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2012

U.S. Nationals

Like a first-run film or a Broadway play, each U.S. National Championship Show has a character all its own. To learn more about how people saw this year’s event, we asked several who were there for their thoughts. What were their favorite memories? How would they evaluate the show? What was best about it, and what suggestions could they offer for the future? There were as many opinions, of course, as there were speakers. However, it was not long before trends became apparent, observations that recurred again and again. For instance, nearly everyone said that this year, there was a new, positive feel to the show, a simmering of enthusiasm 58 | A r a bi a n Hor se T i mes

in the Arabian community that had not been apparent at the U.S. Nationals in recent years. Did everyone suddenly endorse Tulsa? Not really. Many prefaced their answers by saying that it was not their favorite location, but then cited improvements this year that gave them hope for the future. Perhaps it was best phrased by halter judge Van Jacobsen, who said that it was as if everyone had decided to look on the glass as half-full, rather than half-empty. The new sense of excitement was palpable, most said, and they recognized the effort put in by the Show Commission and the APAHA volunteers not only to upgrade the show’s decorations, but to solve past problems and restore the feeling of “Aren’t we lucky to be here!”


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There are some facets of Tulsa Expo Square that draw unreserved praise. “It has the cleanest facilities of anyplace we show,” said Chuck Siemon. “They even clean the wash racks!” Add to that, the weather this year was exemplary—not too hot, nor too cold, and an ongoing parade of fair skies. (As one observer said, there was never a need to throw a tarp over your horse’s head as you hurried through a pelting rain to one of the rings.) The stall decorations, as usual, were beautiful, and Maddy Winer’s rendition of the National Anthem during the opening ceremonies was inspiring. And Arabians were great not only in competition, but as entertainment too: Sylvia Zerbini’s troupe of eight liberty horses gave new meaning to the breed’s legendary intelligence.

Joe Alberti

Rohara Arabians, Orange Lake, Fla. “One of the reasons that this Nationals was special to me is because it was the first time I won a national championship with a purebred,” said trainer Joe Alberti. “The horse was Rohara Crown Prince, who was the U.S. National Champion 3-Year-Old Colt, owned by Matt Murray. It was also Matt’s first national championship after 30-something years of showing Arabian horses.” Actually, the 2012 U.S. Nationals was good for Alberti on a lot of fronts. Showing 15 horses, he won four national championships, three reserve titles and 22 top tens. Rohara fared even better, adding another 10 top tens to the total.

“The show has gotten better every year since it’s been in Tulsa,” said Siemon. “If you had only visited that show, that week, and seen all the positive things that were going on, you wouldn’t think there was any concern about the U.S. economy. Everything was so attractive, and it was wonderful to see so many people working so hard toward a common goal.”

But it was the personal stories that he remembers best. “I love watching my amateurs, who have put in their time all year, come in that ring and win national championships,” he said. “I love seeing their faces. Obviously, I love showing horses and I love winning, but when the amateurs do well and it’s something they’ve worked at, it’s just a great feeling.”

Here is what a broad selection of Arabian owners, trainers, breeders and exhibitors had to say about the 2012 U.S. Nationals.

About the show overall, he observed, “I thought that everybody did a very good job and it was very well run. The committees in charge of decorating, who were trying to ‘spruce the place up,’ did an amazing job. And in the show, the quality was great and the class numbers were increased from last year, which was really encouraging to see. “I’m not a huge Tulsa fan,” he conceded, “but we are there, so I’m a part of ‘we need to make the best of it,’ and I really think they’re trying to do that. My only negative came from being one of (I was told by the show office) only a handful of trainers who show both halter and performance on a national level, so having the Pavilion and the Ford Truck Arena run simultaneously made for a very hectic schedule. I know that they’re working on that; they did the best that they could do and I really appreciate that.”

Bob Battaglia

Battaglia Farms, Scottsdale, Ariz. “My observation of the show this year was that AHA has really tried to listen to the exhibitors and do something about some of the major problems,” said Bob Battaglia. “And the quality of the horses was absolutely incredible. The biggest problem that I saw with the show was the separation of the halter/breeding classes and the performance classes. They’re held in two different rings and there was no way to watch both, which was very disappointing if you are an Arabian breeder.

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see’ classes for anyone looking for young English performance horses—but they are so much more than that! What could be better than watching all the top 4-year-olds in the country being individually showcased? The pattern classes were beautiful, and such a treat for the audience and everyone watching on the live feed. I loved them, and as a breeder, it is so encouraging to know that our young horses will have the opportunity both to win huge prize money and to be displayed to the world in such a great venue. It is such a tremendous marketing opportunity for breeders and for the AEPA-enrolled stallions. 

“However, overall, I felt that the atmosphere at the horse show this year was much more ‘up,’ and people seemed to be enjoying themselves more than they had in the past few years. That’s a positive sign for the Arabian horse industry.”

Gerald Canda

Breeder, Seattle, Wash. “This year’s U.S. Nationals was surreal,” reflected Gerald Canda. “I bought my first U.S. National Top Ten stallion, Pride of Fairwood, as a yearling in 1969. That was 43 years ago. For 2012, I bred the U.S. National Reserve Champion Senior Stallion, Aria Impresario, and the U.S. National Champion 2-Year-Old Filly, GC Seasons Of Love. And this year’s U.S. National Reserve Champion Futurity Gelding, H Mercury H, although I didn’t breed him, represents generations of my program. I bought his fourth dam, RDM Moon Gypsy, in 1976 (and she later gave me Gai Séance, who was the 1987 U S. National Reserve Champion Stallion). “My family has always come first,” he noted. “My wife, Mercedita, and I have been married 44 years, and I’m a grandfather now, but this year’s U.S. Nationals really brought home what a great part of my life breeding and showing Arabian horses has been.”

Peter Conway

Conway Arabians, Chatfield, Minn. “The debut of the two AEPA English performance futurities at U.S. Nationals was historic,” said Peter Conway. “I have no doubt that these will become the ‘must 62 | A r a bi a n Hor se T i mes

“The finals of the AEPA Halcon Furniture $50,000 Half-Arabian Futurity was spectacular and the $100,000 AEPA Purebred Futurity was the highlight of the show. The depth of talent was incredible, and the crowd loved every second of it. “I am very proud of the AEPA for building this program. We have over $500,000 banked for future prize payouts. Every March, we hold the online AEPA Stallion service auction and reserve every dime for prize money. The program is all about encouraging participation in the English performance division, and it is working. Kudos all around!”

Christy Egan

Arabian Horse Global and Arabian Results, Boulder, Colo. Like everyone else, Christy Egan sensed the positive atmosphere of the show. “There was a lot of very, very good energy at the Nationals this year,” she said. “And there were some beautiful performances—some classes which just defied adjudicating, they were so good (the western pleasure championship comes to mind). HalfArabian English is always one to run to the ring for, and the two AEPA classes were phenomenal.” With Arabian Horse Global, Egan had a better feel than most for the interest simmering around the country and internationally. “We had real good numbers,” she said. “At any given moment that you looked to see who was online, you would have at least a 1,000 people. We pumped up our bandwidth for U.S. Nationals—really, we like tripled it, just for the show—and we used every ounce of it.


2012 U.S. Nationals “We went through a couple of little bleeps, where something started to hiccup because the system was stressed,” she noted (which was positive for the show in terms of attention, but hectic for the staff ). “The night of the futurity fillies and colts, we had been told that the odds of x-number of people coming online at one time were something like a million to one—but they did! We’d told everyone 7 p.m., and thousands of people hit at once, like a cannon, to see the futurity in the Pavilion. It took us a few minutes to straighten it out.” The simulcast also was coordinated with USEF. “The first simulcasts we did with USEF were last summer, for the Egyptian Event and Youth Nationals,” Egan said. “For U.S. Nationals, I thought, ‘oh, cool, we’ll have a couple of thousand; we’ll jump that much.’” Their viewership jumped, but not the 2,000 she had envisioned; Friday and Saturday

night feeds attracted more than 3,500 viewers each. “There are proponents for and against [live streaming],” she said. “People say ‘if they can watch the show, they won’t come,’ and I completely disagree with that. We’ve had a lack of attendance by the general public for a long time; to change that, we have to go out and get them. And for many people who legitimately want to come to the show and can’t (like grandparents, friends, people who once owned horses), this allows them to stay involved. I got a nice note from Bill and Donna Bachmann, who were customers of mine 25 years ago; for health reasons, it became too much trouble for both of them to come. They said, ‘thank you for doing this—this way we can watch, because we miss all of you!’” For Egan, there was a broader, ongoing goal in Arabian Horse Global’s mission at the U.S. Nationals. “I’ve had a

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big epiphany over the past two years, since we’ve been doing this,” she said. “I always felt that people out there had a lot of interest in Arabian horses, but that was kind of an intuition. What I’ve discovered from doing Arabian Horse Global and doing outreach is that there are thousands of people interested in Arabian horses. We have the mystique of history and a heritage like no other horse. Our problems are not with people getting interested in Arabian horses or wanting to be around Arabian horses. Our problem is that we don’t reach them. And reaching them is precisely why we opted to be a part of the Arabian Horse Global partnership.”

