Ranch LLP

196AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


U.S. S N National n l

Contender AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE

V ERUCCI Versace x JA Flirtatious

Arabian Hunter Pleasure Open with Josh Quintus 2010 Region 9 Reserve Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure

Arabian Hunter Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 with Rhonda White 2010 Canadian National Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure AATR 2010 Canadian National Top Ten Arabian Hunter Pleasure AAOTR 2010 Scottsdale Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure AAOTR 2010 Region 11 Reserve Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure AAOTR & AATR 2010 Region 9 Top Five Arabian Hunter Pleasure AAOTR Owner: Timberidge Ranch LLP

SEP TEMBER 2010 | 197AA


U.S. S N National n l

Contender

P REGO

RL

Versace x Pasazz

Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 with Jim White 2010 Canadian National Top Ten Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR & AATR 2010 Scottsdale Top Ten Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR & AATR 2009 U.S. National Top Ten Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR

Arabian Western Pleasure Select with Rhonda White 2010 Canadian National Champion Arabian Western Pleasure Select AATR Owner: Timberidge Ranch LLP 198AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


U.S. S N National n l

Contender PA

H OLLYWOOD S TAR LBA Lode Star x Hucks Prelude V

Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Horse with Josh Quintus 2009 U.S. National Reserve Champion Arabian Western Pleasure Futurity 2010 Region 11 Champion Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Horse 2010 Region 9 Top Five Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Horse 2010 Scottsdale Top Ten Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Horse

Arabian Western Pleasure Maturity with Jim White 2010 Reserve Champion Texas State Fair

Owner: Timberidge Ranch LLP

AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE

H ALSTEADS W ATCHME Ariberry Bey V x Halsteads Sandy

Half-Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over with Rhonda White 2010 Region 9 Top Five Half-Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 2009 Scottsdale Top Ten Half-Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 2009 Region 11 Top Five Half-Arabian English Pleasure

Owner: Timberidge Ranch LLP

AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE

SEP TEMBER 2010 | 199AA


U.S. S N National n l

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J OHNNY F ANTASTIC Eqynox+ x Evening Interlude

Half-Arabian English Pleasure Junior Horse with Josh Quintus 2010 Scottsdale Top Ten Half-Arabian English Pleasure Junior Horse 2010 Region 9 Top Five Half-Arabian English Pleasure Junior Horse 2009 Unanimous Region 9 Champion Half-Arabian English Pleasure Junior Horse

Half-Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR Maturity with Jennifer Quintus Owner: Jennifer Quintus

200AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


U.S. S N National n l

Contender

CEA

I MA D IVA Poco Van Star Two x SG Labelle Solay

Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Horse with Carmelle Rooker 2010 Scottsdale Top Ten Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Horse 2009 U.S. National Top Ten Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Horse Owner: Carmelle Rooker

SEP TEMBER 2010 | 201AA


U.S. S N National n l

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O NE B RIGHT S TARR

HA

LBA Lode Star x Muskadot

Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 with Jeremy Harper Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR Maturity with Jeremy Harper 2008 U.S. National Top Ten Arabian Western Pleasure Futurity Owner: Jeremy and Chad Harper

202AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


U.S. S N National n l

Contender AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE

S ALESMAN S AM Were Dun x ABL Antiqua

Half-Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over with Lori-Kay Frommann 2010 & 2009 Region 9 Top Five Half-Arabian Western Pleasure 2010 Champion State Fair Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Owner: Lori-Kay Frommann SEP TEMBER 2010 | 203AA


U.S. S N National n l

Contender

L

M ILLANA Millano x Bullish On Doc

Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Open with Josh Quintus Region 9 Top Five Open Half-Arabian Western Pleasure

Half-Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over with Lynn Andrews Reserve Champion State Fair of Texas Owner: Lynn Andrews 204AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


U.S. S N National n l

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SK

H OT S HOT RA Hot Every Nite x SWF Porchalacja

Half-Arabian Hunter Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over with Kathy Cranford 2008 NSH Finals Champion Owner: Kathy Cranford

SEP TEMBER 2010 | 205AA


U.S. S N National n l

Contender

T AMAR C ARTIER Justafire DGL x Alsace

Arabian Hunter Pleasure Junior Horse with Josh Quintus Arabian Hunter Pleasure AAOTR 18-34 with Kim Warren Owner: Kim Warren

AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE

MD

H OLLYWOOD Afire Bey V x Bint Boakara

Arabian Country English Pleasure Open with Josh Quintus 2010 Region 9 Champion Country English Pleasure Open

Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 18 -34 with Kim Warren 2010 Region 9 Reserve Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 2009 Region 9 Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR Owner: Kim Warren

206AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


U.S. S N National n l

Contender

AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE

TA

M ATISSE Kordelas x Makarena PASB

Arabian Country English Pleasure Junior Horse with Josh Quintus 2010 Champion Country English Pleasure Maturity & Junior Horse Owner: Toskhara Arabians

SEP TEMBER 2010 | 207AA


U.S. S N National n l

Contender AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE

A VANT G UARDIAN DA

Millennium LOA+ x DA Dutchess

2010 Canadian National Champion Country English Pleasure AATR 40 & Over 2010 Canadian National Top Ten Country English Pleasure Junior Horse 2010 Region 11 Champion Country English Pleasure Junior Horse 2010 Region 11 Reserve Champion Country English Pleasure Open 2010 Region 9 Top Five Country English Pleasure Junior Horse Owner: Jennifer Quintus

L ONE S TAR F AME MD Heir Tofame+// x KA Moon River

Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 with Jennifer Quintus 2010 Scottsdale Top Ten Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 2010 Scottsdale Top Ten Arabian Western Pleasure AATR 2009 Region 9 Reserve Champion Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 2010 Region 11 Reserve Champion Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR Owner: Jennifer Quintus

208AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES

AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE


U.S. S N National n l

Contender

F IREWALL

Afire Bey V x HL Cotillion

Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 18-34 with Danielle Accurso Arabian Country English Pleasure Maturity with Danielle Accurso 2010 Region 11 Unanimous Champion Country English Pleasure AAOTR 2010 Region 11 Top Five Country English Pleasure AATR Owners: Kimberly and Danielle Accurso

R IPTIDE

VA

Triften+/ x Ramona V

Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR with Danielle Accurso Arabian English Pleasure Maturity with Danielle Accurso 2010 Region 11 Unanimous Champion English Pleasure AAOTR Owners: Kimberly and Anthony Accurso

Z euSPALOOZA Apollopalooza x Sweet Fire

Half-Arabian Park with Josh Quintus Half-Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR with Danielle Accurso Half-Arabian Park AAOTR with Danielle Accurso 2010 Region 11 Unanimous Champion Half-Arabian Park AOTR 2010 Region 11 Reserve Champion Half-Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 2010 Scottsdale Top Ten Park Open & ATR Owner: Kimberly Accurso SEP TEMBER 2010 | 209AA


T

H

E

ARABIAN HORSE IN HISTORY

Captain Sadleir's Reluctant Odyssey P A R T

I I

by Andrew K. Steen

The Slow March To Hofuf At the nearby camp of the Beni-Kháled, Sadleir placed himself under their protection and after lingering at Oomerrubeeah and a fortnight’s ceaseless riding with the “turbulent barbarians” whom he had contracted to be his guides and escort, they reached Hofuf on July 12, 1819. Upon his arrival at that oasis town, Sadleir found the Egyptian kashif (soldiers) preparing to depart. Although he shrewdly recognized that the Bedouins were the true masters of the surrounding region, he was obliged to wait and accompany one of Ibrahim’s garrisons, which was under orders to rejoin the main body of Egyptian army at Sedeir. In the company of a motley suite of Persians, Indians, Armenians and even a few Portuguese renegades (mercenaries) who had joined the Egyptian expedition

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to share in the spoils, Sadleir slowly marched amidst a baggage train of 600 camels as they trudged stage-bystage across the sterile landscape. Although uncertain of his ultimate fate, Sadleir had no choice but to pursue the rumors of Ibrahim’s disorderly departure.

Torrential Rain And The Wells Of Ream Sadleir entered the Najd from the province of Yemama, which was once so fertile and important that it was the only district of Central Arabia that was well known to ancient Moslem geographers. However, by 1819 the region was of little importance and had been virtually forgotten by the Ottomans. His route lay past the Wells of Ream, where he noted how easily the filling-in of those underground springs and a few others along the trail would render the Najd unapproachable from the eastern shores of the Gulf. Ironically, due to the repeated freak


THE ARABIAN HORSE

IN HISTORY

rainstorms that occurred during that summer, his caravan encountered far too much water, which encumbered their pace.

The Inhabitants Of Maafuha Upon arrival to the Maafuha (Riyadh), the inhabitants at first “made a show of resistance, appearing armed on the roofs,” then later cheated the Egyptians by demanding one piaster for three eggs and four Spanish dollars for every sheep. Once again, Sadleir was held up at that town because of the necessity of rescuing a beleaguered troop detachment that had been delayed at Kharj by four avenging sheikhs whose tribesmen had been treacherously executed at Ibrahim Pasha’s direct orders. Consequently, the Ateiba tribe had thrown off their allegiance to him and had become as hostile to all foreigners as the Muteyr and the Beni-Kháled.

Devastation At Dir’iyah After departing Riyadh and traveling some miles northwestward, Sadleir came upon the ravaged date plantations of Dir’iyah. Finding that Ibrahim had advanced onward, he reluctantly followed him only to discover that the Pasha had once again hit the dusty trail. Throughout his arduous journey and especially at their former capital, Sadleir observed the mind-boggling havoc that Ibrahim had wreaked upon the Wahhabies.

D. G. Hogarth emphasized how “(e)very beam and stick in the town was burnt, and every tree in the plantations and gardens cut down. … Everywhere he saw the hand of the Egyptian spoiler, in the ruined towns, the wasted gardens, the lowered morality, and the dejected and hostile attitude of the people.” Appreciating the futility of his assignment, Sadleir was tempted to abandon his mission and turn back. Although he had traversed almost half of the Arabian Peninsula, he still harbored the wistful desire of returning to the Persian Gulf, where provisions had been made with the Mutefik Arabs to take him to the British Consul at Basra. The consul could easily arrange for one of the East India Company’s gunboats to take him back to Bombay. However, “the whole country was up in arms,” and it was impossible to return the way he had come. Lacking another alternative, Sadleir rode on towards Rass, where Ibrahim was supposedly camped. Upon arriving at that town, though, he learned yet again that the elusive warrior had pulled up stakes only two days before. Thereafter, Sadleir’s narrative devotes less space to the squabbles with his guides and begins to relate more details about the Najd, its crops, commodities, water resources and the general state of the country. True

SEP TEMBER 2010 | 211AA


to his diligent character, the Irishman documented the few well-built stone houses still standing at Rass and the extensive date groves, which were irrigated from deep wells. Along the way, he observed how the geology of the Ared Mountains tended to run from a northeastern direction towards the southwest.

212AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES

Onward To Aneyzeh Following four days of forced marches down the dry waterbed of the Wadi Hanifa and over undulating steppes of sand and gravel, the ungainly caravan lumbered towards Shakra, the capital of the Woshm district. Its extensive date plantations were irrigated


THE ARABIAN HORSE

IN HISTORY by abundant fresh water not found in any other part of the Najd. At Shakar, Sadleir’s fleeting hopes were again dashed by the Bedouins, who told him that “his quarry had escaped.” Sadleir was nearing the very heart of Arabia, but Ibrahim was on the wing and had already taken flight. Nevertheless, Sadleir made notes about the various tribes and commented that the town was an important site of commerce. No other Europeans were to enter Shakar for the next 50 years. Having coerced and bullied their Beni-Kháled cameleers into the heart of their enemy’s territory, the Egyptians with whom Sadleir was traveling confiscated all of their camels and abandoned the drivers to their fates, as the caravan continued to march across the southern confines of the Nafud towards the ruined town of Aneyzeh. About the Ibrahim Pasha’s army, Sadleir remarked, “Each horse-soldier was obliged to supply himself with a camel for transport of his baggage, and on which he was occasionally to ride, the Egyptian horse being unable to undergo much fatigue, and his tardy pace rendering him an unequal match for the Arab. It was necessary at all times to have the horse as fresh as possible. However, as the government bore no part of these expenses, the troops murmured against the Pasha for exposing them to unprecedented expenses.”

The Bedouin Of Barbary And Their Feisty Arab Steeds Regarding the conscripts from North Africa that Sultan Mahmud II (r. 1808-1839) had dispatched to fight under Ibrahim Pasha’s command, Sadleir recorded how the “Magrabeens appear very much discontented with the manner in which the Pasha had dismissed them after so arduous a campaign, in which they bore a great part of the fatigues, particularly guarding convoys. His Excellency did not bestow a single dollar as bucksish on those unfortunate men who had followed his fortunes from the shores of the Mediterranean to the shores of the Persian Gulf. These men were particularly well adapted to this service, being themselves Bedouins and reared up in exactly the same habits as those in Arabia; they

were equal to any fatigue, and could exist on any nourishment, either weeds, herbs, milk, or animal, that chance might throw their way.” Sadleir also described their horses, arms and battle tactics. “They are generally more robust than the Bedouins of Arabia are and are said to be more courageous, but this I am inclined to attribute to their being better armed, and of course better acquainted with their use. Each man is mounted on an Arab horse, the appearance of which is certainly miserable, but as it is a blood animal, its performance exceeds all expectations, which one would form on first sight. They generally ride on a camel, and lead their horse ready saddled; their musket is formed like that of a match-lock; the lock is, however, the same as those used by the French, and the whole piece I imagine is either of French or German manufacture. Many of them have pistols and sabers also, but the musket is the arm, which they appear to place dependence on. They form in troops or teeps, and charge at full speed; they discharge their muskets, and, setting up a yell, dash on with their firelock, which they carry backhanded over their heads, both hands employed with the muskets; the horse is impelled forward by the constant application of the shovel stirrup. No doubt a charge of this kind would prove very destructive against a body of camel Calvary, which, feeling the severity of one attack, would not be inclined to stand a second on such equal terms, and thence might arise, the idea of the Bedouin of Barbary being a much braver man than the Bedouin of Arabia.”

Aneyzeh Upon arriving at Aneyzeh, Sadleir had reached the very core of the Arabian Peninsula. Some 45 years later, the Italian horse-dealer Carlo Guarmani rode to Aneyzeh and later praised the horses of the Atayban tribe in his book Journey to Najd as being “esteemed the best of the Arabian horses of the desert.” Because nearly all of the livestock at Aneyzeh had been plundered by the Egyptian army, Sadleir failed to elaborate upon their quality. However, he took note of the town’s central location and gave a good description of the Bedouins that dwelt nearby, then pressed on, in hot pursuit of Ibrahim Pasha, who had

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reportedly halted only two days before at Rass. To his great frustration upon arriving at that town, Sadleir discovered that while most of the Pasha’s army was encamped there, the Pasha himself was miles away and approaching Medina.

which were then visible. I was obliged to strip the saddle and mount a camel, which was nearly as much jaded as the horse. We had been thirty hours on the march, during which we had watered only once.”

An Audience With The Warlord Miles From Nowhere Sadleir had reached the end of his emotional rope. Word traveled fast in the desert and he knew that reports about the British soldier must have reached the Egyptian warlord. It was obvious that Ibrahim Pasha had no particular desire to see him; by the same token, Sadleir had never had the slightest aspiration of being the first European to cross Arabia. His only concern was finding a means of getting out of to the desolate wasteland. However, he was unable to sway Ibrahim Pasha’s deputy at Rass to provide an escort to conduct him through the war-ravaged desert, where his life would be in mortal danger should he be captured. Although the deputy bowed, smiled and lied, he emphatically refused to assume the responsibility of sending Sadleir back. Therefore, Sadleir’s only option was to ride onward to Medina, but he went grudgingly and inscribed in his diary how he was “dragged as a reluctant witness of the devastation of the Pasha’s army.” After seven uneventful days of arduous riding in the company of the large and undisciplined detachment of Egyptian troops, he reached Henake. Following two more very hard marches, Sadleir caught sight of the suburbs of the Holy City. However, he was not permitted to enter Medina. D. G. Hogarth sardonically remarked, “The Egyptians who cared nothing for the laws of Islam in Najd were the strictest of Moslems in Hijaz, and Sadleir found himself banished to Bir Ali, where (he met) Scoto, the harem doctor, who had been through the campaign.” During the night of September 5, while riding towards Bir Alee, Sadleir recorded how “as we had entered the valley leading to this spot, my horse, unable to bear my weight any longer, fell under me; the animal was so fatigued that he was totally unequal to the exertion of reaching the tents, the lights in

214AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES

Three days later and during part of the following day, four and a half months after his departure from Bombay, Sadleir was finally granted his long-awaited audience with the Pasha. Sadleir recorded how Ibrahim Pasha, “received me with affability and courteousness; and … seemed gratified that the news of his victory had reached Calcutta.” Unfortunately, he demonstrated no interest whatsoever in an alliance with the British to quell the pirate attacks in the Persian Gulf. He professed that he was only the instrument of his father and that his father “was nothing more than the servant of His Imperial Majesty the Sultan in Constantinople.” Understandably perturbed, Sadleir was unable to bind the Egyptian to anything or learn much about his plans. Sadleir’s loathing for Ibrahim Pasha’s brutal excesses were unequivocally negative and he characterized him thusly: “The late campaign entrusted to his management exhibits a series of the most barbarous cruelties, committed in violation of the faith of the most sacred promises; on some occasions to enrich himself by the plunder of the very tribesmen who had contributed to his success, and in other cases to obtain wealth of such of his vanquished enemies as had for a moment screened themselves from his rage. These unfortunate wretches, deluded by the fairest promises, have frequently fallen victims to his avaricious disposition and insatiable desire to shed human blood.” Sadleir’s opinions about the Bedouins were no less caustic. “The procrastinations, duplicity, falsity, deception, and fraudulence of the Bedouins cannot be described by one to a European in language which would present to his mind the real character of these hoards of robbers,” he wrote. “To attempt to argue with them on the principles of justice, right or equity is ridiculous; and to attempt to insist on their adhering to promises or agreements is equally fruitless.”


THE ARABIAN HORSE

IN HISTORY

The Pasha’s Looted Steeds Ibrahim Pasha had promised to arrange for Sadleir to travel with the convoy that was transporting his harem and all of the booty he had stolen to Jidda; however, it arrived at Yembo instead and remained there for the next four days.

