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Arab Horse Couture

October / November 2019


ARAB HORSE

COUTURE MAGAZINE

Contents Issue October/November 2019

Riding In The Classical Way

On Your Beautiful Arabian Horse

10 - RIDING IN THE CLASSICAL WAY

by Jean Paul Guerlain In the past, in addition to his role as master perfumer for the House of Guerlain, Jean Paul Guerlain also accumulated World Championships in Dressage and Carriage Driving.

On Your Beautiful Arabian Horse

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Guerlain is a French perfume house, amongst the oldest in the world. The House of Guerlain was founded in 1828, when PierreFrancois Pascal Guerlain opened his perfume store in Paris. Jean Paul Guerlain is fourth generation Guerlain and the last family master perfumer. Jean Paul continues to travel the globe to develop new fragrances. lassical riding works because it has stood the test of time. It works without fear or force and most definitely without gadgets. It is

working with, never against, the horse. It is opening the lines of communication between horse and rider; listening to the horse, being aware of how every move you make means something to the horse and being able to ask yourself, “What did I do that made the horse respond in that manner?” When you do not get the response you were looking for, there is nothing about making him do it, the responsibility lies with you, the

The emphasis is placed on you the rider to learn about your own body and how even slight variations in the way you hold yourself affect the way the horse moves beneath you. How can you expect selfcarriage of the horse when you are not in self-carriage yourself? When you think of Classical Riding, you think of the

rider, to make things comfortable for the horse.

Spanish Riding School in Vienna, Austria or cadre Noir

The results are achieved through cooperation not

riding. It is horsemanship, not just knowing how to ride. It includes all around knowledge of the horse as a species;

coercion. Classical Riding is foremost concerned with the acquisition of a classical seat; this is a balanced, deep and feeling seat. In this context “seat” includes the seat bones, pubic arch, thighs, lower back and very importantly—the abdominal muscles. Classical riders develop wonderfully light responsive horses because they ride from their center. The horse is ridden from the seat first, then the legs and into the hand. The hands receive what the legs put into them.

14 - HOT TO TROT!

in Saumur, France. In fact, Classical Riding is correct

its psychology and physiology. Now you must find a good classical instructor who will understand the sensitivity and intelligence of the Arabian horse. The basics of a well-ridden and trained horse are the same for the Arabian horse as for other horse breeds. Sadly, many times you see the Arabian horse being treated/ridden like another species.

HOT to TROT!

Several Egyptian Arabian Horse Breeders Descend Upon Cairo at El Zahraa Stud for Traditional Annual Horse Show attendance at the El Zahraa Show continues at a steady rise.

Several Egyptian Arabian Horse Breeders Descend Upon Cairo at El Zahraa Stud for Traditional Annual Horse Show

EAO said the El Zahraa National and International Shows are ‘steeped in history’. In 2019, thousands of visitors are expected to attend the show. Preparations are held at El Zahraa Stud for the Egyptian National & International 21st Arabian Horse Championship Show celebrating the beauty of the purebred Arabian horse from 31 Oct to 3 Nov 2019. The show will be held in two phases including two Championships: one National and the other an International Competition under the European Conference of Arab Horse Organizations (ECAHO) rules. Each year the show attracts international attention due to the power and beauty of the purebred Arabian horses participating in the festival. Arabian horses arrive from the Middle East and many other foreign countries. The show is held under the auspices of the EAO and enjoys an internationally famous position attracting a number of VIP’s from all over the world such as businessmen, Royal Princes, Arabian horse lovers and international breeders. The show is also honored by the attendance of politicians, ministers and ambassadors. Preparing for the event, the show has coordinated with the Cairo Airport to minimize procedures for incoming guests and to ensure the Arabian horses receive due care immediately upon arrival in Cairo.

2019 Egyptian National Championship & 21st International Championship ECAHO B Show

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RIGHT and BOLD crowds of breeders, handlers and judges in addition to local and international media will descend upon El Zahraa Stud for its annual horse show of 2019. The event, a highlight in the Arabian horse beauty show calendar, drew crowds of more than 100 Egyptian and foreign breeders in 2018.

Breeders have gathered for the El Zahraa Show since the 1990’s with last year no different as hundreds of men and women flocked to the Egyptian Agricultural Organization (EAO) venue; kids were also among the hundreds at the 25-year-old event. Some mentioned they had been attending the event for 15 years or more! One of the main events in horse shows, attendees each year rally at El Zahraa Stud to make the most of the Arabian horse competition; however, some attendees say they fear the age-old show is declining in popularity. “The numbers have definitely gone down,” some say. Statistics show the numbers are not declining through the size of past annual participants. Others claim that increasing too many shows in Cairo is a threat to the age-old show. Again,

Celebrating 60 Years of Ansata The Anniversary Interview

18 - CELEBRATING 60 YEARS OF ANSATA

For typical security measures, the show has contacted the Interior Ministry in order to secure the show and its guests. The show has also booked rooms for VIP guests in local luxury hotels and provides all transportation means to ensure the guest’s well-being. A dedicated young show team is hard at work to maintain the show’s history of highest standards. The show is working closely with organizers, local authority partners and businesses to ensure a great environment for visitors and residents at the event. These Championships have been held since the 1990’s. Among the countries participating in this year’s show are the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates, Jordan, Italy, Germany, and Belgium. The show is expecting approximately 350 horses to participate in the event. Two different International Boards of ECAHO Qualified Judges will be scoring the Championships on the basis of the well-known five beauty standards for Arabian show horses:

Type 1-20 Points; Head & Neck 1-20 Points; Body & Topline 1-20 Points; Legs 1-20 Points & Movement 1-20 Points

2019 Show Officials – Judges

Dr. Abd El Razik El Hamdani – Morocco Mrs. Reinhild Moritz – Germany Mrs. Irina Stigler – Russia Mr. Christian Moschini – Italy Mr. Lucas Gozdzialski – Poland Mr. Richard Phlistrom – France Mr. Holger Ismer – Germany Mrs. Jowanaa Lowe – France

Disciplinary Committee

Dr. Vet. Laura Mascagna - Italy Mrs. Jackie Vandyke - United Kingdom Dr. Vet. Iman Hamdy – Egypt Dr. Vet. Ramy Nabeal – Egypt Dr. Vet. Salma Ibrahim – Egypt Dr. Vet . Ahmed Ahdy – Egypt Dr. Vet. Mohamed El Kholy – Egypt Dr. Vet. Ahmed Mokhtar – Egypt Dr. Vet. Ibrahim Abd El-Salam – Egypt Dr. Vet. Mohamed Hossam El-Din – Egypt Dr. Vet. Nadya Nassr – Egypt Dr. Vet. Abd El-Latif Al Agamy – Egypt Dr. Vet. Ahmed Zain – Egypt

Ring Masters

Dr. Vet. Mohamed Mohseen – Egypt Dr. Vet. Ayman Saad – Egypt On the sidelines of the show there will be many related activities to Arabian horses such as attendance by professional artists to introduce sketches of horses, photographs and carvings to the crowd. Once again, the hugely popular horse dancing show will be offered accompanied by traditional Egyptian Baladi Muzmar music. On an annual basis the EAO El Zahraa Championship Show brings together a mix of glamour and excitement! Sincere and heartfelt gratitude is expressed to the El Zahraa show team workers in addition to the breeders, owners, trainers and handlers as well as the gracious sponsors who make this show flawless as is customary. If you wish to register your horse for participation, please contact: Facebook page: E.A.O. - Egyptian Agricultural Organization

By Judith Wich-Wenning

The booth honoring Ansata's 60th Anniversary at the Egyptian Event. Photo: Richard T. Bryant

The Anniversary Interview

Judith Wich-Wenning: Judi, please share with us some special moments during Ansata’s long and eventful history.

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egendary Arabian horse connoisseur, breeder and author of 60 years, Judith Forbis’ role is unique. Together with her late husband Don, the two Americans founded Ansata Arabian Stud, a Straight Egyptian breeding program with vast global influence. Arabian horses from Ansata Arabians are highly regarded worldwide. Many extraordinary horses were born at Ansata Arabian Stud, one of the most prominent was for sure the unforgettable Ansata Halim Shah, who revolutionized Egyptian Arabian horse breeding. Judith and Don met and married in Turkey in 1958. Both loved horses since childhood. An adventurous time followed. With Don as trainer, Judith Forbis took part in horse races as the only female jockey in Turkey at that time. Their quest for the classic Arabian horse throughout the Middle East ended in Egypt at the Egyptian Agricultural Organization’s late Don Forbis pictured Judith Forbis and the El Zahraa Stud. Here they found the quality and type they were looking for. In 1959 they inaugurated into the at the time they were Tent of Honor. obtained the legendary yearlings Ansata Ibn Halima, Ansata Bint Mabrouka and Ansata Bint Arabian Horse Trust Zafaarana and Ansata Arabian Stud was born. Thereafter, they continuously pursued their goal: the breeding and also the promotion of the archetype of this breed, the classic Arabian horse. After thoughtful consideration, they chose the name “Ansata” for their farm, a word that derives from the old Egyptian symbol for “eternal life”, an appropriate choice for their lifelong purpose of preserving the breed. Judith Forbis is furthermore the founding member of the Pyramid Society, a sought-after lecturer and was a highly respected international judge for many years. Moreover, she is famous for her innumerable publications. Besides countless magazine articles, she is the author of standard works such as: “The Classic Arabian Horse”, “Authentic Arabian Bloodstock Vol. I and II”, “Ansata Hejazi – Born to Rule”, etc. Don Forbis passed away in 2008 but Judith continues to remain active in many aspects of the Arabian horse community.

Judith Forbis: “Sixty years holds a treasure trove of memories, each special in different ways. I suppose the first was in 1958 when Don and I married in Ankara, Turkey. We both loved horses and it was there we began our life’s journey together with the Arabian breed. While corresponding with Arabian horse authority Carl Raswan, he suggested we visit the Egyptian Agricultural Organization’s El Zahraa Stud in Ein Shams, Egypt and meet with General von Pettko Szandtner, the manager at that time. It must have been fate that when we arrived, he had just retired and Dr. Mohammed Marsafi was in charge. We were overwhelmed by the beauty of the horses, and to begin our program he let us choose three superb yearlings (Ansata Ibn Halima, Ansata Bint Mabrouka and Ansata Bint Zaafarana), all by Nazeer, the stallion who greatly impressed us despite his 25 years of age. Sometime later, I received a letter from Richard Pritzlaff who had imported five horses to the USA earlier. The General had written to him saying, “I never would have sold them those three yearlings if I had still been there!” “A few others come to mind - such as Ansata Bint Bukra, (named “Husnia” in Egypt) the crippled mare we saw as a yearling but because of the African horse sickness outbreak, we had to wait five years before we could import her. Due to her pelvic injury Dr. Marsafi would not guarantee she could ever produce a live foal. However, they bred her to Sameh, put her on a United States Marine Isthmian ship all alone in a crate and after being trailered by herself across the USA to Oklahoma, she proved to be in foal! Eventually she delivered a bay filly - Ansata Bint Misr - who also founded a dynasty of her own.”

Pasha of the Abbas first ever presentation of the Pyramid receives the the President Judith Forbis Award from Richard T. Bryant Lifetime Achievement Rogers. Photo Society, Rebecca

“When the Arab renaissance began in the early 1990’s, Ansata started exporting to the Arab world. This opened up unique opportunities too numerous to mention. Perhaps the most rewarding was helping the Arabian Horse Center, now Bait Al Arab Kuwait State Stud, acquire foundation bloodstock after the Gulf War.” “I’ve also been grateful for the special awards that have come my way: in 2004 I became the first woman to win the prestigious Galbreath Award for Outstanding Entrepreneurship in the entire equine industry including Thoroughbreds, etc. Arabian breed awards such as the Arabian Breeders Lifetime Achievement Award and the All Nation’s Lifetime Achievement Award were gratifying – and recently the Abbas Pasha Lifetime Achievement Award was especially meaningful after having spent so many years working on the Abbas Pasha Manuscript and trying to achieve the quality of horses so admired by the Pasha .” Please tell us about your beautiful Arabian cover horse, Zayyan. Donnie & Yvonne: “We were flipping through Facebook one day and became smitten by a picture of a gorgeous black two year old Arabian stallion that a friend told us about. Our friend told us, “You should breed a mare to this horse someday.” His name is FA Ali Bey and is owned by Marilyn Lang at Fantasia Arabians in Sealy, Texas.”

GETTING TO KNOW

Dana Jones riding Aga Gamaan (Gamaan X Akira Hassan) 2000 Straight Egyptian Stallion Owned by: Donnie & Yvonne Jones, Hackberry Arabians

30 - HACKBERRY ARABIANS

in Western Pleasure and Champion in ATR/JTR Western Pleasure, Open Western Pleasure Novice and fourth in Hunter Pleasure at the Egyptian Event in Lexington, Kentucky. Aga is a versatile and athletic Straight Egyptian Arabian stallion. His progeny, Halimaars King Tut, also excelled at the 2013 Egyptian Event winning all Western Pleasure classes and the Championship. Tut is owned by Nancy DeLisi and Carol Sandusky of Delsan Arabians.” What attributes of the Arabian horse do you admire the most?

Halimaars King Tut (Aga Gamaan x Haallie) 2013 Egyptian Event Champion Western Pleasure Owners: Delsan Arabians Naples, Florida

Getting To Know

As Arabian horse breeders, what are the conformational and overall characteristics of the Arabian horse that you strive to produce when breeding? How many Arabians do you breed per year?

hen did you first become involved with the Arabian horse and what attracted you to the breed? Donnie & Yvonne: “We became involved with the Arabian horse because of our daughter Dana expressing an interest in riding horses at the age of ten years old. Dana began riding lessons and within a year we had purchased a farm and three Arabian horses.”

“One of the horses we purchased was a Straight Egyptian colt that was 1 ½ years old named Aga Gamaan. Aga is a gentle and loving white stallion that grew up with Dana riding him all around the farm, bareback and talking on her phone. It was a bond that grew and was so very special. After Aga’s training, Dana began showing him in Western Pleasure. He also excelled in side-saddle, trail, hunter pleasure and even jumping.” “Aga Gamaan’s sire was an import from Egypt, *Gamaan and his grandsire was Galal, a direct son of Nazeer. Aga’s tailfemale is Henrietta and he is of the Al Khamsa strain and in the Asil Blue Book. Aga Gamaan has been Champion in many Class A Shows, Region 9 in Western Pleasure, Side Saddle and even Hunter Pleasure. Aga was 2007 Reserve Champion

32 - BEYOND BEAUTIFUL

Please tell us about your breeding program and the number of Arabian horses you own. Donnie & Yvonne: “At present, we own eleven Arabian and Straight Egyptian Arabian horses. We have focused on the Straight Egyptian Arabian horse and are very proud of what we have produced and sold to other satisfied purchasers of our horses.”

Owners: Donnie & Yvonne Jones Manvel, Texas USA

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Donnie & Yvonne: “Their beauty, intelligence, gentleness and temperament are what we admire most. Our foals are imprinted at birth and are handled daily to reinforce their natural abilities. We have a saying about our stallion Aga Gamaan, “Gentle enough to sleep in your tent”. We are very proud to be able to represent what we consider some of the best Arabian horses from our breeding program.”