Tommy Garland

Tommy Garland Horsemanship, Powhatan, Va. “It was one of the worst shows I’ve had in a number of years,” reported Tommy Garland, who usually comes home with a wall’s worth of ribbons, especially in the western division. “But my daughter, Katie, did great and that made up for the whole thing. She was reserve in the English Futurity with ROL Divine Style. That was huge for her, because he’s a young horse that she did herself, and that’s been her dream to do the whole time. She was the only girl, 20 years old, on a 3-year-old horse, competing against all those guys—that was pretty cool!” He was particularly grateful to client Nancy DeLisi, of DelSan Arabians, who opened the door for Katie’s success.

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“Nancy told us to find a horse and we did,” Garland said. “She wanted Katie to be able to start her career doing English, wanted to help her out. That was huge, to give a young trainer a chance like that. We knew he was a very nice horse, and then at the show, he just got better because we were bringing him on slow. When she got in there and started trotting around, we knew she had a chance.” Garland spent the class not only as father and coach, but also announcer for his wife and friends at home. “Dawn was home, so I was on the phone with her when they called the top ten,” he said. “It was pretty exciting. The people back here were watching it on the live feed and they were all hollering and screaming. For me, anytime someone like our amateurs win, it’s great. But knowing how bad Katie wanted to do English, and I never could afford to buy her an English horse [of that caliber], the fact that she had the opportunity and did that made us very proud. It’s good to see a young trainer being successful, whether it’s my daughter or someone else. We need that.”

Kellie Frye

Argyle, Texas “I think Kristian Dior wanted it more than I did!” said Kellie Frye of their 2012 U.S. National Western Pleasure AAOTR 18-35 Championship. Arabians and


2012 U.S. Nationals Half-Arabians have been in Frye’s life since she was 9. “I reacted pretty emotionally. I was so happy, I cried! This was my first national championship, but he was 2006 U.S. National Champion Western Pleasure Futurity horse with J.T. Keller. Last year at U.S. Nationals, Kristian Dior broke his jaw and I never got to ride him.” Stan White III had Frye’s personable, now completely recovered, Versace gelding for 30 days before this year’s show.

John Golladay

Cedar Ridge Arabians, Jordan, Minn. “I thought the U.S. Nationals was great,” John Golladay declared. “The quality was as good as I’ve ever seen it; there were a lot of promising young horses. I’m pretty partial to Louisville and Albuquerque, but this show has always been ‘the place to be,’ regardless of location. There was a lot more going on—more horses, a lot of futurities and maturities, and many more added classes for amateurs—than there were in the first U.S. National Shows I attended with my dad. And of course, the horses are the best thing about the show.”

Bill Hughes

Show Commission Chair, Chino Hills, Calif. “It was a happening, not just a horse show,” said Bill Hughes. “We had 1,847 horses, and it was amazing how the whole Arabian horse community came together;

everybody was pulling together to make the show great. Our volunteers and APAHA members, organized by Mary Jane Brown and Johnny and Christine Ryan, did an outstanding job. The show this year had a whole different, positive feel. I think, in my experience, it was one of the most outstanding U.S. National Shows we have ever had.”

Van Jacobsen

U.S. Nationals Halter Judge, Pine Island, Minn. “As a judge, I thought the quality of horses was impeccable, and I really enjoyed judging the halter horses in the halter venue. The Pavilion provided the exhibitors an opportunity to show their horses to their best advantage; there was no rush that ‘we need to hurry this class through because others are waiting’ type thing. I thought the quality of the horses was impeccably high— phenomenal, actually, in several classes. “As an Arabian owner and often-times attendee at U.S. Nationals, I thought that there was more positive energy on the fairgrounds than I have seen in a long time. People seemed to be saying, ‘It’s time to look on the bright side of things. Instead of the glass is half empty, the glass is half full. Let’s make the most of where we are. Let’s all showcase our beautiful horses and do it in a positive fashion.’ While there are other great horse shows, this still is our national show. Let’s make it the best we can. “I don’t want to imply that all of the credit goes to the Positive Change movement, but that is a part of it. I’m getting ready to head off to Convention. There will be differences of opinion there, absolutely, but that doesn’t mean we can’t discuss different viewpoints in a civilized fashion. And when the vote is taken and the decision is made, we all need to support it. We still need to move our breed forward, and I think that U.S. Nationals this year was part of that. It was a good show.”

Larry Jerome

Jerland Farms, Barron, Wis. “We had a very successful Nationals because so many of the things that I feel strongly about were validated,” said Larry Jerome. “From a horse standpoint, I would say that my stallions confirmed my belief that you can have everything—that type and performance ability are synonymous with one another. We shouldn’t try to divide between the two; they are both equally important and they should be considered when people are planning breedings. That’s because we have a responsibility to make sure that the horses we breed can have good homes. “One of the most exciting things for me was that Khadraj NA get floated to the top in the western performance classes,” he offered. That may be an understatement; the stallion’s get won the purebred Volume 43, No. 6 | 65


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2012 U.S. Nationals western pleasure open, junior and futurity titles, all with different trainers. “One thing that was very important to me was when Jody Strand rode Moonshine J to a top ten [Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Futurity] on Wednesday, and the next day, went national champion in a halter class [HalfArabian Futurity Geldings]. That says to me that yes, it is possible. “One of the other things that was important to me is that I have friends who follow all the disciplines, and I truly enjoy watching all the classes. I felt that even though the people have been disgruntled about some of the things that AHA has done, there was an effort being made to try to pull things together. There was a better feeling about everything; there were a lot of people making a lot of effort in many ways, doing what they could do to unify us as an Arabian breed—an Arabian family. “So, of course, the successes of the Khadraj NA and MPA Giovanni offspring were exciting for me. And for me, Nationals was like Christmas—I got to see not only great horses, but great people too, and that means a lot to me.”

Ashton Kiesner

Kiesner Training, Louisville, Tenn. “Team Kiesner finished off the 2012 U.S. Nationals in great style!” said Ashton Kiesner. “After 10 days of competition, our team earned six national championships, five national reserve championships and 23 top tens! Among the top winners was the exciting AEPA $100,000 Arabian Saddle Seat Futurity National Championship, which Joel won riding Bel Heir LR, owned by William Blankenship. Continuing the winning streak was Joel riding Emperors Fire to the National Reserve Championship in the AEPA $50,000 Half-Arabian Saddle Seat Futurity. What a great year it has been and what an honor it is to have such high quality horses and clients as part of this amazing team. Thank you to everyone and congratulations to all on being part of this amazing show!”

Keith Krichke

Krichke Training Center, Vicksburg, Mich. “We had a great U.S. Nationals show,” said Keith Krichke. “We had a fabulous time in Tulsa—we’re very lucky to be able to work with and enjoy such a wonderful group of supportive and dedicated clients. We were very

fortunate to have shown several national champions and reserve champions, as well as top tens, including National Champion Arabian Gelding AAOTH and National Reserve Champion Gelding 6-7, HF Psypher, owned by Texie Lowery; National Champion Yearling Gelding In-Hand, Bon Iver, bred and owned by Maureen and me; National Reserve Champion Arabian Mare Breeding AAOTH, Silver Laace, presented by her owner Jessie Szymanski; and National Reserve Champion HalfArabian Mare Saddle Pleasure 7 and Over, Koweta Call Me Emmie, also owned by Jessie Szymanski. We want to thank each of our clients for their continued support and for making this an unforgettable year.”

Tish Kondas

Showtime Training Center, Newnan, Ga. “The quality was excellent, the best I’ve seen in years,” Tish Kondas said. “The horses were well turned out and wonderfully presented. For the record, it’s a long show, and the footing problems are troubling. Realizing improvements have been made at the national level, I feel like we are still ‘settling’ in certain areas.”

Claire Larson

Tea, S.D. “Well, naturally, my favorite part of the show was when Pyro won,” said Claire Larson, who with his wife, Margaret, owns U.S. National Champion Senior Stallion Pyro Thyme SA. “To me, it was like winning the Super Bowl. It was a wonderful time and a truly big win for us. And really, I thought that the whole show was nice; I was really impressed with Tulsa this year.”

