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July 2008 - Lara Ames purchases the Arabian Horse Times.

aht timeline no such thing as extracting her embryo and implanting it in another mare with a healthy uterus. How far-fetched! Embryo transfer was barely out of the laboratory trial stage in 1970, but the concept was very intriguing. Breeders speculated about its potential. Equine vets were anxious to try out the procedure in their own practices. The revolution that had begun with artificial insemination began to snowball. Increasingly astounding science and technology came into widespread use, went hurtling off the “yesterday” platform, and raced away into the future. The Arabian Horse Registry approved embryo transfer in 1986. E/T soon became a familiar alternative, perfectly tailored for mare owners who wanted their successful show mares’ careers to continue uninterrupted. It also gave a second chance to valuable mares that could still produce eggs to be fertilized and harvested, but could no longer carry and produce live foals. Transported semen, approved in 1991, virtually eliminated having to ship mares, often with vulnerable young foals at foot, to the stallions. Stallions’ semen could now be put into an Equitainer® in its liquid cooled state, shipped to the mare owner counter-to-counter, retrieved, inseminated, and presto! Conception rates were somewhat lower, but that has improved. A few stallion owners expressed upset over the reduction in revenues for outside mare board, but overall, the new protocol saved mare and stallion owners countless headaches, risks and time. It also opened up several other exciting possibilities. Mares could now be bred to stallions formerly inaccessible to them, in other countries. Best of all, semen could be frozen and stored indefinitely. Semen

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from a highly regarded stallion, long deceased, could go to a special mare, and she (or her surrogate) could produce a cross that was impossible a few years earlier. See recent issues of the Arabian Horse Times for a series of articles that reveal, in some detail, new techniques and advanced discoveries developed in the last few years. What was once science fiction is now hard fact. Forty Years And More To Come Magazines—all magazines—reflect the cultural, social and economic climates that surround them. They come and go as tastes and interests change, making timing an important key to success and longevity. Sports Illustrated is a perfect example. Publisher Henry Luce started Sports Illustrated in August, 1954, at the precise moment when spectator sports (football, baseball and basketball, for starters) were about to burst into popular culture with hurricane force. There has been no other phenomenon like it, before or since. Luce had great instincts. He saw a need and filled it. In 1970, when Arabian Horse Time debuted, it reflected a strong re-focusing on spending the discretionary dollar. The American public’s interest in Arabian horses was growing, often to the degree that people were making changes in their lives around their passion, the Arabian horse.

Arabian Horse Times July 2010  

July 2010 Arabian Horse Timess

Arabian Horse Times July 2010  

July 2010 Arabian Horse Timess