“I don’t think you are beautiful; I think you are beyond it.” – Lit’l Wayne

Photography workshop connects inspiring young models with Straight Egyptian Arabian horses.

Photography workshop connects inspiring young models with Straight Egyptian Arabian horses.

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uane and Diana Cantey, owners of Zajaddi Egyptian Arabians, a small breeding farm in Mount Vernon, Arkansas, hosted a skills development photography workshop on June 29th, featuring award-winning photographer and Arkansas State University Professor of Photography and Graphic Design, Kim Vickrey BoydJones. Kim was the perfect choice to instruct the workshop and brought her many years of experience with shooting horses, and her exceptional portrait skills to share with the group. A lot of planning and preparation were involved over several weeks to assure the event would be successful for all. Fourteen photographers and five gorgeous models ranging in age from 13-19 gathered for a light breakfast, followed by a morning of beauty beyond anyone’s imagination.

Donnie & Yvonne: “As Arabian breeders, we try to improve our foals by looking at the stallion and mare to improve and gain the best attributes of both the sire and dam. As Aga Gamaan has such a wonderful temperament and body, we try to improve with the mare to gain perfection as much as possible.” “We are small breeders so we breed one to four mares per year. The foals are our favorite part of working with the Arabian horse; it’s like watching your children grow. We like working with other successful breeders to carefully choose a sire and dam with compatible strains to ensure our chances of producing a new family member for us to enjoy and/or possibly sell for someone else to enjoy.”

“Ali Bey is a Justynn son that we fell in love with. We reached out to Marilyn and asked her to help choose which of our three Straight Egyptian mares we should breed to Ali Bey. After reviewing their pedigrees and pictures, Marilyn said she felt Akila Mareekh would be the best choice. At the time she was a six-year-old maiden mare and Zayyan is the result of this breeding.” “Zayyan was imprinted for two hours after birth and was handled daily. He has all the best attributes of his sire and dam. The breeding to FA Ali Bey was acquired through the Egyptian Breeders Challenge Auction at the 2016 Egyptian Event. In 2019 we took Zayyan to the Egyptian Event in Lexington, Kentucky where he was in the Futurity Class for Yearling Colts and was crowned Reserve Champion in the Egyptian Breeders Challenge with winnings over $12,000 USD. The announcer at the Egyptian Event in the Futurity Class said she had never in her 20 years of announcing seen so many scores of 18 and 19 in a class.” “We are so excited to see what Zayyan will accomplish in his career and anxious to find out what he will produce with his beauty and elegance. At present, he is only 1 ½ yrs old and stands 15 hands high so we feel he will be a very tall and gorgeous stallion by the time he reaches his full potential. We love our boy “Z”.” Please explain your passion for the Straight Egyptian Arabian horse. Donnie & Yvonne: “There is such a misconception of the Straight Egyptian Arabian horse. Most other breed lovers feel they are too high spirited and uncontrollable; however, we find exactly the opposite. We see them as the most loving, sweet and intelligent breed of all. The beauty of their sculpted heads, refinement in their bodies and tail carriage, are to us what defines the breed and makes them such a gift from God.” What are the most rewarding aspects of your involvement with the Arabian horse? Donnie & Yvonne: “To us, the most rewarding aspect is to see the results of our breeding program and watch the foals develop as well. Also, we have met some of the most wonderful, friendly and intelligent people through our association with the Arabian horse industry. Whether it is to talk pedigrees or just ask for advice, our Arabian horse friends are always ready to help.” Contact information: Donnie & Yvonne Jones Hackberry Arabians, LLC Manvel, Texas USA www.hackberryarabians.com www.zayyan.us 713.715.9300

As introductions were made, outfits were assembled, and horses were groomed to perfection, the excitement was building as it was the first time the models, and many of the photographers, were to meet and work with Straight Egyptian Arabian horses. Diana gave a brief history of the Straight Egyptian Arabian horse and why it is considered rare, historical, and very special to the family. She further elaborated that the farm is celebrating its 20th year of breeding and that she and her husband Duane are very passionate about breed promotion. “It is important for us to educate the public about this special breed and how it is the perfect family horse. Having the opportunity to work with Kim, and host photographers who came from as far as Texas and Tennessee to participate, was very exciting. We sold out the workshop in less than 72 hours after posting on social media and had several photographers on a waiting list. The attendance was restricted to allow for a smaller group learning environment,” stated Diana. “I was convinced after witnessing the interactions between the models and horses that everyone was impressed with their kind, sweet personalities. We adorned the mares with jewelry pieces to compliment the models’ outfits, which ranged from casual to formal. We allowed each girl to briefly meet with the horses before they posed with them. Later I asked the models what they thought of our Straight Egyptian mares, and for some who had owned other breeds, the experience was amazing, and for the model who had never been around horses, it was a fairytale. The mares just know and seem to have a strong intuition about newcomers. They enjoy the attention and affection anytime and received lots of kisses and cuddles from everyone,” said Diana Cantey.

It was exciting to work with all of the photographers at the workshop. When I saw the photos, I could not have been happier with the results. I hope to be able to model at a future workshop and with Rose. She is very special.” – Rylee

The models featured in the workshop were fabulous to work with, open to learning, very coachable, and gave the photographers a lot to shoot with regard to outfits, personalities, and poses. The horses were very tuned in, and the pairings were “Beyond Beautiful”. Rylee Brockinton is a 14-year-old 9th-grade student at Cabot Freshman Academy. She plays volleyball for her school but her passion is barrel racing with her horse Harley. Rylee is pictured sharing a tender moment with Roses Silhouette RH, affectionately known as “Rose”, a Straight Egyptian Arabian mare owned by Zajaddi Egyptian Arabians. (Rylee quote) “I have always had a passion for God’s beautiful creation of the horse. I’ve never had an opportunity to experience the majestic beauty of the Egyptian Arabian horse until my recent visit to Zajaddi Egyptian Arabians for the photography workshop. I wasn’t sure what to expect, but I can say first hand that these beautiful horses were a pleasure to work with and their presence was angelic. I felt very comfortable and had an instant bond with Rose.

39 - PIONEER PEPPER

AN ARIZONA LEGEND Internationally Acclaimed Singing Cowboy Your Arabian Fancy Tack is meticulous and the attention to detail shows your gifted talent and passion for the tack that adorns the Arabian horse. Please tell us what inspired you to begin yourbusiness? Gina: “My first Arabian horse was a Kaborr+++ daughter and I wanted to dress her up as the queen she certainly was. I made a few halters for her, received some great advice and found my calling. I was blessed to design for some great people and trainers involved with the Arabian horse from the very beginning of my career.”

42 - COVER FEATURE: ARABIAN FANCY TACK

Dazzling Sets Created & Designed by Gina Roland Dupree

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escribe your first introduction to the Arabian horse and what characteristics attracted you most to the breed?

Gina: “I read “The Black Stallion”in grade school and became obsessed with the Arabian horse. I slowly collected the whole series reading and rereading them over and over again.” “When I first saw the stunning beauty of the Arabian horse, I was captivated by the breed. There remains no animal on earth as beautiful as an Arabian horse in motion. The versatility of the Arabian is incomparable. My husband and I own a cattle farm and ride our Arabians with the cows. The horses love doing this type of work!”

Dazzling Sets Created & Designed by Gina Roland Dupree

What is your involvement with the Arabian horse?

“Many of my designs are photographed in close range mode. I’m a fanatic about perfection and my first priority is always strength of product. My halters are STRONG and they do not break! If a stallion is on the end of a lead in a show ring full of other stallions, the last thing the handler should worry about is the halter breaking. Many of my designs look very light and delicate; they are in fact durable and solid.” What are the most in demand, Arabian horse tack sets for stallions, mares or geldings? What are the most popular colors requested from customers? Gina: “The trend has always been presentation sets for photo shoots and show ring halters for both stallions and mares. I’m seeing a trend for mare sets at the moment. I would love to see more geldings being promoted. Arabian Fancy Tack has sponsored several awards for amateur gelding classes.” “Color trends are difficult to predict.There are now rong choices of color on a good horse! For the show ring, I’m still doing many black bases with silver or gold beading; classic and elegant. Colors for sets are limited only by the customer’s imaginations! My latest favorite theme is mixing light airy metal pieces with colored bases.”

Gina: “I have been involved with Arabian horse rescue, quarantine and rehoming for the past several years. I see horses begin to thrive and recover after discardfrom their unethicalformer owners. They are hungry and dirty when they arrive; however, it’s very rewarding to see these horses recuperate and find a great new home for them.”

Aggressivity: Dominance or Fear Response?

48 - AGGRESSIVITY: DOMINANCE OR FEAR RESPONSE?

The Human vs. the Horse’s Perspective Written by Eva Reifler

to jump into the white stall despite its height. That seems to please everybody and for the first time I am content even without a carrot.” We are all enthralled by how easy it was to load Tael. After all, we started to have a slight idea about the upcoming challenge. He attacked about everything and everybody who was unfortunate enough to get into his reach without any means of protection. I am running an equine facilitated learning facility which doesn’t combine well with a crazed horse at the barn. This is far from ideal. Did I make a mistake? And I admit that I have a problem.

The Human vs. the Horse’s Perspective

ould you happen to know someone who is looking for a sweet gelding?” the message I “Wsee on my WhatsApp account shows. “I am!” I reply Instantly, without a clue what horse my friend Donna is talking about. “Well – come and see “Tael”, was the prompt reply. “Okay – when?” (I was puzzled though, as I remember him as a very handsome but quite frustrated stallion a couple of years ago). A week later we are on our way to meet Donna. The car full of best friends AND the intention of NOT to take on another horse. No space for another horse, and certainly not before Winter I tell everybody in the car. And I MEAN it... Well – I was wrong! Tael: “Those creatures coming up the walkway, do they bring carrots? I can’t smell any. But then it’s cold and foggy and I feel so lonely in my pasture. They’re dragging their feet as they always do in this weather and I wonder why. But I still can’t smell any carrots – maybe if I turn my head sideways, I can get closer through the pinching ribbons and maybe, maybe I can reach a carrot. But my ears – what do I do with my ears – I don’t want them to get caught in the biting fence. It’s easier when I flatten them along my head as I can get much closer. Plus, these two-legged creatures, humans as they say, seem to leave me alone or feed me a lot of carrots when I pin my ears. That surely must please them.” Oh – I think, he has the same attitude as my belated horse Markash and I instantly fall for the little sorrel gelding. Smart little guy, he also figured out that

Arabian Horse Fine Artistry

by turning his head he can see us better. And with it goes my intention TO NOT BRING HIM HOME. I shouldn’t fail to mention that he attacked my horse trainer in the round pen and didn’t stop trying to nip me on our way there. The next day the four of us drive back to Donna’s with a horse trailer and hopeful about giving this little, “charming” guy a good new home. If I only knew what we got ourselves into. Tael: “Ouff – out of my solitary pasture. I am careful because I never know when they scold me. Although the one who seems to be around me the most is really nice and I am very attached to her. She’s the closest I have to a herd and I really would like to connect and play with her. But I don’t always understand the rules. Their signals are so confusing and I don’t always get it and then I get so mad and I tell them to leave me alone. I shall learn later that they call it “putting on pressure” and “attacking” – but today I only know they all tiptoe around me when I do that. The one takes me out of my pasture and I am really trying to be good despite my dislike of men. There is so much buzzing and anxiety and it is so hard to contain myself. The best escape is

Tael: “Horses – all colours, and I can smell them and touch them through a solid fence which doesn’t bite back. Wow, it’s all so exciting and new. I would like to connect with my four-legged friends, but the humans keep me locked in this large sandy paddock. They don’t seem to like me a lot, because they bring these sticks to keep me at distance and I wonder why they do that – I do have my ears flat, but that doesn’t seem to impress them. And then one day they open the gate and I find myself with this pretty little painted filly. A girl!! I have never been so close to another horse without a fence, least of all a girl. It is so exciting and I run to greet her – needless to say, that my hormones carry me away a bit. Ouch – this was a painful kick in the chest, stunned I remain at a secure distance. Horses kick, humans have sticks and fences bite – I discover it’s a hostile world as I observe from a safe distance. The entire herd is now running towards me to greet me which is scary. However, I can run much faster than them which saves me. There is a very small version of a horse I didn’t know exists. It’s even a girl and I can even graze with her. It is so nice to have a herd-mate. There’s a bigger one who is very friendly too and the coloured horse has reconsidered her approach and is now nice, too. I learn quickly to stay out of the colt’s way. If only there wasn’t this yellowish chubby guy on the other side of the solid fence. One day when I got too close, he grabbed my throat and almost pulled me over the door. Gheez… that was

Robert Zietara

Arabian Horse Fine Artistry

An artist who feels great joy when sharing his world with others

55 - Robert Zietara

An artist who feels great joy when sharing his world with others "White Horse"

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obert Zietara is a man who has been painting ever since he can recall. Robert feels great joy when he can share a bit of his world with some other people. Robert’s artwork is a constant search for the best way to interpret the ideas he has about himself and the world he lives in. For Robert, nature is the most direct and intense inspiration.

58 - USA LAW

"Mysterious Beauty"

because the incident occurred in an indoor arena where equine activities were occurring. Finally, the court did not consider plaintiff to be a “spectator” under the law because the incident occurred in an area where people were riding horses, as opposed to an observation area.

USA LAW

Wisconsin Case A September 2018 Wisconsin case, Dilley v. Holiday Acres Properties, Inc., 905 F.3d 508 (7th Cir. 2018), consolidated two equine liability cases. In one of them, Brown v. Country View Equestrian Center, Inc., the plaintiff was taking a riding lesson on her own horse when the instructor allegedly allowed a “highspirited” horse to enter the arena. That horse allegedly collided with the plaintiff ’s horse, and she was injured. Her lawsuit raised the Wisconsin EALA exception of “providing a horse and failing to make reasonable and prudent efforts”, but the court found it inapplicable because the plaintiff was riding her own horse at the time. The plaintiff also argued that the defendant’s instructor “exercised control over the lesson and plaintiff ’s behavior with respect to her horse”, but the court disagreed and noted that the instructor never made the horse “available” for her use.

New Cases Show Strength of State Equine Activity Liability Laws By Julie I. Fershtman, Attorney at Law

Currently, all states except for California and Maryland have some form of an equine activity liability act (“EALA”). Since the first EALA was enacted thirty years ago, courts have evaluated numerous cases involving these laws. In two recent cases, lawsuits that had been brought by people injured in horserelated activities were dismissed.