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Ashlynd Pleus

FFA Junior Judging Team member, Columbia City, Ind. “I started showing Quarter Horses in ‘Peewee’ classes when I was 5,” said Ashlynd Pleus. “I’m currently ranked third in the nation in hunt seat, and also compete in barrel racing. I was raised to believe that Arabians were highstrung, crazy and not very intelligent. This was our team’s second time at Arabian Nationals. We watched halter first and thought, ‘This is cool!’ Arabians are very elegant, refined and stylish, and there is so much diversity. Each horse has a different face, neck and eye appeal. In Quarter Horse halter classes, everything, and every horse is very standardized. Then we watched a park class. Wow! There is nothing even close to that in the Quarter Horse world!

Pyro Thyme SA hadn’t been shown since his U.S. National Stallion Championship in 2007. What made the Larsons decide to bring him back into the show ring? “You know, I always said that I’d never bring him back,” Larson admitted, “but this year he seemed to be in the best condition of his life, so I just had to bring him back into the show ring. And with the support of Andy Sellman and a lot of other people, we decided that we wanted to come back to U.S. for the chance to win again. We just really wanted people to be able to see him in person—he’s the best stallion that I’ve ever owned and in my opinion, one of the best stallions ever. And it was great at U.S. because the crowd was just wild about him, which always makes it better. It was such a pleasure and honor to me that everyone was so excited about him—it was really an unforgettable night and win. I am very proud of him and very proud of everyone that was a part of it. Not everyone has the chance to have a horse that does that well, and at the same time, is such a gentleman.”

Crystal McNutt

Crystal McNutt Performance Horses, Scottsdale, Ariz. “I think it was a good show,” said reining trainer Crystal McNutt. “The added amateur classes created a lot of interest. It made my amateur riders feel like they had a chance of winning; ‘I can do that!’ they’d say, and feel confident. This year’s show was very much about doing what was in the exhibitors’ best interests. The warm-up rings were smaller than we’re used to, but we made do. We did have to ride at night because we had to wait for the trail people to finish—and we started at 8 a.m. the next day!”

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“We saw a lot in nine days. Arabian western looks like Quarter Horse western: slow, with slightly different head carriage. Quarter Horses in hunt seat do an extended trot, but no hand gallop. There is nothing in the Quarter Horse or Paint world that can do so many different disciplines, and do them well. I’m going to Oklahoma State next year, and getting into strictly barrels and reining. I want to find something young and green that can run (waiting until their joints develop, of course, so they aren’t crippled by the time they’re 8). Quarter Horses are fast, but only over short distances. I want to have something good, something competitive. After what I’ve seen, I’m looking for a horse with Arabian blood. They have more stamina than any other breed. Arabians are so responsive—and they’re so beautiful.”

Christine Ryan

Springwater Farms Arabians, Stockton, N.J. “This was one of the most upbeat and energetic U.S. Nationals in recent history,” attested Christine Ryan of Springwater Farms Arabians. For the last few years, Ryan has helped decorate the Tulsa facility for the national show. “The improvements by the show commission and the facility made the event more comfortable for exhibitors and spectators. The fact that AHA could put on such an outstanding show in this economy is a testament to the strength and dedication of our industry. I’m proud to be part of this organization.”

Andy Sellman

Argent Farms, River Falls, Wis. “My most memorable moment from the show was showing Pyro Thyme SA, and there are several reasons why that was important to me,” Andy Sellman said. “I’ve been showing horses professionally for 17 years, and this was the second time that I got to show a national champion stallion. In my eyes, I think that this title is the most sought-after title there is. And I think that my colleagues and I are all in the same boat as we try to align ourselves with horses that are worthy of doing something like that—being a national champion stallion. From there,


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The U.S. Nationals

Inaugural Red Carpet We’ve been hearing it for the past few years, even before the U.S. Nationals departed Louisville and Albuquerque: whatever happened to the glamour that used to characterize our national show? There was a time when, on Friday and Saturday nights, only those handling horses showed up in jeans; everyone else was dressed to the nines. Lately, it’s been primarily up to the horses to introduce the glamour at Nationals—until this year. One of the contributions of the Positive Change movement was a Red Carpet on Friday and Saturday night, and, as the old saying goes, the stars came out. The Red Carpet, which ran from 6 to 6:45 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, and was live-streamed on Arabian Horse Global and the USEF website, was the brainchild of Lester Martin of Lawson, Mo. Martin advanced the idea on Positive Change’s Facebook page, and the idea took off like a rocket. He enlisted his friend, Michelle (“Mike”) Hoelscher, who had worked in the fashion industry, and she arranged for Saks Fifth Avenue to sign on. In seven short weeks, they organized the support of AHA (the entire Show Commission and AHA Staff Liaison Julie Stewart) and got Arabian Horse Global’s Jim and Christy Egan to sign on. And on Friday evening at the U.S. Nationals, the red carpet was on the air. Well-dressed Arabian horse owners, trainers, breeders and exhibitors were ready for their close-

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we have to prepare them in a fashion that is bordering on perfection, so that not only do you have a good enough horse, but it’s easy to use and a horse that people easily get behind. And so, it’s very rewarding and an honor to win that title, period. In addition, what made it truly special was doing it with the people in my life that I care so much about. To have that experience with my new family was really a special situation.” And it was not just family, but friends, too, that touched him. “There was amazing energy there for that horse, and the thing I realized that night, was ‘whoa, I didn’t realize we have so many friends!’ But honestly, every person that was in the picture is somehow or another a part of our lives or Pyro’s life or Claire and Margaret’s life. It was so cool, how many people were supportive. Another thing that made it so wonderful was winning the viewer’s choice award—having Pyro be so well received, and having our friends there to share the moment with Claire and with all of us. Experiences like that are made better when surrounded by friends and family, and that’s exactly what we had. “Angie and I have talked about the show quite a bit since we got home,” Sellman continues, “and all in all, I thought that the show commission and the various contributors to the show made this U.S. Nationals really great. The decorations and the pageantry were excellent, and the feel of the show was one of the best they’ve had in Tulsa. It was just a friendlier and more enjoyable feel this year. I really think that this year was a step towards gaining back any people who may have lost interest or support in U.S. Nationals.”

Gregg Shafer

Shafer Arabians, Warren, Ohio “We won both open park championships—purebred and Half-Arabian—at both the U.S. and Canadian Nationals this year,” said Gregg Shafer, who started showing when he was 9. “I think that’s the only time that ever happened. It was pretty special. One of the horses is an Allience baby, from one of the first Allience breedings I sold.” Nancy and Gregg Shafer purchased Allience, the four-time U.S. and Canadian National Champion Park Horse, 1992 U.S. National Top Ten English Pleasure Horse, and 1996 U.S. National Champion in Formal Driving in 2003, but have been breeders for almost 40 years.

Tim Shea

Shea Stables, St. Clair, Mich. “The quality of the horses and horsemanship at the U.S. Nationals was just off the charts,” said Tim Shea. “One of my favorite things was the AEPA class; this is the first year we have had it at Nationals. One of the neat things about it is that it gave the opportunity for some of these young trainers to shine. That was cool to me, to see some of these


2012 U.S. Nationals young people coming up and how good they are getting—and looking down the road, how good they are going to be.” Would he care to get specific? Sure. “Matt Siemon winning both Half-Arabian open park and purebred open park was historically significant. Stachowskis have three young people: Sharon Blendinger, who won the junior country; Gabe DeSoto and Jon Ramsay, who’s working for them in California. Then there was Dalton Budd, who put on a hell of a show for reserve in the junior Half-Arabian English stake. And of course Jessica Clinton, and Rhein Standish from Boisvert. Also, John Golladay had the crowd on their feet in the Half-Arabian English stake. Then there’s Leah Beth Boyd, Jason Krohn and Chase Harvill. Those are just some of the ones off the top of my head. There is a group of 20 and early 30-somethings

right now that are impressive and that bode well for the future of the breed, because we need those young people.”

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ups, being interviewed on camera by exhibitor Brittney Berget and Christy Egan. Anyone was welcome to appear on the red carpet, but to make sure that everything went smoothly, Martin recruited several people he knew would make good subjects. “I didn’t want it to be all fashion or all horses,” he said. “I wanted it to be kind of ‘Oprah moments.’ Amy Johnson was probably my favorite interview. Her husband was deployed overseas and she talked about how the Arabian horse has gotten her through his deployment, being a single mother while he’s gone, and how it was her horse and her horse community that gave her her sanity during that time. Those were the stories I was interested in telling— the interpersonal stories.” The kind of stories, he might add, that bring the community closer together and offer an effective outreach to the general public. Look for the Red Carpet to be back next year at U.S. Nationals. But it will be a little different, Martin says; in 2013, it will take place only on Saturday night, so that it does not compete with the popular Wine Walk, which raises money for the Arabian Horsemen’s Distress Fund. And they plan to provide a live feed of the action to the arena’s big screens and throughout the barns. This year was a shakedown cruise, and next year will be better than ever.