About the final leg of his accidental odyssey and the consequences of the Pasha’s pillage of Arabian horses, Sadleir wrote, “There not being sufficient numbers of troops to form a guard, my destination has been altered to Yumbo, whither the harem is to proceed to embark for Suez. His Excellency’s stud is also to

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accompany. It consists of three hundred mares and horses, the choicest breeds of Arabia, which His Excellency has collected from the different tribes of those districts which he visited, who scarcely retain either horse or mare to propagate the species; those parts of Arabia will therefore for many years remain destitute of good horses, which will now be transferred in great numbers, independent of the number carried out of Arabia by the soldiery.”

Sadleir’s Momentous Arrival On September 20, 1819, the saddle-sore captain staggered down to the shoreline of the Red Sea. For the first time in history, a European had crossed Arabia! Unfortunately, no one was present and Sadleir was in no frame of mind to celebrate the momentous occasion. Although Ibrahim Pasha had promised to meet Sadleir in Yembo, due to a last minute decision to make a hajj (pilgrimage) to Mecca, he failed to appear. While waiting at Yembo, Sadleir recorded the arrival of a caravan of Damascus pilgrims and described the port with its whitewashed minarets and domes. Disheartened and angry, he sailed in an open boat for four days to Jidda, where he chanced

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to encounter Ibrahim Pasha again just before he was about to sail home to Egypt. Sadleir’s final encounter proved disastrous. It culminated in a ridiculous quarrel over some tattered “saddle furniture” that was to accompany an Arabian stallion and mare that Ibrahim had entrusted to Sadleir to deliver as a present to Lord Hastings. Through his interpreter, Sadleir had diplomatically objected that “the trappings could not be considered a suitable present to a nobleman … in so high an official situation under the British Government as the Marquis of Hastings now fills.” The upshot of the squabble was that Ibrahim ordered the stallion and mare disembarked from the baggala (a large ocean-going dhow), which had been specially prepared to transport Sadleir and the horses to Mocha, Yemen, and demanded that the letter he was carrying be destroyed. As the coup de grace, Ibrahim told Sadleir that upon reaching Cairo, he would write to Lord Hastings and return the sword of honor that he had been given! This was the last straw, an ignominious conclusion to all of Sadleir’s efforts and privations. The incident


THE ARABIAN HORSE

IN HISTORY extinguished the last ray of hope that the mission might yet end on a positive note. Although Ibrahim had not been responsible for the insults made to the British envoy, he had made no effort to redress them. Hogarth wrote that Sadleir “was a sick and disappointed man, alone and discredited amongst fanatics, but a proud man and true to his high standard of loyalty.”

Mocha And Passage To India Deprived of his means of transportation, Sadleir remained in Jidda until January 23, 1820, when he procured passage on the cruiser Prince of Wales to Mocha, Yemen, where he was obliged to wait six more weeks before a ship could be caught to Bombay. In the interim, unbeknownst to either Sadleir or Ibrahim Pasha, in September of 1819, Lord Hastings had precipitated events by sending a contingent of 4,000 subalterns (soldiers) to the port of Qutif. However, upon learning that the Egyptian army had already evacuated the Najd, the troops re-embarked, having suffered a severe epidemic of dysenteric fever. From Mocha, Sadleir wrote to Henry Salt, the British Consul-General in Cairo (John Lewis Burckhardt’s friend, the executor of his will, and the artist that sketched the last images of the great Swiss explorer). In the hope that he could induce Mohammed Ali into viewing “the conducts of his son and General in the light (in which he) deserves and express his disapprobation …”

Back In Bombay Following his return to Bombay, in May of 1820 Sadleir was dispatched by the East India Company on another mission to Hyderabad, “concerning the suppression of the Cutch and Khosa Banditti.” There, after 26 days of intense negotiations, he successfully concluded the Treaty of Hyderabad on the Indus. F.E. Edwards mused, “How our own statesmen must sigh for the days when one English Captain could achieve such results.” Three years later, in 1824, Sadleir was sent to Burma, where he took part in the attack on Cokain and fought at the battles of Panlang and Donabew.

His last recorded engagement was storming the heights of Napadee, where he was again “noticed in the General Orders” by General Cotton, who commanded that campaign. Sadleir’s service record indicates that on June 11, 1830, he was promoted to the rank of major “by purchase vice Blackhouse.” The final entry in his service record stated only, “India & Voyage to England.” The same document indicated that he was “retired from service, 17 February 1837,” and that he sold his majority, i.e., his commission, for £1,400. He had served abroad continuously for 22 years.

A Forgotten Man Upon Sadleir’s return to Ireland, he became the Sheriff of Cork in 1837. In 1848 or 1849, he married Miss Ridings, who was also from Cork. Unconfirmed reports that he migrated to Auckland, New Zealand, sometime around 1855 proved to be correct. His obituary in The New Zealander stated only that “George Foster Sadleir Esq., Late Major in H.M. 47th Regiment, died on December 2, (1859) at his residence, Upper Queen Street, age 73.” Although the first report of Captain Sadleir’s remarkable adventure had been read in his absence before the Literary Society of Bombay in April 1820, a complete account of his mission was not made public until 47 years after his journey, when it was disinterred from the “Bombay Secret Proceedings” in the East India Company’s archives. It was finally published in 1866, but only then because of the great interest and curiosity that William Gifford Palgrave’s 1862 trip to the Najd Desert had created. By that time, Sadleir had been dead for seven years. Sadleir’s remarkable journey across the width and breadth of the Arabian Peninsula would not be duplicated by another European for 95 years! ■ AUTHOR’S NOTE: As always, the spelling of Arab proper nouns (Qutif, Kuteef, Al-Katif, etc., Dir’ iyah, Diriyyah, Deriah, etc., Yumbo, Yembo, etc., Maafuha, Manfuhuh, etc., Najd, Nejd, Nejed, etc.,) vary ad infinitum at the whim of a given author. I have endeavored to use the spellings employed in previous AHT articles.

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The

Black Stallion Literacy Project: Inspiring Kids To Love Reading by Linda White

“Imagination can help you reach into the heavens to grasp an idea, bring it down to earth, and make it work.” —Walter Farley

Illiteracy is an enormous problem, not only in the United States, but throughout the world. Several prime examples are Middle Eastern countries we often see in the news these days. Afghanistan’s illiteracy rate is an estimated 88.6 percent overall, and 97.2 percent of Afghani females can’t read or write! Over 60 percent of Iraq’s population is illiterate, and just next door, according to a CIA survey conducted this year, only 28.1 percent of Iran’s population over the age of 15 is literate. That means close to two of three of Iran’s citizens cannot read or write. Why should we care? Why do those numbers matter? They matter because social scientists and anthropologists calculated (and observed) a long time ago that there is a direct correlation between a country’s illiteracy/literacy rates and the incidence of widespread violence it experiences. Let us not kid ourselves either. Pockets of illiteracy and abysmally poor reading and writing skills still exist in the United States. Luckily, a group of today’s educators,

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foundations, corporations, and growing numbers of volunteers from every state have helped put into play an important project, the Black Stallion Literacy Project (BSLP). In 1999, 10 years after his father’s death, Tim Farley, Walter’s youngest son, had lunch at an Italian restaurant with Mark Miller, a family friend. The two men discussed an idea for a new project that seemed eminently worthwhile. As they talked, their imaginations took wing and raced away into the idea’s endless possibilities. They could foresee that it would bring Tim’s father’s stories to life and spark children’s interest in reading. Growing up with The Black Stallion, Farley saw the positive influence his father’s books had on millions of children and their families. Walter Farley and Miller’s mother, Al-Marah Arabians’ owner Bazy Tankersley, were close friends; thus, Walter Farley and The Black Stallion were a part of Miller’s life, too.


THE BLACK STALLION LITERACY PROJECT “Walter Farley loved horses, and horse people,” Miller recalls. “On June 26, 1989, he celebrated his birthday with us at Arabian Nights Dinner Theater. He had suffered a major stroke, from which he never recovered, and although he still tried to put in those famous 90-hour weeks, the stroke’s lasting effects made him bashful. Then he got cancer, and he was in a wheelchair by that time, so we sent an ambulance for him. We invited all his old Arabian horse friends to the party, and all the Arabian Nights performers had brought all their old The Black Stallion books for him to sign. He really enjoyed that evening, which was his last public appearance. He died in Venice, Fla., a few months later in October. Miller and Farley were in total agreement with the project’s objective: “Children who learn to read succeed; children who don’t, fail, both in school and in life,” states Mark Miller. “The more literate an individual is, the likelier it is that he or she will lead a happy life.” A lifelong Arabian horseman, Miller owns and operates the popular Arabian Nights Dinner Theater, Home of The Black Stallion, in Kissimmee, Fla. He explains the connection. “When I was developing the entertainment concept for Arabian Nights, Farley told me he wanted to have The Black Stallion in the show,” Miller explains. “He told me that he had always wanted a place where children could come and see horses ‘in person,’ and could The Black Stallion become the Arabian Nights icon?” Succeeding black Arabian stallions portray the dinner show’s Black Stallion. (The dinner show is unforgettable, by the way; a spectacular don’t-miss for

any traveler who is even close to the quadrant of the United States that contains Florida.) In some areas of the United States, 40 percent of grade school children have never had a book of their own! This is part of the reason the original idea remains essentially in place today. Schools are contacted, agreements are signed, and hard-bound copies of The Black Stallion are given to fourth and fifth graders. Paperback copies of one of Walter Farley’s later Little Black Pony stories go to thrilled first graders. Both age groups get to keep their books forever. Eventually, as the BSLP spreads, that 40 percent without books of their own could dwindle and disappear altogether. Years of success prove that Farley and Miller’s idea was more than just a snappy little plan that sounded like it might be a winner. The Black Stallion Literacy Project and The Black Stallion Literacy Foundation (BSLF) was created in 2000 to raise and manage funds for the much requested project’s implementation in every state’s elementary schools. It is no wonder; the concept is changing children’s lives. The formula is truly magical. In the years since The Black Stallion Literacy Project was introduced, Walter Farley’s books about horses, combined with the time their young readers get to spend with the real, live article, is providing hundreds of thousands of elementary school kids with the encouragement and support to give reading a try and ideally, to learn to love it. The seeds from which the project grew were planted much earlier, of course.

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THE BLACK STALLION LITERACY PROJECT When Walter Farley started writing The Black Stallion he was still in high school, and it’s a good bet he never imagined what lay in store for his fictional steed. He completed the book and got it published in 1941, when he was a student at Columbia University. Its immediate success prompted him to pen a sequel, The Black Stallion Returns, in 1945. Son Of The Black Stallion followed two years later. Eighteen more sequels, a television show and a hit movie later, he co-authored a 19th sequel, The Young Black Stallion, in 1986 with his older son, Stephen. Farley passed away, shortly before The Young Black Stallion’s publication, but he and The Black Stallion would live on, introducing millions of children and adults to the Arabian breed, and kindling in them the joys of reading. In addition to The Black Stallion series, Farley wrote a number of other books. Little Black, a Pony; Little Black Goes To The Circus; and The Little Black Pony Races were created later in Farley’s life specifically to help young children learn to read. A great advocate of education and literacy, Farley believed that enjoying reading was essential to a rewarding, happy life. He knew the project was on the drawing board, and asked that his fictional Arabian stallion become the literacy project’s icon. He would be thrilled, we suspect, that The Black Stallion Literacy Project now prints Farley’s Little Black Pony books, and hands them out to thousands of first graders every year. The Black Stallion Project is available to children in every state. “The Black Stallion Literacy Foundation helps children discover the joys of reading and the excitement of learning through the wonders of live horses and Walter Farley’s Black Stallion books,” begins the eloquent text on the BSLF website. “Our goals are to spark the imaginations of first graders so they will want to learn to read, and to motivate fourth and fifth-graders so they will experience the joy of reading.”

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To date, the BSLF has touched the lives of hundreds of thousands of children in grade schools throughout North America. The BSLF has also joined in creating successful programs with Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs, the Girl Scouts of America and many others. There are BSLF project coordinators in every state. In Arkansas, the BSLF project coordinators are Laura and Gene Graves, who came on board six years ago. Each year, they are committed to hosting a one-day gathering to introduce The Black Stallion Literacy Project and BSLF to horse people and non-horse people, young and old. The annual event takes place at the Graves’ Round Mountain Arabians in the Ozark Mountains near Mountain View, Ark. “The program is so successful here in Arkansas,” says Laura Graves. “Why don’t Arabian owners everywhere host something like this at their farms and ranches each year? I guess people think they don’t know enough to tell people about the BSLF program and how it fosters the magical connection between children and Arabians. They don’t have to know everything! It takes no skill to do this, except to love your Arabian horses. “One day a year, I have 48 friends who come here with 150 to 200 children,” she explains. “We can probably expect 250 or more next year. The children just light up when they meet our Arabian horses! They are thrilled. This one-day, annual gathering gives the children a little window into the magic of the horses. “The Black Stallion Literacy Project has really grown,” she adds. “Teachers, librarians, educators of every kind are so enthusiastic. ‘The kids love it!’ they tell us. Horses and the joys of reading can make immeasurable differences in children’s lives. We have given 22,000 books to kids in Arkansas alone this year, and more than 50,000 books in the last five years.


THE BLACK STALLION LITERACY PROJECT

prick their ears and never take their eyes off the reader. It “We call elementary schools directly, tell them about the looks as if they are listening … and maybe they are. program, and ask if their first graders and fifth graders might benefit from what we would bring them. They “At our one-day gatherings,” relates Graves, “we play one almost always agree enthusiastically. We provide the game with horse-related flash cards. The picture might class teachers with an information packet, and we have a be ‘water,’ or ‘brush,’ or ‘bridle.’ They are so excited contract with each school, outlining what we will do and when they can identify almost provide, and what they will do everything. The Black Stallion and provide. The deal, we tell Literacy Project touches so the children, is that they have “When children love reading, they are many areas of a child’s life. to read part of the book before they get to meet the live horses. infinitely more likely to be successful, They learn to love animals, and to think about, and be We ‘test’ them at a pizza party, and to have higher self-esteem and responsible for, something where we play ‘20 Questions” other than themselves. They with questions—and they’re self-confidence.” don’t get to ride the horses, but hard questions—based on the they do get to meet them and Little Black Pony story they have pet them. I can’t tell you what interacting with an animal received. Many of the kids will get as many as 18 so large, so beautiful, and so intelligent does for their correct. The book’s content has stayed with them. self-esteem! “Inspiring kids to learn to read and to love reading are “What a matchless gift to give a child … to give to many gifts that keep on giving,” continues Graves. “When children! This program has so much to offer. We are children love reading, they are infinitely more likely to changing children’s lives in a positive way. Just imagine: be successful, and to have higher self-esteem and selfif we could have every child touched positively by The confidence. Can we change their lives? If we only change Black Stallion Literacy Project, what a difference it one life, we have done our job, but experience shows would make! I want to say to other Arabian horse owners that we change many lives. The kids who come here love it when they get to read to one of the horses from their everywhere,” concludes Graves, “to open your doors and be part of this experience!” ■ book. When a kid is reading to them, the horses will

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Paul Heiman

Impossible Dreams Come True by Linda White

The evidence is everywhere. In the kitchen, living and dining rooms, the walls are fi lled with framed color photos of high-trotting Arabians and Half-Arabians under saddle or in harness. Each horse is wearing a floral garland, and each one is making a victory pass or standing in the spotlight, being awarded a trophy, a plaque and a big tricolor ribbon for some coveted national performance title most of us only dream about. The same man, grinning from ear to ear, is riding or driving the horse in almost every photo. In the main hallway, huge rose garlands festoon the staircase leading to the second floor. Interspaced between them are the tri-color ribbons with long red, blue, yellow and white streamers that come with every national award. On the wall beneath are a dozen or more engraved plaques, more championship ribbons, and national-winning moments captured by clever show ring photographers. Trainer Matthew Siemon is up in a few images, or his father, Chuck, Paul Heiman’s trainer for the last 16 years, but most often, the exhibitor in the picture

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is Heiman, our host today. He leads us into an adjoining alcove, where a wall of shelves holds 10 or 12 bronze sculptures, familiar because they are given only to U.S. and Canadian national champions and reserve champions. Throughout the house, the handsome displays’ understated elegance and clearly treasured contents confi rm public knowledge about Heiman’s horse connection, but there is a measure of gratitude and humility here that no one mentioned. All the awards and trophies represent Heiman’s long held dream—a dream that once seemed so impossible. When he was voted the 2007 Arabian Professional & Amateur Horseman’s Association Amateur English Horseman Of The Year, his accomplishments that year included three 2006 Canadian national championships, in country English pleasure AATR and AAOTR, and pleasure driving AOTD; two 2006 U.S. Top Tens in country English pleasure AAOTD and AAOTR; multiple 2006 regional amateur titles, and numerous 2006 Arabian and Half-Arabian country English titles in driving


PAUL HEIMAN: IMPOSSIBLE DREAMS COME TRUE and under saddle. And that was only in 2006. Today, four years later, Heiman’s horses have won many more national titles, regional and class A championships, all in performance. More remarkably, Heiman, now 83, has usually been on the lines or in the saddle!

profoundly affected when they learned that their friend, ally and tireless supporter would no longer be there to champion their causes.