New Cases Show Strength of State Equine Activity Liability Laws

The Dilley opinion also evaluated a second case. There, during a guided trail ride, the horse plaintiff rode tried to pass the trail guide’s horse, which kicked at plaintiff ’s horse, causing injuries. Her lawsuit argued that the defendant’s trail operator failed to adjust her stirrups or provide her with a helmet; also, she allegedly told the trail guide that she lost control of the reins to which the guide allegedly responded: “Don’t worry; this horse knows where it wants [to] go.” The court found that plaintiff ’s claims resulted from an “inherent risk of equine activities” under Wisconsin’s EALA. Also, the court found evidence of the defendants’ “reasonable” assessment of the plaintiff ’s ability to ride a horse and safely manage the particular horse assigned, but it found no evidence of faulty tack or equipment or willful or wanton disregard of her safety. Dismissal, the court ruled, was

Maine Case In July 2019, Maine’s Supreme Court in the case of The case of McCandless v. Ramsey, Maine Supreme Judicial Court (July 11, 2019), dismissed a case based on Maine’s Equine Activity Liability Act. The case involved a plaintiff who was standing within an indoor arena. In the arena at the time was a horse ridden by the defendants’ 10 year-old daughter. This horse passed plaintiff three times, but during the horse’s fourth pass, it apparently came too close and struck the plaintiff, causing injuries. Directly at issue was Maine’s EALA, which provides protection from liability (subject to possible exceptions) if a person was “engaged in an equine activity”, qualifies as a “participant or spectator” and was injured from “the inherent risks of equine activities”. The plaintiff considered herself to be a “spectator” at the time (a designation with which the court disagreed), and argued that issues existed as to whether her injuries resulted from “inherent risks of equine activities”; in addition, her case raised exceptions of (1) “reckless misconduct” by the defendants’ daughter, and (2) plaintiff being in an area where horses would not be expected or a protected area for spectators.

proper under Wisconsin’s EALA. Conclusion

Please keep in mind that all of the 48 EALAs differ. Whether or not a case succeeds depends on the law and each case’s facts. Read each law carefully in the states where you live and do business and seek advice from knowledgeable legal counsel. This article does not constitute legal advice. When questions arise based on specific situations, direct them to a knowledgeable attorney.

Affirming dismissal of the case, the court found that the horse’s unanticipated resistance to the rider’s directions was “part and parcel of the ‘propensity of an equine to behave in ways that may result in … injury”, which was part of the definition of an “inherent risk of equine activity”. The court went on to state that the plaintiff ’s interpretation of the statute “would thwart the

About the Author Julie Fershtman is one of the nation’s most experienced Equine Law practitioners. A lawyer for 32 years, she is a Shareholder with Foster Swift Collins & Smith, PC, in Michigan. She has successfully litigated equine cases in 18 jurisdictions nationwide and has tried equine cases in four states. She is listed in “The Best Lawyers in America” and is the recipient of the ABA’s “Excellence in the Advancement of Animal Law Award”. Her speaking engagements span 29 states. For more information, please visit www.equinelaw.net.

entire purpose of the law to curtail liability for injuries arising from risks that are ‘impracticable or impossible

to eliminate due to the nature of equines”. It found insufficient evidence of reckless misconduct on the rider’s part because the rider was unable to steer the horse to avoid a collision. As to the second EALA exception at issue, the court found no liability

60 - TRANSFORM EMOTIONS THAT KEEP YOU STUCK Equestrian Mindset Coach

Transform Emotions That Keep You Stuck “Authenticity will make you rich!”

Tony Robbins Written by Nancy Dye

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hat drives the need for elaborate masks and master performers? How many times have we heard our children respond to our inquiries about their day, or their feelings, with this robotic, conversational brick wall, “I’m fine.” (How many times have we said that to others about ourselves?) Treatment centers are filled with children and adults insisting they are fine, if nothing else, just out of habit! Sadly, morgues are filled as well, but with the permanently silenced echo of those words … from suicides and accidental overdosing. The truth is, we have all learned to act perfectly “fine” behind our masks! And then we broadcast that fictional “show” onto our social media. To transform emotions; what’s REALLY behind the mask? Why is taking off the mask so powerful for creating a change? That was the question I asked the psychologist Susan Jeffers on my radio show, “Triumphs of the Human Spirit”. Susan wrote “Dare to Connect” and “Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway”. Susan’s journey into becoming a well-known personal development author, whose books have become classics, began when she found out she had breast cancer. “When I found out I had breast cancer and had a mastectomy,” Susan said as she began the interview, “I realized I had a choice. I could say, ‘Why did this happen to me? Woe is me, in a negative way, to be a victim. Or I could say, ‘OK, this did happen to me, now how can I make this into something WONDERFUL?’ I took a look at myself and my life and I realized, couldn’t HELP but realize, that I

was a very angry woman. Very independent, but with that came a lot of anger. I asked myself, ‘Why am I angry?’ So I picked up a mirror instead of the magnifying glass.” “Oh, I love that phrase,” I said to Susan. “Ah, in a way, I don’t like that phrase!” “Sure, well, we don’t like to hear it, but it is the way to our real power; which is our love and the ability to control our own lives. You see, this is why people, men, and women alike, are angry. It’s when we don’t feel in control of our own lives. And what we do, which feels safer, is to blame. And I point out, and certainly it was true for me, that blame is such a powerless act. It puts all of the control out there somewhere.” “When I did pick up the mirror, behind the anger I saw a hurt and fearful person. And that’s what I really had to work on. And what I learned was that I was angry because anger feels better than helplessness.” “I was angry because of the actions I wasn’t taking in my own life to get what I truly wanted. I was angry because I would often sell my soul to hang onto somebody.” “And I’m sure a lot of people out there will relate to this: it gets us off the hook when we blame. But what happened when I started to really look at this was, I started to take control so that when I was angry, instead of saying, ‘What is he doing to me, or why is he doing this to me,’ it became, ‘Why am I not doing something for myself to help me feel better?’ And invariably, I always found the answer to that question is: ‘What do I need to do in my own life to create what I need? And it was amazing what wonderful things it did to my relationships.”

NO MORE THE DESERT NOMAD

64 - NO MORE THE DESERT NOMAD

Designing the Safest Barn for Your Arabian Horse

By John Blackburn, AIA ridge skylights, Dutch doors, and sliding aisle doors are a few ways to let the sunshine in. Vertical ventilation is created by allowing fresh cooler air to enter the barn at ground level and escape through ridge vents at the top of the barn where the air is warmer. This design feature can create an upward draft or indoor wind on even the most stifling days of the summer and in the hottest climates.

Designing the Safest Barn for Your Arabian Horse

Fire Prevention Morven Stud in Charlottesville, Virginia, sits atop a hill positioned to catch prevailing breezes.

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hile gentle, loyal, and congenial, Arabians are also powerful and spirited, so the goal is to create an indoor environment that both fosters good health and anticipates all the ways your horse could get injured. Here’s how a well-designed barn can keep your Arabians protected from the elements and safe from injury.

Keeping your barn naturally ventilated and cool is the first step to take against fire because these design features reduce your dependence on electrical appliances. In addition, decisions regarding hay storage are critical. My recommendation is to keep hay storage separate from your stalls wherever possible. If hay must be stored within your barn, extra precautions must be taken to reduce fire risk such as fire separations. In the event of a fire, exterior stall doors provide the opportunity for horses to be led out of the barn from outside, reducing the risk of injury to horse and handler.

Barn Placement

Where your barn sits on your property is the first significant choice to be made. Grade, drainage, proximity of service roads, prevailing winds, and barn angle in relation to the sun, all play a key role in health and safety. Equestrian site planning can help you avoid mistakes that can have significant health consequences for your horses, as well improve the efficiency of day to day operations. Light Your horse thrives on natural daylight and seasonal changes in night and day patterns. Arabians were bred to tolerate blinding sunlight. Dark barns can be detrimental to their health. The use of continuous

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The passive lighting and ventilation designed into this Virginia stable using skylights and ridge vents reduces the risk of both fire and disease.

“Susan,” I asked, “you talk about the importance of group therapy, but the truth of the matter is, we all have our dirty laundry and that terrifying fear that ‘if I say this, people are just going to be so turned off to me.’ But really, what does happen when we take the risk and air out our dirty laundry?” Susan said, “Well, first of all, we usually hear somebody else airing the same thing.”

“Oh, absolutely. People bring us into their lives because of our acts. So, sometimes when we change them, they obviously are not the right people for us. On the other hand, as we keep putting out who we truly are, then we seem to draw people into our life who love us for who we really are. In my first marriage, I was the obedient, good wife and tried very hard to play the role that my mother taught me. It didn’t work for me, and eventually, there was a divorce.”

“Just as bad?” I asked her. “Are you sure it’s just as bad, Susan?”

“So, that’s why a lot of us get rejected a lot? Because the people in our lives came to be there for our masks?”

“Yes, and worse,” she confirmed.

“Yes, so I started learning, and believe me it’s a learning process how to become more authentic. To find out what I liked, and what I didn’t like, and to put that out there. And then I started to draw people into my life who loved that.”

“In your book, Susan, you talk about ‘a life that lacks integrity’. What do you mean by that?” I asked her. “We’re pretending to be somebody we’re not. We lack integrity. As I became more authentic and acted from integrity, I started liking myself better. The reason I was so unhappy is that I had never found that center of myself, and I was so dependent on the outside world … my husband, my job … and I was always angry because I never felt filled up. So you blame those outside people or things. We put on our ‘masks’ because we don’t feel that we’re good enough. Therefore, if I show you who I truly am, you might not like me. Therefore, I’ll pretend to be somebody else.”

“So, you have a world of master performers who really don’t know how to touch one another’s souls, which is where the real level of connection is.” “Susan, if we were to take off our masks, and if we were to drop our act, could it be that maybe some people then won’t like who we really are?” I asked her.

“How did you get authentic?” I asked her. “Group therapy. It’s very healing. I was so uptight when I went into the group. I really put on a mask. I was incredible. I’ll never forget the first time I went to a group called Scream Therapy. It was amazing. I was so proper, and the group leader was magical in getting me to open up into screams of rage because I was so angry all the time.”

“And my beautiful hairdo went and the makeup was pouring down my face. You know, I just absolutely became real.” “When I looked around the group after I had stopped, I was amazed at what had happened to me. I realized as I looked around the group, that I had connected with other people for the first time in my life. I think I felt twenty-five pounds lighter.”

Stall Design Never use swinging doors, since the wind can force them to open and knock into a horse. It’s often difficult to tell if a hinged door is unlatched, as the door may appear closed even if it is not fully latched. A sliding door allows the door to remain open while the horse is removed from the stall without much effort or fuss, making it safer for both the horse and the handler leading it back to the stall. Also, when looking down an aisle, an open sliding door can easily signal an empty stall. The pin latch is a simple, low maintenance, and inexpensive system for sliding doors, whereas hinged doors require a slightly more complex mechanism that may malfunction or expose bolts to horses.

Aisle Design Giving your horses adequate aisle space is a crucial design element for safety. Spirited animals need room to maneuver without risk of collision with handlers, horses, and the barn itself. Ideally, an aisle is comprised of horse-friendly materials and kept clear of obstructions, sharp objects, and sharp corners. Recess anything that protrudes into the aisle, including hydrants, switches, ladders, fire extinguishers, etc. Similarly, provide several hydrants along the aisle, preferably recessed, to avoid pulling hoses down the aisle. Muck wagons, tractors, and the like do not belong in the aisle and can injure the horses if carelessly stowed or if the aisle is too narrow.

This Northern California barn is built with wide aisles and horse-friendly materials such as interlocking rubber brick flooring and smooth metal yoke gates for safety and comfort.

This Texas ranch uses elements from the local landscape and includes indoor and outdoor grooming stalls built to protect horses from possible injury.

Wash/Groom Stall Design As in the aisle way, the use of horse-friendly materials such as interlocking rubber bricks and recessed fixtures that may injure a horse when it moves around the stall are important design choices. Either recess the hose reel or use a hose with an overhead wand, which is less likely to entangle the horse during bathing. The back corner of the stall should have a recessed area for a shovel and muck bucket. This area can also double as a safe area for the handler in the case of an unruly horse, which may otherwise back its handler into a corner, causing serious injury. Miscellaneous Details A well-designed barn that reflects a careful regard to health and safety requires a lot of consideration. Over the past 25 years, we’ve developed a library of details that prove to be safe, economical, and practical. While no barn is hazard-free, minding the details during the design process can provide the safest possible environment for your Arabian horses that, just as in their desert past, depend on humans for their wellbeing. Equestrian architect, John Blackburn, AIA, of Blackburn Architects, PC, has been designing safe barns for a quarter of a century all over the country and around the world. To view his portfolio go to www.blackburnarch.com

October/November 2019


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On the Cover: Zayyan (FA Ali Bey x Akila Mareekh) 2018 Black Homozygous Colt 2019 Reserve Champion Yearling Futurity Colt Egyptian Breeders Challenge - Egyptian Event SCID, CA & LFS Clear Owned by: Donnie & Yvonne Jones Hackberry Arabians, LLC Manvel, Texas hackberryarabians.com zayyan.us Cover photo: Moffatt Photography & Design Trace & Lisa Moffatt

CONTRIBUTORS: Jean Paul Guerlain - PARIS, FRANCE Hares Fayad M.D. - Dubai UAE Julie I. Fershtman - USA Judith Wich-Wenning - GERMANY visionpure, Eva Reifler, - FRANCE Nancy Dye - USA John Blackburn AIA - USA

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October/November 2019


Riding In The Classical Way

On Your Beautiful Arabian Horse

By Jean Paul Guerlain In the past, in addition to his role as master perfumer for the House of Guerlain, Jean Paul Guerlain also accumulated World Championships in Dressage and Carriage Driving. Guerlain is a French perfume house, amongst the oldest in the world. The House of Guerlain was founded in 1828, when PierreFrancois Pascal Guerlain opened his perfume store in Paris. Jean Paul Guerlain is fourth generation Geurlain and the last family master perfumer. Jean Paul continues to travel the globe to develop new fragrances.

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The emphasis is placed on you the rider to learn about your own body and how even slight variations in the way you hold yourself affect the way the horse moves beneath you. How can you expect selfcarriage of the horse when you are not in self-carriage yourself?

lassical riding works because it has stood the test of time. It works without fear or force and most definitely without gadgets. It is working with, never against, the horse. It is opening the lines of communication between horse and rider; listening to the horse, being aware of how every move you make means something to the horse and being able to ask yourself, “What did I do that made the horse respond in that manner?” When you do not get the response you were looking for, there is nothing about making him do it, the responsibility lies with you, the rider, to make things comfortable for the horse.

When you think of Classical Riding, you think of the Spanish Riding School in Vienna, Austria or cadre Noir in Saumur, France. In fact, Classical Riding is correct riding. It is horsemanship, not just knowing how to ride. It includes all around knowledge of the horse as a species; its psychology and physiology.

The results are achieved through cooperation not coercion. Classical Riding is foremost concerned with the acquisition of a classical seat; this is a balanced, deep and feeling seat. In this context “seat” includes the seat bones, pubic arch, thighs, lower back and very importantly—the abdominal muscles. Classical riders develop wonderfully light responsive horses because they ride from their center. The horse is ridden from the seat first, then the legs and into the hand. The hands receive what the legs put into them.

Arab Horse Couture

Now you must find a good classical instructor who will understand the sensitivity and intelligence of the Arabian horse. The basics of a well-ridden and trained horse are the same for the Arabian horse as for other horse breeds. Sadly, many times you see the Arabian horse being treated/ridden like another species. 10

October/November 2019


ARNELLE ACAPULCO (JS Marrak x Platinum Fantasie) Champion Purebred Arabian Stallion IN-HAND & DRESSAGE, Guerlain Stables, France; CA & SCID Clear; vitalcell.km@gmail.com

The Arabian horse loves to be ridden (ridden correctly), to have a job to do to express themselves and to burn some energy.

loving, humble, understanding, patient and show empathy and humility. They will become your best friend.