Les Sichini

Belvedere Farm, Cedartown, Ga. “I loved the show!” said trainer Les Sichini. “It was U.S. Nationals! This has been an exciting year. My clients won five national championships at that show. Our riders also won five national championships at Youth Nationals and one Canadian national championship. That’s 11 national championships, a very good year.”

Chuck Siemon

Siemon Stables, New Carlisle, Ohio “Each year it has improved,” stated trainer Chuck Siemon. “That’s quite a compliment to AHA and the APAHA. Center ring was beautiful, the judging was good, and they did a great job of scheduling. We still had time to work horses without staying up all night. Footing in the work arenas was too deep. We had a lot of tendons swollen. But they’ll get it. “Otherwise, it was all positive—overall, an incredible show. Each year we’ve come away saying we like Tulsa. The stands were full by mid-week! That gives you encouragement, and keeps me in business.”

Kennedy St. George

FFA Junior Judging Team Member, Columbia City, Ind. “When I got to Tulsa I thought, ‘Wow! This breed isn’t given enough credit!’” said Kennedy St. George. She is studying agronomy communications at Kansas State University, and hopes to become a journalist, writing to help increase public awareness about crop diseases. St. George grew up on a beef cattle and crop farm, and has been barrel racing Quarter Horses competitively since she was 13. “I had seen a couple of Half-Arabians at open shows, but I’d never seen high quality Arabian halter and performance horses until I came to U.S. Nationals. Once we started watching them, our team saw that they were beautiful, responsive to their handlers, and had so much diversity! They could do so many different disciplines well, and look beautiful doing them. We would sit and talk about the horses we were seeing.. Their athleticism, stamina and animation (those English and park horses!) definitely gave us a new appreciation for the breed. “I had always heard that they were crazy,” she continued, “and had never particularly cared about being involved with them, but I joined the judging team in 2008 to learn more about what was under the saddle. Now, after this judging experience, I would love to ride an Arabian! Arabians will definitely be the breed I look at when I finish college and start looking for my next horse.”

Jim Stachowski

Stachowski Farms, Mantua, Ohio “I think everyone is getting used to the Tulsa facility,” said Jim Stachowski, “and the Commission is genuinely trying 72 | A r a bi a n Hor se T i mes


2012 U.S. Nationals to make the show as good as possible with a facility which is adequate. This year, the show was upbeat; we had people looking at horses, and people wanted to have fun, so I have to say it was a much better atmosphere than it was in past years. The first year was not good, the second year it got better, and this year was the best year of all.” Stachowski, who saw his team win 16 national championships and five reserves, had reason to celebrate, but when he thought of the show, his favorite memory was not from the ring. “At the end of the show, we had a party and everybody came and had a great time. That’s what we need to do at these shows—have a good time!”

Peter Stachowski

Stachowski Farms, Mantua, Ohio “It felt like there was a much more upbeat enthusiasm at the show,” said Peter Stachowski. He attributed some of that

to the improved decoration of the ring, a better patron area, the festive line of lights on the rail and the green shavings, all of which lent a sense of importance to the competition. “I know they put much more effort into the footing, and the show ring was fine,” he added. “The work rings were better too, although personally, I’d like a little more shavings mixed in, for a little more softness. (I prefer less sand.) But at least it wasn’t packed hard, as it sort of was last year. I know they made a big effort, so if they could tweak it a little, that would be great.” He offered a suggestion for the future. “If we could make our presentations a little shorter, I think it would give people more free time and shorten the show in the evening,” he said. “Basically, for the win photos of the champions and reserves, it takes a long time to get all the owners and friends in the ring. I know people have a lot of enthusiasm and that’s a good thing, but for those pictures, why not have a photographer right outside the ring? Outside spectators that come to the show want to have a nice show that keeps moving.”

Sheila Varian

Varian Arabians, Arroyo Grande, Calif. “You simply have to be so proud of our horses,” Sheila Varian said, “because without doubt, the horses in our open divisions, especially the western, English and hunter horses, are simply spectacular. They are so schooled, so lovely, so well-presented, I could bring any person from any breed in for that Saturday night, and be very proud of our horses. They are simply over the top.”

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She offered several suggestions for in the future. “If I had my druthers, especially on Friday or Saturday night, we would decide whether we want a presentation or a show,” she said. “What we have now is more like a presentation/competition, which is wonderful and thrilling for those of us that love the Arabian horse, but it’s not an exciting show. That’s okay if we are happy with what we have, but on Friday and Saturday nights, I’d like to see us step it up a little. “For instance, there are certainly ways of making it exciting for a short few minutes while the scores are being tabulated. Think out of the box! Think of what would keep your focus on the ring for that time—for instance, it could be riders galloping around the ring with an American flag and a flag from one of the states. Probably there would be someone at the show who would be willing to carry the flag for one performance (unpaid, of course), and the flags could be donated by the members in each state. By the end of the show, all of the states which have Arabian horses there could have seen their flags go around. That’s just a thought. “And personally, I’d like to have the photograph of the champion and reserve

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2012 U.S. Nationals champion be taken outside. It takes too long for a group of people to go into the ring for the photograph; perhaps a nice site could be designed out back. (Again, I’m just talking about Friday and Saturday night, not the whole show.) Another thing I’d like to see is that in the finals, each horse that comes in is announced, and the announcer tells the crowd to pick their favorites and cheer them on. And I would love to see the finals for the reining back in center ring on Saturday night—it’s an exciting class that shows the amazing capability of the Arabian horse to shine in all disciplines. “But the bottom line is, if we want it to be a show, then we need to make it a show. If we want it to be a presentation, which is wonderful, then that’s fine, we have a presentation. But there would be more promotional value in a show.”   She considered the halter classes as well. “So many different age groups in halter made classes small and not as interesting,” she observed. “I think it would be advantageous to go back to where the national champion mare and stallion no longer qualify to show in halter at the Nationals, which would leave room for the horses coming up. That would definitely encourage more horses to show. I do like seeing the scores on the screen right after the horse shows, although it appears that the score for legs is the defining point (or else that we have no adequate-legged horses in our breed, which I know is not so). There were some beautiful horses that were presented very well, and the quality of the horses we are breeding now is very apparent in all of the disciplines. “And finally, it would be my desire for people to understand the effect of some of our padding and overshoeing. We need to remember that with that much shoe on some of these horses—including some of the western pleasure, hunter and halter horses—they no longer can be turned out in a paddock to see a little sun. A little of that kind of enjoyment would have a big effect on some of the behavior, such as anxiety, cribbing and ulcers, that we see in many show horses.   “The main thing is, though, that U.S. Nationals made you very, very proud of our Arabian breed. The performance horses were over the top.”

Michael Whelihan

Whelihan Arabian Farms, Eatonville, Wash. “Although we had our share of the ribbons, the highlight of the U.S. Nationals for me was seeing my clients, who

have worked so hard over the past year, be rewarded for their efforts,” said Michael Whelihan. “I am extremely proud of each of my amateur riders. Here at the farm, my clients and I believe awards are great, but it’s about the ride—not the ribbon. I want my riders to be proud of their accomplishments in making advances toward their personal goals and better horsemanship. “I also really enjoyed the addition of the AEPA Futurity classes to the Nationals. They were fun classes with very talented horses. I like the fact that these futurities showcase 4-year-olds, and I especially appreciate that the classes are now in October. I believe this greatly benefits the health of our horses by allowing more time for training, which relieves some of the stress placed on these young horses to perform at extremely high levels. It’s good for our horses and great for our breed.”

Maddy Winer

Owner, Asheville, N.C. “I had the honor of singing the national anthem at the opening ceremonies at both U.S. and Canadian Nationals this year,” reflected entertainer Maddy Winer. “I hadn’t done that since 1994, when I did it riding Karma Gypsy.” Winer bought her first Arabian horse in 1979. “These horses are so aware; they are part of our souls. The privilege—the icing—is having horses that are able to compete on a national level. Owning and showing Arabians is realizing my dreams; every morning I have to pinch myself. And I have been lucky to have Roxann Hart as a partner.”

June Yahola

Breeder, Cromwell, Okla. June Yahola has bred 12 to 14 national halter and performance champions, reserves and top tens, including Volume 43, No. 6 | 75


five-time U.S. National Champion Pyro Thyme SA, but still considers herself a small breeder. “What we breed has to be good enough not to be denied,” she said, “so good that they have to pay attention. “I was really proud of Tulsa and Oklahoma this year. The show was very well-run, well-organized, and everybody did a superb job!” What’s next for Yahola? “I’ve bred two national champion stallions. My next goal is to breed a national champion mare! I think I’ve already picked the mother. Now, to find her the perfect stallion.”