Joyce was an active Region 14 member, well-known and highly esteemed for her support of regional youth programs and Camp Jabez. A Buckeye charity From the moment we turn since its inception, Camp into the farm’s well kept, Jabez is the ministry stone-pillared entrance Joyce and Paul Heiman celebrated their 60th Anniversary at the 2009 Region 13 Show. Chuck and Luann Siemon on this sunny, unseasonably started for at-risk children. warm day, the place begins Most people who knew Joyce Heiman also knew that to work its magic. We press the button on the call box, from the day of their first horse show, she unstintingly identify ourselves, a male voice welcomes us, and the iron supported her husband’s favorite pastime. She loved gates slide back. We head down the long road, noticing him, she loved Arabian horses, and she made enduring the miles of board fencing, healthy maple trees every 250 friendships at every show. She was always on the rail when feet, and the fields of fat, green soy beans planted on either Paul was in the ring. side. A small lake to the right glitters with sunlight and blue sky. No cattails here. “Her death has been a tremendous blow for everyone who knew her,” Ohio Buckeye Sweepstakes Manager Cindy This is Valley Hei Arabians, the home Paul and Joyce Clinton says. “She touched so many lives.” The 2010 Ohio Heiman dreamed of, built for themselves and moved into Buckeye Sweepstakes was dedicated to Joyce Heiman. in 1986 to better enjoy life with their Arabian horses. For almost a quarter-century the couple lived here in quiet The couple had three sons: Harry, 52; Mark, 56; and contentment, enfolded by a stillness broken only by bird Gary, now 59. Each of them inherited the entrepreneurial and insect sounds, and the occasional whinny. Heiman spirit with their individual gifts, but Gary was the one most willing to take risks. He opened a plant for On the farm are countless reminders of their hope-fi lled, the family’s company, Standard Textile, in China five mostly joyous life together. They were inseparable from years ago, and earlier, developed manufacturing operations the beginning, and in 1985, they added Arabian horses in Israel, Pakistan and the Philippines. He also moved the to their journey together. When Joyce, Paul’s wife of 61 company out of its middle man position; today Standard years, died in January 2010, their dream faded away. She Textile Co. manufactures its own products. By eliminating was his only love, his partner in life, and most ardent fan. their middle role, the business, now worldwide, continues “We met when a friend of my sister’s was having a New to provide its clients with high quality products at the Year’s Eve party, and arranged a blind date for Joyce and reasonable prices their self-sufficiency creates. me,” Heiman says. “She was 15 and I was 18.” He raises his eyes, looking at a place far back in time, remembering Heiman senior still goes to the office one or two days that night. “I fell in love with her the moment I saw her.” a week “ just to look at balance sheets and talk with the employees,” he assures us as we sit at the kitchen table, Joyce Heiman’s death fi lled many hearts with grief: enjoying the hot tea and cinnamon rolls he has graciously she had made dozens, and more likely, hundreds of served. He looks out the window at the dense, oldfriends during her more than 25 years in the Arabian growth woods bordering the property behind the house. horse community. Ohio’s Arabian horse people were

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PAUL HEIMAN: IMPOSSIBLE DREAMS COME TRUE

“When I bought the 120 acres around 1982, all that was here was that 212-year-old stone house over there.” He gestures behind him, indicating the structure, barely visible through the trees. “Frank Robinson, our farm manager of 26 years, lives there with his family. Buying this property was the best thing I ever did. “Several years after we bought the land, we built this house and the eight-stall horse barn you see across the driveway,” he says. “We put up all the board fencing, dug the lake, put up the other buildings and improvements, and moved here in 1985. It wasn’t long before Joyce was outdoors constantly, working with the horses, feeding and handling them and giving them baths. They all adored her—to the point that Chuck Siemon asked her please to not come around before any of our horses’ classes. It got so bad that when any of them saw her or heard her voice, they would get so distracted that they forgot all about everything else.” The barn has six distinguished residents, show ring stars from Heiman’s past. Most were national champions, reserves or top tens, in typically long careers. The eldest aristocrat is Tsabre Al Sufi, now 29, who, his owner admits, taught him to ride. The other occupants are 26, 24 and 22 years old. Heiman purchased the sporty bay Avatar Al Sufi gelding 20 years ago. Bred and raised at Jan and Jim Senneker’s Avatar Arabians, Tsabre Al Sufi already had a 1989 U.S. National Top Ten Pleasure Driving AOTD and a 1986 Canadian National Top Ten English Pleasure AOTR to his credit. For Heiman, he earned five more U.S. and Canadian National top tens in country

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English pleasure and country English pleasure driving, as well as 1995 and 1996 Canadian National Reserve Championships in Informal Combination. We all like to think that our childhoods were unique, one-of-a-kind adventures, but Heiman’s childhood years in Nazi Germany, and later, in Cincinnati, Ohio, eclipse most children’s experiences. Paul spent his fi rst seven years in Munich with his parents, Karl and Else Heiman, and an older sister, Lottie, in relative prosperity. Karl Heiman, Paul’s father, came from a tiny Bavarian farming village that was the home of only 100 families. The hamlet’s rural setting suited Paul perfectly when he visited his grandmother, a widow, during the summer from the time he was 5 until he was 11. An uncle who lived outside Munich let his small nephew ride a nice saddle horse he kept, and kind neighbors across the road put the boy up on the draft horses that were elemental to their livelihood. “One day I was riding my uncle’s saddle horse down the country road, showing off, I suppose,” Heiman recalls. “I noticed that my father had come outside and was watching me ride. ‘Look at me!’ I shouted to him. Sensing that I wasn’t paying attention, the horse spun around and gave me a fast ride back to the barn. I tried to turn him, but he paid no attention to me. I was so embarrassed, especially since my father was watching!” As newlyweds, Paul and Joyce trail rode when they honeymooned on Mackinac Island, but soon, raising three children and growing a business became much higher priorities. Years later, as they planned the move to their


PAUL HEIMAN: IMPOSSIBLE DREAMS COME TRUE Berry Supreme, became the 2006 Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 40 and Over winner with Heiman in the irons. When the announcer informed spectators that Hes The Berries had won the national championship, the crowd jumped to its feet, crying, clapping and hugging each Supreme Decision, Paul Heiman, Tsabre Al Sufi and Joyce Heiman. other, overjoyed by the popular exhibitor A colleague at work and his perfectly-mannered gelding’s good fortune. suggested that they might prefer Arabians, who were Heiman is universally admired by Arabian community a little more spirited, intelligent and challenging than members all over North America, and has made a great many breeds, and Arabians it has been ever since. They many friends (and admirers) over the years. lost Wisteria, their fi rst Arabian, last year at 29. They lost Supreme Decision, a show-stopping Half-Arabian by ProHis wife’s lingering illness clouded Heiman’s success, Fire, to cancer in 2000. Heiman had purchased Supreme however. By 2006 she was too ill to make the trip to Decision, or “Bubba” to his devoted owners, in November, Regina, Sask., where the Canadian Nationals has been 1993. held since 1987. Joyce Heiman insisted that her husband go anyway. Knowing that she was anxiously awaiting a “Losing Supreme Decision was one of the hardest things full report, he called her immediately after his last class to that has ever happened,” the gelding’s loving last owner tell her the good news: they had won three 2006 Canadian admits. “He was only 14.” National championships. An impossible dream, tripled! Supreme Decision had six national titles when Heiman Although he is well known for his enviable show career bought him, and Heiman won his fi rst national and boundless devotion to Arabians and Half-Arabians, championship on him. The gifted chestnut gelding there is a chapter of Heiman’s life of which few people are easily added four more U.S. or Canadian National park aware. He has had unusual success with Arabian horses championships, nine reserves and four top tens, showing and in the textile business, and in his loving 61-year in open and amateur with Heiman or Matt Siemon. marriage to Joyce. He also takes great pride in his family Add to that enough regional and prestigious class A and their accomplishments, but this positive outlook on championship trophies and tri-color ribbons to fi ll a goodlife becomes all the more remarkable when it is understood sized closet. And this was back when park classes had a that Heiman is a Holocaust survivor. dozen or more talented entries in the ring every time. newly-completed farm, they told each other, “We’ll get two riding horses!” The couple bought two Tennessee Walking Horses, just to ride recreationally around the farm and the thinly-populated countryside around them, but neither found much challenge in the mild, naturalgaited animals.

One of many memorable Heiman achievements came about at the 2006 Canadian Nationals. Heiman, who was 80, won the first of two national championships on Monday in Arabian country English pleasure driving AOTD with CL Berry Supreme (Hucklebey Berry x Baskins-Belle, by Mon-Ta-Basko). Two days later, Hes The Berries, Heiman’s 1998 chestnut full brother to CL

Ah, but he was luckier than most. He and his parents and sister escaped from Munich, where Paul was born in 1926, and ultimately landed in the United States in November 1940. Still, the little family’s unexpected bits of luck, and the help from old friends and less likely sources, could not erase the experiences the young Heiman witnessed and lived through in Nazi Germany.

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The Early Years Adolph Hitler came to Munich from Vienna in 1913. He was accepted into the German Army, he served for four years, and he then returned to Munich after World War I. He soon joined the city’s German Workers’ Party, which renamed itself the National Socialist German Workers’ Party (NSDAP) in 1919. The NSDP acronym was soon corrupted to ‘Nazi.’ Later that year, it was official: the NSDAP became the Nazi Party. Small, unprepossessing, and increasingly bitter over a succession of failures, Hitler blamed his and his country’s every adversity on a nonexistent Jewish cartel. Hitler became Germany’s hate-mongering strongman. He made his fi rst power play in Munich in 1923. One chilly, early November night, his Nazi henchmen surrounded a large, popular beer hall, where many well-placed government officials were known to refresh themselves after work. But Hitler’s poorly planned revolt fell fl at. The next morning the city’s armed police force shot down 16 of his “storm troopers” and their disappointed leader, enraged, was arrested and convicted of treason in a highly publicized trial.

“We were not wealthy, but we lived comfortably,” Heiman offers. “My father was in the textile business. He sold yard goods to stores and small retailers in the area, but the country’s economic crisis made it so that nobody could afford to buy from him anymore. When my father’s business dried up, my mother went to work for a retail clothier, doing alterations, and we were able to get by, if barely.” In the years before 1933, intermittent ant-Semitic demonstrations and violent outbursts characterized Munich life. Jews had been in the city since the 13th century, but atrocities had been committed against them from time to time, and anti-Semitic bitterness lingered in many hearts. The Heiman family had arrived in 16th century Munich, only to find themselves the inadvertent victims of widespread fear and mistrust. They and thousands of other Jews were repeatedly driven from the city. They always returned, hopeful, only to suffer again the repeated violence and hatred many fellow citizens seemed to reserve for anyone different from themselves.

Setback after setback nearly put the Nazi Party out of business as, locked away in Landsberg Prison, Hitler’s hatred fed on itself as he obsessed about Jews, convinced that they bore sole responsibility for his failed revolt and subsequent imprisonment.

Dachau, the fi rst concentration camp, was built near Munich, giving Nazi officials a convenient place to confi ne Munich’s Jewish community, a population of 10,000, among which numerous cultural, social and charitable organizations thrived. But by 1937 the violence, discrimination and fear encouraged by Nazis, their henchmen and thugs, began to roll over Munich’s Jews. Heiman remembers the growing terror that swept over them.

Hitler and his party profited from the events following the United States’ 1929 stock market crash. When Germany was in essence bankrupted, the German people’s anger and dissatisfaction with their government rose alarmingly. Unemployment skyrocketed in September 1933, allowing Hitler and his now carefully sanitized Nazi Party to seize real power. In Munich, the Nazi Party’s unofficial birthplace, the Heiman family’s fortunes began to slide away.

“I went to public school until I was 11, when Hitler prohibited all Jewish children from attending school,” Heiman explains. “A group of rabbis opened a school for us in a temple, where they taught us themselves. We probably didn’t learn much, but I realize now that the rabbis just wanted to keep us busy and off the streets. I rode my bike to school; it was a 45-minute ride. That was the morning after Kristallnacht, but we didn’t realize what

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PAUL HEIMAN: IMPOSSIBLE DREAMS COME TRUE had happened. A friend warned us that something awful was going to happen the night of November 9th, so at his urging, that evening we went up to the third floor, where we heard nothing. But let me go back to the friend who warned us about Kristallnacht.” Kristallnacht, literally translated “Crystal Night,” was a violent, organized, anti-Jewish pogrom the Nazis declared just retribution for a German-born Polish Jew’s assassination of a German diplomat in Paris. More than 90 Jews were slaughtered that night. An estimated 30,000 were arrested and sent to Dachau and other concentration camps, close to 300 synagogues were ransacked and burned to the ground, and thousands of Jewish homes and businesses were destroyed in mountains of broken window glass and anything else that could be shattered or broken. The Hitler Youth, the Gestapo (Hitler’s crack enforcement police) and the SS carried out the long, horrific night’s death and destruction. Many historians see the event as the genesis of the Holocaust that followed. Heiman explains their friendship with the man whose warning protected them that night. “My father built his textile business by traveling to smaller towns and villages, selling yard goods,” he explains. “A little while after the close of World War I, a woman my father sold yard goods to begged for his help. Could he free her 18-year-old son, who had been mistakenly imprisoned? Father went to several people he knew who had some influence. He told them about the young man, and they were able to help. He got the woman’s son released. The son studied and became an accountant, and never forgot his indebtedness to my father, the man who had gotten him out of prison.”

By 1933, Nazis had become the country’s second-largest party, and the elderly German President Paul von Hindenburg appointed a political opponent, Adolf Hitler, his Chancellor. (Von Hindenburg had been re-elected Germany’s President in 1932, defeating Hitler for the post. The Chancellor’s appointment, that was to have appeased the power-hungry Nazi leader, backfi red when Hitler assumed total control.) “When Hitler came to power, what Hitler wanted, Hitler got,” Heiman recalls. “If Nazi soldiers saw you on the street and you didn’t salute and say, ‘Heil Hitler!’ the soldiers would shoot you. The same thing happened if you didn’t join the Nazi Party—you were gone. “The morning after Kristallnacht, I biked out to our temple school. As I approached, I saw the Gestapo there, setting fire to the building. I quickly stopped my bike, turned around and pedaled home as fast as I could. As I raced along, I noticed what I had not seen on my way in: there was shattered glass and broken windows—anything else that could be broken or shattered—everywhere, and everything in the Jewish shops I saw had been destroyed, broken or burned, and thrown out into the street. I was terrified and confused. I ran up the stairs to tell Mother what I had seen. “When Hitler came to power,” he continues, “he built a Gestapo training ground right across the boulevard from our house. The same friend who had warned us about Kristallnacht told us to leave our home right away and move out of the city. The economy took a big hit when Hitler came to power, and he began to impose stringent measures against Jewish businesses and individuals. All my father’s customers lost everything. Nobody could buy yard goods, which meant that my father couldn’t earn any money to support his family. We had run out of money, so when our friend warned us the next time, we moved from a 10-room house into a one-room, third floor walk-up with a hot plate on the outskirts of town— but we were alive!” The same friend next told the family to leave Munich, and Germany if possible, immediately. “Get out!” he told Karl Heiman. “They’re going to arrest you!”

A picture of some of the individuals who were arrested during Kristallnacht.

“The next day the Gestapo did come and arrest my father,” Heiman says. “Why? To get rid of another Jew

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PAUL HEIMAN: IMPOSSIBLE DREAMS COME TRUE and to grab his business, his money and everything of value he might still have. The Gestapo were thieves. They would take artwork right off the walls, and cars, gold jewelry, bank notes, fi ne silver, and anything else they saw that they liked. They also arrested 15- and 16-year-old Jewish boys and took them to Dachau or another concentration camp, but I was only 12, so they left me alone. I was no threat to them.

Bundesarchiv, Bild 102-14468 / Unknown / CC-BY-SA

father, out of Germany, we would need passports, visas and tickets to—someplace. And the three of us wondered if there were even the slightest chance that my father could be gotten out of the concentration camp to go with us. “Miraculously, our friend was aware of our critical situation, so he arranged—we never learned how—to have my father released and sent home that day. To this moment, to protect our wonderful benefactor and any of his family or descendents who may still live there, we have never revealed his identity. “Our friend, the CPA my father had gotten out of prison after World War I, always had the latest information to share with us because he was the Nazi Party’s financial expert. The Fuhrer had personally selected him, he told us. ‘But why are you working for the enemy?’ my parents asked him, horrified. In their eyes, working for Hitler and his goons betrayed them, the entire Jewish population and everything they stood for. “‘You know that if you refuse to join the Nazi Party, they shoot you,’ he reminded them. ‘I wasn’t ready to die yet, so I went through the motions of joining, and when Hitler himself chose me to be the Nazi Party’s financial authority, of course I agreed. Had I refused, we wouldn’t be having this conversation; I would be dead.’ “My mother had wanted to leave earlier, but it was tough to go anywhere, because Hitler kept all the Jews’ money and valuables. Then our friend phoned to tell us we had about 24 hours to get away. ‘Get out of Germany now, while you still can,’ he urged my mother, and she agreed. But to get our little family, penniless and without my

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“I’m sure you understand,” he adds, smiling kindly but shaking his head in an unspoken “No,” when we ask for a name. Then he continues. “When this same friend brought Dad home, we hardly recognized him. His head had been shaved, he was very weak because he had lost 50 pounds in 34 days, and we could see that the soles of his feet had open sores. He could hardly walk. He had been starved, he told us (unnecessarily). They had taken away his shoes and forced him to stand barefoot for hours every day, beginning at 5: 00 a.m. He sat down painfully, and watched us while our friend helped us pack two suitcases, all we would be allowed to take, with what little we had. “The friend then handed us an envelope containing four legal passports and train tickets he had gotten for each of us. We thanked him, over and over, weeping. When my father tried to express his gratitude (through his tears), our friend just smiled and said, ‘Now, we’re even.’”


PAUL HEIMAN: IMPOSSIBLE DREAMS COME TRUE Although the passports and train tickets have had been provided, Paul’s mother, Else, wanted to know what was the family going to do about money. “While my father was still earning money, he suspected that business was going to dry up, so he began hiding money,” Heiman says. “He had hidden about $10,000, but we wondered how we could take it with us. Father told my sister to go buy talcum powder, which then came in metal canisters. When she came back he poured out the powder, put some of the money in each canister, and poured the powder back in on top of it. Within 24 hours, we left for Zurich. All we had was the $10,000 Dad had hidden. We would need it. “Every Jew attempting to leave the country had to pay a 1,000 percent duty on the contents of the two suitcases that were allowed, but every Jewish bank account had been closed, so we couldn’t get any funds out to take with us,” Paul continues. “Because the Nazis knew that none of us had any money, there were 20 big containers on the street to hold the furniture and other valuables we left behind to pay the huge duty. “Luggage was stored in the baggage car. At the Swiss border, the Nazi guards opened the car and took out all the suitcases to inspect the contents. The Gestapo that came into our car took away the two people sitting next to us. We held our breath, terrified that they had found the money hidden in the talcum powder canisters, but they never found it. If they had, that would have been the end of us. “Our visitors’ visas only allowed us to stay in Switzerland for two weeks, and no work permits were being issued. When our Swiss visas expired, we went on to France for two more weeks, but again, no work permits were to be had. We had six-month visitors’ visas for England,” Heiman says. “At the end of the six months, the Brits realized that because of the war, there was no safe place they could send us, so our visas were extended through December but no permanent work permits came with the extensions. While we were in England, I attended a small boys’ school that charged tuition to all students after the sixth grade, but the school administrator allowed me to attend without charging. I think he felt sorry for us.