Just a few basics….no matter what discipline you enjoy with your Arabian horse, you must make sure that he is ridden round, with the hindquarters underneath so the back is round not concave. Otherwise, you could run into some back problems with your horse.

Sometime, ask yourself the question: “Do you deserve a beautiful Arabian horse in your life?”

Let me give you a few names of classical riders who have written some wonderful books: Alois Podhajsky, who became the Director of the Spanish Riding School in 1939; Nuno Olivera, an outstanding Portuguese Dressage Rider; Egon Von Neindoff, author of “The Art of Classical Horsemanship”.

And please, if you must sell your Arabian horse, see that your loyal friend is going to a good loving home.

Also, reminding you of the big responsibility you have in your life of owning an Arabian horse. Be sensitive,

October/November 2019

Wishing you all a wonderful AUTUMN season! -JPG11

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HOT to TROT!

Several Egyptian Arabian Horse Breeders Descend Upon Cairo at El Zahraa Stud for Traditional Annual Horse Show

2019 Egyptian National Championship & 21st International Championship ECAHO B Show

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RIGHT and BOLD crowds of breeders, handlers and judges, in addition to local and international media, will descend upon El Zahraa Stud for its annual horse show of 2019. The event, a highlight in the Arabian horse beauty show calendar, drew crowds of more than 100 Egyptian and foreign breeders in 2018.

Breeders have gathered for the El Zahraa Show since the 1990’s with last year no different as hundreds of men and women flocked to the Egyptian Agricultural Organization (EAO) venue. Kids were also among the hundreds at the 25-year-old event. Some mentioned they had been attending the event for 15 years or more! One of the main events in horse shows, attendees each year rally at El Zahraa Stud to make the most of the Arabian horse competition; however, some attendees say they fear the age-old show is declining in popularity. “The numbers have definitely gone down,” some say. Statistics show the numbers are not declining through the size of past annual participants. Others claim that increasing too many shows in Cairo is a threat to the age-old show. Again, attendance at the El Zahraa Show continues at a steady rise.

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October/November 2019


EAO said the El Zahraa National and International Shows are ‘steeped in history’. In 2019, thousands of visitors are expected to attend the show.

Type 1-20 Points; Head & Neck 1-20 Points; Body & Topline 1-20 Points; Legs 1-20 Points; Movement 1-20 Points

Preparations are held at El Zahraa Stud for the Egyptian National & International 21st Arabian Horse Championship Show celebrating the beauty of the purebred Arabian horse from 31 Oct to 3 Nov 2019. The show will be held in two phases including two Championships: one National and the other an International Competition under the European Conference of Arab Horse Organizations (ECAHO) rules.

2019 Show Officials – Judges

Dr. Abd El Razik El Hamdani – Morocco Mrs. Reinhild Moritz – Germany Mrs. Irina Stigler – Russia Mr. Christian Moschini – Italy Mr. Lucas Gozdzialski – Poland Mr. Richard Phlistrom – France Mr. Holger Ismer – Germany Mrs. Jowanaa Lowe – France

Each year the show attracts international attention due to the power and beauty of the purebred Arabian horses participating in the festival. Arabian horses arrive from the Middle East and many other foreign countries.

Disciplinary Committee

Dr. Vet. Laura Mascagna - Italy Mrs. Jackie Vandyke - United Kingdom Dr. Vet. Iman Hamdy – Egypt Dr. Vet. Ramy Nabeal – Egypt Dr. Vet. Salma Ibrahim – Egypt Dr. Vet . Ahmed Ahdy – Egypt Dr. Vet. Mohamed El Kholy – Egypt Dr. Vet. Ahmed Mokhtar – Egypt Dr. Vet. Ibrahim Abd El-Salam – Egypt Dr. Vet. Mohamed Hossam El-Din – Egypt Dr. Vet. Nadya Nassr – Egypt Dr. Vet. Abd El-Latif Al Agamy – Egypt Dr. Vet. Ahmed Zain – Egypt

The show is held under the auspices of the EAO and enjoys an internationally famous position attracting a number of VIP’s from all over the world such as businessmen, Royal Princes, Arabian horse lovers and international breeders. The show is also honored by the attendance of politicians, ministers and ambassadors. Preparing for the event, the show has coordinated with the Cairo Airport to minimize procedures for incoming guests and to ensure the Arabian horses receive due care immediately upon arrival in Cairo.

Ring Masters

For typical security measures, the show has contacted the Interior Ministry in order to secure the show and its guests. The show has also booked rooms for VIP guests in local luxury hotels and will provide all transportation means to ensure the guest’s well-being.

Dr. Vet. Mohamed Mohseen – Egypt Dr. Vet. Ayman Saad – Egypt On the sidelines of the show there will be many related activities to Arabian horses such as attendance by professional artists to introduce sketches of horses, photographs and carvings to the crowd. Once again, the hugely popular horse dancing show will be offered accompanied by traditional Egyptian Baladi Muzmar music.

A dedicated young show team is hard at work to maintain the show’s history of highest standards. The show is working closely with organizers, local authority partners and businesses to ensure a great environment for visitors and residents at the event.

On an annual basis the EAO El Zahraa Championship Show brings together a mix of glamour and excitement!

These Championships have been held since the 1990’s. Among the countries participating in this year’s show are the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates, Jordan, Italy, Germany, and Belgium.

Sincere and heartfelt gratitude is expressed to the El Zahraa show team workers in addition to the breeders, owners, trainers and handlers as well as the gracious sponsors who make this show flawless as is customary.

The show is expecting approximately 350 horses to participate in the event. Two different International Boards of ECAHO Qualified Judges will be scoring the Championships on the basis of the well-known five beauty standards for Arabian show horses:

October/November 2019

If you wish to register your horse for participation, please contact:

Facebook page: E.A.O. - Egyptian Agricultural Organization 15

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Celebrating 60 Years of Ansata The Anniversary Interview By Judith Wich-Wenning

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egendary Arabian horse connoisseur, breeder and author of 60 years, Judith Forbis’ role is unique. Together with her late husband Don, the two Americans founded Ansata Arabian Stud, a Straight Egyptian breeding program with vast global influence. Arabian horses from Ansata Arabians are highly regarded worldwide. Many extraordinary horses were born at Ansata Arabian Stud, one of the most prominent was for sure the unforgettable Ansata Halim Shah, who revolutionized Egyptian Arabian horse breeding. Judith and Don met and married in Turkey in 1958. Both loved horses since childhood. An adventurous time followed. With Don as trainer, Judith Forbis took part in horse races as the only female jockey in Turkey at that time. Their quest for the classic Arabian horse throughout the Middle East ended in Egypt at the Egyptian Agricultural Organization’s ed late Don Forbis pictur Judith Forbis and the the into d El Zahraa Stud. Here they found the quality and type they were looking for. In 1959 they rate ugu ina re at the time they we Tent of Honor. obtained the legendary yearlings Ansata Ibn Halima, Ansata Bint Mabrouka and Ansata Bint Arabian Horse Trust Zafaarana and Ansata Arabian Stud was born. Thereafter, they continuously pursued their goal: the breeding and also the promotion of the archetype of this breed, the classic Arabian horse. After thoughtful consideration, they chose the name “Ansata” for their farm, a word that derives from the old Egyptian symbol for “eternal life”, an appropriate choice for their lifelong purpose of preserving the breed. Judith Forbis is furthermore the founding member of the Pyramid Society, a sought-after lecturer and was a highly respected international judge for many years. Moreover, she is famous for her innumerable publications. Besides countless magazine articles, she is the author of standard works such as: “The Classic Arabian Horse”, “Authentic Arabian Bloodstock Vol. I and II”, “Ansata Hejazi – Born to Rule”, etc. Don Forbis passed away in 2008 but Judith continues to remain active in many aspects of the Arabian horse community. Arab Horse Couture

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October/November 2019


The booth honoring Ansata's 60th Anniversary at the Egyptian Event. Photo: Richard T. Bryant

Judith Wich-Wenning: Judi, please share with us some special moments during Ansata’s long and eventful history. Judith Forbis: “Sixty years holds a treasure trove of memories, each special in different ways. I suppose the first was in 1958 when Don and I married in Ankara, Turkey. We both loved horses and it was there we began our life’s journey together with the Arabian breed. While corresponding with Arabian horse authority Carl Raswan, he suggested we visit the Egyptian Agricultural Organization’s El Zahraa Stud in Ein Shams, Egypt and meet with General von Pettko Szandtner, the manager at that time. It must have been fate that when we arrived, he had just retired and Dr. Mohammed Marsafi was in charge. We were overwhelmed by the beauty of the horses, and to begin our program he let us choose three superb yearlings (Ansata Ibn Halima, Ansata Bint Mabrouka and Ansata Bint Zaafarana), all by Nazeer, the stallion who greatly impressed us despite his 25 years of age. Sometime later, I received a letter from Richard Pritzlaff who had imported five horses to the USA earlier. The General had written to him saying, “I never would have sold them those three yearlings if I had still been there!”

sha e Abbas Pa tation of th ramid ever presen Py st e fir th e of th t is receives the Presiden Judith Forb Award from ard T. Bryant hievement o Rich ot Ph Lifetime Ac . rs becca Roge Society, Re

“When the Arab renaissance began in the early 1990’s, Ansata started exporting to the Arab world. This opened up unique opportunities too numerous to mention. Perhaps the most rewarding was helping the Arabian Horse Center, now Bait Al Arab Kuwait State Stud, acquire foundation bloodstock after the Gulf War.” “I’ve also been grateful for the special awards that have come my way: in 2004 I became the first woman to win the prestigious Galbreath Award for Outstanding Entrepreneurship in the entire equine industry including Thoroughbreds, etc. Arabian breed awards such as the Arabian Breeders Lifetime Achievement Award and the All Nation’s Lifetime Achievement Award were gratifying – and recently the Abbas Pasha Lifetime Achievement Award was especially meaningful after having spent so many years working on the Abbas Pasha Manuscript and trying to achieve the quality of horses so admired by the Pasha .”

“A few others come to mind - such as Ansata Bint Bukra, (named “Husnia” in Egypt) the crippled mare we saw as a yearling but because of the African horse sickness outbreak, we had to wait five years before we could import her. Due to her pelvic injury Dr. Marsafi would not guarantee she could ever produce a live foal. However, they bred her to Sameh, put her on a United States Marine Isthmian ship all alone in a crate and after being trailered by herself across the USA to Oklahoma, she proved to be in foal! Eventually she delivered a bay filly - Ansata Bint Misr - who also founded a dynasty of her own.”

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Judith Wich-Wenning: What have you learned about life and yourself in the 60 years of Ansata? Judith Forbis: “From the time I was three years old I loved horses. During my childhood I was not able to own a horse, so I learned to draw pictures of them. This taught me an appreciation of art and honed my eye to perfections and imperfections in conformation - helpful later on in buying and judging. I took riding lessons, competed in equitation classes on various horses, and eventually, when I went to Turkey, I purchased my first Arabian mare. Always my focus was on animals, not people. When our first three Egyptian yearlings arrived, they created a huge impact in America. Thereafter I was often asked to speak and show photographs of the horses we saw in the Arab world and also talk about the history and culture of the people. Gradually I learned that the love and perpetuation of these special horses must be shared - and most importantly, their lives depended on people caring for them if the breed was to survive in this changing world. Sharing, socializing, and hopefully inspiring others became an important part of my life’s work and I became “a people person” as well as a “horse person”.

achim r. Hans-Jo Hamza, D a . tm g in Fa . n en Mrs to right: ith Wich-W From left hoto Jud Forbis. P h it d Ju and

re. Judith blished befo ver been pu legal l ne vi s ci ha e th ch picture whi d me signing em, the an th on d D ne is A wedding s e sig bers: "Thi ey. After w to kiss!" Of g in go Forbis remem ents in Ankara, Turk u cum id, "Aren't yo cting that!" sa do d ge an ria us ar at m pe clerks looked s to say, we weren't ex es two Turkish liged. Needl ob e w se cour

Judith Wich-Wenning: Please name and shortly describe the most important stallions in Ansata’s history. Judith Forbis: “Ansata was graced with more superior breeding and show stallions than most stud farms - partially because so few breeders make it a life’s work to develop an influential herd. Stop and think how many “true Breeders” with a capital B, have existed in the last l00 years? Each stallion used in the Ansata program contributed something important even though some stayed a shorter time at the farm - such as Ansata Abbas Pasha, Ansata Abu Sudan, Ansata Omar Halim, Ansata Malik Shah, Ansata Sokar, Ansata Sinan, Ansata Iemhotep, among others - and of course Dr. Nagel’s Jamil who spent only a year. All appear in my book: “Authentic Arabian Bloodstock II: The Story of Ansata”. However, those noted below probably had the most universal impact.” “Ansata Ibn Halima (Nazeer x Halima) began the legacy. He was a perfectly balanced ideal classic Arabian horse who was appreciated - even by owners of other breeds - because of his beauty, and athletic ability. He was a consistent sire of “that Halima look” and was three times U.S. National Champion Top Ten Halter Stallion as well as winner of Regional and Class A Championships in various performance classes. He was an inspiration to most people who saw him.”

Nagel

Judith Wich-Wenning: What things in life are still a mystery to you? Judith Forbis: “Life itself is a mystery…especially the miracles of birth and death. Anyone who breeds animals experiences these more frequently than most people. I often wonder why I was gifted with parents and family who supported my love for horses and all animals, and why I was blessed to acquire the special horses that came my way. William Barclay perhaps summed up life’s mystery well: “There are two great days in a person’s life - the day we are born and the day we discover why.” I’m still searching!”

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Ansata Ibn Halima. Photo Sparagowski

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“Ansata Ibn Sudan (Ansata Ibn Halima x Ansata Bint Mabrouka) was next. Not only was he a magnificent stallion - produced by breeding a Nazeer son to a Nazeer daughter - but he was a prankster - always wanting attention. He was a born show off with exceptional charisma. Watching him win U.S. National Champion Stallion in 1971 was a highlight in my early years as a breeder. Regrettably Sudan had less opportunity as a sire with Ansata due to our lack of mares at that time; nevertheless, he produced some remarkable show-winning progeny, including Ansata Abu Sudan - a valued sire and show winner, and the gorgeous Champion Ansata Sabrina.”

Head study of Ansata Ibn Sudan and Ansata Ibn Halima taken at the Lufkin, Texas ranch. Photo Sparagowski

Mr. M

and Ansata

o Grasso Hejazi. Phot

“Ansata Hejazi (Ansata Halim Shah x Ansata Sudarra). Hejazi replaced Ansata Halim Shah and had all the qualities of a superior show horse and breeding stallion. However, his time at Ansata was relatively short. He was purchased in 1999 by Mohammed Al-Marzouq and shipped to Kuwait where he went on to inspire a generation of breeders after the Gulf War. The book: “Ansata Hejazi - Born to Rule”, describes this unique stallion who was affectionately called “The King of Kuwait”.