“I keep an order; I have a lead horse and then they’re numbered up to eight, but if my lead horse isn’t feeling well, my number two or three horse could lead. So if I ever decide to change, I can. I also try to keep the ones who get along really well together, just so they have more fun and to hopefully avoid the stress of a situation where somebody behind another is trying to nip them in the butt or something. Keeping buddies together prevents things like that, which makes it more fun for them.”

Sylvia Zerbini

The three Half-Arabians in her group are halfAndalusians. “They are the leader, the one in the middle,

Grande Liberté Performance Zerbini, who is based in Williston, Fla., is the former star of the equestrian spectacular Cavalia, and now is in demand with her own act, which features Arabians and Half-Arabians. “I find them more playful than any other breed and I also find them the most sensitive in all the breeds that I’ve worked with,” she explained. “So, therefore, they make the perfect liberty horses. And also, I’ve always been attracted to Arabians because I think that they’ve always had a bad rap, and they’re just so intelligent and sensitive. “They are so extremely smart; they have a silent language, and I think that a lot of people are trying to do way too much without reading the horse. If we sit back, don’t use so many words, and just observe, we can notice that they are actually trying to communicate with us with eye signals, head movements, and body language. If you watch horses out in the pasture, you can watch them communicate with each other, which relates very closely to what I do with Arabians. I just feel that they are so much more responsive and are a lot better partner than a lot of other breeds that I’ve worked with.” Zerbini’s impressive routines exhibit the intelligence and responsiveness of her horses. “I try to change the pattern,” she said. “Instead of keeping all eight or 10 working in one big line, I think it’s more interesting and shows more control when you’re able to have, say, 10 horses, and then call four or five, and send the others in a different direction. It shows that I am able to get their attention, because some people might think that they’re herd-bound and that they’re just running together as a group, but when I’m able to individually call different horses, it shows the level of control of the group. So that’s what I’m trying to show in the demonstration—that it’s not just a herd running around, but they’re really paying attention to and are aware of what’s happening. 76 | A r a bi a n Hor se T i mes


2012 U.S. Nationals and the last one. The reason for this is because when I do eight abreast, I put the stronger-structured horses on the outsides to take up more of the weight and take a lot of the pressure off the other horses in the group. “In this group, the youngest is 4 and the oldest is 19,” she added. “The 19-year-old is the very last horse, and he was actually a problem horse that I got about 10 years ago. He was the horse that nobody could do anything with, and was one of the hardest horses that I ever had to train; it took me nearly a year to get him to perform. He had been really abused and mishandled, and he would just run for days—I think that he could’ve won the Indy

500. But now that it’s all said and done, he’s become one of my best horses, and when we tried to retire him, he got so upset that he quit eating. So, now I bring him on tours because the stress of the show is nothing. It keeps him happy.” The 2012 U.S. Nationals is now in the record books. The stories that emerged—the individual horses and people who turned in their best performances on one important day in October—will go on till next year. But if our survey is indicative of the mood in the Arabian community, the “take away” is that the future lies in everyone’s working together to go forward. n

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2012

U.S. Nationals

Show Results

Arabian Stallion Adult 4 & Over Champion PYRO THYME SA (Pryme Thyme x Holly Onfire JW), shown by Andrew Sellman for owners Claire and Margaret Larson.

Arabian Colt (1-3 Years) Champion HARIRY AL SHAQAB (Marwan Al Shaqab x White Silkk), shown by Michael Byatt for owner Al Shaqab Member Qatar Foundation.

Arabian Stallion 8 & Over Champion PYRO THYME SA (Pryme Thyme x Holly Onfire JW), shown by Andrew Sellman for owners Claire and Margaret Larson.

Arabian Stallion 6-7 Champion ARIA IMPRESARIO (Marwan Al Shaqab x GC Echlectica), shown by David Boggs for owner Sloan Family Impresario Holding.

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Arabian Stallion 4-5 Champion TRIBUTE THYME SA (Pryme Thyme x Diamond Tribute), shown by Alcides Rodrigues for owner Jason Tackett.

Arabian 3-Year-Old Colt Breeding Champion ROHARA CROWN PRINCE (Da Vinci FM x DD Crown Jewel), shown by Joseph Alberti II for owner Matthew Murray.

Arabian 2-Year-Old Colt Breeding Champion HARIRY AL SHAQAB (Marwan Al Shaqab x White Silkk), shown by Michael Byatt for owner Al Shaqab Member Qatar Foundation.

Arabian Yearling Colt Champion EXCALIBUR EA (Shanghai EA x Essence Of Marwan EA), shown by Ted Carson for owner Equus Arabians.

Arabian Futurity Colt Champion TRUSSARDI (Stival x Precious As Gold), shown by Eric Wolfe for owner Rojo Arabians.

Arabian Stallion AAOTH Champion MISTER MAGNUM (Magnum Chall HVP x Pretty Tricky), shown by owner Robert Janecki.

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Arabian Mare 4 & Over Champion CR JASMEENAH (WH Justice x Fforget-Me-Not), shown by Michael Byatt for owner Al Jassimya Farm.

Arabian Filly (1-3 Years) Champion LUXEMERE JIZETTE (KM Bugatti x TA Jihana Bey), shown by David Boggs for owners Anthony Marino Sr and Anthony Marino Jr.

Arabian Mare 8 & Over Champion CR JASMEENAH (WH Justice x Fforget-Me-Not), shown by Michael Byatt for owner Al Jassimya Farm.

Arabian Mare 6-7 Champion MARWAN CRISTALRCA (Marwan Al Shaqab x Crysstell), shown by Gregory Gallun for owner Al Shahania Stud.

Arabian Mare 4-5 Champion JJ LA BARONESA (Magnum Psyche x NV Angelica), shown by David Boggs for owner Mayed SA.

Arabian 3-Year-Old Filly Breeding Champion LUXEMERE JIZETTE (KM Bugatti x TA Jihana Bey), shown by David Boggs for owners Anthony Marino Sr and Anthony Marino Jr.

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Arabian 2-Year-Old Filly Breeding Champion GC SEASONS OF LOVE (Aria Impresario x GC Memoirs Of Gaishea), shown by Michael Byatt for owners Gerald Canda.

Arabian Yearling Filly Champion MISS MARWAN PA (Marwan Al Shaqab x Miss Amerika), shown by Michael Byatt for owner Al Shahania Stud.

Arabian Futurity Filly Champion RD MARCIENA (QR Marc x NW Siena Psyche), shown by Michael Byatt for owner Luciano Cury.

Arabian Mare AAOTH Champion ANNA MARIE BHF (Marwan Al Shaqab x BHF Anna Tevkah), shown by owner Anthony Marino Jr.

Arabian Gelding Adult 4 & Over and Gelding 6-7 Champion DC MAGNUM STORM (Magnum Psyche x Rohara Eclipse), shown by owner David Boggs.

Arabian Gelding Juvenile (1-3 Years) Champion ARIYA ENCORE (Aria Impresario x Airiya), shown by Andrew Sellman for owner Russell Family Trust.

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Arabian Gelding 8 & Over Champion RELENTLYSS (First Cyte x Padrons Nike), shown by Jeff Schall for owner Kara Amundson-Laventure.

Arabian Gelding 4-5 Champion GH MARYN (NYN Hisani x Enjoue), shown by Austin Miller for owner Donald LeFever.

Arabian 3-Year-Old Gelding Champion SIR KEMPTON AC (Sir Fames HBV x TF Psynergy), shown by Jeff Schall for owners Andrew and Christine Steffens.

Arabian 2-Year-Old Gelding Champion RD SHANTAR (Bey Ambition x RD Arietta Bay), shown by Claudinei Machado for owners Murray and Shirley Popplewell.

Arabian Yearling Gelding Champion BON IVER (Aria Impresario x Rosetta LA), shown by owner Keith Krichke.

Arabian Futurity Gelding Champion ARAGONN (Aria Impresario x MFA Annies Song), shown by Leslie Sichini for owner Christian Cook.

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Arabian Gelding AAOTH Champion HF PSYPHER (Amir Jamaal x HF Psyquoia, shown by owner Texie Lowery.

AEPA $100,000 Arabian Saddle Seat Futurity Champion BEL HEIR LR (Afires Heir x JKF Wistful), ridden by Joel Kiesner for owner William Blankenship.

