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Kresge College Commentary "Kresge College is situated on the heavily wooded UC Santa Cruz campus overlooking Monterey Bay. It is a residential college accommodating 650 students, of whom half live in. It was built to a tight budget and its architecture attempts to express a 'noninstitutional' alternative type of college. All the buildings are 2storeys [?km] and located along a pedestrian street route." — Dennis Sharp. Twentieth Century Architecture: a Visual History. p310. "The L-shaped layout rambles through a redwood forest, widening, narrowing, twisting along its central 'street' in his version of the 'Italian hill town'. Paradoxically, Moore vividly evokes the picturesque vitality of the hill town by fronting the ades with a varied series of stuccoed, trabeated screens, ‫چ‬street fa stairs, and 'arches'. These flimsy-looking, Pop-Hollywoodish forms are accented with bright, primary colors at strategic places, marking with 1960s irony as 'monuments' such functional banalities as a public telephone and laundromat."


"In the late sixties, the Moore group, designing Kresege college for the University of California at Santa Cruz, developed a totally theatrical-like painted stucco environment almost dancing in and through the landscape. For the college, Charles Moore and William Turnbull have designed a village street, one that is intimately defined by irregularly punctured false fronts of free-standing appearance and almost cardboard cut out feeling, of white painted stucco with accent planes of primary colors, where spaces are animated by social facilities and oriented to a sequence of plazas and gardens, all threaded, in what initially seems to be somewhat incongruously, through a redwood forest setting. Facades of buildings facing the trees are muted by being painted a dull brown color. The traditional college campus hierarchy of buildings and spaces, sequentially and predictably shaped and axially related, is rejected (the traditional sense of permanence and quality of detail and execution has also been surrendered) in favor of a 1,000-foot-long winding street rising 45 feet up the site to an octagonal dining commons and assembly, and a space looking toward a fountain at the ridge. The whole visually appears as a randomly disposed flow of space with shifting glimpses of views through facade cutouts of planes and planes to woods;


Villa La Rotonda is a Renaissance villa just  outside Vicenza, northern Italy, designed by Andrea Palladio. The proper name is Villa Almerico Capra, but it is also known as La Rotonda, Villa Rotonda, Villa Capra and Villa Almerico. The name "Capra" derives from the Capra brothers, who completed the building after it was ceded to them in 1592. Along with other works by Palladio, the building is conserved as part of the World Heritage Site "City of Vicenza and the Palladian Villas of the Veneto".


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The design is for a completely symmetrical building having a square plan with four facades, each of which has a projecting portico. The whole is contained within an imaginary circle which touches each corner of the building and centres of the porticos. (illustration, left). The name La Rotonda refers to the central circular hall with its dome. To describe the villa, as a whole, as a 'rotonda' is technically incorrect, as the building is not circular but rather the intersection of a square with a cross. Each portico has steps leading up, and opens via a small cabinet or corridor to the circular domed central hall. This and all other rooms were proportioned with mathematical precision according to Palladio's own rules of architecture which he published in the Quattro Libri dell'Architettura.[1] The design reflected the humanist values of Renaissance architecture. In order for each room to have some sun, the design was rotated 45 degrees from each cardinal point of the compass. Each of the four porticos has pediments graced by statues of classical deities. The pediments were each supported by six Ionic columns. Each portico was flanked by a single window. All principal rooms were on the second floor or piano nobile.


Seattle Art Museum  The Seattle Art Museum (commonly known as "SAM") is an art museum located in Seattle, Washington, USA. It maintains three major facilities: its main museum in downtown Seattle; the Seattle Asian Art Museum (SAAM) in Volunteer Park on Capitol Hill, and the Olympic Sculpture Park on the central Seattle waterfront, which opened on January 20, 2007. Admission to the sculpture park is always free. The Seattle Art Museum (commonly known as "SAM") is an art museum located in Seattle, Washington, USA. It maintains three major facilities: its main museum in downtown Seattle; the Seattle Asian Art Museum (SAAM) in Volunteer Park on Capitol Hill, and the Olympic Sculpture Park on the central Seattle waterfront, which opened on January 20, 2007.

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The SAM collection has grown from 1,926 pieces in 1933 to nearly 25,000 as of 2008. Its original museum provided an area of 25,000 square feet (2,300 m2); the present facilities provide 312,000 square feet (29,000 m2) plus a 9-acre (3.6 ha) park. Paid staff have increased from 7 to 303, and the museum library has grown from approximately 1,400 books to 33,252. SAM traces its origins to the Seattle Fine Arts Society (organized 1905) and the Washington Arts Association (organized 1906), which merged in 1917, keeping the Fine Arts Society name. In 1931 the group renamed itself as the Art Institute of Seattle. The Art Institute housed its collection in Henry House, the former home, on Capitol Hill, of the collector and founder of the Henry Art Gallery, Horace C. Henry (1844–1928).[2][3]


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Hans Hollein

Hans Hollein was born on 30 March 1934 in Vienna, Austria, he is an architect and designer. Hollein received a diploma from the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna in 1956. During 1959 he attended the Illinois Institute of Technology and then in 1960, the University of California located in what is now called Berkeley. Afterwards, he worked for various agencies in Sweden and the United States of America before returning to Vienna, founding his own agency in 1964. Hollein was a guest professor at Washington University in St. Louis on two separate occasions, the first period was from 1963-4 and the second during 1966. From 1967 to 76 he was a professor at the Academy of Fine Arts in Düsseldorf. Since 1976 he has been a professor at the The University of Applied Arts Vienna (German: Universität für angewandte Kunst Wien. In 1985 Hollein was awarded the Pritzker Prize. Hollein works mainly as an architect but has also established himself as a designer through his work for the Memphis Group and the Alessi Company.


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