Ansata Ibn Sudan. Photo Sparagowski

“Ansata Shah Zaman (Morafic x Ansata Bint Mabrouka) followed in age sequence. He was our first, and very successful, attempt at inbreeding full brother to full sister. A powerful stallion with huge black eyes, long neck – but not as shapely as Sudan’s, extreme depth of shoulder, strong body and high tail carriage. Shah Zaman tended more to Morafic in type and combined perfectly with the Halima bloodlines. He won his share of Championships and was extremely important in our program.” “Ansata Halim Shah (Ansata Ibn Halima x Ansata Rosetta) was the fulfillment of a breeder’s dream. Perfect balance, beauty and harmony in all parts - a fine show horse - but most of all he literally transformed Egyptian breeding programs because of his extreme prepotency as a sire. While in Germany on lease to Dr. Nagel, Halim Shah was the only stallion at the German Licensing to receive 20’s in type. He also won Championships in America and at the Salon du Cheval in Paris. His bloodlines are found throughout the world. He was simply the most influential stallion we ever bred.”

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Marzouq ohammed Al

Ansata Hejazi as a young stallion with Judith & Don Forbis. Photo Sparagowski

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Judith Wich-Wenning: Please tell us about the most important foundation mares of Ansata and their influence for the breeding program. Judith Forbis: “A superior broodmare band is most important in a breeding program. We selected three yearling fillies (Ansata Bint Bukra was a real gamble) rather than older broodmares when we began because we felt the yearlings were superior. We chose patience rather than instant gratification. In total we imported five Nazeer daughters including Ansata Bint Misuna “Bint Misuna” and Ansata Bint Nazeer “Fulla”; also Ansata Bint Sameh (by Sameh) and Ansata Bint Elwya (by Anter). Additionally we leased four mares from the Babson Farm. However, the following mares were the most prolific and influential.”

Ansata Bint Bukra – foundation mare of a legacy. Photo Judith Forbis

“Falima (Ansata Ibn Halima x FaHabba) was the founder of the Ansata Nile family. We leased her dam from Henry Babson and three other mares. FaHabba gifted us with a very classic bay filly with a beautiful head and wonderful balance overall that we named Falima. She was a “watch mare” - always concerned about the welfare of the herd around her. The Ansata Nile family was very prolific and is highly respected globally for its beauty and athletic ability (e.g., Ansata Nile Echo).”

Ansata Iemhotep and his son Ansata Sirius. Photo Judith Wich-Wenning

“Ansata Bint Mabrouka (Nazeer x Mabrouka x Moniet El Nefous) was my first love. She was an elegant yearling with big black soulful eyes, long neck - overall a classic model of femininity that served as an inspiration to me for the future. She produced one filly that died, and three stallions that became world famous: Ansata Abbas Pasha, Ansata Ibn Sudan and Ansata Shah Zaman- and then she tragically passed away - truly a legendary mare.”

Judith Wich-Wenning: Do you still own any horses? Judith Forbis: “When Don passed away in December 2008, we had already sold the big farm in Mena, Arkansas and all the horses. I have retained frozen semen to many of the Ansata stallions and have a special arrangement with Mauri and Steve Chase of Chase Arabians in Texas regarding several mares including Ansata Samiha - who produced three outstanding stallions: Ansata Sheikh Halim (at Bait Al Arab, Kuwait), Ansata Marengo (at Sakr Arabians, Egypt) and Ansata Sinan Pasha (at Chase Arabians). Another cooperative venture with Chase Arabians is with the elderly Hadban Enzahi mare Baraka Fairuz (by Ansata El Sharaf) who recently produced a striking filly by Ansata Sheikh Halim. Thereafter Mauri leased the beautiful bay mare MA Arianna (Baariqu Al Amali x MFA Maarqesa) tracing in female line to Maaroufa. We bred Arianna to Ansata Hejazi and she produced an excellent young stud-prospect colt. Fortunately, I am able to maintain a strong connection at home and abroad to the people who are using Ansata bloodlines.”

“Ansata Bint Zaafarana (Nazeer x Zaafarana x Samira) was Don’s favorite because of her overall balance and the athletic ability she inherited from her dam’s sire, the superb racehorse balance. She was only bred to Ibn Halima during her lifetime producing high quality sons and daughters. Her son Ansata El Nisr became a U.S. National Top Ten Stallion and was most influential in other programs. His beautiful sister Ansata Aziza founded a valued line, which includes the Champion Farid Nile Moon.” “Ansata Bint Bukra (Nazeer x Bukra) needs little introduction. She became the true matriarch of Ansata with branches through her daughters: Ansata Bint Misr, Ansata Rhodora, Ansata Rosetta, Ansata Regina and Ansata Bint Sudan - with descendants from each branch founding dynasties of their own. Of these branches, one would have to mention Ansata Delilah, Ansata Samantha, and Ansata Sudarra among the most influential of her descendants worldwide.”

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Judith Wich-Wenning: Ansata bloodstock has widely influenced Arabian horse breeding globally. How do you evaluate the current development of Ansata within the Arabian breed (Straight and non-Straight)?

photographs through countless lectures, magazine articles as well as through my books.” “Celebrations in honor of Ansata’s 60th anniversary were held at the Noble Festival in The Netherlands and the Egyptian Event in Kentucky. Both brought back many memories of when Don and I began, how far Ansata has come in those six decades and how many wonderful people have crossed our paths.”

Judith Forbis: “Anyone traveling to the Middle East since 1990 will have seen the gradual, then the tremendous influence of Ansata bloodlines. This included Al Rayyan, Al Shaqab and Al Naif in Qatar, then to Saudi Arabia, Sharjah, Egypt, Jordan, Morocco, and Kuwait during the close of the 20th century and into the new millennium. However, in Kuwait the Bait Al Arab Kuwait State Stud, Ajmal Arabian Stud and other Kuwaiti breeders have taken Ansata stock to a new level, as has Al Waab in Qatar more recently. Ansata is also well-represented in Egypt, particularly through the fine programs of Sakr Arabians and Al Baydaa. The Nagel Katharinenhof program and Tauschke’s El Thayeba Arabians among others in Europe leaned heavily on Ansata bloodlines, as did Forest Hill, Simeon and other stud farms “down under” in Australia. There’s just too many other countries and breeders to mention here. Overall, the Ansata horses have provided a firm foundation of classic quality, substance, and athletic ability upon which breeders worldwide have successfully built.”

Judith Forbis signing “Ansata Hejazi - Born to Rule". Photo Suzanne

Judith Wich-Wenning: Of the many things you did concerning Arabian horses, which one made your heart beat the fastest?

“With regard to what I term “international bloodlines” the influence of Ansata is found in the most prestigious show horses of today: Gazal Al Shaqab, Marwan Al Shaqab, WH Justice, Escape Ibn Navaronne-D, Eternity Ibn Navaronne-D, to name just a few.” ((Please see “List of International Champions Influenced by Ansata Bloodlines” on page 25)

Judith Forbis: “The first thing that came to my mind in answering this question was an incident in 1959 when I was working out our Arabian race mare on the track in Diyarbakir, Turkey. Don and I had purchased two racehorses: he would train and I would jockey in this “outback” region that, at the time, was under strict military governance. I was the only American woman there and consequently something of an oddity. One particular morning two askers (Turkish soldiers) were off to my right side repairing a downed telephone line that laid across the dirt race track. Just as I galloped near them they yanked the line into the air, intentionally tripping my mare. She went to her knees but I managed to grab hold of her neck to keep from going over her head before she righted herself. Don came racing towards us in the Jeep to see what happened while his staff, who were watching us, called the military police. The officer in charge wanted to have the askers shot - but we pleaded for their lives and from then on the two offenders were assigned to protect us the rest of the time we were there. To say my heart beat fast was an understatement; but we won or placed in all our races thereafter with other challenging incidents, which I describe in my book, “Hoofbeats Along the Tigris”.

Judith Forbis and Mauri Chase with Ansata Samiha. Photo Richard T. Bryant

Judith Wich-Wenning: What are your feelings when you see the fantastic progeny of Ansata bloodstock at so many important stud farms? Judith Forbis: “Although Don and I never had any children, our horses have provided us with a global family. Wherever I travel and see Ansata bloodlines represented, I feel I’ve contributed a strong link in the chain that has bound Arabian horse breeders together for centuries. Additionally, I am pleased to have also helped educate breeders by sharing many of my experiences and

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Judith Wich-Wenning: What projects are you currently working on? Judith Forbis: “I’m always working on projects of some kind. I participate in the local Southwest Artists projects in Mena; I’ve been remodeling a guesthouse and large workshop on my property where I might hold some seminars in the future. Lately some consulting work

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has taken my time as has editing, writing articles and, most recently, helping with the Pyramid Society’s 50th Anniversary Reference Handbook of “Straight Egyptian Arabian Horses”. This is the 13th edition and the largest ever - over 500 pages; with the Society’s 50th Anniversary arriving in 2019. I’m sure there will be something more to do!” Judith Wich-Wenning: future?

What are your plans for the

Judith Forbis: “At the moment I expect to return to the Gulf States for the Kuwait and other shows, and to visit the Qatar National Library where my photo library has been digitized for eventual publication online. I also plan to visit various farms to see how they are progressing. And yes there is another book in progress - something special and very dear to my heart - a remarkable story that still causes me to wonder about fate, blessings, and “the mystery of life”. The legendary mare Ansata Selket (Ansata Halim Shah x Ansata Samarra). Photo Judith Wich-Wenning

Judith Forbis receiving the Lifetime Achievement Award at the 2016 All Nations Cup from former WAHO president, Dr. Hans-Joachim Nagel. Judith Forbis is the first person to receive this newly established award. Photo Lisa Abraham

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Judith Forbis. Photo Lisa Abraham

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International Champions Influenced by Ansata Some Winners at the World Championships - Egyptian Related: Bloodlines: •ZT Sharuby (ZT Sharello x ZT Bint Ruby) World Champion Mare [2 x Ansata Shah Zaman]

(Compiled by Joe Ferriss) Some Winners at the World Championships - Straight Egyptian:

•Khidar (Ansata Sinan x Elizja) World Champion Stallion

•Ansata Abbas Pasha (Ansata Ibn Halima x Ansata Bint Mabrouka) World Reserve Champion Stallion

•Athenaa (Ashhal Al Rayyan x Ass-Windi) Top Ten World Champion Junior Female

•Sherif Pasha (Ansata Abbas Pasha x Sabah GASB) World Champion Stallion

•Aliha (Indian Silver x AK Atallah x Ansata Ibn Halima) World Reserve Champion Mare

•Fa Halima (Ansata Ibn Halima x Sabrah) World Reserve Champion Mare, U.S. National Champion Mare

•Atlantica (El Shaklan x Aliha) World Champion Mare •Gazal Al Shaqab (Anaza El Farid [Ansata Ibn Halima grandson] x Kajora) World Champion Stallion

•AK Fanniya (Ansata Ibn Halima x Narimaan) World Champion Mare

•Marwan Al Shaqab (Gazal Al Shaqab x Little Liza Fame) World Champion Stallion

•Simeon Shai (Raadin Royal Star x Simeon Safanad) World Champion Stallion, [2 x Ansata Ibn Halima]

•Pianissima (Gazal Al Shaqab x Pianosa) World Champion Mare

•Al Adeed Al Shaqab (Ansata Halim Shah x Sundar Alisayyah) World Champion Stallion

•Eternity Ibn Navaronne-D (Ansata Sinan x Navarrone-P) World Champion Stallion

•Al Lahab (Laheeb IASB x The Vision HG) World Champion Stallion

•Escape Ibn Navarrone-D (AS Sinans Pacha x Navarrone-P) World Champion Stallion

•Bint Saida Al Nasser (Imperial Mahzeer x Saida) World Reserve Champion mare [2 x Ansata Ibn Halima]

•Hlayyil Ramadan (Kamar El Zaman [2 x Ansata Halim Shah] x Haroub) World Champion Stallion

•Imperial Imdal (Ansata Imperial x Dalia) World Champion Stallion

•Galilea (Laheeb IASB x Georgia) World Champion Mare [bred by Michalow Stud, Poland]

•Imperial Phanilah (Ansata Imperial x Imperial Phanadah) World Champion Mare

•BJ Thee Mustafa (Thee Desperado x Khalili El Bahar [1 x Ibn Halima]) World Champion Stallion

•Imperial Kamilll (Imperial Al Kamar x Imperial Mistilll) Top Ten World Champion Stallion

•Fadi Al Shaqab (Besson Carol x Abha Myra) World Silver Champion Junior Colt

•Loubna (Imperial Imdal x Imperial Kalatifa) World Champion Mare

•Kahil Al Shaqab (Marwan Al Shaqab x OFW Mishaahl) World Gold Champion Senior Stallion

•Ansata Nile Pasha (Jamilll x Ansata Nile Dream) Top Ten World Champion Stallion

•Wadee Al Shaqab (Marwan Al Shaqab x OFW Mishaahl) World Gold Champion Junior Colt

•Ansata Halim Shah (Ansata Ibn Halima x Ansata Rosetta) World Reserve Champion Colt •Insh Allah (Ashhal Al Rayyan x India) World Champion Colt

About the Author: Straight Egyptian Arabian Owner and Breeder, Judith Wich-Wenning, is a freelance photographer and journalist and works for numerous Arabian horse magazines around the world. Moreover, she is the author of the highly acclaimed book “Jewels of the Desert - The Magic of Egyptian Arabians”, published by Orienta Publications.

•Lohim (Ansata Halim Shah x Loheila) Top Ten World Champion Stallion •Royal Colours (True Colours x Xtreme Wonder) World Champion Stallion

Judith Wich-Wenning, Orienta Arabians, Germany: judithwich@t-online.de

•HS Ramira (Simeon Sadik x Rihahna) World Reserve Champion Filly

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Halimaars King Tut (Aga Gamaan x Haallie) 2013 Egyptian Event Champion Western Pleasure Owners: Delsan Arabians Naples, Florida

Getting To Know

Owners: Donnie & Yvonne Jones Manvel, Texas USA

W

hen did you first become involved with the Arabian horse and what attracted you to the breed? Donnie & Yvonne: “We became involved with the Arabian horse because of our daughter Dana expressing an interest in riding horses at the age of ten years old. Dana began riding lessons and within a year we had purchased a farm and three Arabian horses.”

“One of the horses we purchased was a Straight Egyptian colt that was one and a half years old named Aga Gamaan. Aga is a gentle and loving white stallion that grew up with Dana riding him all around the farm, bareback and talking on her phone. It was a bond that grew and was so very special. After Aga’s training, Dana began showing him in Western Pleasure. He also excelled in side-saddle, trail, Hunter Pleasure and even jumping.” “Aga Gamaan’s sire was an import from Egypt, *Gamaan and his grandsire was Galal, a direct son of Nazeer. Aga’s tailfemale is Henrietta and he is of the Al Khamsa strain and in the Asil Blue Book. Aga Gamaan has been Champion in many Class A Shows, Region 9 in Western Pleasure, Side Saddle and even Hunter Pleasure. Aga was 2007 Reserve Champion

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Please tell us about your beautiful Arabian cover horse, Zayyan. Donnie & Yvonne: “We were flipping through Facebook one day and became smitten by a picture of a gorgeous black two year old Arabian stallion that a friend told us about. Our friend told us, “You should breed a mare to this horse someday.” His name is FA Ali Bey and is owned by Marilyn Lang at Fantasia Arabians in Sealy, Texas.” “Ali Bey is a Justynn son that we fell in love with. We reached out to Marilyn and asked her to help choose which of our three Straight Egyptian mares we should breed to Ali Bey. After reviewing their pedigrees and pictures, Marilyn said she felt Akila Mareekh would be the best choice. At the time she was a six-year-old maiden mare and Zayyan is the result of this breeding.”