Arabian English Pleasure Champion DEFYING GRAVITY RGS (Afire Bey V x MA Nobella), ridden by John Ryan for owner Cheryl Doran.

Arabian English Pleasure Junior Horse Champion HA TOSKCAN SUN (Baske Afire x Matoska), ridden by James Stachowski for owner HA Toskcan Sun LLC.

Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over Champion BORNE THIS WAY (Baske Afire x MD Aquarius), ridden by owner Jeri Smith.

Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 18-39 and AAOTR Maturity Champion CP SHENANIGAN (Anza Padron x CP Dance Card), ridden by owner Katherine Kirby.

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Arabian English Pleasure Futurity Champion HEIRS NOBLE LOVE (Afires Heir x Noble Aphroditie), ridden by Joel Kiesner for owner T. Karlton Jackson.

Arabian Country English Pleasure Champion CSP AMERICAN IDOL (DS Mick Jagger x Merlot CSP), ridden by Gordon Potts for owners Stan and Barbara Cook.

Arabian Country English Pleasure Junior Horse Champion ERA HORACIO (Baske Afire x Pavlova X), ridden by Sharon Blendinger for owner Whispers Acres, Inc.

Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 55 & Over Champion MBF BURNING SPRINGS (Baske Afire x Mahalin), ridden by owner Linda McArthur Conish.

Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 Champion AFIRES GUNS NROSES (Afire Bey V x HL Glitter Ngold), ridden by Lori Lawrence, owner of Starline Arabians LLC.

Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 18-35 Champion MM SABE (Desperado V x Sabriina), ridden by owner Morgan Kelly.

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Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR Maturity Champion ROL CYCRET SERVICE (Cytosk x Passion X), ridden by owner Melanie Ronen.

Arabian Country English Pleasure Futurity Champion ROL MARTINI (Baske Afire x Matoska), ridden by James Stachowski for owner Kimberly Jarvis.

Arabian Country English Pleasure Select AATR Champion ROXBURY (Hucklebey Berry x Parting Glance), ridden by Sara Erwin for owner Elizabeth Hoffman.

Arabian Park Horse Champion RONDE VU (Mamage x Ames Deja Vu), ridden by Matthew Siemon for owners Gregg and Nancy Shafer.

Arabian Park Horse AAOTR Champion MANDALAY BAY (Promotion x Mi Kaborina), ridden by Cathy Vecsey for owner Hawk Haven Farms LLC.

Arabian Informal Combination Champion AFIRES NOBLEST (Afire Bey V x Her Nobility), ridden by Dwane Hankins for owners James and Linda Niebrugge.

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Arabian Ladies Side Saddle English Champion MAXAMILLEN (Millennium LOA x Padronzza), ridden by Natalie Jones for owners Donna and Shannon Chudzicki.

Arabian Ladies Side Saddle Western Champion TA PRELUDE (Kordelas x Promocja), ridden by Cynthia Burkman for owner Highland Pride Arabians, Inc.

Arabian Pleasure Driving Champion EXPRESSLY BELLA (IXL Noble Express x Colorado Sage), driven by Shan Wilson for owner Karen Mahan.

Arabian Pleasure Driving AAOTD Champion EXPRESSLY BELLA (IXL Noble Express x Colorado Sage), driven by owner Karen Mahan.

Arabian Country Pleasure Driving Champion VIBRATO G (Gitar MF x Starlite Flite), driven by Catharine Vincent for owner Jeffrey Allen.

Arabian Country Pleasure Driving AAOTD Champion THUNDER STRUCK LR (SF Specs Shocwave x Berre Striking), driven by owner Lindsay Rinehart.

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Arabian Western Pleasure Champion KHABERET PGA (Khadraj NA x RA Kela), ridden by Elizabeth Bentley for owners Robert and Nancy Risen.

Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Horse Champion KHASH PGA (Khadraj NA x RA Kela), ridden by Bob Locke for owner Bond Show Horses, Inc.

Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 55 & Over Champion AMAZING EDITION (Amazing Fame V x MCA Cherish), ridden by owner Joe Betten.

Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 Champion CLARISSE PR (SJ Mikhail x Cerisse PR), ridden by Karen Dearth for owner Gary Dearth.

Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 18-35 Champion KRISTIAN DIOR (Versace x Kristianna), ridden by owner Kellie Frye.

Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR Maturity Champion KHEANNE (Khadraj NA x TN Katiki), ridden by owner Brooke Pitassi.

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Arabian Western Pleasure Futurity Champion KHOSMOPOLITAN MD (Khadraj NA x Luck Wood Have It), ridden by Jody Strand for owner David Teigen.

Arabian Western Pleasure Select AATR Champion GARTH MH (Khadraj NA x Dancing Gdynia), ridden by Kayli Fortun for owner Amara Spizzirri.

Arabian Hunter Pleasure Champion VERUCCI (Versace x JA Flirtatious), ridden by Vickey Bowman for owner Maurene Samuelson.

Arabian Hunter Pleasure Junior Horse Champion PA LUCCHESE ALWAYS (Always A Jullyen V x Lily Dancer V), ridden by Caralyn Schroter for owner Tiffany Travis Capobianco.

Arabian Hunter Pleasure AAOTR 55 & Over Champion OFW PSY FI (Afire Bey V x OFW Psymara), ridden by owner Sidney Splawn Dolquist.

Arabian Hunter Pleasure 36-54 AAOTR Champion C HONDO (Enzo x Enchantes Bey), ridden by owner Carrie Olson.

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Arabian Hunter Pleasure 18-35 AAOTR Champion NEPYR (Neposzar x Balanai), ridden by Jaymie Woods for owners Doug and Kristi Stewart.

Arabian Hunter Pleasure AAOTR Maturity Champion EF TRI-N-SHOCME (SF Specs Shocwave x DA Trifinity), ridden by owner Mallory Pehrsson.

Arabian Hunter Pleasure Futurity Champion PA MONTANA ALWAYS (Always A Jullyen V x BP Meditation Bey), ridden by Wendy Potts for owners Carole Ann Vandyke.

Arabian Hunter Pleasure Select AATR Champion NEPYR (Neposzar x Balanai), ridden by Jennifer Harris for owners Doug and Kristi Stewart.

Arabian English Show Hack Champion A NOBLE PASS (IXL Noble Express x SA Passing Fancy), ridden by Tish Kondas for owners Jeanne Marie, Anna and Colleen Boylan

Arabian English Show Hack AAOTR Champion CP HURRICANE (HF Mister Chips x First Danse), ridden by owner Christine Lawson.

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Arabian Mounted Native Costume Champion HL SANCTION (The Chief Justice x Overlook Seratifa), ridden by Jessica Clinton for owner Hawk Haven Farms LLC.

Arabian Mounted Native Costume AAOTR Champion MWF BENEDYKT (Afire Bey V x Bold Love), ridden by Kayli Fortun for owner Fortun Arabians LLC.

Arabian Reining Horse Champion IM THE REAL DEAL (MHR Muscateal x Kheyarraberribeyv), ridden by Crystal McNutt for owner Audrey Zinke.

Arabian Reining Junior Horse Champion TA MOZART (Kordelas x Marieta), ridden by John OHara for owner Kimberly Kirk Tillman.

Arabian Reining Horse AAOTR Champion VLQ FRIENDLY FIRE (Forelock’s Petja x Polka Jane), ridden by owner Allison Mostowich.

Arabian Reining Horse Futurity 5 & Under Champion TA MOZART (Kordelas x Marieta), ridden by John OHara for owner Kimberly Kirk Tillman.

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Arabian Reining Intermediate Non-Pro AAOTR Champion WCT SHIMMR’N SHYNE (Shine On Mahogany x Lasa Flair), ridden by owner Abigaile Greendyk.

Arabian Reining Limited Non-Pro AAOTR Champion LE INDIAN OUTLAW (AUR Kenosee Colour x KGB Summer Classic), ridden by owner Megan Francis.

Arabian Reining Primetime Non-Pro AAOTR Champion ART BY HESA (Hesa Zee x Artymusme), ridden by owner Kevin Simmons.

Arabian Reining Rookie Non-Pro Champion SALTY JOHN (GS Khochise x Shezn Uptown Girl), ridden by owner Gail Genzel.

Arabian Trail Horse Champion PRETTY BOI MCCOY (Rob Roi McCoy x Gaijeta), ridden by Lou Roper for owners James and Karen Gavin.

Arabian Trail Junior Horse and Futurity Champion KHODY FAME (Mosqof Fame V x LK Flicka Bey), ridden by Lou Roper for owners Marilyn Bray and Marni Lombardo.

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Arabian Trail Horse AAOTR Champion IMMORTAL TREASURE (D A Napitov x Sugarnspice MC), ridden by owner Margaret Lucas.