“In December 1939, Mother, Dad, Lottie and I tried to leave England, but because we had only the extended visitors’ visas and no work permits, we couldn’t leave.” There was another roadblock as well. “A doctor who had examined me in Germany had told me I had trachoma (a contagious viral disease that causes the conjunctiva of the eye to become inflamed and painful). I was sure there was nothing wrong with my eyes, but the doctor, who was probably a Nazi Party member, insisted I had trachoma, and operated on my eyes. When British officials saw the trachoma diagnosis from the German doctor, they said I couldn’t go anywhere. Dad and Lottie were finally allowed to sail on ahead, but Mother stayed in England with me. The irony is that a just few years later, penicillin would wipe out diseases like trachoma, but at the time, there wasn’t much doctors could do. “When several British doctors said they saw no evidence of trachoma, Mother and I were finally allowed to leave. We sailed for the United States on a Dutch ship that was part of a 30-ship American convoy heavily guarded by submarines. Because we made the voyage in the ship’s lowest level, we were seasick the whole trip, but we made it. When we sailed into New York Harbor, Dad and Lottie were waiting for us on the pier.” Despite letters from the British doctors dismissing the trachoma diagnosis, the lingering stigma got Paul shipped to Ellis Island and put into a cell with a group of men from the Far East. The 13-year-old was given black-and-

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PAUL HEIMAN: IMPOSSIBLE DREAMS COME TRUE to every station, and one by one, he made the men stamp the documents ‘yes.’ He even walked out to the big hall with me, and there was Dad, waiting, just as he did every day, and hoping to see me. Then the doctor said, ‘Let’s go get your mother out of here, too.’ He went back into the cells area and brought her out, too.”

Ellis Island in New York Harbor, N.Y.

white striped pajamas like that of his Asian cellmates. “We looked like a gang of criminals,” he remembers. “Dad would send me a note daily, along with a candy bar. He would write inspirational messages like, ‘Have faith in God, son. He will give you the strength to get better.’ I knew there was nothing wrong with me, but I appreciated the daily notes—and the candy bars. “A volunteer doctor would come out to the island every day to examine the detainees who had something wrong with them. They would ignore my letters from the British docs, barely look at my eyes, and sign a diagnosis report saying I still had trachoma. Then I had to take the report, with a request for release, around to each of five men at desks in an administration room. They all would just stamp it ‘No’ without even looking at the letters. Officially, I still had trachoma. Mother insisted on staying at Ellis Island too for as long as it took to get me released. “On my sixth or seventh day there, a Jewish doctor came out. Because I was a Jew, he listened to my story and examined my eyes carefully. He told me that there was absolutely nothing wrong with my eyes and signed a medical report to that effect, along with a request for my release. I told him what had been happening with the five stamp-holders at the desks, so he walked around with me

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The Heiman family was united once more, benefiting from someone else’s kindness, generosity and desire to see injustices righted. The couple and their two children headed for Cincinnati, Ohio, where a cousin who had left Germany well before the nick of time now lived. After looking for months, Karl was unable to find work in the industrial Ohio River city (it was still the Great Depression), so he started his own textile business again, this time with the last of the $10,000 he had squirreled away in Munich. His wife, Else, went to work 48 hours a week, doing alterations for a Cincinnati clothier. His son remembers that period well. “People would say to us, ‘After all, you Jewish people are the chosen race,’” he says. “My dad would always reply, ‘Choose somebody else.’ Because we all had to pitch in and contribute, if we were going to survive in our new country, Dad told me I should leave school at 16 and learn a trade. He suggested I might enjoy auto mechanics, so I left school and for two years, I earned $10 to $15 a week as a mechanic for a local Buick dealership. Then, beginning when I was 18, I worked days and went to night school for two years to get my high school diploma. After that, I went to college at night school for five years. When the economy began to turn around, Dad’s business started to grow. When I came aboard, Standard Textile was supplying hospitals and nursing homes with towels, uniforms, bed sheets and patients’ gowns. This year is the 70th anniversary of our family business, and we are now an international company with manufacturing plants all over the world.” Our interview concluded, we walk out the front door and down the cobbled path to the row of parked cars. The late afternoon sun creates long shadows that dramatize the trees, the board fences, the outbuildings and the beautiful


PAUL HEIMAN: IMPOSSIBLE DREAMS COME TRUE old woods behind the house. Except for a few tentative locusts and an apparently irate blue jay, evening quiet begins to settle over the farm. As we drive out and the gate slides closed behind us, we can only feel humbled by Paul Heiman, and what we have learned about him. His tenacity and life-long inclination to take risks and make informed, careful choices have created positive change— sometimes enormous, life-altering change. He has brought great satisfaction and sometimes unexpected joy not only to himself and his loved ones, but to a great many others as well. (“Others” would include us humans and several other familiar species.) And isn’t that really the whole megilleh? Bottom line, isn’t that what life is all about? ■

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Vicki Humphrey’s

AFRICA Story by Linda White ~ Photos by Abby Jensen

Going

on a genuine African safari is not like watching “Zoo Parade” on television or viewing old “Tarzan” movies. The Dark Continent got its name because so much there remains a mystery; perhaps it is less so to its diverse inhabitants, but most westerners are definitely mystified. Old TV programs like “Sheena: Queen of the Jungle” so thoroughly confused most children about which animals live in which habitats that years later, we still aren’t sure. Nobody ever told us, “Real giraffes, lions and zebras don’t live in the thick jungle, kids.” Still, it was “Tarzan” on TV that ignited Vicki Humphrey’s fascination with the continent and its amazing animals. 232AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


“I always wanted to go where no one had ever been,” she confesses. “Th is January’s was my 12th trip. I have become addicted to certain places: Kenya, Botswana, Namibia and South Africa. “In 2000 I took my first trip to Africa during the Christmas and New Year’s holidays. That first time was a gamble. I wanted to take in everything and go everywhere, but it’s hard to head out alone into the unknown, into what might be dangerous situations that I, a complete neophyte, would not be equipped to handle. But I lucked out. I came across a group who ran safaris, asked lots of questions, and ended up with the best people in the business, Off beat Safaris.” The Off beat website makes the organization’s mission statement clear: “We operate horseback and Land Rover safaris from luxury mobile tented camps in remote areas.” The company is located in Kenya. “They have a wonderful base camp,” says Humphrey, confirming the website’s claims. “Deloraine is an old English estate from the days when Kenya was part of British East Africa. The place has enough bedrooms— probably 14—to accommodate everyone, and the staff is great! Off beat’s safaris are by Land Rover and on horseback, and Deloraine has riding trails, a jump course and a polo field. They gave us polo lessons and played matches with the neighboring polo players, and showed us how to swing the mallet properly and how to balance it. It isn’t lightweight—swinging that mallet is exhausting! To hit the ball, you can’t merely grip the mallet; you have to balance it perfectly, between your thumb and first finger. It was very humbling. (Owners) Tristan and Cindy’s two high school kids helped teach us how to play polo also. We played croquet in the evenings.” When Humphrey speaks in the plural, she is referring to the others who came on safari with her. Her January 2011 trip will include 10 other people. “Word of

my safaris gets around,” she explains. “As I was fi rst planning the January 2011 trip, so many people wanted to go, I said, ‘Okay then, let’s go!’ We are already booked, with another date open, in case we want to go out again. Last year I made two safari trips, back-toback, and 2012 is nearly booked as well.” Did she say that Off beat’s safaris are by Land Rover and on horseback? She did. “The horses in sub-Saharan Africa are polo ponies, steeplechasers, three-day eventers and stadium jumpers, for the most part. Most are Thoroughbred crosses, as well as Arabians and part Arabians. All are responsive, strong and fit.” Humphrey describes an African encounter from her fi rst safari that she will never forget. “Our party was out on horseback in a very remote area. When we rounded a corner of some rocky escarpment, we came upon a small village, where its inhabitants were living in primitive mud huts. A small boy near us was sitting on the ground playing with a toy. He heard the horses’ footfalls so he looked up—and screamed. He jumped up from where he sat and ran screaming all the way across the compound to a hut. A lady, presumably his mother or aunt, came out of the hut where the child had run to tell us, ‘He thought you were ghosts.’ The little boy had never seen people with white skin.” Some of her experiences have been not only interesting, but educational as well. “At Deloraine we became familiar with the marula tree,” she says. “Th is is a tall, spreading tree that grows in Africa, but nowhere else. Elephants and some other animals eat the fruit and leaves, and the fruit is used to make a creamy liquor called Amarula. It tastes something like Bailey’s Irish Cream.” Archaeological evidence shows that the marula tree was a nutritional source as long as ago as 10,000 years BCE. A relative of the mango tree, its fruit and nuts are rich in vitamins and minerals, and were a popular mainstay of ancient African diets.

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No newcomers to conducting African safaris, the Off beat folks discovered long ago that Deloraine—and descriptions and photos of the company’s other luxury overnight camps—impress prospective safari signups. In business for more than 25 years, this team of professionals has guided travelers on safaris in countries from the Horn of Africa and South Africa to the shores of the Indian Ocean. Off beat has camps in some of East Africa’s most popular destinations: the Masai Mara Game Preserve on the Kenya-Tanzania border; the Meru National Park, which skirts East Africa’s Great Rift Valley; and northern Kenya’s Laikipia plateau region. Novice safari members make two important discoveries the first night: that sleeping in tents can be downright luxurious and that the food the Off beat staff serves them is superb, unparalleled in the Kenyan safari business. Off beat adheres to its founding principles, which were to have an enduring passion and respect for Africa’s wildlife and to maintain the highest standards of comfort and service for its safari guests.

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VICKI HUMPHREY’S AFRICA

“The food is superb,” Humphrey confi rms. “They cook impala and kudu (large, brown-and-white striped antelope; the males have long, spiral-curling horns). They serve meat with lots of local veggies. They also make a wonderful kind of homemade bread and they serve this amazing cream, something like whipping cream, on fresh strawberries. And wine and ‘avocado pizza’ by the fire is superb!” The overnight campsites are in incredible locations, Humphrey adds. For example, the Masai Mara Game Preserve, site of one Off beat overnight camp, is named for the Masai people, its traditional inhabitants. Wildlife here includes 450 species of birds, including vultures, marabou storks, hornbills, ostriches, fishing eagles and hundreds of other species. Also renowned are the Mara’s large number of big cats, not to discount their prey, among them the thousands of zebra, Thompson’s gazelle and wildebeest, which it is most famous for, that come to the Masai Mara from the Serengeti, in their migration to the south. Elsa’s Kopje Lodge, in Meru National Park, was named for Elsa the lioness, subject of the movie “Born Free.” The lodge overlooks the vast Meru Plains, lending travelers

perfect photo opportunities. The animal population here is widely diverse. Digital camera carriers can expect to have hundreds of shots of buffalo, elephants, baboons, giraffes, lions, cheetahs, warthogs, more zebras and gazelles, hippos, and black and white rhinos. This is another of Off beat safaris’ overnight destinations. The guides at Meru are Masai—tall, handsome young men who take great pride in their educations, in their ages-old culture, and in their idealism. All of them speak earnestly about sustaining their lands for the future. They are articulate, well-informed proponents of land conservation, and mineral, ecological and animal preservation in their country. “At home and school I always had a great interest in the conservation of our Masai lands,” explains Vincent Lenkoko, who joined Off beat Meru Camp in 2007, on the Off beat website. “I aim to educate my community on the importance of conservation of both wildlife and their habitat. I also want to teach my guests who come from all corners of the globe, who are interested in this amazing world of natural life and wonders that we the Masai live, and be a voice that calls for all survival and conservation of abundant life.”

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VICKI HUMPHREY’S AFRICA Humphrey first met the Masai 10 years ago. “They still wear red cloaks draped over their shoulders, and they still carry a stick, but now they have cell phones tucked in their belts!” she says with a smile. “Kenya today is a democracy, and Kenya’s government is black, but the whites are the only ones with the financial means to employ blacks. Working for whites is a huge source of income, but some of the indigenous people choose the simple lives their ancestors began a thousand years ago. “The Masai still wear red cloaks draped over their shoulders, and each man carries a long stick, but they also have cell phones tucked in their belts!” —Vicki Humphrey

“The Masai still live in huts made of mud and sticks,” she continues. “They are surrounded by a kraal, made of acacia thorns, to protect the animals at night from lions. The women build the houses, men build the fences and the boys tend to the cattle. “The government is giving back lands they took from the Masai, and the Masai are building fences and raising crops. But weather and seasons force them to move their animals when the dry seasons come and there is no grass. Now the tribesmen are sending cattle back into the bush, where they compete for food with wild animals. “So many of the old ways are still around,” she says. “Last January we observed the Masai custom of circumcising young teenage boys,

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VICKI HUMPHREY’S AFRICA who must remain absolutely silent during the procedure; showing pain brings dishonor. The boys are then sent out alone to make it, to survive, on their own during the healing process. They are not allowed back into their villages until they have survived for a certain length of time, usually four to eight months. While they are away, they dress in all black and shave their heads as a rite of passage. “When we went into Nairobi, we found quite a diversity of people. More Masai are moving into town, but we spent most of our time with them outside the city. They live on blood mixed with goat’s milk, plus any vegetables they grow. They milk the goats, drain a little blood from their cows, and mix the two. Theirs is a meat diet.”

and eastern valleys, slides along through Kenya, reunites itself just west of Mount Kilimanjaro (elevation 19,590 ft.), and continues to southeastern Tanzania, where it bisects the Olduvai Gorge. In the 1950s, the Olduvai was where paleontologists Louis and Mary Leakey discovered proto-human bones that carbon 14 analysis showed were 1.75 million years old. Mary Leakey’s stunning find left even skeptics speechless. In 1978, Leakey came upon 3.5 million-year-old hominid footprints (two adults and a child) clearly preserved in volcanic ash.

An unusual Off beat safari destination is in the Great Rift Valley, a 4,500mile long geographic trough that stretches from the Gulf of Aden, which connects to the Red Sea, to the Mozambique coastline, where the Rift disappears into the Indian Ocean. The Rift Valley splits into western

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Off beat has another campsite on Kenya’s Laikipia plateau, which lies on the equator, on the Great Rift Valley’s eastern escarpment. Laikipia’s vast, scenic plains offer safari members spectacular views and terrific photo opportunities. Laikipia’s human population is far less diverse than the region’s immense wildlife population; the plateau is home to more endangered species than anywhere else in East Africa. Except for the animals in Kenya’s national parks and reserves, Laikipia also has East Africa’s largest elephant population and it may be the endangered black rhino’s last refuge. Africa’s lions make any safari unforgettable. “One night the lions were loud, and we thought they might have us surrounded,” Humphrey says. “We got up and walked 100 yards—and there were 13 lionesses. When they make a kill, the males come in for the first meat, then the females eat, then the hyenas, and lastly, the vultures and maybe a jackal or two.” She recalls a safari she took with another company a few years ago in South Africa. “At Kruger National Park, we saw five lionesses jump a Cape buffalo. They eventually killed it, but not without a lot of effort. Cape buffalo are huge and very tough. They are the world’s most dangerous hoofed animal.”

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VICKI HUMPHREY’S AFRICA

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VICKI HUMPHREY’S AFRICA Kruger National Park is South Africa’s largest, most famous game reserve. It extends over 7,332 square miles, is 217 miles long and 37 miles wide. Kruger, lying northeast of Johannesburg, is part of two provinces, Limpopo and Mpumalanga, with Zimbabwe to the north and Mozambique to the east. The name “Limpopo” immediately recalls Rudyard Kipling’s Just So Stories, wherein the curious Elephant Child says, “Goodbye. I am going to the great grey-green, greasy Limpopo River, all set about with fever-trees, to find out what the Crocodile has for dinner.” Thus was the great grey-green, greasy Limpopo River indelibly stamped on readers’ minds. “South Africa is much tamer than Kenya,” Humphrey notes. “Although Kruger is unfenced, the cars drive through daily and the animals are so used to them that they have little fear. Most of the safari lodges in South Africa are on private, fenced game preserves. On horseback, in the Mara in Kenya, the animals are wild and not nearly as predictable. Kenya and Botswana are much more open, and safari members can be exposed to more danger. In Botswana, a girl who worked for our safari company was attacked by a hyena. She went after it because it attacked her dog, but it turned on her as well. One was big enough that he put his paws on her shoulders; hyenas at full growth weigh over 150 pounds and, at the withers, are about three feet tall. “In Botswana, we got chased by a huge elephant one day, the matriarch of the herd, because we got too close to some babies,” she recalls. “Hippos are very big, too, and in a river, where they are at home, hippos will ‘mock charge’ you; you kind of get used to that. On the fi rst trip we tried to cross a river where there were hippos. Our horses were slipping in the mud and we got between a mother and her brand new baby. It was so new that it still had the afterbirth on it. The mother got really upset, and it was pretty scary, until all the horses got to the top of the riverbank. Hippos make great noises. They kind of grunt; the sound is unmistakable. Ask L.A. Flynn if hippos can run!” Th is reminds her of other experiences that she and others who have gone on safari remember vividly. “One time Joe Kinarney, D.V.M. (and Arabian horse enthusiast!) and I were in a Land Rover, watching some lionesses eat,” she says. “There were more than 30 hyenas gathered around, waiting. Then suddenly,

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there came an amazing roar. An older, male lion with a full, black mane came bounding past us. But he went about 20 strides, and then headed right at the hyenas. The hyenas scattered, the females laid in wait for some remaining scraps, and the male feasted alone for 30 minutes. Joe got it on video, a spectacular sight. “Once we watched a python kill a baby gazelle. Abby Jensen, the photographer who traveled with us on this most recent trip, was kneeling down, about 10 feet away, and the python struck at her camera lens (the snake was about 10 feet long). Abby fell down, I fell down—the domino effect—and Apryl Hughes made record time to the Land Rover. And once, a hippo knocked over somebody’s tent while they slept.” There are as many stories as there are exciting safaris. “Another time, watching a huge variety of animals migrating—wildebeests, gazelles and impalas—a little herd of warthogs got under the horses’ feet and spooked them. We ran along beside the giraffes for probably 15 minutes.” She smiles. “Every day, unexpected things happen. Other than knowing what direction you’re going, you have no idea what will happen that day.” Are there any other special destinations on Humphrey’s Africa itinerary? “This November, I am going to the Kalahari. It’s a desert that goes into Namibia, and on into South Africa and Botswana. The Kalahari is mostly sand, with no grass, so it’s easy to track lions there.”


VICKI HUMPHREY’S AFRICA

Speaking of South Africa, what about the social upheaval that has had it in the news for decades? “South Africa has almost seen the end of apartheid, because the people have reached a point where they refuse to allow discrimination,” Humphrey replies. “Before the British came, whites and blacks in South Africa co-existed peacefully. They intermarried without problems, and the children from intermarriages didn’t suffer, nor were they discriminated against. “While we were in South Africa, we went to District 9, in Capetown. That section of the city is a monument to curfews, amazingly split up families, and there are three distinct classes: whites, blacks and coloreds. There is still a definite class distinction, but are closer to doing away with apartheid.” She considers the people in all the countries who have become so much a part of her affinity for Africa. “The African people seem to know about truth and honesty,” she reflects. “There isn’t all the duplicity and phoniness we see here too often. The people have a great respect for nature, and they hunt to eat. They do what they can to protect the animals from poachers, but there are still ivory poachers,” she adds sadly.

