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NONPROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE PAID Grand Rapids, MI PERMIT NO. 101 1607 Robinson Road, S.E. Grand Rapids, MI 49506-1799

Photo by Silvija Visockis

Address Service Requested

Photo by John Niedzielski

The new Performing Arts Center

Photo by John Niedzielski and Silvija Visockis

Albertus Magnus Hall of Science

Photo by Brian Kelly

off of Robinson Road S.E., next to

NONPROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE PAID Grand Rapids, MI PERMIT NO. 101 1607 Robinson Road, S.E. Grand Rapids, MI 49506-1799

Photo by John Niedzielski and Silvija Visockis

The new Performing Arts Center off of Robinson Road S.E., next to Albertus Magnus Hall of Science

Photo by Brian Kelly

Photo by John Niedzielski

Photo by Silvija Visockis

Address Service Requested


AQUINAS COLLEGE MISSION STATEMENT

Aquinas College, an inclusive educational community rooted in the Catholic Dominican tradition, provides a liberal arts education with a global perspective, emphasizes career preparation focused on leadership and ser vice to others, and fosters a commitment to lifelong learning dedicated to the pursuit of truth and the common good.

VISION STATEMENT

A

B

C

Aquinas College conducts an array of educational programs whose quality and effectiveness cause it to be considered consistently as a premier Catholic liberal arts college in the Midwest. In doing so, it is the college of choice for increasing numbers of students who seek a diverse, but inclusive, learning community that will enable them to increase their knowledge, hone their competencies, develop their character, and answer God’s calling to use their gifts and talents to make a positive difference in our world through their lives, work, and service. Aquinas strives to graduate students of competence, conscience, compassion, and commitment.

DIVERSITY STATEMENT

D

E

Aquinas College is committed to equality. This statement of the College speaks to this commitment, as do our history and heritage.We believe that diversity is a blessing, which

F

brings a richness of perspective to our intellectual, cultural, social, and spiritual life. All members of our community—faculty, staff, students—will demonstrate respect for each other regardless of our differences. All of us will be sensitive in our actions, words, and deeds. We will demonstrate these sensitivities in our classrooms, curricula, offices, meeting places, and living environments.

G

We will maintain the diversity of our Board of Trustees, faculty, student body, and staff and appreciate the different gifts each brings to this community regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, or disability. SHIPPING: $5.50 1st item; $.50 each additional item. Aquinas magazine is a publication of the College Relations Department, Aquinas College, Grand Rapids, Michigan. It is published semi-annually, spring and fall. Comments/suggestions are encouraged: Online: collegerelations@aquinas.edu

Mail:

College Web site: www.aquinas.edu Alumni news: www. aquinas.edu/alumni

(Michigan residents please add 6% sales tax.)

Aquinas Magazine, College Relations Department DESCRIPTION

Aquinas College, 1607 Robinson Road, S.E. Grand Rapids, MI 49506-1799

QTY

SIZE/COLOR

PRICE

A Blanket B 12" Saints Bear

Fax: 616-459-2563 • Phone: 616-459-8281

C 51/4 " Rosewood/Brass Howard Miller Clock Editorial Team Marty Fahey Joelle Kwiatkowski ’02 Sally Reeves Julie Ridenour Contributing Writers Brigid Avery ’01 Kathy Barker Joe Boomgaard ’03 Damon Bouwkamp ’00 Curtis R. Burdette Judi Creamer Cecilia Cunningham Dave Dvorak Thomas Eggleston ’03 Marty Fahey

Kathy Fore V. James Garofalo, Ph.D. Gail Gromaski ’03 Woody Hoover, Ph.D. Laura Bennett-Kimble ’95 Harry J. Knopke, Ph.D. Joelle Kwiatkowski ’02 Crystal (Lubbers ’02) Laska Joyce LaFleur ’82, MM’95 Albert Lewis, D.H.L. Shirley K. Lewis, Ed.D. Kate Luce Robin Mankel ’03 Maryann Matzke, junior Kathleen McFadden, junior Paula Meehan ’75 Bob Niedzielski, Ph.D, ’58

Jessica Olson ’03 Lisa Piatek ’97 Sally Reeves Julie Ridenour Tonya Schafer ’02 Nicole Selzer Jill Straub ’00 Cynthia Van Gelderen Brad Winkler, J.D. Bill Weitzel Jeremy Wood ’99 Design Greg Becker Layout Silvija Visockis

$29.95 $11.95

N/A

$49.95

D Alumni Tee ( OXFORD • S-XXL )

Photography Aquinas Times Brigid Avery ’01 Kathy Barker Eric Bridge ’92 Judi Creamer Marty Fahey Libby Hews Brian Kelly John Niedzielski ’97 Mark Schmidbauer Amy Sprouse The Grand Rapids Press Sarah Van Hall Andris Visockis Bill Weitzel

RED WHITE

TOTAL

$15.99

E Marbled Seal Mug

N/A

$5.95

F Hand-Painted Ceramic Snowman Ornament

N/A

$9.95

G Stainless Steel Travel Mug

N/A

$14.95 Plus Shipping $____________ Mich. 6% sales tax $___________ TOTAL $_____________