Arabian Working Cow Horse Champion CIMMARRON SUNRISE (Cimmarron Bey x Hawaiian Dancer), ridden by Kathy Braden for owners Larry and Penny Nace.

Arabian Working Cow Junior Horse and Futurity Champion KALALOCH (Piaff PASB x Ahbliss), ridden by Kim Witty for owner Shelly Brown.

Arabian Working Cow Horse AAOTR Champion VALLEJO CYLEBRITY (Rohara Moon Storm x Cytrina), ridden by Katharyn Hart, owner of Vallejo III Ranch LLC.

Arabian Reined Cow Horse Champion SOGO KHEMO (Khemonada x Fahim Aphrodisia), ridden by co-owner Lisa Gallery for co-owner Brenda Wyant.

Arabian Reined Cow Horse ATR Champion KHATCH A DIAMOND (Kharbine x Southern Secrett), ridden by owner John Dwyatt Bull.

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Arabian Cutting Champion TRICK R TREAT (MA Gallant Ladd x Class Of Angels), ridden by Wesley Larkin for owner Madelena Camacho-Larkin.

Arabian Cutting Junior Horse and Futurity Champion PAKHITA (Pikhasso x Morning Musk VA), ridden by John Holman for owners Marla Melloway and Kelly Damaj.

Arabian Cutting Non-Pro Champion KHEMANDERS BREEZEE (Khemander Kody x Zee Winstar), ridden by owner Michelle Chouteau.

Arabian Cutting Novice Horse Champion BSJ GOOD N READY (AM Good Oldboy x Gai Patina), ridden by Jesseca Hutchings for owners Stacey Turner, Cassandra & Pamela Dabella and B. Steinberg.

HA/AA Mare Saddle/Pleasure 4 & Over Champion JUDITA AMORE BPA (Afire Bey V x Bella Amora BPA), shown by Troy White for owners Katherine Rich and Tyler Elzig.

HA/AA Mare Stock/Hunter 4 & Over Champion TAMAR DEVINE DESIGN (The Color Of Fame x Shameless Desire), shown by Ricardo Rivero for owner Dana Daniels.

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HA/AA Filly (1-3 Years) Champion BENI TG (DA Valentino x Rohara Mademoiselle), shown by David Boggs for owners Todd and Glenna Weegens.

HA/AA Mare Saddle/Pleasure 7 & Over Champion A FIRE INSIDE (Baske Afire x Mystical Fire JDR), shown by Jay Allen for owner Ann Campbell.

HA/AA Mare Stock/Hunter 7 & Over Champion SWEET CAROLINE SKF (Legacy Of Fame x Jackie Monasis), shown by Jamie Ann Gray for owners Linda and James Witzal.

HA/AA Mare Saddle/Pleasure 4-6 Champion JUDITA AMORE BPA (Afire Bey V x Bella Amora BPA), shown by Troy White for owners Katherine Rich and Tyler Elzig.

HA/AA Mare Stock/Hunter 4-6 Champion TAMAR DEVINE DESIGN (The Color Of Fame x Shameless Desire), shown by Ricardo Rivero for owner Dana Daniels.

HA/AA 3-Year-Old Filly Champion LADY VAVA (Versace x Moonrose Delight), shown by Eric Wolfe for owner Rojo Arabians.

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HA/AA 2-Year-Old Filly Champion SHES STILL JAMMIN (Monogramm JD x She Be Adiva KBS), shown by Rinaldo Longuini for owner Jeff McAlpin.

HA/AA Yearling Filly Champion BENI TG (DA Valentino x Rohara Mademoiselle), shown by David Boggs for owners Todd and Glenna Weegens.

HA/AA Futurity Filly Champion EBONY BY VALENTINO (DA Valentino x CF Mamies Night Out), shown by Gregory Gallun for owner Sally Bedeker.

HA/AA Mare Saddle/Pleasure AAOTH Champion JUDITA AMORE BPA (Afire Bey V x Bella Amora BPA), shown by Patricia Rich for owner Katherine Rich and Tyler Elzig.

HA/AA Mare Stock/Hunter AAOTH Champion TAMAR DEVINE DESIGN (The Color Of Fame x Shameless Desire), shown by owner Dana Daniels.

HA/AA Gelding Adult Saddle/Pleasure 4 & Over Champion VSH DOMINIC (Majesteit x O Katie), shown by John Rannenberg for owner Texie Lowery.

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HA/AA Gelding Adult Stock/Hunter 4 & Over Champion MAGHNUS Z (Magnum Chall HVP x The Sweet Rose), shown by Joseph Alberti II for owners Maddy and Jay Winer.

HA/AA Colt/Gelding Juvenile (1-3 years) Champion COCOA MOTION (Baske Afire x Haute Chocolate), shown by Andrew Sellman for owner Strawberry Banks Farm.

HA/AA Gelding Saddle/Pleasure 7 & Over Champion VSH DOMINIC (Majesteit x O Katie), shown by John Rannenberg for owner Texie Lowery.

HA/AA Gelding Stock/Hunter 7 & Over Champion IMA COOL CAT CB (Majesteit x Catherine X), shown by Terry Holmes for owner Elaine Finney.

HA/AA Gelding Saddle/Pleasure 4-6 Champion SHOCK N ROCK (SF Specs Shocwave x Card Trick), shown by Grant Krohn for owner Burrline LLC.

HA/AA Gelding Stock/Hunter 4-6 Champion MAGHNUS Z (Magnum Chall HVP x The Sweet Rose), shown by Joseph Alberti II for owners Maddy and Jay Winer.

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HA/AA 3-Year-Old Gelding Champion SAFARI AF (Taste Afire x Butterfly’s Kentucky Rose), shown by Leslie Sichini for owner Don Olvey.

HA/AA 2-Year-Old Gelding Champion COCOA MOTION (Baske Afire x Haute Chocolate), shown by Andrew Sellman for owner Strawberry Banks Farm.

HA/AA Yearling Colt/Gelding Champion THE GODFATHER ORA (Vitorio TO x SH Sebella), shown by Dagmar Gordiano for owners Richard and Justine Goodrow.

HA/AA Futurity Gelding Champion MOONSHINE J (Khadraj NA x Ultra Violet Blue), shown by Jeff Schall for owner Justin Kruse.

HA/AA Gelding Saddle/Pleasure AAOTH Champion VSH DOMINIC (Majesteit x O Katie), shown by owner Texie Lowery.

HA/AA Gelding Stock/Hunter AAOTH Champion PROMISES LEGACY (Legacy Of Fame x Alada Promises), shown by owner Deborah Anne Walters.

Volume 43, No. 6 | 97


AEPA $50,000 HA/AA Halcon Saddle Seat Futurity Champion NUTCRACKER SWEET PF (Undulata’s Nutcracker x Ames Deja Vu), ridden by James Stachowski for owner 6D Ranch Ltd.

HA/AA English Pleasure Champion ERA MOONLITE SERENADE (Baske Afire x Undulata’s Lady Delight), ridden by James Stachowski for owners Norma and John Diver.

HA/AA English Pleasure Junior Horse Champion HOT AIR (Baske Afire x Rita), ridden by James Stachowski for owner Bryan Grossman.

HA/AA English Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over Champion EVES FIRE (Afire Bey V x Ritida), ridden by Lori Lawrence, owner of Starline Arabians LLC.

HA/AA English Pleasure AAOTR 18-39 Champion ADAMS FIRE (Afire Bey V x Ritida), ridden by Nicole Lawrence for owner Starline Arabians LLC.

HA/AA English Pleasure AAOTR Maturity Champion CF JIMMY NEUTRON (Baske Afire x She’s A Mystery), ridden by Katie Burr for owner Burrline LLC.

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HA/AA English Pleasure Futurity Champion CL SHAMPAGNE WISHES (SF Specs Shocwave x Contessa’s Wine), ridden by Jonathan Ramsay for owners Tracy and Judy Fincher.

HA/AA Country English Pleasure Champion SUGAR MOUNTAIN (Baske Afire x Kelly Le Brock), ridden by James Stachowski for owner Elvin Berkheimer.

HA/AA Country English Pleasure Junior Horse Champion COOL HAND LUKE WA (Mariachi WA x Watchful), ridden by Joel Kiesner for owner Jessica Anderson.

HA/AA Country English Pleasure AAOTR 55 & Over Champion POKER FACE BMJ (HF Mister Chips x Laced With Love), ridden by owner Diane Varley.

HA/AA Country English Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 Champion PRINCE JAMES SF (Baske Afire x Captivating Style), ridden by Nicci Reeder Waldschmidt for owner Loretta Reeder.