“Still, these are truly genuine people. They take the time to appreciate things; they’re never ‘too busy.’ The Masai, for example, have no written language, and if you ask someone how old he or she is, they don’t know. Their concept of time is entirely different. Their music is simple and primitively produced, and yet it sounds like a fi nely rehearsed orchestra. (It really gets to you!) It consists of rhythms provided by a chorus of vocalists singing harmonies that have a structure-based call and response.” Humphrey admits that she has become addicted to certain parts of Africa. Why is that? “In the beginning, the horses were the draw,” she says. “Now it’s the land and the people. What draws me to each place is the heart of the country. There is a primal, gut reality there. Most people live primitive, basic lives—they’re just surviving, not trying to impress anybody, and they are never superficial. “I’ve come to love these amazing people who have so much to offer in life,” she concludes. “They change your life with their perspective; when you come back, you’re not the same person you were when you went there. You see things differently.” ■

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Leaders Of The Times: September Calendar Feature

Maddox Van Ryad And Gemini Acres by Colleen Scott

When the unmistakable sounds of the old Rod Stewart classic “Do Ya Think I’m Sexy?” filled the arena at the Iowa Gold Star for the Liberty class, all eyes were on the one and only Maddox Van Ryad … and he delivered. Trotting high, tail flagged, nostrils flared, the handsome grey stallion didn’t disappoint the hundreds of people in the stands with his showy, blowy attitude. Handlers Travis Rice and Jason Tackett had to do little to encourage the stallion, as center stage seemed to be exactly where he belonged. Maddox Van Ryad won the Liberty class handily with the three judges having nothing but glowing remarks about him. “Maddox was electric in the Liberty class,” says Janice McCrea Wight. “That dynamic, beautiful stallion seemed to be following a well-choreographed routine. It was an outstanding liberty performance and the crowd went wild. It was a treat to watch him, as he seemed to be enjoying himself,” she says. Another member of the panel, Beth Stover, concurs. “As soon as they took the halter off him, it was like, ‘it’s show time.’ He had a lot of presence, a lot of animation and a lot of charisma. He really showed to the crowd.” 242AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES

Panelist Bruce Bates said all of the competitors were of good quality and fun to watch, but that Maddox Van Ryad seemed to have something extra special. “I really liked him,” says Bates. “He was very pretty and very trotty. He looked extremely talented.”


MADDOX VAN RYAD

Maddox Van Ryad also attended the many Midwest functions hosted throughout the Iowa Gold Star weekend. “Being able to see the stallions, including Maddox Van Ryad, up close and personal is one of the very special things made possible at the Iowa Gold Star,” says David Boggs.

The decision to purchase Maddox Van Ryad and bring him to the United States proved to be just as wise as previous endeavors Team Midwest and the Bedekers took on together. In 2009, the stallion was named champion at Regions 10, 12, 14 and 17. His Top Ten victory at the U.S. Nationals in a highly competitive field of junior stallions was close to a Reserve Champion title, as just one point separated him from that contender. In 2010, he was Region 13 Champion Stallion.

So, how did this Brazilian National Champion, by Ryad El Jamaal and out of Barbara Van Kaset, come to be in Iowa on Labor Day weekend? Through the efforts of Team Midwest. Clients Sally and Jim Bedeker of “I think Maddox Van Ryad is one of the premier, Gemini Acres, Morris, Ill., knew they wanted to acquire up-and-coming stallions in the industry today,” says the stallion for their breeding program as soon as they Travis Rice. “He has a very promising future as a herd laid eyes on him. However, that acquisition wouldn’t sire. He is one of the most athletic stallions I’ve ever come easily. “Maddox Van Ryad was touted as Ryad’s seen, and replacement for although he the Agropec has a sweet Vanguarda disposition, breeding he knows his program; so, job and is an convincing incredible show them to sell the horse when he stallion took a lot hits the ring.” of negotiations,” The stallion says Boggs. Yet, certainly proved Team Midwest just that with was able to work his breathtaking their magic as performance in they have on Iowa on Labor so many other Day weekend. occasions, and Maddox Van As for the Ryad became a stallion’s future part of Gemini as a sire, Boggs Acres in Maddox Van Ryad (Ryad El Jamaal x Barbara Van Kaset). says, “We are December 2006. all very excited about what is already on the ground by Maddox Van Ryad, and also the babies that will The Midwest/Gemini Acres partnership wasn’t a new be coming. Jim and Sally have bred him to their best one. Team Midwest had assisted the Bedekers in their mares, and we’ll see some exciting prospects over the pursuit for the finest Arabian horses in the world on next decade,” he says. Those mares are a stellar line-up, many other occasions, resulting in the purchases of such including the daughters of Magnum Psyche, Desperado legendary industry stars as MM Magnum Butterfly, GA V, MHR Trinidad and Da Vinci FM. Clio Dulaine, Envy C and NBW Angels Kiss. Sally Bedeker explained the couple’s relationship with Team Midwest in a previous Times article. “We really trust and rely on David and Terry Anne, Travis Rice and the rest of the people at Team Midwest to help us make decisions. They really know their horses,” she said.

Given the high caliber of the dams being bred to Maddox Van Ryad, there is no doubt his offspring will be thrilling crowds of Arabian enthusiasts for years to come, whether being shown at liberty, in-hand or performance. ■ SEP TEMBER 2010 | 243AA


Poland And

Horsefly Films Horsefly Films’ Adventure In Poland, Filming The Pride Of Poland Video Catalog by Jen Miller and Sophie Pegrum Driving rain rendered it a bit difficult to make out the Polish policeman standing at the side of the road. That was our first mistake. It was our third time in Poland in 12 months. We were on cruise control, our GPS set to a lovely English gentleman’s voice that we’d dubbed Clive. Clive knew the way to Janów Podlaski in case we didn’t, which we did. Easy. That is, before the aforementioned soggy Polish cop. We were setting out on our two-week trip to film the second Pride of Poland video catalog at the three state studs, keenly aware of how well our historic first video catalog was received last year and dreaming up ways to top ourselves this time. Being in a position to push the envelope as equine filmmakers is just where we like to be. So here we were, giddy to be back in our beloved Poland as the beautiful countryside enveloped us, Warsaw receding in the distance. Sleeting rain smeared the image of the Polish policja in our windshield when he held up a small red reflector as we passed an accident involving a giant truck. We waved and obediently slowed to a respectable 60 km/hour. Second mistake. Three miles later, lights and sirens roared up on our rented tail. Great. We’re going to be late for the alwaysdelectable Janów lunch. We pulled into a bus turnout, the only available real estate in the middle of nowhere. The policja pulled in front of us, gesturing wildly. Being used to U.S. police protocol, we knew not to get out of the car. Third mistake.

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We waited. And waited some more. No one emerged. Not from our vehicle or theirs. After five minutes, a thoroughly beleaguered cop got out and came over. We rolled down the window and he launched into the longest, most blistering diatribe in the history of Polish law enforcement. Clearly he had been building up to this for the last several miles as he sped after what must have been, to him, the criminal catch of the century. We listened politely until the now red-faced cop literally ran out of steam. “Nie rozumiem,” we smiled. “We don’t understand.” The cop looked heart-stricken. He blinked his eyes in the rain, as all visions of glory and promotion and the nightly news fell by the wayside. He slumped back to his car. After another few minutes, we figured out that we were supposed to get out of the car. We stepped out into the weather, trudged over and handed the cop our documents. He glanced at the California license and the U.S. passport. “No!” he barked. “Yes!” we replied. That’s all we’ve got, take it or leave it. The passport’s idyllic pictures of American scenes seemed to mock him. The cop’s partner, meanwhile, had exited and was standing at the roadside, flagging the little red reflector at several other cars. We watched as each of these drivers in turn got out of their cars, entered the police car, paid their speeding fine on the spot, then drove away, each transaction processed with the highest speed and efficiency on both sides. Us? Not so much. We waited, shivering in the icy downpour as our cop slumped over his ticket book, head in hands, moaning. Exceptionally dramatic. Once in a


while he looked up at our documents then shook his head and started moaning again. He showed us in a little, official book that we had been driving 120 km/hour. We knew we had done no such thing and told him so. We then discerned from his flailing hand movements that he demanded payment of 500 zloty. We told him we had no money—a bold-faced lie, but what the hey. At 30 minutes and counting, the other cop came over and said they would follow us to a bank ATM to withdraw the money. We refused. We’d lost count of our mistakes by this point. In the unrelenting rain, we coughed consumptively. They asked us our destination. Janów Podlaski! Ha! The great and revered Polish Arabian would surely save our freezing cold necks, but no such luck. Fearful of a never-ending impasse and coughing up a lung with pneumonia, we tried another tactic: We might have 100 zloty. “Yes!” came the resounding answer from both cops. We dashed back to the car and rifled through our envelope of cash, hoping they couldn’t see it. We paid, and we are pretty certain they told us to get out of their sight forever.

So much for an auspicious beginning. That afternoon, we were treated to a folk hero’s welcome by everyone at Janów. Unfortunately, no photos exist of this little escapade, as we decided it probably would have been our last mistake if we had lugged out our cameras and started filming.

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Sophie Pegrum at Janów Stud.

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HORSEFLY FILMS’ ADVENTURE IN POLAND

Pilar, led by Gerard Paty, passing by Piaff. A few days later, we started the morning with Dr. Marek Trela, Director of Janów Podlaski, and Darek, driving the four-in-hand carriage for us. Last year they had treated us to an incredible carriage ride with two horses, but it seemed we weren’t the only ones who wanted to top ourselves this year. We recognized the front two as Eldon and Edgar from last year, but Darek told us the back two had never been harnessed before. He seemed so casual about it that we weren’t sure whether to believe him or not. Off we went to the back side of the kurs, or race course, four huge bay horses thundering up front. At one point, everyone got out and sent Darek and the team across the fields so we could capture it all on film. He began trotting them, and then a huge grin crept across his face as he let them fly. Director Trela stood nearby, shouting, certain we had a runaway on our hands. He shouted at the carriage as it rumbled and flew across the meadow, the flash of the golden Janów crown gleaming on its side as Darek and the horses blurred past. Just as a crash was imminent, Darek confidently drew them up to a stop. Everyone let out a collective sigh of relief, then whoops of joy. Darek just smiled proudly. No language barrier could hide the fact that he had just opened the throttle to “see what she could do.”

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Filming the glorious Pilar for the sale, our trusty friend and ever-present Polish helper Scott Benjamin suggested we do something larger, more grandiose with her. We decided to film her as part of the immortal Pipi’s family, with her two brothers Piaff and Pilot, who is back at Janów on loan from Halsdon Arabians in England. On paper it was a great idea—dam extraordinaire Pilar and her two brothers, who represent Pipi’s first foal (Pilot) and her last (Piaff ). First, we would film the two stallions together. However, they are as different as chalk and cheese, and when brought head to head, the elder Pilot was intimidated by Piaff. Who wouldn’t be? Piaff is always large and in charge. We had them take Piaff away for a moment, and Pilot came to life. We decided to bring Pilar into the mix and move the whole shoot over to Pod Zagarem, the famous Janów clock tower barn. It was a simple setup: Pilar would exit the barn and walk straight toward the camera as she passed between Piaff and Pilot. We called for action and Pilar came out of the barn, led by our friend Gerard Paty. Piaff looked at her excitedly. Pilot was more cautious, as if he knew what was coming. As she approached her brothers, Pilar’s ears flattened to her head and she turned, and yes, that’s right—tried very hard to kick Piaff in the chops. Piaff was baffled and Pilot puffed up—told you so. Pilar then put her delicate ears forward and sashayed past the camera, always the diva (“That’s the way you do it, boys”). After a few takes with always the same outcome, Piaff was visibly deflated. It had taken his own sister to defeat him.


HORSEFLY FILMS’ ADVENTURE IN POLAND

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We took the opportunity in between filming everything for the Pride of Poland catalog to film a few shots for our upcoming documentary on the Polish Arabian Horse. One of these was the return home of the legendary Count Rzewuski’s bloodied white horse, without the count, from battle. One day while filming mares in the pastures, we spotted a white mare with a noticeable limp. After inquiring, we found out she was born with a limp but is a wonderful broodmare. Our wheels started turning—a limp! How cinematic would that be! Now all we needed was blood. At home, that would mean whipping up a batch of fake movie blood with corn syrup and a proprietary mix of food coloring, but here in the wilds of Janów Podlaski, it was going to be a little trickier. We found ourselves with Scott in the four aisles of a tiny grocery—the only local grocery—in Janów. Poland does not have corn syrup. Or food coloring, although there seems to be a plethora of food flavorings. We eyed the coconut flavoring, but then remembered we were not filming in smell-o-vision. Our eyes hit upon the honey. The color was a bit off, but the consistency was perfect. Still, the color stumped us until we were saved by a bottle of borscht concentrate. Hooray for the Polish beet! We hurried back to the Stud and into the kitchen to mix it up. The Janów staff asked what we were up to. “Fake blood,” we told them. “Oh, that’s nice,” they said, unfazed. We elaborated that it was for Rzewuski’s horse. They smiled and laughed, now very excited and proud. The legend lives and they were proud to be a part of it—did we need anything else? Yes, the color looked wonderful! Oh, it looked very bloody and horrific indeed! They were wonderful cheerleaders. Early that evening, as the Janów sunset began to glow, Gerard and Scott joined us in a wooded cobblestone path at the rear of the farm. It was quiet there, except for the audible struggle of Scott trying to hold onto the limping mare’s colt. We carefully poured the “blood” onto the mare, hoping she wouldn’t stain pink. It cascaded

over her shoulder, chest and down her front legs. She looked battle weary. Perfect. Gerard led the mare down the path, slipped the halter from her and dove into the bushes to clear the shot. The mare ran toward us and her waiting colt—Scott’s little rodeo continuing behind the camera. As she approached, she slowed, limping, the fake blood dripping down her leg. For an instant Rzewuski’s horse was there with us in this little mare. For good measure, we did the shot one more time, but we all knew it had been a perfect moment in time. We caught the mare up again and took her back to the barn to wash her off. And no, there was no trace of pink. The only blood really drawn here was Gerard’s. Having learned the hard way that stepping outside in the humidity of Janów’s backwoods without liberally dousing oneself with industrial-strength DDT was tantamount to slow, tortuous murder by mosquito, we weren’t surprised to hear Gerard’s cries for help from the hedgerow. Desperate for us to finish the shot so he could eject himself back onto the path, poor Gerard was being eaten alive. It was a small sacrifice for a beautiful shot. Thank you, Gerard.

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HORSEFLY FILMS’ ADVENTURE IN POLAND

Ekstern

At one moment of sunset filming out at the kurs, we realized that the sheer number of insects in the air were actually creating a backlit haze around our subjects. A photograph of us with Ekstern reveals the insane number of flying fans we had on that shoot, and though we learned to spray the straps and tripods of our camera gear to create additional walls of protection, we were always swatting, batting and spitting. At one point, Scott Benjamin suggested that while making the film catalog for Pride of Poland, we could supplement it with a special short film on the Polish mosquito, hinting that a lovely Chopin waltz score over a low angle shot of the waltzing mosquitoes on the puddles would be a great bonus feature. Though we try to love all living things, one look of disgust from us put a swift end to that idea. Mosquito movie—not.

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HORSEFLY FILMS’ ADVENTURE IN POLAND

At one point on our trip we crossed paths with Stu Vesty, who was there to shoot the wonderful still photos for the Pride of Poland catalog, as he does every year. Last year we didn’t meet up with him, so we thought it would be fun to see him this trip—but frankly, after meeting him for one evening at Michalów, we were sort of glad he went on his way. He had suffered miserable rain during his week there, and we didn’t want to be jinxed by “Storm” Vesty’s weather pattern (sorry, Stu!). Two weeks later, we were all once again together at Janów, with most of the work behind us and a few more days left just to create some film magic. Stu wandered out to the kurs as we were filming some local girls in native Polish costume riding the stallions Metropolis and Album. Both horses are stunning athletes, and we’d been impressed by their prowess last year during a special exhibition performance at the sale. Stu being Stu, at the end he jumped on Metropolis and rode around, looking entirely too tall for the little powerhouse trotting machine. No one thought anything of it, except that we of course began scheming, brewing another cinematic adventure, this time enlisting Stu as our “victim” helper.

Director Trela called a local artist known to have an incredibly authentic Polish native costume—just the kind Count Rzewuski or Potocki or Sanguszko, or any of those early pioneers in Polish Arabian breeding, might have worn. The next morning, we strode over to Czelowa, the stallion barn, to find Stu decked out from head to toe in said costume, the great athletic stallion Album beside him. The only trouble was, the artist was apparently a foot or so shorter than Stu and the boots were rapidly

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HORSEFLY FILMS’ ADVENTURE IN POLAND

Stu and Album

cutting off all circulation to Stu’s toes. Ever the trooper, Stu donned his fur hat and sword, mounted up and rode out to the woods with us in tow. For over an hour, Stu and Album thundered through the trees, over meadows, charging with sword held high, Album’s hooves barely touching the ground. It was breathtaking, and we thank Stu for being such a good sport. We hope that his toes eventually unfold.

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One afternoon at Michalów, we set the camera up to film some time lapse footage of towering clouds rolling over

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the red-roofed barns. These time lapse shots require just that—time—and very little else in the way of babysitting, so off we went to wander around and gather more inspiration. As we walk through the barns, Scott began to formulate a spectacular idea with us. There are 11 world and/or international champion mares currently standing in the barns. Never mind mares that have been sold or leased or who have passed away, there are 11 right now on this ground. Individually, they are mind-blowingly breathtaking; together they are historic. Each of them fueled our collective passion: Emanda, Emandoria, Egzonera, Zagrobla, Palmera, Pistoria, El Dorada, Galilea, Espadrilla, Emmona, Georgia …


HORSEFLY FILMS’ ADVENTURE IN POLAND

Emanda

Zagrobla

El Dorada

That night at dinner we asked Director Bialobok about doing a shot with all these mares together. He loved the idea, and said he could probably get four or five of the staff to dress in uniform for it, including himself. We were thrilled beyond measure, but had no idea what awaited us the next day. The following morning, under a perfect blue sky, we entered the barns, gear slung over our shoulders. We passed the staff break room and our hearts leapt in our chests—every person on the stud, from the director to the handlers to the grooms—all of them were in uniform. They knew the importance of this group of mares together more than anyone and they were ready to make it all happen.