Dana Jones riding Aga Gamaan (Gamaan X Akira Hassan) 2000 Straight Egyptian Stallion Owned by: Donnie & Yvonne Jones, Hackberry Arabians

“Zayyan was imprinted for two hours after birth and was handled daily. He has all the best attributes of his sire and dam. The breeding to FA Ali Bey was acquired through the Egyptian Breeders Challenge Auction at the 2016 Egyptian Event. In 2019 we took Zayyan to the Egyptian Event in Lexington, Kentucky where he was in the Futurity Class for Yearling Colts and was crowned Reserve Champion in the Egyptian Breeders Challenge with winnings over $12,000 USD. The announcer at the Egyptian Event in the Futurity Class said she had never in her 20 years of announcing seen so many scores of 18 and 19 in a class.”

in Western Pleasure and Champion in ATR/JTR Western Pleasure, Open Western Pleasure Novice and fourth in Hunter Pleasure at the Egyptian Event in Lexington, Kentucky. Aga is a versatile and athletic Straight Egyptian Arabian stallion. His progeny, Halimaars King Tut, also excelled at the 2013 Egyptian Event winning all Western Pleasure classes and the Championship. Tut is owned by Nancy DeLisi and Carol Sandusky of Delsan Arabians.” What attributes of the Arabian horse do you admire the most?

“We are so excited to see what Zayyan will accomplish in his career and anxious to find out what he will produce with his beauty and elegance. At present, he is only one and a half years old and stands fifteen hands high so we feel he will be a very tall and gorgeous stallion by the time he reaches his full potential. We love our boy “Z”.

Donnie & Yvonne: “Their beauty, intelligence, gentleness and temperament are what we admire most. Our foals are imprinted at birth and are handled daily to reinforce their natural abilities. We have a saying about our stallion Aga Gamaan, “Gentle enough to sleep in your tent”. We are very proud to be able to represent what we consider some of the best Arabian horses from our breeding program.”

Please explain your passion for the Straight Egyptian Arabian horse. Donnie & Yvonne: “There is such a misconception of the Straight Egyptian Arabian horse. Most other breed lovers feel they are too high spirited and uncontrollable; however, we find exactly the opposite. We see them as the most loving, sweet and intelligent breed of all. The beauty of their sculpted heads, refinement in their bodies and tail carriage, are to us what defines the breed and makes them such a gift from God.”

Please tell us about your breeding program and the number of Arabian horses you own. Donnie & Yvonne: “At present, we own eleven Arabian and Straight Egyptian Arabian horses. We have focused on the Straight Egyptian Arabian horse and are very proud of what we have produced and sold to other satisfied purchasers of our horses.” As Arabian horse breeders, what are the conformational and overall characteristics of the Arabian horse that you strive to produce when breeding? How many Arabians do you breed per year?

What are the most rewarding aspects of your involvement with the Arabian horse? Donnie & Yvonne: “To us, the most rewarding aspect is to see the results of our breeding program and watch the foals develop as well. Also, we have met some of the most wonderful, friendly and intelligent people through our association with the Arabian horse industry. Whether it is to talk pedigrees or just ask for advice, our Arabian horse friends are always ready to help.”

Donnie & Yvonne: “As Arabian breeders, we try to improve our foals by looking at the stallion and mare to improve and gain the best attributes of both the sire and dam. As Aga Gamaan has such a wonderful temperament and body, we try to improve with the mare to gain perfection as much as possible.” “We are small breeders so we breed one to four mares per year. The foals are our favorite part of working with the Arabian horse; it’s like watching your children grow. We like working with other successful breeders to carefully choose a sire and dam with compatible strains to ensure our chances of producing a new family member for us to enjoy and/or possibly sell for someone else to enjoy.”

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Contact information: Donnie & Yvonne Jones Hackberry Arabians, LLC Manvel, Texas USA www.hackberryarabians.com www.zayyan.us 713.715.9300

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“I don’t think you are beautiful; I think you are beyond it.” – Lit’l Wayne

Photography workshop connects inspiring young models with Straight Egyptian Arabian horses.

D

uane and Diana Cantey, owners of Zajaddi Egyptian Arabians, a small breeding farm in Mount Vernon, Arkansas, hosted a skills development photography workshop on June 29th, featuring award-winning photographer and Arkansas State University Professor of Photography and Graphic Design, Kim Vickrey BoydJones. Kim was the perfect choice to instruct the workshop and brought her many years of experience with shooting horses, and her exceptional portrait skills to share with the group. A lot of planning and preparation were involved over several weeks to assure the event would be successful for all. Fourteen photographers and five gorgeous models ranging in age from 13-19 gathered for a light breakfast, followed by a morning of beauty beyond anyone’s imagination.

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As introductions were made, outfits were assembled, and horses were groomed to perfection, the excitement was building as it was the first time the models, and many of the photographers, were to meet and work with Straight Egyptian Arabian horses. Diana gave a brief history of the Straight Egyptian Arabian horse and why it is considered rare, historical, and very special to the family. She further elaborated that the farm is celebrating its 20th year of breeding and that she and her husband Duane are very passionate about breed promotion. “It is important for us to educate the public about this special breed and how it is the perfect family horse. Having the opportunity to work with Kim, and host photographers who came from as far as Texas and Tennessee to participate, was very exciting. We sold out the workshop in less than 72 hours after posting on social media and had several photographers on a waiting list. The attendance was restricted to allow for a smaller group learning environment,” stated Diana. “I was convinced after witnessing the interactions between the models and horses that everyone was impressed with their kind, sweet personalities. We adorned the mares with jewelry pieces to compliment the models’ outfits, which ranged from casual to formal. We allowed each girl to briefly meet with the horses before they posed with them. Later I asked the models what they thought of our Straight Egyptian mares, and for some who had owned other breeds, the experience was amazing, and for the model who had never been around horses, it was a fairytale. The mares just know and seem to have a strong intuition about newcomers. They enjoy the attention and affection anytime and received lots of kisses and cuddles from everyone,” said Diana Cantey.

It was exciting to work with all of the photographers at the workshop. When I saw the photos, I could not have been happier with the results. I hope to be able to model at a future workshop and with Rose. She is very special.” – Rylee

The models featured in the workshop were fabulous to work with, open to learning, very coachable, and gave the photographers a lot to shoot with regard to outfits, personalities, and poses. The horses were very tuned in, and the pairings were “Beyond Beautiful”. Rylee Brockinton is a 14-year-old 9th-grade student at Cabot Freshman Academy. She plays volleyball for her school but her passion is barrel racing with her horse Harley. Rylee is pictured sharing a tender moment with Roses Silhouette RH, affectionately known as “Rose”, a Straight Egyptian Arabian mare owned by Zajaddi Egyptian Arabians. (Rylee quote) “I have always had a passion for God’s beautiful creation of the horse. I’ve never had an opportunity to experience the majestic beauty of the Egyptian Arabian horse until my recent visit to Zajaddi Egyptian Arabians for the photography workshop. I wasn’t sure what to expect, but I can say first hand that these beautiful horses were a pleasure to work with and their presence was angelic. I felt very comfortable and had an instant bond with Rose.

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Alissa Faircloth is a 19-year-old college student and competes in barrel racing with her Quarter Horse, Dandy. Alissa is pictured with Azaamah, a 1995 mare sired by Tammen x Aleeyah, by *Ibn Morafic. Azaamah was the foundation mare at Zajaddi Egyptian Arabians and is now officially retired from breeding. (Alissa quote) “I recently was asked to work with a group of wonderfully talented photographers, and it was my first time to model with a group. The other models and I posed with Straight Egyptian Arabian horses as part of a photography skills development workshop. We learned a lot about posing with the horses and quickly developed a special bond with them. Arabian horses are easy to fall in love with as they have beautiful, sculpted faces, large expressive eyes, and are so peoplefriendly. They have a reputation for being intelligent, spirited, but not in a negative way, and they have outstanding stamina. What stood out to me the most is their curiosity, pride, and confidence. They seemed to like having lots of attention! The mares, Azaamah and Rose, are similar in qualities but have very unique personalities. The Straight Egyptian Arabian is not just amazing in beauty but has such an interesting history. I thoroughly enjoyed this workshop experience and look forward to the next one.� - Alissa

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Meagan Compton is a 17-year-old, recent Rose Bud High School graduate who participated in competitive cheerleading and earned numerous awards. Pictured is Meagan enjoying a moment with Rose during the photo shoot. (Meagan quote) “I grew up around Arabian horses and know how special they are as a breed. This was the first time I had ever done any modeling so I was excited, especially after seeing the horse that I would be working with named Rose. She was breathtaking, and her bay coat was so shiny, eyes big and black. The skin around the muzzle was so soft like velvet. I was charmed by her personality. She was radiant, bold and so beautiful. Posing with her was effortless, and I felt like I had formed a bond with her. Arabians compliment any setting they are in, and I just let her lead and do what made her feel comfortable. I could hear the photographers’ comments about how stunning we looked. Our style was casual, and Rose made me feel so special.” - Meagan

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Ava Claire Johnson was the youngest of the models at the workshop, but she is no stranger around horses. Her family breeds, raises, trains and competes in barrel racing. Only thirteen years of age, she was a natural in front of the camera and exuded a lot of confidence. Pictured is Ava Claire with Rose. (Ava Claire quote) “I have been around horses my entire life and began barrel racing at just two years of age when my Dad used to lead me through the patterns. I have never met an animal I didn’t love and have been accused of having my very own zoo because I am always bringing home some sort of critter. I have always had Quarter Horses myself, so this experience was not only my first time for modeling, but also my first time around Straight Egyptian Arabian horses. Rose is a beautiful animal with a sweet disposition. She helped make me feel at ease in an unfamiliar situation. I am very thankful for the opportunity I was given to do this!” - Ava Claire After a few hours of shooting and admiring the horses, the group appreciated the break for lunch as the outside temperature was heating up. Over refreshing cold cut sliders, barbeque, fresh-cut fruit and ice-cold beverages, Diana shared a bit of information with the group about the current status of the breed. “There are less than 6,000 Straight Egyptian Arabians that exist worldwide and they represent two to three percent of the entire Arabian breed

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many Championships by actor Patrick Swayze. Duane and Diana are very proud to have managed Azaamah’s breeding career and follow the journeys of her children and grandchildren around the world. She now serves as a breed ambassador and enjoys appearing in senior high school photoshoots. Throughout lunch, Kim provided some aspects about operating a successful photography business as well as discussed cameras, settings and featured a slide show of some of her award-winning work. The group gathered for another shooting session in the evening, with an emphasis on “action” as well as portraits. Everyone enjoyed spending the day shooting beautiful horses and models.

at large. The statistics are quite alarming as fewer and fewer farms remain operational. One breeder shared that according to the Arabian Horse Registry, less than 200 Straight Egyptian Arabian foals were registered in 2018. Although our Zajaddi Egyptian Arabians has just a few horses, and one now retired, our goal is still to focus on breed promotion.” The two special mares used in the workshop, Azaamah (1995 grey, bred by Thistlewood Farm, sired by Tammen x Aleeyah, by *Ibn Morafic) and the recent addition to the farm, Roses Silhouette RH (2011 bay, bred by Jerry and Annette Boles, sired by The Sequel RCA x Minstrils Rose, by The Minstril) trace back to the ancient horses of the Bedouin tribes of Arabia. They are prized for their extreme beauty and rarity which their guardians believe is unsurpassed in the equine world. Diana also mentioned that since establishing Zajaddi Egyptian Arabians their goal has been to perpetuate the Straight Egyptian Arabian for future generations to enjoy and treasure. Several horses bred by the farm have been sold abroad, and have impacted breeding programs all around the world including those in Australia, New Zealand, China, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Abu Dhabi, Kuwait, Israel and most recently Qatar.

The photography workshop was a great way to promote the Straight Egyptian Arabian horse with emphasis on the qualities that make it the special breed that it is, peoplefriendly with a kind, sweet-natured temperament, and “Beyond Beautiful”. Many comments and amazing photos were shared in the days that followed, along with a strong interest for a future workshop at the farm.

Several Zajaddi-bred horses have garnered Championships in Halter competition and they earned an Egyptian Event Breeder’s Excellence Award in 2010 with the yearling homebred colt “Zaarakh” who was exported to Kuwait.

Photos and story by Diana Cantey, freelance photojournalist, professional photographer and videographer. Diana’s photos have appeared in several Arabian horse breed journals covering shows and events in the United States and abroad.

Azaamah is the foundation mare at Zajaddi and had six foals bred by the farm. She was officially retired this year. Her total progeny was eleven, including undetected twins in 2009. She was leased to The Imperial Egyptian Stud in 2005-2006 for two breeding seasons. She produced a Yearling Champion Futurity Filly named Beveerah by Imperial Baarez, who they claimed was one of the best they had ever bred. Azaamah is well respected amongst breeders as a top-producing daughter of the celebrityfamous stallion Tammen who was owned and shown to

October/November 2019

www.dianacanteyphotography.com www.zajaddiegyptianarabians.com

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Arab Horse Couture Cover Feature

Dazzling Sets Created & Designed by Gina Roland Dupree

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escribe your first introduction to the Arabian horse and what characteristics attracted you most to the breed?

Gina: “I read “The Black Stallion” in grade school and became obsessed with the Arabian horse. I slowly collected the whole series reading them over and over again.” “When I first saw the stunning beauty of the Arabian horse, I was captivated by the breed. There remains no animal on earth as beautiful as an Arabian horse in motion. The versatility of the Arabian is incomparable. My husband and I own a cattle farm and ride our Arabians with the cows. The horses love doing this type of work!” What is your involvement with the Arabian horse? Gina: “I have been involved with Arabian horse rescue, quarantine and rehoming for the past several years. I see horses begin to thrive and recover after being discarded from their unethical former owners. They are hungry and dirty when they arrive. It’s very rewarding to see these horses recuperate and find a great new home for them.”

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Your Arabian Fancy Tack is meticulous and the attention to detail shows your gifted talent and passion for the tack that adorns the Arabian horse. Please tell us what inspired you to begin your business? Gina: “My first Arabian horse was a Kaborr+++ daughter and I wanted to dress her up as the queen she certainly was. I made a few halters for her, received some great advice and found my calling. I was blessed to design for some great people and trainers involved with the Arabian horse from the very beginning of my career.” “Many of my designs are photographed in close range mode. I’m a fanatic about perfection and my first priority is always strength of product. My halters are STRONG and they do not break! If a stallion is on the end of a lead in a show ring full of other stallions, the last thing the handler should worry about is the halter breaking. Many of my designs look very light and delicate; however, they are in fact durable and solid.” What are the most in demand, Arabian horse tack sets for stallions, mares or geldings? What are the most popular colors requested from customers? Gina: “The trend has always been presentation sets for photo shoots and show ring halters for both stallions and mares. I’m seeing a trend for mare sets at the moment. I would love to see more geldings being promoted. Arabian Fancy Tack has sponsored several awards for amateur gelding classes.” “Color trends are difficult to predict. There are no wrong color choices on a good horse! For the show ring, I’m still doing many black bases with silver or gold beading; classic and elegant. Colors for sets are limited only by the customer’s imaginations! My latest favorite theme is mixing light airy metal pieces with colored bases.”