HA/AA Country English Pleasure AAOTR 18-35 Champion SAL MINEO BF (Mamage x Clover Hill’s Blazing Luck), ridden by Amanda Purdin for owner Boisvert Farms LLC.

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HA/AA Country English Pleasure AAOTR Maturity Champion THE TRASHMAN (Allience x Petra C), ridden by Katie Burr for owner Burrline LLC.

HA/AA Country English Pleasure Futurity Champion CURTIS LOEW (Baske Afire x Aladdins Tapestry), ridden by Peter Stachowski for owner Sugar Hill Farm LLC.

HA/AA Country English Pleasure Select AATR Champion DANSE ALL NIGHT (Baske Afire x Danse Brilliant), ridden by Jacqueline Lang for owners Elizabeth and Stephen Lang.

HA/AA Park Horse Champion REA MY ALLIENCE (Allience x My Diamond Girl), ridden by Matthew Siemon for owners Gregg and Nancy Shafer.

HA/AA Park Horse AAOTR Champion SA SOPHISTICATED LADY (AE Excel x Cathedral Bells), ridden by owner Jessica Medved.

HA/AA Ladies Side Saddle English Champion PRINCE LOA (Krewe x Sultan’s Final Dawn), ridden by Kimberly Verhage for owner L. David Pease.

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HA/AA Ladies Side Saddle Western Champion WA HOLLYWOOD SPOTS (Tackitts Mr Magic x My Krystal Rose), ridden by Sarah Paripovich for owner Connie Cutler.

HA/AA Pleasure Driving Champion BASKE IS A GENIUS (Baske Afire x Winning Asset), driven by Matthew Siemon for owner Paul Heiman.

HA/AA Pleasure Driving AAOTD Champion PAPA RHAZI (El Ghazi x Mama Jazz), driven by owner Beth Jupp.

HA/AA Country Pleasure Driving Champion DRAMBUIE LOUIE (Baske Afire x Isabel’s Supreme Lady), driven by James Stachowski for owner Norma Diver.

HA/AA Country Pleasure Driving AAOTD Champion WORTH THE WAITT (Hucklebey Berry x Galexina), driven by Karen Root for owner Great Bend Ranch.

HA/AA Western Pleasure Champion CALIENTE VIRTUOSO (C A Hermoso x Crystal Blue Persuasion), ridden by Josh Quintus for owner Robin Porter.

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HA/AA Western Pleasure Junior Horse Champion IMA ROCKIN POP STAR (Poco Van Star Two x Weczendela), ridden by Joe Reser for owners Karen and Rick Bliha.

HA/AA Western Pleasure AAOTR 55 & Over Champion IMA ROCKIN N ROLLIN (Poco Van Star Two x Kickin N Screamin), ridden by owner Brian Wheeler.

HA/AA Western Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 Champion LETS GET LODED (LBA Lode Star x Aura Spring), ridden by Jamie Leonardini Gotelli for owner Sally Leonardini.

HA/AA Western Pleasure AAOTR 18-35 Champion TAMAR CHIARO DI LUNA (Mais Shah x Tamar Lady Sunshine), ridden by Amy Peterson for owner Troy Peterson.

HA/AA Western Pleasure AAOTR Maturity Champion TAMAR CHIARO DI LUNA (Mais Shah x Tamar Lady Sunshine), ridden by Amy Peterson for owner Troy Peterson.

HA/AA Western Pleasure Futurity Champion IMA ROCKN TWO (Poco Van Star Two x Luminette), ridden by Joe Reser for owner Kristi White.

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HA/AA Western Pleasure Select AATR Champion IMA ROCK STAR (Poco Van Star x Rocky Rhoda II), ridden by Gregory OShanick for owners Drew and Greg OShanick.

HA/AA Hunter Pleasure Champion WD NOBLE LADD (IXL Noble Express x Gifted JG), ridden by Wendy Potts for owner Audrey Zinke.

HA/AA Hunter Pleasure Junior Horse Champion EC CAUSE TO CELEBRATE (A Noble Cause x EC Brass Motion), ridden by Ali Brady for owner Brandi Pearson.

HA/AA Hunter Pleasure AAOTR 55 & Over Champion WMF SWEET ADVENTURE (Sultan’s Premier x Sowikas Candice), ridden by owner Pamela Brooks.

HA/AA Hunter Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 Champion ALLECTRI PHI CF (Allusion AOF x Jamin Like Crazy), ridden by Katie Russell for owner Russell Family Trust.

HA/AA Hunter Pleasure AAOTR 18-35 Champion AMAZZZING GRACE ( Jonker x MN Miss Keemo), ridden by Nicole Leverett for owners Christine and Michael Leverett.

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HA/AA Hunter Pleasure AAOTR Maturity Champion EC CAUSE TO CELEBRATE (A Noble Cause x EC Brass Motion), ridden by owner Brandi Pearson.

HA/AA Hunter Pleasure Futurity Champion MAYBELLINE CA (Noble Way x Abeline), ridden by Thomas Theisen for owner Conway Arabians, Inc.

HA/AA Hunter Pleasure Select AATR Champion ROLLIN DOUBLES (Armani FC x Roligemma), ridden by owner Laura Lynn Dickert.

HA/AA English Show Hack Champion GLORY GOT GAME (Heir To Glory x Savirene B), ridden by Thomas Theisen for owner Conway Arabians, Inc.

HA/AA English Show Hack AAOTR Champion PRINCE LOA (Krewe x Sultan’s Final Dawn), ridden by Michelle PeasePaulsen for owner L. David Pease.

HA/AA Mounted Native Costume Champion HS TOMMY HILFIGER (Versace x Sabahs Fancy Lady), ridden by owner Katelyn Thomas.

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HA/AA Reining Horse Champion TR TEXAS T (Ima Dun Kid x Portena), ridden by Crystal McNutt for owner Dennis & Linda Clark Limited Family Partnership.

HA/AA Reining Junior Horse Champion DUN WALTZIN (Walla Walla Dun It x Francheskaa), ridden by Tyson Randle for owners Bryan and Cheryl Nelson.

HA/AA Reining Horse AAOTR and Non-Pro AAOTR Champion HH IN LIVING COLOR (Tucknicolor x Khabreah), ridden by owner Kim Niven.

HA/AA Reining Horse Futurity 5 & Under Champion DUN WALTZIN (Walla Walla Dun It x Francheskaa), ridden by Tyson Randle for owners Bryan and Cheryl Nelson.

HA/AA Reining Limited Non-Pro AAOTR Champion RF SCARLET O HARA (Im Genuinely Smart x MVA Scarlet Orzel), ridden by owner Kimberly Kirk Tillman.

HA/AA Reining Rookie Non-Pro AAOTR Champion SUGARPLUM STARLIGHT (Plum Masterful x Sonjia), ridden by owner Auriel Overall-Isaman.

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HA/AA Trail Horse Champion IM DESTINEES HOBBY (Como Chex Hobby x Oasis Destinee), ridden by owner Jessica Bein.

HA/AA Trail Horse Junior Horse Champion DARLIN LIL (Vanilla Zip x Somebodys Darling), ridden by Lou Roper for owner Susan Cavanagh.

HA/AA Trail Horse AAOTR Champion IM DESTINEES HOBBY (Como Chex Hobby x Oasis Destinee), ridden by Amanda Golestani for owners David and Jessica Bein.

HA/AA Trail Horse Futurity Champion DARLIN LIL (Vanilla Zip x Somebodys Darling), ridden by Lou Roper for owner Susan Cavanagh.

HA/AA Working Cow Horse Champion DAKOTA WOLF ( Jaborr x Cry Wolf ), ridden by Donald Ulmer for owner Stephen Grove.

HA/AA Working Cow Junior Horse Champion OASIS CYAIN HOLLYWOOD (Hollywood White x AM Sea Angel), ridden by Eddie Ralston for owners Deborah Crosby and Nancy Brant.

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HA/AA Working Cow Horse AOTR Champion COCO POLENE (Shahcolate Bey MA x Hema), ridden by owner Madelena Camacho-Larkin.

HA/AA Reined Cow Horse ATR Champion SMART LITTLE ALEX (The Smart Smoke x HF Farena), rriden by Michelle Roberts for owner Gary Kehl.

HA/AA Cutting Junior Horse, Futurity and Novice Horse Champion JOHNNY NITRO (Ridin Withthe King x Tucked In Wranglers), ridden by Elise Ulmer for owner Stephen Grove.

HA/AA Cutting Non-Pro Champion RCC REINMAN (Smart Chic Olena x Impacts Reina), ridden by owner Stephen Grove.

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U.S. Nationals Results Editorial 2012  

U.S. Arabian Nationals

U.S. Nationals Results Editorial 2012  

U.S. Arabian Nationals