Emanda and Emandoria

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HORSEFLY FILMS’ ADVENTURE IN POLAND

We headed outside to set up our shot, knowing everything else was well in hand. They had brought out all of the world championship saddles for the shot that we meticulously set up in front of the barn. A few minutes passed, and our favorite scruffy barn cat (that we’d affectionately dubbed “Pathetikitty”) meandered over for a tummy rub as we sat waiting in the dirt paddock between the barns, fiddling with our gear. Suddenly the cat darted away and we looked up to the most incredible, aweinspiring sight we’d ever seen: all 11 mares were being walked to the barn, all adorned with their red roses. The legendary white mares of Michalów were never better represented than this group, and each one was truly more beautiful than the last. The hair stood up on the back of our necks and we had lumps in our throats. We were both teary. We invoked our mantra “JKS, JKS,” Just. Keep. Shooting. We filmed them as a group, standing with their trophy saddles, the morning sun arcing over the roofs and

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gleaming on their pearl-white coats. Only Egzonera had trouble focusing, but we knew it was because she had left her tiny filly back in her stall. We filmed them each coming through the doorway in succession, Emanda regal and prancing, Zagrobla’s impossible swan neck curving with curiosity, El Dorada elegant and lofty, Emandoria a creature unto herself, Galilea filmed from the opposite side so her exquisite head will not show the loss of her right eye. Each has a story and a history, and we captured all their glory with our hearts splashing, fit to burst. “The Champions” shot, as it has become known, was captured for all eternity.


HORSEFLY FILMS’ ADVENTURE IN POLAND

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At the end of two weeks, we were overjoyed. Filled to the brim with breathtaking beauty and power. Hearts and hard drives full, we f lew home with hours and hours of footage to edit into the catalog of 41 horses and opening film. We had the exquisite sale mares, including the jewel Pilar, the stunning Ekstern daughters Batawia and Etyka, the intriguing Hekla, the larger-than-life Demona, the sexy and superb Ebla. We also had the mighty Ganges, the indomitable Ekstern, the incomparable Algeria family, the legendary E family, rising superstar Pogrom, and so many, many others. We anxiously await sharing it all with you. ■ This year’s Pride of Poland video catalog can be seen at horseflyfilms.com/prideofpoland.html or can be ordered on DVD from Pride of Poland at www.prideofpoland.pl.

Ganges

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Buying And Selling Horses 101 Part I by Joe Alberti

T

hese days, when you hear discussions of the health of the Arabian horse industry, you’re sure to hear something about how hard it can be to sell horses. Only the high-end ones sell easily, people say, and actually, these days, even some of them don’t. In an uncertain economy, selling horses can be a challenge. The truth is, selling a lower-quality horse is never all that easy (that’s why many people simply give them away to pleasure riders or horsemanship schools). But in my opinion, the market for middle-level horses is not as tough as it might appear. The key to selling horses is to start with a good product, and one of the key factors in a successful sale is being able to match a horse with the right person in the right division.

PLACEMENT

Not every horse is going to be top notch in open English, western, hunter, or halter. If you want to sell your horse because it isn’t meeting your needs, first figure out where it is best suited. Is it clearly right for its division, but just not for you? If so, what kind of a rider or handler would it work well for? Or, if it is not really in the right division, what talent does it have to give a clue where it might belong? If not in the main show ring, could it excel as a sport horse, or in dressage, hunter over fences, endurance, main “The key to selling ring show hack, side saddle, etc.? A clear understanding of where your horses is to start with a horse needs to be is key, both for good product, and one selling and also for finding bargains of the key factors in a as a buyer.

successful sale is being able to match a horse with the right person in the right division.”

If you have a well-puttogether animal, a horse that is conformationally correct, it should in theory be able to do some division in the Arabian horse spectrum to some serious level of competition. We have the extremes of all that; we have the horses that are conformational messes that can do things and we don’t know why, and we have horses with great conformation who don’t do it as well as we think they should. But, I believe that if you can evaluate a horse and you have an understanding of the different

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disciplines and divisions the Arabian world offers outside of our main ring, that can be a really good tool to use in selling horses who don’t fit in the mainstream of our show ring.

How can you tell what a horse should do? Basically, you do the same thing you would with any horse you own. You evaluate it. If you’re starting with a foal, look at it as it grows up. For me, I’d show it at halter and try to win with it somewhere, so that it has some sort of a show record under its belt. Then I’d take it home (or, if it is owned by a client, send it home) and let it grow up. When it is 3, I’d look at it again. If it is not apparent what the horse does well, then I would call for advice about the divisions I don’t show in.


BUYING AND SELLING HORSES 101

It pays to develop relationships in different divisions because very few of us are as familiar with all the disciplines in the industry as we are with the ones we participate in. Develop contacts with people in those areas who can tell you whether your horse might have a future in their activities. If you’re unsure, give some of those specialists a call and ask for advice. Of course, if you know your horse would do well in their division, you can say, “Hey, I’ve got a horse that doesn’t work for me, but it might fit for you. You might want to look at it.” If it doesn’t work, it doesn’t work, but a sales call takes only a few minutes of your time. Let me state clearly: I’m not talking about treating other divisions as a dumping ground. They have their standards and requirements just as the mainstream show divisions do. The idea is to find what the horse you are selling does well, and offer it to people who are looking for a prospect in that discipline. Remember, a horse might not be great for your division, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t a good horse. Many of the most successful purchases I’ve made came because the horse I was buying didn’t fit in the program it was in (and the reverse has been true in my sales).

TELL THE TRUTH Successful marketers usually keep a database of people they have dealt with who buy horses in certain price ranges, and call when they have appropriate candidates. When you are honest, you’ll find that people listen and act on what you say. If you don’t think the horse you are selling is good, don’t tell someone it is. That doesn’t mean you don’t sell it. Just price it accordingly. Now and then, I’ve told owners, “Okay, I’ll help you sell this horse, but I will disclose what the deal is (that it’s a kicker, or it gets hot on the victory pass, or it’s iffy at the walk, or whatever).” There are all kinds of things people can deal with and all kinds of things they can’t; it just

depends on the trainer or the owner who will handle the horse. If everyone disclosed everything, the world would still go around and horses would still sell—they’d just go to people who fit them better. Perfection does not exist. Imperfection can be worked with. Let’s say a buyer looks at a horse and says, “Well, its right front turns out a little.” If that turn-out doesn’t mean the horse’s hoof goes completely east, I’ll talk to them about what they want to do with the horse and how this f law will affect that. Sometimes it has an impact, and sometimes it doesn’t. One thing everyone— buyer and seller—needs to realize, though, is that f laws should be priced appropriately. If a buyer is blown away by an inexpensive price tag for a beautiful horse, and notices that its right front leg turns out, then that’s why the owner isn’t asking the moon and the stars. What about the horse who just plain isn’t a good animal? If it’s not a good animal, it’s not a good animal—and you can’t make chicken salad from chicken you-know-what. If you have a horse that for whatever reason, physical or mental, is not going to make it, then you need to cut your loss and market it for a very inexpensive price and let the people know what’s going on with it. Nine times out of 10 if you put a price of $1,000 or so on it, someone will buy it, but they need to know what it does or doesn’t do. And sell it with papers. What is a new owner going to do with the horse if it doesn’t have papers? They probably are buying it with the hope that they’ll be able to fix it and show it and maybe then sell it for something. You may agree or disagree, but the ‘no paper’ practice does not work for me. I may not want the horse, but I want it to have its chance somewhere else.

PRICING The fastest way to lose a sale is to price yourself out of the market. That means that sellers have to be intensely

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BUYING AND SELLING HORSES 101

realistic about the prices horses are bringing these days, and also realize that when a prospective buyer is on the line, they need to respond. For example, everyone gets excited about babies (“it’s a star, it’s got a freaky face”), and for the real standouts, offers are a strong possibility. How many overzealous owners then slap an astronomical price tag on the foal? In those first few days, say, maybe $150,000. Too many times, the interested buyer backs away. Four months later, the baby is a nice horse but not as great as they may have thought, and now the owners can’t get $25,000 for it. If you have a buyer knocking on your door and you want to make a sale, be f lexible and realistic.

will fall on happier ears than just standing firm at one figure. Additionally, if you have a breeding program, even a small one, and are interested in return clients, take into consideration the exposure the horse will get when it moves to its new home. That in itself might make you more negotiable. If the horse is going to a great facility, where it will be well-cared-for and shown, and will generate publicity—basically, advertise your program— for you, doesn’t that give you an incentive to close the sale?

SALESMANSHIP Yes, I’ve heard people protest that they “gave away” a good horse—but there are no guarantees that a horse With the basic guidelines in place, how do you actually who starts out good will stay good. “I sold the horse sell the horse? The first step is to get great pictures and to so-and-so and they doubled their money!” the story a great video. I won’t put a horse for sale on my website sometimes goes. What’s wrong with that? You got that doesn’t have good pictures, and I prefer great videos a good price for the time, and maybe the buyer who too. You need to have them available when you put the doubled his money has a market that you don’t. In a horse up for sale. If you have to wait to take photos case like that, just remember that if they didn’t think and videos and then send them out, nine times out of they could resell it at a profit, they probably wouldn’t 10 your buyers are down the road already, looking at be buying from you in the first another horse. When they call, place. There is also the ever-present send out a package the same day if chance that they won’t pull off the you can. “When pricing a horse, big sale, and in that case, they have to eat their mistake. If at all possible, use a great I think it makes good professional photographer and have psychological sense to When pricing a horse, I think it the video well-edited and backed be negotiable. Nudge makes good psychological sense to with music. Have it look as good as be negotiable. Nudge your price up you can; don’t send out a video of a your price up a little a little higher than what you really $25,000 horse running hairy in the higher than what you want to make, just enough to have field, with you in the background really want to make, negotiation room. Most people shaking a plastic bag at it. just enough to have who buy horses want to bargain a little. If your price is really $12,500, It is popular right now to send negotiation room.” and they want to buy for $12,500, out e-mail blasts about horses for sometimes pricing the horse at, say, sale, and I have used that service $15,000 and coming off that price to meet the $12,500 a lot in the past. These days, we get so many e-mails in

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BUYING AND SELLING HORSES 101

our inboxes that it pays to remember two things if you choose to go that route: have a great picture and a catchy subject line that is specific as to what the email is about. When your recipient opens your message, it should not be something he or she is not expecting. If you have a video, it is best to have a link to it. Yes, your ad might include your website, but make it as easy as possible for your prospective buyer. If he or she has to click to get to the website, find the sale page, find the horse, find the video and then click on it, my guess is that you will lose a percentage of them. Embed the video in the e-mail blast if possible.

Next month: More on buying and selling horses. A lifelong horseman, Joe Alberti is the owner/trainer at Chestnuthill Arabians in Gilbert, Pa., where he manages Canadian National Reserve Champion and multi-U.S. National Top Ten Stallion Shaddofax. He trains a show string of about 40 horses at the regional and national level, and supervises the care of broodmares at the farm. His program is based on an understanding of each horse’s heritage, experience, physical abilities and mental requirements. ■

Some people may disagree with me, but I dislike ads where the video plays automatically. For one thing, if I’m not interested in seeing it, I don’t want to be bothered; for another, in cases like that, I’m usually not able to control the speed and volume. I want to be able to fast forward and find out if what I want to see is included. I want to see the pedigree and then the horse, and if a quick fast-forward tells me those are there, I will then go back and watch more closely. In a perfect world, I’d also see footage of the head, the legs, the feet, the stand-up pose, etc. Here again, it helps to be honest. You don’t want to spend a lot of time f lying somewhere to look at a horse who looked great on the video, but looks nothing like that in person. Your buyers don’t want to do that either. I’ve heard people say, “But the idea is to get them there.” I disagree. No one likes false pretenses. I believe if you are absolutely honest, people will come back, and they will trust your honesty. If you call and say, “I have a really nice horse available,” they’ll believe you and come to see it.

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Times For Amateurs Aging Out by Keri Schenter If all of you are like me, you are probably sitting back and wondering where this last show season has gone. Is it just me, or as we get older does time go by faster? Anyway, a topic I have been meaning to touch on for some time is that of our junior exhibitors who are in their last year of 17 and under competition. What happens when they age out? Do they “age in” to the amateur divisions? Certainly some do, but what about those who, for whatever reason, can’t or don’t? What happens next for them? I hear stories all the time about people who walk away from horses and horse showing and never look back. Probably because horses and showing are now a part of my heart and soul, that is something I just don’t understand. But I do understand that sometimes kids are tired of the demands and isolation from “real life” that horses ultimately place in their lives, and they are eager to go to college and/or start a new career that will give them a chance to live in the mainstream. But for those who are not lucky enough to have the resources to continue into the amateur divisions, the break from horses and showing can be difficult. I came across Susanne Fernald’s story by accident. Susanne graduated from the junior division in 2002 and was not in a position to continue into the amateurs at the time. This is her story, as told to me. “My mom bought Smart Zee (Xenophonn x Marilyn Monroe) for me when I was just 13, and to be honest, I didn’t want him,” Susanne says. “I had him with another trainer for a year, and we didn’t connect. We took him to Karla Moffitt to get him ready to sell. “Karla changed everything, from the way I understood Smart to the way I understood life. She took me under her wing, and I was with her at the barn, learning, every day after school (I even skipped school to go ride sometimes). Smart and I started progressing together and we won the championship in Region 4 Stock Seat Equitation my first year in the 14-17 division, in a very competitive class. 258AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES

“We went to Youth and Canadian Nationals the next year, and Youth Nationals two more years. After our years together, Smart and I finished our career together with three national championships and two national reserve championships, multiple top tens, and regional championships, reserves, and top fives. “I sort of remember the blur of winning my first national championship at Youth in 14-17 Horsemanship, but the more vivid memories include riding Smart bareback through the fairgrounds with his halter on at the beginning, feeling the atmosphere together … giving him baths and watching him drink from the hose with his lips flapping around … cuddling up in his stall with my dad’s portable TV … eating gummy worms (both of us) … and him having the trust to lay down and sleep … galloping through puddles at the horse show in Albuquerque when Karla wasn’t watching … hearing Smart call out to me, and hang his head out his stall door when I would enter the barn after school … and riding through a snowstorm together, knee-deep, when we knew we weren’t supposed to. “Having Smart and our time together gave me so much confidence through my awkward high school years, because I knew that no matter what happened at school or with friends, it was no big deal because I had him. The same confidence Smart and I had in the show ring reflected in my everyday life. “My last year in high school, I had a feeling of dread hanging over my shoulder. I always joked with my parents that Smart would be coming with me to school, but when I started looking at schools, the realization hit that it simply wouldn’t be that way. “At Region 4, the summer of 2002, right after graduation, Karla let me know that a little girl wanted to look at Smart. I looked at my mom in horror, and immediately burst into tears. In complete denial, I figured that in the end they wouldn’t want him. Why would anyone find him as special as I did? Of course, the little girl and her trainers came down,


Times For Amateurs rode Smart around for about five minutes, and then went to talk with Karla. After they left, I took Smart outside to let him graze, and I tanned on his back (in my bathing suit, of course). I was sure there was no way they’d want my horse. “After I was done daydreaming, we went back to the barn where Karla said those awful words ‘They want him.’ I cried for about an hour in the groom stall, and even more when I got home. In the back of my mind I still had this idea that he wouldn’t be gone, that Smart would be mine forever. Of course I had Smart through Youth Nationals, but the arrangement was that he would have a vet check, and if he checked clean, he would go to his new home. I had my fingers (secretly) crossed he wouldn’t check out, but I knew he would. “Our last class together at Youth Nationals was Stock Seat Equitation 14-17. We rode a good class, not our best, but good, and we finished with a top ten. After receiving our ribbon and getting pictures taken, I suddenly realized this was the last time. As we came out of the arena, Karla grabbed Smart, pulled him away from our crowd of friends, and we cried together. “From the time we got home to the time he was gone, my life was a whirlwind. I rode Smart every day, and regardless of what I was told not to do, we jumped low fences with no splint boots on. I ran on him in the grass, and did everything in my power to figure out ways to keep him. But, of course, he checked out, and made a 10-year-old girl very happy. “I finished that summer riding other horses here and there for Karla and friends. In October, I moved to California to go to fashion school. I always felt like horses defined me. Smart was who I was, my true soul mate, my only confidence in myself. In awkward situations, I knew I was fine because he was always there. I didn’t care what people thought of me, because I had something bigger: I had him. “Selling Smart, moving to California and starting school, I felt as if I lost part of me. I didn’t know how to explain who I was to new friends. I wasn’t passionate about school, and I hated living in L.A. I went into a downward spiral, regressed from talking with my parents, talking to Karla, and talking to friends. I felt as though I was completely unimportant and mostly I felt like I had nothing. It’s a hard thing to explain, having something like this taken away from you. Maybe it’s different if you decide to let it go, or you decide to take a year off. I felt like I had utterly no control over this ‘thing’ and I started to freak out. I went through the

Suzanne and Smart Zee.

mean boyfriend phase in life, I went through the ‘hating my parents’ part in my life, I went through having utterly nothing, hitting complete rock bottom. In the end, however, I made it through it all, and I am so lucky to have parents as good as mine to help bring me back to life. “Years later, do I still think of Smart? All the time! I have these vivid dreams of him, and I can almost feel his muzzle in my hand, and his touch on my shoulder. I wake up and I can feel my heart breaking because he isn’t mine anymore. For a while, I just wanted to stay asleep, so I could live in my dream with him. He is still very much a thought in my everyday life, I have pictures of him in my office at work, on my phone, and of course, plastered to my Facebook® account. “As for Smart, he’s been a very lucky boy. He has a wonderful girl to take care of who loves him as much as I do. She puts up with my constant questions about how he is doing, and fills me in on his latest antics.” Susanne realizes that at this stage in her life she is not financially ready to bring a horse of her own back into her life, but after living and working in Hawaii for several years, she has moved back to the Northwest and is finally able to begin putting foot in stirrup again. Looking toward next year’s show season, she is hoping to be able to show some of her friends’ horses and get back into the horse show world. She does say, however, that she is looking forward to someday again finding that one horse with whom she can share gummy worms and snuggles after a long day in the ring. ■ SEP TEMBER 2010 | 259AA


A Leg Up Equine Hearing by Heather Smith Thomas The horse’s ears are sensitive and delicate, well designed for excellent hearing. The horse in the wild depends on keen eyesight, a sense of smell, and good ears to detect danger and flee from predators before they get close enough to eat him. The funnel shape of the ear captures and conducts sound vibrations, and the hairs inside the ear help keep dirt and insects from getting down into the ear. The canal at the base of the ear drops straight down about two inches, then turns sharply before reaching the eardrum, where sounds are transmitted to the inner structures of the ear. Those structures then transform the vibrations into electrical signals which are transported to the brain.