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What pieces of tack are included in an Arabian Fancy Tack order? Gina: “Halters are just the halter with a throat latch added by request. Bitted halters are also available. Sets begin with halters and breast pieces and most have an optional forehead piece/browband. I also offer back scarves, great for beautiful broodmares and aged horses.” Do you look at the specific Arabian horse prior to the design process for inspiration of each individual set? Gina: “Yes, I prefer to see the Arabian horse prior to beginning my work. This truly helps the design process to see the horse and know a bit about them. I can also suggest styles that emphasize or minimize certain colors or characteristics. I also prefer to know the plans for a specific horse before designing a set. A presentation photo set is quite decorative; a show ring halter is more refined and elegant.”

What is involved in the process of creating the tack and the typical length of time it takes for you to create each set? Gina: “The initial contact is usually due to someone seeing a design posted on social media. The person likes a particular design and then clicks through to see more photos. Many times the initial design they chose to begin with is completely redone and customized.” “Each set takes on a life of its own. I send sample photos and work to the customers to perfect the design down to the last detail.” “Timing depends on the customer’s needs for a particular set. I have several sets in progress at all times. The sets are usually arranged by date desired. Halters can be made in a few days, sets require two weeks or longer. Some designs are months in the making.” Approximately how many sets of Arabian horse tack have you created subsequent to the start of your business? Gina: “My tack has appeared on over 50 magazine covers, some with the same design on different horses. In addition, I have sent 30 tack set orders to the Middle East and Europe. Several customers have personal collections totaling over 20 unique pieces.”

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“I’ve been designing and making Arabian horse tack for 19 years. I recently sent a set to a Greek Island for a breed other than an Arabian horse. I’ve completed sets for Miniature horses for the Rose Parade and Friesians with top of show and breeding industry owners.”

“I work from our cattle ranch in South Mississippi. I hand make each piece and design sets myself, never copying other designers.” “One of my favorite suggestions for customers is to have a vision, a dream design in mind for me to customize this creation for them.”

What would you like people to know about Arabian Fancy Tack?

Could you please share some price points for purchasing Arabian Fancy Tack?

Gina: “Arabian Fancy is a one person business. I work alone with occasional help from my Aunt on complex pieces.”

Gina: “Halters begin at $175 USD. Multiple piece orders receive a discount. Full set pricing begins at $650 USD. The prices may increase depending on the type and amount of decorations on each set.” You have a vision of the current market for Arabian Fancy Tack. What do you see on the horizon for the tack the Arabian horse will be wearing in the future? Gina: “I love the simple elegance of an Arabian horse show ring halter on the cover photo of a magazine. Along with the gold pieces of Swarovski Crystals, the colors are elegant in the show ring and beautiful in photos. This particular design has already been in the winner’s ribbon circle in Australia.” “The difficult aspect of my job is creating a show ring design that is elegant, eye catching and unique. New design sets are available in an unlimited number of colors and patterns. Sets change daily. I continue to create completely new and distinctive looks so customers may have an exclusive design of their own.”

Contact information for Arabian Fancy Tack: @facebook.com/arabianfancytack arabianfancy@live.com 601.670.5707

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Aggressivity: Dominance or Fear Response? The Human vs. the Horse’s Perspective Written by Eva Reifler

ould you happen to know someone who is looking for a sweet gelding?” the message I see on my WhatsApp account shows. “I am!” I reply Instantly, without a clue what horse “W my friend Donna is talking about. “Well – come and see “Tael”, was the prompt reply. “Okay – when?” (I was puzzled though, as I remember him as a very handsome but quite frustrated stallion a couple of years ago). A week later we are on our way to meet Donna. The car full of best friends AND the intention of NOT to take on another horse. No space for another horse, and certainly not before Winter I tell everybody in the car. And I MEAN it... Well – I was wrong!

by turning his head he can see us better. And with it goes my intention TO NOT BRING HIM HOME. I shouldn’t fail to mention that he attacked my horse trainer in the round pen and didn’t stop trying to nip me on our way there. The next day the four of us drive back to Donna’s with a horse trailer and hopeful about giving this little, “charming” guy a good new home. If I only knew what we got ourselves into.

Tael: “Those creatures coming up the walkway, do they bring carrots? I can’t smell any. But then it’s cold and foggy and I feel so lonely in my pasture. They’re dragging their feet as they always do in this weather and I wonder why. But I still can’t smell any carrots – maybe if I turn my head sideways, I can get closer through the pinching ribbons and maybe, maybe I can reach a carrot. But my ears – what do I do with my ears – I don’t want them to get caught in the biting fence. It’s easier when I flatten them along my head as I can get much closer. Plus, these two-legged creatures, humans as they say, seem to leave me alone or feed me a lot of carrots when I pin my ears. That surely must please them.”

Tael: “Ouff – out of my solitary pasture. I am careful because I never know when they scold me. Although the one who seems to be around me the most is really nice and I am very attached to her. She’s the closest I have to a herd and I really would like to connect and play with her. But I don’t always understand the rules. Their signals are so confusing and I don’t always get it and then I get so mad and I tell them to leave me alone. I shall learn later that they call it “putting on pressure” and “attacking” – but today I only know they all tiptoe around me when I do that. The one takes me out of my pasture and I am really trying to be good despite my dislike of men. There is so much buzzing and anxiety and it is so hard to contain myself. The best escape is

Oh – I think, he has the same attitude as my belated horse Markash and I instantly fall for the little sorrel gelding. Smart little guy, he also figured out that

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to jump into the white stall despite its height. That seems to please everybody and for the first time I am content even without a carrot.” We are all enthralled by how easy it was to load Tael. After all, we started to have a slight idea about the upcoming challenge. He attacked about everything and everybody who was unfortunate enough to get into his reach without any means of protection. I am running an equine facilitated learning facility which doesn’t combine well with a crazed horse at the barn. This is far from ideal. Did I make a mistake? And I admit that I have a problem. Tael: “Horses – all colours, and I can smell them and touch them through a solid fence which doesn’t bite back. Wow, it’s all so exciting and new. I would like to connect with my four-legged friends, but the humans keep me locked in this large sandy paddock. They don’t seem to like me a lot, because they bring these sticks to keep me at distance and I wonder why they do that – I do have my ears flat, but that doesn’t seem to impress them. And then one day they open the gate and I find myself with this pretty little painted filly. A girl!! I have never been so close to another horse without a fence, least of all a girl. It is so exciting and I run to greet her – needless to say, that my hormones carry me away a bit. Ouch – this was a painful kick in the chest, stunned I remain at a secure distance. Horses kick, humans have sticks and fences bite – I discover it’s a hostile world as I observe from a safe distance. The entire herd is now running towards me to greet me which is scary. However, I can run much faster than them which saves me. There is a very small version of a horse I didn’t know exists. It’s even a girl and I can even graze with her. It is so nice to have a herd-mate. There’s a bigger one who is very friendly too and the coloured horse has reconsidered her approach and is now nice, too. I learn quickly to stay out of the colt’s way. If only there wasn’t this yellowish chubby guy on the other side of the solid fence. One day when I got too close, he grabbed my throat and almost pulled me over the door. Gheez… that was

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frightening. Luckily a human was around – she looks like a boss too, scolding the chubby guy who finally let go of me.” Let’s leave him alone for a month or two I advise. Simply do the basic handling and use the energetic boundaries (a method of approaching and rocking back and sigh as soon as Tael starts to show signs of aggressions) – he must learn that he may say NO, but it has to be gentle. Attacking people for the sheer offense of walking too close by the fence or holding the fork the wrong way is not an option – give him space when he asks gently and be firm when he is aggressive. Don’t hit him, but don’t hesitate to defend yourself for protection should he attack. Let’s give him the opportunity to learn to navigate and find out on his own which responses are welcome.

Tael: "If I get it right, all is well. Even the humans are laid back here – they are very clear with what they like and don’t like as well, the same routine every day. They are so easy to be around that I start to relax and even look forward to meeting them. I can’t help but put my ears forward and not flat as I have learned – and funny enough they seem to prefer that. I tried to attack them a couple of times, but that was not a wise choice. I understood quickly that made them mad and that I did not get what I wanted. Ears pricked seems to function best to have them decipher my wishes. These humans are very good at that and I often get my needs met. Sometimes they are severe – mostly when I have my ears flat or when I try to nip a butt, even if only for fun. When I attack them hell breaks loose! Better to avoid that. They even scratch me only where I like it and I can relax a bit more every day."

Tael is settling in remarkably well and I am relieved that no one has come to be harmed. It’s a good thing he joined us in winter, when activity is low. After only a few days we can already halter him without being nipped and scratch his forehead. However, he is still hypersensitive and touching his body immediately gets him in one of his kicking and biting states. We rule out physical pain as a source of aggression. I think about Linda Kohanov’s stories of her Arabian stallion, Midnight Merlin. Tael showed the same reactions. Impossible to get closer than 10 inches without him attacking. I was relieved I didn’t need to put him in with the other herd, where a particularly dominant gelding is calling the shots since I got quite frightened the day Shaman grabbed Tael by the throat and almost pulled him over the door.

I think it is time to start working with him on a more regular basis, just ask a little bit more of him every day I suggest – after all he has been integrating nicely for the last three months. He gained confidence, is much less aggressive and cooperates well in the round pen. Yesterday, four months after his arrival, I was riding him for the first time in the arena. Ears pricked, head forward, cooperative and calm. What an honouring experience. I have no regrets.

However, everybody who gets too close, especially men, are subject to squealing, kicking, biting or attacking. Tael behaves like a stallion greeting another stallion and it is still impossible to get close enough to him for relaxing treatments like massages, grooming or osteopathy. Tael will need time and gentle teaching steps which will help him grow his confidence into himself.

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Afterword: Tael’s incredible submissive attitude in the herd contrasted starkly from the behaviour he showed toward humans. It became clear that he has not a dominant/aggressive character but that his behaviour must be founded in something else. He developed a hypersensitivity to physical touch which is common to stallions who find it offensive to be touched by any being – human or horse. The other outrageous thing that humans bring to the barn is incongruency: we think something and do another thing, or we put on a happy face when we are frightened. This results in energetic indecisiveness which creates confusion in horses. A healthy body scan, deep breath and a phone on airplane mode are essential before going near a barn, least of all an insecure horse.

Should you find yourself in a similar situation – try to get into your horse’s head. Why does he do what he does? Is he frustrated because he is isolated or doesn’t have enough exercise? Is he angry because he must endure all sorts of things that humans do to horses without asking, maybe someone took his mare away? Or is he vulnerable because you ask too much of him for his age? Or is he dominant by nature, is he hypersensitive or in pain? Any of these questions require a different approach to get solved despite the same visible result. Getting down to the bottom of the source of the behaviour of your horse will help you to quickly release the pressure and get back to a more relaxed and safer place. For questions or comments, please contact:

I sometimes observe aggressivity for no reason in young stallions. Responsibilities exceeding their psychological development bring them into their vulnerability. (Article February 2018: “3 The Refusal to Follow the Call” treats fear and vulnerability). Vulnerability tells us that something is about to change and that we strayed or we were pushed too far out of our comfort zone. We react with panic or with rage. Tael goes into rage and setting very firm (not cruel) boundaries helps him gain confidence into his environment but also in himself. Handlers often start to be frightened in the presence of aggressive horses which is only accelerating the downward spiral.

October/November 2019

Eva Reifler - Owner - visionpure eva.reifler@visionpure.fr http://www.visionpure.ch/ or any Eponaquest Instructor in your area https://eponaquest.com 51

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Arabian Horse Fine Artistry

Robert Zietara

An artist who feels great joy when sharing his world with others

"White Horse"

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obert Zietara is a man who has been painting ever since he can recall. Robert feels great joy when he can share a bit of his world with some other people. Robert’s artwork is a constant search for the best way to interpret the ideas he has about himself and the world he lives in. For Robert, nature is the most direct and intense inspiration.

October/November 2019

"Mysterious Beauty"

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"Beauty"

Robert Zietara’s principle medium, oil on canvas, is the genesis of artistic method. He is interested in detail, which is visible in all his works, as the most attainable and close to the real-life element of painting. Robert’s works are created through the accumulation of the details and layers; each of them is somehow an individual collection of signs and motives consisting of a whole new system. Robert’s favorite subjects are portraits, horses and landscapes, in addition to surreal images. Although Robert was born in Poland, he spent most of his life abroad having lived in Germany, Greece, Cyprus and now based in Norway. During Robert’s long stay in Greece, back in the nineties, he founded his own gallery “Robert Art Gallery” in Nafplio. "Sleipnir"

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"Alexander the Great"

Robert was lucky enough to have lived in Greece for many years. “Dealing every day with the spirits of art and our civilization is like a feast with the Gods of Olympus,” Robert states.

October/November 2019

In addition to Robert Zietara’s paintings, he is also a landscape designer in 3D, graphic designer, photographer and film maker. Contact Robert Zietara by email at: zietara.art@gmail.com

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USA LAW New Cases Show Strength of State Equine Activity Liability Laws By Julie I. Fershtman, Attorney at Law

Currently, all states except for California and Maryland have some form of an equine activity liability act (“EALA”). Since the first EALA was enacted thirty years ago, courts have evaluated numerous cases involving these laws. In two recent cases, lawsuits that had been brought by people injured in horserelated activities were dismissed. Maine Case In July 2019, Maine’s Supreme Court in the case of The case of McCandless v. Ramsey, Maine Supreme Judicial Court (July 11, 2019), dismissed a case based on Maine’s Equine Activity Liability Act. The case involved a plaintiff who was standing within an indoor arena. In the arena at the time was a horse ridden by the defendants’ 10 year-old daughter. This horse passed plaintiff three times, but during the horse’s fourth pass, it apparently came too close and struck the plaintiff, causing injuries. Directly at issue was Maine’s EALA, which provides protection from liability (subject to possible exceptions) if a person was “engaged in an equine activity”, qualifies as a “participant or spectator” and was injured from “the inherent risks of equine activities”. The plaintiff considered herself to be a “spectator” at the time (a designation with which the court disagreed), and argued that issues existed as to whether her injuries resulted from “inherent risks of equine activities”; in addition, her case raised exceptions of (1) “reckless misconduct” by the defendants’ daughter, and (2) plaintiff being in an area where horses would not be expected or a protected area for spectators. Affirming dismissal of the case, the court found that the horse’s unanticipated resistance to the rider’s directions was “part and parcel of the ‘propensity of an equine to behave in ways that may result in … injury”, which was part of the definition of an “inherent risk of equine activity”. The court went on to state that the plaintiff ’s interpretation of the statute “would thwart the

entire purpose of the law to curtail liability for injuries arising from risks that are ‘impracticable or impossible

to eliminate due to the nature of equines”. It found insufficient evidence of reckless misconduct on the rider’s part because the rider was unable to steer the horse to avoid a collision. As to the second EALA exception at issue, the court found no liability

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because the incident occurred in an indoor arena where equine activities were occurring. Finally, the court did not consider plaintiff to be a “spectator” under the law because the incident occurred in an area where people were riding horses, as opposed to an observation area. Wisconsin Case A September 2018 Wisconsin case, Dilley v. Holiday Acres Properties, Inc., 905 F.3d 508 (7th Cir. 2018), consolidated two equine liability cases. In one of them, Brown v. Country View Equestrian Center, Inc., the plaintiff was taking a riding lesson on her own horse when the instructor allegedly allowed a “highspirited” horse to enter the arena. That horse allegedly collided with the plaintiff ’s horse, and she was injured. Her lawsuit raised the Wisconsin EALA exception of “providing a horse and failing to make reasonable and prudent efforts”, but the court found it inapplicable because the plaintiff was riding her own horse at the time. The plaintiff also argued that the defendant’s instructor “exercised control over the lesson and plaintiff ’s behavior with respect to her horse”, but the court disagreed and noted that the instructor never made the horse “available” for her use. The Dilley opinion also evaluated a second case. There, during a guided trail ride, the horse plaintiff rode tried to pass the trail guide’s horse, which kicked at plaintiff ’s horse, causing injuries. Her lawsuit argued that the defendant’s trail operator failed to adjust her stirrups or provide her with a helmet; also, she allegedly told the trail guide that she lost control of the reins to which the guide allegedly responded: “Don’t worry; this horse knows where it wants [to] go.” The court found that plaintiff ’s claims resulted from an “inherent risk of equine activities” under Wisconsin’s EALA. Also, the court found evidence of the defendants’ “reasonable” assessment of the plaintiff ’s ability to ride a horse and safely manage the particular horse assigned, but it found no evidence of faulty tack or equipment or willful or wanton disregard of her safety. Dismissal, the court ruled, was

proper under Wisconsin’s EALA. Conclusion

Please keep in mind that all of the 48 EALAs differ. Whether or not a case succeeds depends on the law and each case’s facts. Read each law carefully in the states where you live and do business and seek advice from knowledgeable legal counsel. This article does not constitute legal advice. When questions arise based on specific situations, direct them to a knowledgeable attorney.

About the Author Julie Fershtman is one of the nation’s most experienced Equine Law practitioners. A lawyer for 32 years, she is a Shareholder with Foster Swift Collins & Smith, PC, in Michigan. She has successfully litigated equine cases in 18 jurisdictions nationwide and has tried equine cases in four states. She is listed in “The Best Lawyers in America” and is the recipient of the ABA’s “Excellence in the Advancement of Animal Law Award”. Her speaking engagements span 29 states. For more information, please visit www.equinelaw.net.

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Transform Emotions That Keep You Stuck “Authenticity will make you rich!”

Tony Robbins Written by Nancy Dye

was a very angry woman. Very independent, but with that came a lot of anger. I asked myself, ‘Why am I angry?’ So I picked up a mirror instead of the magnifying glass.”

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hat drives the need for elaborate masks and master performers? How many times have we heard our children respond to our inquiries about their day, or their feelings, with this robotic, conversational brick wall, “I’m fine.” (How many times have we said that to others about ourselves?)

“Oh, I love that phrase,” I said to Susan. “Ah, in a way, I don’t like that phrase!” “Sure, well, we don’t like to hear it, but it is the way to our real power; which is our love and the ability to control our own lives. You see, this is why people, men, and women alike, are angry. It’s when we don’t feel in control of our own lives. And what we do, which feels safer, is to blame. And I point out, and certainly it was true for me, that blame is such a powerless act. It puts all of the control out there somewhere.”

Treatment centers are filled with children and adults insisting they are fine, if nothing else, just out of habit! Sadly, morgues are filled as well, but with the permanently silenced echo of those words … from suicides and accidental overdosing. The truth is, we have all learned to act perfectly “fine” behind our masks! And then we broadcast that fictional “show” onto our social media.

“When I did pick up the mirror, behind the anger I saw a hurt and fearful person. And that’s what I really had to work on. And what I learned was that I was angry because anger feels better than helplessness.”

To transform emotions; what’s REALLY behind the mask? Why is taking off the mask so powerful for creating a change?

“I was angry because of the actions I wasn’t taking in my own life to get what I truly wanted. I was angry because I would often sell my soul to hang onto somebody.”

That was the question I asked the psychologist Susan Jeffers on my radio show, “Triumphs of the Human Spirit”. Susan wrote “Dare to Connect” and “Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway”. Susan’s journey into becoming a well-known personal development author, whose books have become classics, began when she found out she had breast cancer.

“And I’m sure a lot of people out there will relate to this: it gets us off the hook when we blame. But what happened when I started to really look at this was, I started to take control so that when I was angry, instead of saying, ‘What is he doing to me, or why is he doing this to me,’ it became, ‘Why am I not doing something for myself to help me feel better?’ And invariably, I always found the answer to that question is: ‘What do I need to do in my own life to create what I need? And it was amazing what wonderful things it did to my relationships.”

“When I found out I had breast cancer and had a mastectomy,” Susan said as she began the interview, “I realized I had a choice. I could say, ‘Why did this happen to me? Woe is me, in a negative way, to be a victim. Or I could say, ‘OK, this did happen to me, now how can I make this into something WONDERFUL?’ I took a look at myself and my life and I realized, couldn’t HELP but realize, that I

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“Susan,” I asked, “you talk about the importance of group therapy, but the truth of the matter is, we all have our dirty laundry and that terrifying fear that ‘if I say this, people are just going to be so turned off to me.’ But really, what does happen when we take the risk and air out our dirty laundry?” Susan said, “Well, first of all, we usually hear somebody else airing the same thing.”

“Oh, absolutely. People bring us into their lives because of our acts. So, sometimes when we change them, they obviously are not the right people for us. On the other hand, as we keep putting out who we truly are, then we seem to draw people into our life who love us for who we really are. In my first marriage, I was the obedient, good wife and tried very hard to play the role that my mother taught me. It didn’t work for me, and eventually, there was a divorce.”

“Just as bad?” I asked her. “Are you sure it’s just as bad, Susan?”

“So, that’s why a lot of us get rejected a lot? Because the people in our lives came to be there for our masks?”

“Yes, and worse,” she confirmed.

“Yes, so I started learning, and believe me it’s a learning process how to become more authentic. To find out what I liked, and what I didn’t like, and to put that out there. And then I started to draw people into my life who loved that.”

“In your book, Susan, you talk about ‘a life that lacks integrity’. What do you mean by that?” I asked her. “We’re pretending to be somebody we’re not. We lack integrity. As I became more authentic and acted from integrity, I started liking myself better. The reason I was so unhappy is that I had never found that center of myself, and I was so dependent on the outside world … my husband, my job … and I was always angry because I never felt filled up. So you blame those outside people or things. We put on our ‘masks’ because we don’t feel that we’re good enough. Therefore, if I show you who I truly am, you might not like me. Therefore, I’ll pretend to be somebody else.”

“How did you get authentic?” I asked her. “Group therapy. It’s very healing. I was so uptight when I went into the group. I really put on a mask. I was incredible. I’ll never forget the first time I went to a group called Scream Therapy. It was amazing. I was so proper, and the group leader was magical in getting me to open up into screams of rage because I was so angry all the time.”

“And my beautiful hairdo went and the makeup was pouring down my face. You know, I just absolutely became real.”

“So, you have a world of master performers who really don’t know how to touch one another’s souls, which is where the real level of connection is.”

“When I looked around the group after I had stopped, I was amazed at what had happened to me. I realized as I looked around the group, that I had connected with other people for the first time in my life. I think I felt twenty-five pounds lighter.”

“Susan, if we were to take off our masks, and if we were to drop our act, could it be that maybe some people then won’t like who we really are?” I asked her.

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“Because you had given up the weight of that mask?” I asked.

from the cocoon; about to complete its transformation and to fly away. Keep going.”

“Yes, we walk around with the weight of the mask, or rather the role or part we’re supposed to play, and a lot of anger and pain. We’ve got to deal with that. I’ve interviewed a women’s group and it’s so nourishing to be around people who have this ability to be real. It’s beautiful.”

“You feel an urge to die because something does need to die. The caterpillar and her old lifestyle, identity and story need to die. But don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater. Don’t kill the caterpillar!”

“So, to recap, Susan,” I summed up, “maybe if we’re feeling heavy, so to speak, we don’t necessarily need to lose weight … maybe we just need to lose our masks and all that emotional weight of the pain, resentment and the anger?”

“Birthing a new life and letting go always comes with pain. But the only way out is through “Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway”. Let go of the old. Keep moving forward. That’s how you transition. That’s how you earn your beautiful new wings.”

“Absolutely,” she said. “And people will be drawn to the new, ‘lighter’ you.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Nancy Dye is a breakthrough mindset coach and resilience trainer helping people to transform the quality of their lifestyles. Nancy was trained in strategic intervention with Robbins-Madanes Training (Tony Robbins and Cloe Madanes) and has over 30 years as a weight loss, peak performance, and sober coach. She specializes in “jumping over” adversity, addictions, diseases, and transitioning through life stages.

“No matter how beautiful the mask we design on the outside, if we’re operating from anger and fear on the inside, the mask isn’t really covering anything up, although we would like to think so. And thus we begin our elaborate attempts at perfect costumes and more spectacular masks.” “The more armor we create, the less we can authentically connect with others. Meanwhile, our truly magnificent self is hidden inside. It is the work on the inside we need to do, not the mask on the outside.”

With a career in sales and marketing, and having been coached by the top sales trainers in the corporate world, as well as by some of the most elite coaches in the world of sports, Nancy redesigns the inside lives of executives, entrepreneurs, veterans, and athletes.

“Nancy,” my therapist said to me back then when I was resisting going into a treatment center, “the saddest thing about suicide is that people’s lives usually get worse right before the breakthrough to the other side of a better life. Unfortunately, people who commit suicide give up hope during the toughest time, whereas if they had just held on a little longer, their lives would have turned around for the better.”

Nancy is married to Jack Miles, a former Olympian gymnast who is inducted into four athletic Hall of Fames. For one-on-one coaching, or information on her “Mindset to Walk on Fire” workshop, books, etc., Nancy can be reached at:

“It’s a cliché symbol, I know, but it is still a powerful metaphor to remember for times like this. Think of yourself as the butterfly trying to emerge and break free

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NancyDyeSICoach@gmail.com; www.Elitelifestyletransformations.com

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October/November 2019


NO MORE THE DESERT NOMAD

Designing the Safest Barn for Your Arabian Horse By John Blackburn, AIA ridge skylights, Dutch doors, and sliding aisle doors are a few ways to let the sunshine in. Vertical ventilation is created by allowing fresh cooler air to enter the barn at ground level and escape through ridge vents at the top of the barn where the air is warmer. This design feature can create an upward draft or indoor wind on even the most stifling days of the summer and in the hottest climates.

Fire Prevention Keeping your barn naturally ventilated and cool is the first step to take against fire because these design features reduce your dependence on electrical appliances. In addition, decisions regarding hay storage are critical. My recommendation is to keep hay storage separate from your stalls wherever possible. If hay must be stored within your barn, extra precautions must be taken to reduce fire risk such as fire separations. In the event of a fire, exterior stall doors provide the opportunity for horses to be led out of the barn from outside, reducing the risk of injury to horse and handler.

Morven Stud in Charlottesville, Virginia, sits atop a hill positioned to catch prevailing breezes.

W

hile gentle, loyal, and congenial, Arabians are also powerful and spirited, so the goal is to create an indoor environment that both fosters good health and anticipates all the ways your horse could get injured. Here’s how a well-designed barn can keep your Arabians protected from the elements and safe from injury.

Barn Placement

Where your barn sits on your property is the first significant choice to be made. Grade, drainage, proximity of service roads, prevailing winds, and barn angle in relation to the sun, all play a key role in health and safety. Equestrian site planning can help you avoid mistakes that can have significant health consequences for your horses, as well improve the efficiency of day to day operations. Light Your horse thrives on natural daylight and seasonal changes in night and day patterns. Arabians were bred to tolerate blinding sunlight. Dark barns can be detrimental to their health. The use of continuous

Arab Horse Couture

The passive lighting and ventilation designed into this Virginia stable using skylights and ridge vents reduces the risk of both fire and disease.

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October/November 2019


Stall Design Never use swinging doors, since the wind can force them to open and knock into a horse. It’s often difficult to tell if a hinged door is unlatched, as the door may appear closed even if it is not fully latched. A sliding door allows the door to remain open while the horse is removed from the stall without much effort or fuss, making it safer for both the horse and the handler leading it back to the stall. Also, when looking down an aisle, an open sliding door can easily signal an empty stall. This Texas ranch uses elements from the local landscape and includes indoor and outdoor grooming stalls built to protect horses from possible injury.

The pin latch is a simple, low maintenance, and inexpensive system for sliding doors, whereas hinged doors require a slightly more complex mechanism that may malfunction or expose bolts to horses.

Wash/Groom Stall Design As in the aisle way, the use of horse-friendly materials such as interlocking rubber bricks and recessed fixtures that may injure a horse when it moves around the stall are important design choices. Either recess the hose reel or use a hose with an overhead wand, which is less likely to entangle the horse during bathing.

Aisle Design Giving your horses adequate aisle space is a crucial design element for safety. Spirited animals need room to maneuver without risk of collision with handlers, horses, and the barn itself. Ideally, an aisle is comprised of horse-friendly materials and kept clear of obstructions, sharp objects, and sharp corners. Recess anything that protrudes into the aisle, including hydrants, switches, ladders, fire extinguishers, etc. Similarly, provide several hydrants along the aisle, preferably recessed, to avoid pulling hoses down the aisle. Muck wagons, tractors, and the like do not belong in the aisle and can injure the horses if carelessly stowed or if the aisle is too narrow.

The back corner of the stall should have a recessed area for a shovel and muck bucket. This area can also double as a safe area for the handler in the case of an unruly horse, which may otherwise back its handler into a corner, causing serious injury. Miscellaneous Details A well-designed barn that reflects a careful regard to health and safety requires a lot of consideration. Over the past 25 years, we’ve developed a library of details that prove to be safe, economical, and practical. While no barn is hazard-free, minding the details during the design process can provide the safest possible environment for your Arabian horses that, just as in their desert past, depend on humans for their wellbeing. Equestrian architect, John Blackburn, AIA, of Blackburn Architects, PC, has been designing safe barns for a quarter of a century all over the country and around the world. To view his portfolio go to www.blackburnarch.com

This Northern California barn is built with wide aisles and horse-friendly materials such as interlocking rubber brick flooring and smooth metal yoke gates for safety and comfort.

October/November 2019

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Arab Horse Couture Magazine - Oct/Nov 2019  

Celebrating the Beauty & Charisma of the Arabian Horse

Arab Horse Couture Magazine - Oct/Nov 2019  

Celebrating the Beauty & Charisma of the Arabian Horse