What The Horse Hears “The basic sounds that horses can detect are similar to those heard by humans, except that horses can hear another two-thirds of an octave higher,” Heffner says. “Healthy young humans can hear up to about 18 kilohertz or so, and listening hard, can maybe hear 20 kilohertz. Most audio speakers are rated to go up to about 20 kilohertz. Horses, however, can hear up to 35 kilohertz, which is another two-thirds of an octave or more. Thus they can hear higher-pitched noises than we can, but not as high as a dog or cat can hear.” Cows and horses have about the same abilities to hear high-pitched sounds.

“Cats and cows are the most sensitive mammals when it Rickye Heffner Ph.D., Professor of Psychobiology at the comes to detecting very soft sounds (low intensities),” she University of Toledo (Ohio), specializes in mammalian continues. “Detecting soft sounds in the most sensitive part hearing. Together with her husband, Harry, she has of the hearing range is a separate ability than hearing highdone studies and experiments to evaluate equine hearing. frequency sounds.” “There hasn’t been a lot of research done on equine ears The sounds that a horse and hearing, and there’s not hears the best are still not “The basic sounds that horses can likely to be a lot of research heard as well as a cow or a detect are similar to those heard in the near future on hearing cat would hear them. In the by humans, except that horses can in horses,” she says. “Rats, middle part of the hearing cats and small animals are hear another two-thirds of an octave range, where all animals fairly easy to work with, hear the best, cows and cats higher,” Heffner says.” but it’s not as convenient to are quite a bit more sensitive bring a horse into a soundthan horses. Horses are proof chamber. You also have to train them. They are not ranked similarly to most mammals, but cows and cats have commonly used as laboratory animals. the very best hearing for high-pitched sounds. They are similar, however, in their ability to hear low-pitched sounds. “When we worked with horses back in the early 1980s, we first spent a month modifying a dairy barn to quiet it down (and make it more sound-proof), out in the country where there was very little noise,” she continues. “We worked with several horses in that modified barn for more than a year, and later got some ponies and actually brought them into our lab. We wouldn’t be able to do that today, however, with all the animal-care regulations and increased bureaucracy.”

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“Horses have independently mobile ears and can turn them in separate directions,” says Heffner. “This probably helps them focus in on a sound and screen out background noise.” The funnel-shaped ear gathers the sound and shields the tones the horse is trying to focus on from being diluted by other noises in the environment. This is like cupping your hand behind your ear to screen out wind and other noise.


A Leg Up

Inside The Ear The inside of the ear has small hairs to help keep out insects, and the ear also produces wax. Horses occasionally have “ear mange,” brought on by psoroptic mites (P. cuniculi) that cause severe irritation in the ear accompanied by discharge, shaking of the head, and rubbing of the head. “If they get ear mites, this can compromise their hearing and make it harder for them to hear higher-pitched sounds,” says Dr. Rickye Heffner. “The horses we studied didn’t have mites, but we found that with cows and goats that have ear mites, some days they can hear very well and other days their hearing is very poor. The mites make an irritation in the ear canal and it collects f luid and obstructs the ear canal. Since the obstruction is like soft peanut butter, it can shift around. Sometimes it may settle and leave a little opening or air tunnel so the sound can come through better, and sometimes it totally blocks the canal. If you notice that the animal some days seems to ignore you (because it doesn’t hear the sounds you are making), or that sometimes it may hear things and sometimes not, this would be a clue that there are mites in the ear and the animal should be treated to get rid of them.”

“The thing that’s unusual about horses, compared with the other hoofed animals we’ve worked with, is that they don’t localize high-pitched sounds very well,” says Heffner. “A horse can hear a high-pitched whistle, but may not know where it’s coming from. He may prick his ears or rotate his ears, searching for the direction of the sound. Low-pitched sounds they hear better, but still are not good localizers. Animals that adapted to living out on the plains, with broad horizons, have eyes on the sides of their head so they can see a wide angle. Horses are like cattle and rabbits in that respect. Because they can see so well—practically 360 degrees—their ears don’t have to be as accurate to tell them where to look for the source of a sound.” They depend more on their vision to locate potential danger.

The ear canal turns sharply before it gets to the eardrum. “If the horse is standing in a normal head-up position, the ear canal goes straight down for a couple of inches and then turns horizontally toward the middle of the head,” she says. “It’s down in that horizontal part that mites can settle.” The hairs inside the ear are different from the body hairs on the outside. “They are not soft hairs that can lie flat,” she says. “They are short hairs that stick straight out from the skin of the inside of the ear. These hairs are not just to keep flies from crawling down into the ear; they are actually sense organs. If anything touches one of those hairs, there is an immediate reflex and the ear flicks—to try to get rid of the offending fly or foreign object.” Most animals with mobile ears have this protective mechanism. You can readily see this reflex in a cat. “If your cat is sleeping in your lap and you touch one tiny hair on the inside of its ear with a pencil, it will immediately flick the ear,” Heffner says. “The hairs serve as a warning device; if something is crawling in the ear this triggers the reflex action.” The animal doesn’t want anything crawling down into the ear because the ear canal is very close to the brain, so this is a good defensive measure.

Why The Horse Hears Certain Sounds Better Than Others “We all depend on our eyes,” says Heffner. “The first thing we do when we hear a sound is turn and look in that direction. Horses are already looking everywhere, so their ears don’t have to be that accurate in localizing the sound to tell them where to look. What they hear just tells them the general direction. If they just have the sound (and no visual contact) to go on, they are not very good at knowing where that sound came from.” This may make them nervous until they can actually see what is making the sound.

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A Leg Up “If they hear something and can’t see it, they are worried. This may be one reason horses are so jumpy,” she says. “Their ears are not very accurate at telling them where a sound is coming from, and if they also can’t see it (something hidden in the grass, for instance) they fear it might be a predator. Horses are like rabbits in many aspects (regarding their senses), except that rabbits can hide in the grass. The horse’s only survival response is to run—so he wants to know which way to run. Since horses are not localizers in regard to sounds, they depend more on their vision. If their ears tell them something is over to their right, and they look in that direction and don’t see it, then they get worried and just run the other direction.”

“Cattle are similar to horses in that they don’t know where the high pitched sounds are coming from. They are better at localizing low-pitched sounds. Most of the sounds in their natural environment that might indicate danger for a cow or horse are low-pitched. A mouse rustling the grass creates very high-frequency rustling noises. A bear stepping on a log will be a lower-pitched noise. “Little things that make high-pitched noises are not a threat to horses, whereas bigger things make lowerpitched noises—and step on bigger sticks that snap with a lower-frequency sound component. Those are the things that horses and cows might have to contend with, and those are the sounds they are able to localize.”

By contrast, cats are excellent localizers. They can hear exactly where the squeaking mouse is hiding in the grass, and pounce right on it. “If they were to pounce three “If they hear something and can’t degrees off, the mouse would get away,” she says. see it, they are worried. This may be “The horse doesn’t need one reason horses are so jumpy,” this precision, however; all Heffner says. “Their ears are not he has to do is run in the very accurate at telling them where opposite direction from a a sound is coming from, and if they frightening sound.”

Similarities Among Mammals

Ears in mammals are all similar. They may have different external shapes, but are basically the same. The external also can’t see it (something hidden An animal’s senses have part is simply there for in the grass, for instance) they fear it to be accurate enough for catching and funneling might be a predator.” the appropriate response, sound waves into the ear, depending on the and may also be useful in information and what is needed. “It’s not just the sensory flicking flies away from the face. “In some animals, and system that is important, but also what the animal needs to some extent in the horse, the outer ear also acts like to do with the information coming in—what movement a radiator to help get rid of excess body heat during hot is needed in response,” she says. “Our senses are there weather,” says Heffner. In an animal with large ears, like to serve our movement, to tell us how to behave, how to an elephant (or even a donkey), the blood vessels beneath cope, and what behaviors are appropriate after we receive the thin skin of the ear bring overheated blood to the the information.” Our senses give us information and our surface and expose it to cooler air. This can help dissipate brain makes a decision on how we respond to facilitate body heat. the behavior needed. “The inner parts of the ear—the middle ear cavity and “We think that having accurate senses is good, but if the spiral cochlea—are pretty standard and similar in all you don’t need a certain accuracy, it’s not fine-tuned,” mammals, regardless of the shape of the outer ear,” she she continues. “Each sense, in each animal, fits a certain says. “Mammals all have a middle ear cavity, and they all purpose. In horses, there is no problem in being a poor have three middle ear bones and an eardrum. In some localizer of sounds because they don’t need really precise animals the spiral cochlea is longer, and in some it is information. They don’t need to know exactly where the shorter. In some animals the middle ear cavity behind the mouse is squeaking in the grass because they don’t need eardrum is larger or smaller, but it’s all the same basic plan, to catch the mouse. whether it’s the ear of a horse or a dog or a mouse.” ■ 262 | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


Handy Horse Tips The Importance Of Stirrup Length by Lee Bolles

Wouldn’t it be a perfect world if every tall or short person had an equally tall or short horse to ride? Their bodies would be perfectly matched for optimum performance. The legs of the rider would fall precisely at the right spot on the horse’s sides—not so far down that the heels are hanging below the horse’s belly, but not so far up that they are hitting the horse in the middle of the rib cage.

Besides adjusting your stirrup length within the realm of what is comfortable and effective, you can also gain inches either upwards or downwards with spurs. There are some that are specifically designed to point, which can help the rider with a shorter leg. With that spur automatically turning in, the rider doesn’t have to point his or her toe out in order to make contact with the horse’s side.

Every once in a while, I find myself riding a horse for In order to help in situations where my legs are too which my legs are a touch too long or a touch too short. long for the horse’s side, I invested in a pair of custom Where the leg of the rider falls on the horse isn’t merely a spurs that look like a gooseneck with the spur directed matter of aesthetics, it is a matter of effectiveness. Almost up. This helps me reach everything we do with our the right spot without horses, when done properly, changing my leg position has to do with the position of “Almost everything we do with too drastically. our legs on the horse’s side. In order to support the horse, our horses, when done properly, In the big scheme of guide the horse, drive the has to do with the position of our things, how long your horse forward, and collect legs on the horse’s side.” stirrups are and where the horse, we need the full your spurs make contact use of our legs. with the horse’s side may not seem like a big thing. However, think about it from Adjusting where the leg falls on the horse can be a horse’s perspective. A tall trainer and a short rider manipulated partly with stirrup length. You may have could mean the spur touches his side as much as several to ride one or two holes shorter or longer depending on inches apart. If I were a horse, that might make me a the size of the horse, the discipline you are riding in, and little confused. Wouldn’t it confuse you? Making sure whether or not you need to use spurs. If you need spurs the stirrups are adjusted in order to provide the horse and the stirrups are too long, you might find yourself in with maximum, effective and consistent direction is the the position of bending your toes down in order to have goal, and it is a little thing that only takes a few minutes the spurs make contact with the horse’s side. This isn’t to adjust in most cases. ■ ideal, as it tends to change your entire lower leg position.

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Calendar Of Events Items for the calendar are run FREE of charge on a space-available basis. Calendar listings are subject to change; please confirm dates and locale before making your plans or reservations. MAIL or FAX notices to Arabian Horse Times, Attention: Charlene Deyle, 299 Johnson Ave. Suite 150, Waseca, MN 56093; phone 507-835-3204 or fax 507-835-5138 or e-mail: charlened@ahtimes.com. *Due to the intrinsic nature of these shows, Arabian Horse Times cannot be held accountable for their validity.

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EGIONAL SHOWS & HAMPIONSHIPS

OCTOBER October 2-3, 2010, Region 9 Competitive Trail Championship, Quitaque, Texas. Contact: Alice Yovich, 817-460-8111.

SHOWS SEPTEMBER September 22-25, 2010, National Show Horse Finals, Springfield, Illinois. Contact: Cynthia Clinton, 937-935-1753. September 30-October 1, 2010, Tulsa State Fair, Tulsa, Oklahoma. Contact: Art Byrd, 918-363-7747. September 30-October 3, 2010, Eastern States Exposition II, West Springfield, Massachusetts. Contact: Carol Keller, 413-205-5016. OCTOBER October 1-3, 2010, Diablo Fall Fling, Elk Grove, California. Contact: Nancy Goertzen, 559-625-2631. October 1-3, 2010, Oregon Fall Classic, Eugene, Oregon. Contact: Heather Engstrom, 541-746-4375. October 16-17, 2010, Pacific Rim Arabian Fall Classic, Elma, Washington. Contact: Lanora Callahan, 360-832-6076. October 19-20, 2010, NC State Fair Horse Show, Raleigh, North Carolina. Contact: Dale Barnett, 270-227-2063. October 23-24, 2010, PMHA Morab National Championship, Lexington, Kentucky. Contact: Jean Buddin, 228-826-1486. NOVEMBER November 5-7, 2010, Western Carolinas Fall Show, Clemson, South Carolina. Contact: Nancy Baker, 828-817-0359. November 6-7, 2010, Arabian Sport Horse Challenge, Newberry, Florida. Contact: Carlie Evans, 352-215-0710. November 11-14, 2010, NTAHC Shootout, Glen Rose, Texas. Contact: Sherry McGraw, 903-872-7279.

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November 12-14, 2010, AHAA Fall Festival A and B, Scottsdale, Arizona. Contact: Jean Beck, 559-642-2072. November 12-14, 2010, Dixie Gulf Panhandle Ruff Out, Baker, Florida. Contact: Jean Buddin, 228-826-1486. November 24-27, 2010, AHAF 41st Annual Thanksgiving Show, Tampa, Florida. Contact: Sally Dunn, 561-784-4632. November 26-28, 2010, AHASFV 40th Annual Thanksgiving Show, Burbank, California. Contact: Sue Todd, 805-646-5703. DECEMBER December 3-5, 2010, Gulf Coast Christmas Show, Katy, Texas. Contact: Sherry McGraw, 903-872-7279.

DISTANCE/ COMPETITIVE TRAIL RIDE SEPTEMBER September 28-October 2, 2010, Owyhee Canyonlands 50- and 55-Mile Endurance Ride, Oreana, Oregon. Contact: Jannelle Wilde, 541-849-2460. September 30, 2010, Alabama Yellowhammer Pioneer 55- and 75-Mile Endurance Ride, Heflin, Alabama. Contact: Tamra Schoech, 770-554-1545. OCTOBER October 1-2, 2010, Alabama Yellowhammer Pioneer 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Heflin, Alabama. Contact: Tamra Schoech, 770-554-1545. October 2-3, 2010, Pine Marten Run 50Mile Endurance Ride I and II, Rapid River, Michigan. Contact: Linda Hamrick, 260-602-9660. October 9-10, 2010, RAHA Rally 50-Mile Competitive Trail Ride, Escondido, California. Contact: Robert Insko, 760-789-1977. October 14, 2010, AERC National Championship 100-Mile Endurance Ride, Patrick, South Carolina. October 16, 2010, Foothills Of The Cascade 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Molalla, Oregon. Contact: Janelle Wilde, 541-849-2460. October 16-17, 2010, High Desert III and IV 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Weeks, Nevada. Contact: Judy Jewkes, 702-267-2587. October 21-22, 2010, AHA National Open 35Mile Competitive Trail Ride I and II, Stillwater, Oklahoma. Contact: AHA, 303-696-4500. October 23-24, 2010, AHA National Open 25and 50-Mile Endurance Ride I and II, Stillwater, Oklahoma. Contact: AHA, 303-696-4500. October 23-24, 2010, AHA National Open 75and 100-Mile Endurance Ride, Stillwater, Oklahoma. Contact: AHA, 303-696-4500.

October 30, 2010, AHAA 25- and 50-Mile Halloween Endurance Ride, Fountain Hills, Arizona. Contact: Lancette Koerner, 480-655-9434. October 30, 2010, Big River 60-Mile Endurance Ride, Keithsburg, Illinois. Contact: Christopher Power, 217-648-2974. October 30, 2010, Blackwater Boogie 25- and 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Milton, Florida. Contact: Diane Hawthorne, 850-374-1403. October 29-30, 2010, Spook Run 50-Mile Endurance ride, Henryville, Indiana. Contact: Lois McAffe, 812-294-1776. October 30-31, 2010, Big River 30-Mile Competitive Trail Ride I and II, Keithsburg, Illinois. Contact: Christopher Power, 217-648-2974.

NATIONAL EVENTS September 21-25, 2010, Sport Horse Nationals, Nampa, Idaho. Contact: AHA, 303-696-4500. October 22-30, 2010, U.S. Nationals, Tulsa, Oklahoma. Contact: AHA, 303-696-4500.

INTERNATIONAL EVENTS September 24-26, 2010, All Nations Cup and German National Show, Aachen, Germany. Contact: VZAP, 49-5113881180, info@vzap.org; www.vzap.org October 21-24, 2010, El Zahraa National C Show and 13th International Championships, El Zahraa, Egypt. Contact: Ahmed Hamza, 202-22983733, info@elzahraa-stud.org; www.elzahraa-stud.org November 17-21, 2010, 29th Brazilian National Arabian Horse Show, Indaiatuba (Campinas) – SP, Brazil. Contact: 55.11.3674.1744; www.abcca.com.br December 4-5, 2010, Chilean Breeders Cup. Contact: M. Trinidad Del Campo, tdelcampo@achcca.cl December 10-12, 2010, World Championships, Paris, Nord Villepinte. Contact: Alice Wermus, alice.wermus@comexposium.com December 16-18, 2010, 7th Sharjah National Arabian Horse Festival, Sharjah, UAE. Contact: 971-65311155, frsan@emirates.net.ae; www.forsanuae.org.ae *Go to www.arabianessence.com or www.ecaho.org, for additional international shows and information.


Calendar Of Events

  

      

   

t4BGFGPSZPVSIPSTFT t4USPOHFSUIBOXPPEBOE17$ t-PXFTUDPTUPWFSUJNF t.BJOUFOBODFGSFF t4BGFGPSUIFFOWJSPONFOU t.BEFJOUIF64" Carrie Cada and John McCarty were married on June 10th in Holland, Mich. It was a beatiful ceremony set on the blu overlooking the shores of Lake Michigan. Guests traveled from nine dierent states to be there, and all had a wonderful time, dancing under the stars that evening. Following the nuptials, Carrie and John enjoyed a honeymoon in New York City.

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1-800-248-4637 SEP TEMBER 2010 | 265AA


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Breeders of exceptional English Pleasure horses. Multi-National winning breeder. Full siblings to National winners and young prospects available.

Steve Grove - Owner Don Ulmer - Trainer/Manager • Elise Ulmer - Trainer www.ranchofcc.com • dkulmer@venturecomm.net

Call Carrie for your DVD at 248-563-4373 www.stonecreekarabians.com

R.O. LERVICK ARABIANS NS S

AND

Home of Cytosk+++ & Out Of Cyte yte e Halter & Performance Horses For Sale e Roger & Linda Lervick Dennis Wigren - Manager/Trainer P.O. Box 699 Stanwood, Washington 98292 t E-mail: cytosk@whidbey.net Web site: www.rolervickarabians.com

BREEDINGS

AND

HORSES FOR SALE

Owned by: Maroon Fire Arabians, Inc. Standing at: Shea Stables ~ 1925 Bartlett Rd., St. Clair, MI 48079

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The Hat Lady has the hats you need and MORE! Western Hats, Derbies, Homburgs and Snapbrims. Custom hats. Top hats, hunt caps and helmets. Hat carriers: single and multiple. Ultimate Show Apparel by Diane Olsen. Frank Principe Silver Bits. AHA OďŹƒcial Championship Jackets.

Champion Show Horse For Sale. Visit me online: www.thehatlady.com E-mail: herhatness@aol.com

X

treme To The Max

Halstead’s Karina American Saddlebred Palomino - Pinto Taking it to the XTREME!

“Seeing . . . Is Believing Arabian Breeders Sweepstakes and SHP Sire Everyone knows GOLD is an Investment with Xtreme returns.

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A Stallion so Exotic he will leave you burning with desire to have your own. “XTREME� baby! Join the Xtreme Team today!

Xtreme “Golden� Babies and Mares in foal to Xtreme occasionally available. Call for availability now.

266AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES

We currently have Purebred and Half-Arabian Country Pleasure and English Pleasure horses available, from prospects to finished, proven amateur mounts. Call for more information:

Bob Jorgensen Training 7326 Chester Avenue Northfield, MN 55057 507-744-3110


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For incredible opportunities on world class foals, broodmares in foal to and breedings to Hucks Connection V+/, log on to www.hucksconnectionV.com Standing at Vicki Humphrey Training Center Owned by Diamond Hill Arabians Call Jack Lapointe 704-243-7036 • janprointl1@aol.com

IRISH BORN & RAISED! Purebred Arabian Horses Young stock for sale - Reasonably priced Photo: Zygmunt (*Ganges x Zuzanna)

Mrs. Mickey Hegg Bordwin, Mountrath, Co. Laois, Ireland mickeyhegg@aol.com Cell: 353-87-6937634 • Home: 353-57-87-56435

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SEP TEMBER 2010 | 267AA


GENUINE RUBBER for stalls, alleyways, trailers, grooming areas and wash racks

Deluxe “Soft Stall” Mats make horse sense Mats lay flat without curling and resisting shifting. Install over any surface. Sure-traction surface for natural footing. Cut bedding and disposal costs to 75%. Made in USA.

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IN-STOCK FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY: 10' x 10', 10' x 12', 12' x 12', 12' x 14' and 12' x 16'. NO CHARGE for custom trimming.

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I-Block PAVERS Perforated RING MATS ARENA RUBBER ■

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Faulkner’s Most Popular Rolled Arabian Halters.

Faulkner’s Top of the Line Padded Arabian Halters. Padded nose and crown made specifically for Arabians. 3/4” double stitched, solid brass hardware, adjustable chin and crown. 100% guaranteed. Beta* with leather padding. $45.00. Sizes: small/large yearling and med/large adult. Colors: brn or blk. Stainless steel hardware on request.

Durable Beta* with rolled leather nose and throat. 3/4” wide, solid brass hardware. Perfect fit. Clean, elegant look. 100% guaranteed. $49.50. Sizes: small/large yearling and med/large adult. Colors: brn or blk. Solid brass nameplates $8.95. Stainless steel hardware on request. *Beta is a flexible and durable coated nylon. Completely washable.

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1-800-821-5524 268AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES

www.faulknerssaddlery.com e-mail: faulknerssaddlery@kc.rr.com


Sixteenth Annual

Enter your beautiful foals in the 16th Annual Arabian Horse Times Beautiful Baby Contest – and win a full-color, in-depth story on your farm and breeding program.

2009 Beautiful Baby Contest winner PS Echo Domani, bred by Sheila Stewart.

All Baby Contest entries will be published in the November 2010 issue of the Arabian Horse Times. DEADLINE IS NOVEMBER 1, 2010 All you have to do is submit: 1. A color photo (any size) of your most beautiful foal ever born. 2. Its name, sire and dam, sex, and date of birth. 3. Owner name, farm name, address, and phone number. 4. Note if it is FOR SALE and/or Futurities and Sweepstakes nominated. 5. $100 entry fee per photo. Enter as many photos of the same foal or different foals as you like.

Win a FREE ry! to S m r Fa

Here iis your opportunity to presen Here present e t th the e fo ffoals alss of yyour al ou ur fa favorite stallion or mare. Many M Ma ny foals f from past contests con ntests were e ssold old ol d im immedi immediately. diattelly. The wi w winner nner nn er w will ill be il be selecte selected te ed byy tthe he sstaff ta aff o off th the e Ar A Arabian ab bian Horse Ho orse Times, Tiimees, and will be featured d iin n th the he Ja January an nu uar aryy 20 2011 11 iissue ssue ss ue e of of the the Ar Arabian rab abia i n Horse ia Hors rse Times. rs

Enter on our website: www.ahtimes.com or send entries to: ARABIAN HORSE TIMES • 299 JOHNSON AVE. • SUITE 150 • WASECA, MN 56093 PH: 1-800-248-4637 • FAX: 507-835-5138 SEP TEMBER 2010 | 269AA


270AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


U.S. NATIONALS Show Coverage in

NOV E M BER You made history at the show. Now chronicle the great event in the Arabian Horse Times! Visit with us during the show about SPECIAL PRICING for NOVEMBER ADS and BLAST EďšşMAILS from the show to share your big news with everyone immediately.

KANDI MENNE kandi@ahtimes.com

JOHN DIEDRICH johnd@ahtimes.com

WWW.AHTIMES.COM 1-800-248-4637

SEP TEMBER 2010 | 271AA


LOOKING AHEAD NOVEMBER 2010 NATIONAL SHOW HORSE FINALS Full show coverage, showcasing the Champions of elegance in motion!

SMALL BREEDERS Featuring those breeders whose contributions are all about QUALITY, not quantity.

THE 16TH ANNUAL BEAUTIFUL BABY CONTEST To the Most Beautiful Baby goes the bragging rights, plus a free full-page story!

MINNESOTA FALL FESTIVAL It’s about the fun. It’s about the amateurs. It’s about THE MONEY. Catch all the show and auction results here.

U.S. NATIONALS COVERAGE See pages 270AA-271AA.

Kandi Menne or John Diedrich

1-800-248-4637 or 507-835-3204 www.ahtimes.com 272AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES


LOOKING AHEAD DECEMBER 2010

Stallions One-stop shopping for all your 2011 stallion promotional needs!

TOP TEN

Stallions Showcasing this year’s top award-winning stallions, junior stallions and senior stallions.

TOP TEN

Colts Featuring this year’s top U.S. and Canadian National Futurity Colts

Kandi Menne or John Diedrich

1-800-248-4637 or 507-835-3204 www.ahtimes.com SEP TEMBER 2010 | 273AA


Index Of Advertisers A ABCCA ........................................15AA-17AA Adandy Farm.............................157AA-163AA Al Shaqab Stud ...................................22A-25A Arabian Horse Times’ Anniversary Celebration ... .............................................................. 277AA Arabian Horse Times’ Beautiful Baby Contest ..... .............................................................. 269AA Arabian Horse Times’ Facebook .................. 262A Arabian Horse Times’ Farm Brochures ..... 276AA Arabian Horse Times’ Online Auction ........ 148A Arabian Horse Times’ Reader’s Choice Awards .... ................................................................. 136A Arabian Horse Times’ Stallion Cards.................... ....................................................251A, 265AA Arabian Horse Times’ U.S. Nationals ................... ............................256A, 257A, 270AA, 271AA Arabians Ltd...............................................BCA Arabians of Qiran Al Sa’Dain LLC .................... ......................16Shada, 17Shada (52AA, 53AA) Argent Farms.......................IFCAA, 1AA-7AA Avalon Crest ............................28Shada (64AA) B Battaglia Farms...............72A-97A, 174A, 175A Bein Performance Horses ....................98A, 99A Bob Jorgensen Training ................252A, 266AA Boisvert Farms, LLC ...........................59A-63A

274AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES

Brass Lite Arabians ................................... 128A Bridgette White Training ....................... 108AA C Canyon Creek Ranch ..........................88A, 89A Cedar Ridge Arabians, Inc.................................. ... 148A, 1CR-15CR (278AA-292AA), IBCAA Chaos Arabians, LLC......................230A, 231A Chase Harvill Training Centre ...167AA-173AA Chattooga Ridge Arabians, Inc...................... 7A Chestnuthill Arabians ...................10AA, 11AA Christy Higman-Clements Training .................. .....................................................82AA, 83AA Clanton Performance Horses ..........154A, 155A Colonial Wood Training Center ...191AA-209AA Cortese Arabians ...........................69AA-75AA Culbreth Equine Training & Management, LLC ................................................................ 20AA D Daly Pride Arabians, LLC.................................. .................... 12Shada, 13Shada (48AA, 49AA) Dan Lynch Farms..........................33AA-36AA Deak, Darby ....................................174A, 175A Diamond Hill Arabians ................253A, 267AA Donna Waggoner Training ........................ 178A Dremul Enterprises ............................................ ........................ 76A, 77A, 82A, 83A, 90A, 91A

E Enchanted Acres, Inc. ..................252A, 266AA Equine Associates............................................... .................... 24Shada, 25Shada (60AA, 61AA) Excellence Auction ................................... 14AA F Faulkner’s Saddlery, LLC .............254A, 268AA Ford Brook Farms, LLC ..........20Shada (56AA) Frierson Atkinson .........................253A, 267AA G Grandeur Arabians ........................12AA, 13AA H H B Arabians ...6Shada, 7Shada (42AA, 43AA) Hayes Equestrian Center........................... 172A Heartland Ventures, LLC ................................... ...................................94A, 95A, 252A, 266AA Hegg, Mickey ...............................253A, 267AA I Iron Horse Farms ............................134A, 135A J John White Stables..........................176A, 177A K Kiesner Training ..............................106A-122A L Lamb Show Horses ...................103AA-107AA Lambert Arabians................................53A-58A Laurie Long Performance Horses ............. 179A


Index Of Advertisers Liberty Meadows Training Center ..................... 263A, 264A, 1LM-24LM (265A-288A), IBCA Linear Rubber Products, Inc. .......254A, 268AA Lone Tree Farm .............31AA-36AA, 14Shada, .......15Shada (50AA, 51AA), 30Shada (66AA) Long Meadow Arabians ................80AA, 81AA Luton Performance Horses .............232A, 233A Luxemere Arabians..................26Shada (62AA) M Markel Insurance Company ....................... 9AA Maroon Fire Arabians, Inc. ..........252A, 266AA Michael Byatt Arabians, Inc. ...................BCAA Midwest.................................................8A-11A Mike Neal Arabian Center, LLC ....230A, 231A Milagro Arabians.................................96A, 97A Milestone Arabians ............................................ ...................... 22Shada, 23Shada (58AA, 59AA) Morton, Janice & Laura ............................ 173A Mountain Classic Arabians ................................ .................... 10Shada, 11Shada (46AA, 47AA) O Oak Haven Arabian Horse Farm ..21AA-30AA Orrion Farms...........................................BCAA Overall, Auriel .....................................84A, 85A P Pay-Jay Arabians ..........................253A, 267AA PCF Arabians, LLC ........................100A-105A

Pelham, Lady Georgina ...........21Shada (57AA) Prairie View Farm ...................29Shada (65AA) Prestige Farms, LLC ...........................26A, 27A Price Performance Horses ...................31A-35A Q Quail Ridge Arabians ..........................78A, 79A R R.O. Lervick Arabians .................252A, 266AA Rae-Dawn Arabians ............................12A-15A Ranch of Cherry Creek ................252A, 266AA Rick Gault Training...................164AA-166AA Ron Copple Training Stables ..........129A-133A Rooker Training Stable................84AA-102AA Ross, David Zouch ............................................. ....... FCAA, 5Shada (41AA), 32Shada (68AA) S Scheier Farms ................................................ 1A Shada, Inc. .............................................. FCAA, 31AA-33AA, 1Shada-32Shada (37AA-68AA) Shamrock Farms..................................... 190AA Sherman Ranch ............................................. 5A Showtime Training Center ................................. ......................................16A-21A, 137A-147A Shuster Arabians, LLC............27Shada (63AA) Sichini Training, LLC .....................149A-153A Siemon Stables .......................................... 128A Smoky Mountain Park Arabians .........16A-21A

Southwest Farm Services ..............253A, 267AA Stahler, Sara ....................... 86A, 87A, 92A, 93A Stankovic, Dean......................................... 123A Stone Creek Arabians...................252A, 266AA Stonewall Farm .................................................. .................... 18Shada, 19Shada (54AA, 55AA) Strawberry Banks Farm ...................................... ...............FCA, 36A, 1SBF-16SBF (37A-52A) Sypolt Insurance Services, Inc. ....254A, 268AA T Tall Timber.......8Shada, 9Shada (44AA, 45AA) Ted Carson Training Center, Inc. at Butler Farms Arabians ..................................... IFCA, 1A-3A The Brass Ring ....................................... 190AA The Hat Lady ...............................252A, 266AA Thiago Sobral Performance Horses ........... 179A Toskhara Arabians ....................................... 30A U Underwood, Diane .................................... 123A V Vicki Humphrey Training Center ...................... .................................................109AA-125AA W Wilkins Livestock Insurers, Inc. ...253A, 267AA WindRiver Fence .........................251A, 265AA Windwalker Enterprises, LLC ........................... ......................................... 74A, 75A, 80A, 81A

SEP TEMBER 2010 | 275AA


High Impact Advertising Witness the grace of the Arabian Horse

Custom

Farm

BROCHURES ~No Job Is Too Big ~Award Winning Design ~The BEST Customer Service 1-800-248-4637 w w w. a h t i m e s .c o m 276AA | AR ABIAN HORSE TIMES

Raymore, Missouri 816.651.7424 info@liberty-meadows.com

liberty-meadows.com


Arabian Horse Times’ 40th Anniversary Celebration Began In July ...

The Party Starts In Tulsa!! Be sure and stop by the Arabian Horse Times booth during U.S. Nationals ... OFTEN!

Join us daily rday u t a S y a d s e Wedn . 11 a.m. - 1 p.m . ents v e n o i t a r b e l e for c

Visit us on FacebookŠ and at www.ahtimes.com for party schedules and updates!

See you all in Tulsa!


U.S. N ational Champ i o nshi p C onte nd er s

1 Cedar Ridge | Ar a bian Horse Times


Cedar Ridge

www.Cedar-Ridge.com

SEP TEMBER 2010 | Cedar Ridge 2


s r e d n e t n o C

SHF Encore (Apollopalooza x SMS Forever Bay) Owned by the Encore Select Group LLC Arabian English Pleasure Junior Horse Shown by Tom Moore

Page 5-6 Cedar Ridge

Elle Yes (Baske Afire x Showtime's Daddy's Girl) Owned by Tom & Elizabeth Moore Half-Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over Shown by Elizabeth Moore Offered for sale RJ Ames (Brass x Toi Jabaska) Owned by Cedar Ridge Farm Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR Maturity Shown by Lara Ames Arabian Country English Pleasure Junior Horse Shown by Eric Krichten

Page 7-8 Cedar Ridge

Miss Montana CRF (Mister Montana NIC x Marliera) Owned by Dick Ames Half-Arabian Reining Horse Futurity 5 & Under Shown by Brian Welman Miss Maximus (HH Maxemus x She Dun Slid) Owned by Dick Ames Half-Arabian Reining Horse Futurity 5 & Under Shown by Brian Welman

Page 9-10 Cedar Ridge

3 Cedar Ridge | Ar a bian Horse Times


CRF Intoxicating (Matoi x Glamorize) Owned by Cedar Ridge Farm Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR Maturity Shown by Lara Ames Offered for sale Bright Ghazet (El Ghazi x Bright Fire) Owned and shown by Robyn Johnson Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure Select AATR Half-Arabian Country Pleasure Driving AAOTD Brass Star (Brass x CB Shining Star) Owned and shown by Moriah Fischer Arabian Park Horse AAOTR Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 18-39

Page 11-12 Cedar Ridge

Ames Admiral (Hucklebey Berry x MC Jakita) Owned and shown by Toni Dolby Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 Offered for sale CW Knoxville Rush (Navajo Moun x Shetaxa Bay) Owned by Cheryl Wright Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 Shown by Elizabeth Moore Arabian Country English Pleasure Shown by Tom Moore Offered for sale

Page 13-14 Cedar Ridge

Top Brass CRF (Brass x Ferachask) Owned by Cedar Ridge Farm Arabian Country Pleasure Driving AAOTD Shown by Dick Ames

Page 15-16 Cedar Ridge

SEP TEMBER 2010 | Cedar Ridge 4


! n o m e Cheer t h

5 Cedar Ridge | Ar a bian Horse Times


sh f

ENCORE And Tom Moore

SEP TEMBER 2010 | Cedar Ridge 6


Elle

YES

7 Cedar Ridge | Ar a bian Horse Times

and Elizabeth Moore


RJ

AMES and Eric Krichten

SEP TEMBER 2010 | Cedar Ridge 8


s s i M

MAXIMUS 9 Cedar Ridge | Ar a bian Horse Times

And Brian Welman


M is s

MONTANA

crf

And Brian Welman

SEP TEMBER 2010 | Cedar Ridge 10


crf

Intoxicating And Eric Krichten

11 Cedar Ridge | Ar abian Horse Times


t h g i r B

Ghazet And Robyn Johnson

s s a r B

Star And Moriah Fischer

SEP TEMBER 2010 | Cedar Ridge 12


s e m A

Admiral

e l l i v x o n K w c

Rush

And Elizabeth Moore

13 Cedar Ridge | Ar a bian Horse Times

And Toni Dolby


w e n r u o t Visi

website www.Cedar-Ridge.com

SEP TEMBER 2010 | Cedar Ridge 14


Top

Brass

crf

And Dick Ames

The Ames Family Jordan, Minnesota 952.492.6590

www.Cedar-Ridge.com


Magic Wan

OF W

ARABIAN FUTURITY COLTS

BRED

WITH

MICHAEL BYATT

MICHAEL BYATT ARABIANS, INC. • NEW ULM, TEXAS • WWW.MICHAELBYATT.COM & OWNED BY ORRION FARMS • ELLENSBURG, WASHINGTON • WWW.ORRIONFARMS.COM

Arabian Horse Times September 2010 AA  
Arabian Horse Times September 2010 AA  

September 2010 - AA