Order Form (prices good through Februar y 2004)

Name _____________________________________ Phone (______)_____________________________________ Address_________________________________________________________________________________________ City_________________________________________________

State________ ZIP __________________________

Credit Card: VISA M/C AMEX DISCOVER Card No._________________________ Exp. Date __________

AQUINAS COLLEGE MISSION STATEMENT

Aquinas College, an inclusive educational community rooted in the Catholic Dominican tradition, provides a liberal arts education with a global perspective, emphasizes career preparation focused on leadership and ser vice to others, and fosters a commitment to lifelong learning dedicated to the pursuit of truth and the common good.

VISION STATEMENT

A

B

C

Aquinas College conducts an array of educational programs whose quality and effectiveness cause it to be considered consistently as a premier Catholic liberal arts college in the Midwest. In doing so, it is the college of choice for increasing numbers of students who seek a diverse, but inclusive, learning community that will enable them to increase their knowledge, hone their competencies, develop their character, and answer God’s calling to use their gifts and talents to make a positive difference in our world through their lives, work, and service. Aquinas strives to graduate students of competence, conscience, compassion, and commitment.

DIVERSITY STATEMENT

D

E

Aquinas College is committed to equality. This statement of the College speaks to this commitment, as do our history and heritage.We believe that diversity is a blessing, which

F

brings a richness of perspective to our intellectual, cultural, social, and spiritual life. All members of our community—faculty, staff, students—will demonstrate respect for each other regardless of our differences. All of us will be sensitive in our actions, words, and deeds. We will demonstrate these sensitivities in our classrooms, curricula, offices, meeting places, and living environments.

G

We will maintain the diversity of our Board of Trustees, faculty, student body, and staff and appreciate the different gifts each brings to this community regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, or disability. SHIPPING: $5.50 1st item; $.50 each additional item. Aquinas magazine is a publication of the College Relations Department, Aquinas College, Grand Rapids, Michigan. It is published semi-annually, spring and fall. Comments/suggestions are encouraged: Online: collegerelations@aquinas.edu College Web site: www.aquinas.edu Alumni news: www. aquinas.edu/alumni

Mail:

(Michigan residents please add 6% sales tax.)

Aquinas Magazine, College Relations Department DESCRIPTION

Aquinas College, 1607 Robinson Road, S.E. Grand Rapids, MI 49506-1799

QTY

SIZE/COLOR

PRICE

A Blanket B 12" Saints Bear

Fax: 616-459-2563 • Phone: 616-459-8281

C 51/4 " Rosewood/Brass Howard Miller Clock Editorial Team Marty Fahey Joelle Kwiatkowski ’02 Sally Reeves Julie Ridenour Contributing Writers Brigid Avery ’01 Kathy Barker Joe Boomgaard ’03 Damon Bouwkamp ’00 Curtis R. Burdette Judi Creamer Cecilia Cunningham Dave Dvorak Thomas Eggleston ’03 Marty Fahey

Kathy Fore V. James Garofalo, Ph.D. Gail Gromaski ’03 Woody Hoover, Ph.D. Laura Bennett-Kimble ’95 Harry J. Knopke, Ph.D. Joelle Kwiatkowski ’02 Crystal (Lubbers ’02) Laska Joyce LaFleur ’82, MM’95 Albert Lewis, D.H.L. Shirley K. Lewis, Ed.D. Kate Luce Robin Mankel ’03 Maryann Matzke, junior Kathleen McFadden, junior Paula Meehan ’75 Bob Niedzielski, Ph.D, ’58

Jessica Olson ’03 Lisa Piatek ’97 Sally Reeves Julie Ridenour Tonya Schafer ’02 Nicole Selzer Jill Straub ’00 Cynthia Van Gelderen Brad Winkler, J.D. Bill Weitzel Jeremy Wood ’99 Design Greg Becker Layout Silvija Visockis

Photography Aquinas Times Brigid Avery ’01 Kathy Barker Eric Bridge ’92 Judi Creamer Marty Fahey Libby Hews Brian Kelly John Niedzielski ’97 Mark Schmidbauer Amy Sprouse The Grand Rapids Press Sarah Van Hall Andris Visockis Bill Weitzel

RED

$29.95

WHITE

$11.95

N/A

$49.95

D Alumni Tee ( OXFORD • S-XXL ) E Marbled Seal Mug

TOTAL

$15.99 N/A

$5.95

F Hand-Painted Ceramic Snowman Ornament

N/A

$9.95

G Stainless Steel Travel Mug

N/A

$14.95 Plus Shipping $____________ Mich. 6% sales tax $___________

Order Form (prices good through Februar y 2004)

TOTAL $_____________

Name _____________________________________ Phone (______)_____________________________________ Address_________________________________________________________________________________________ City_________________________________________________

State________ ZIP __________________________

Credit Card: VISA M/C AMEX DISCOVER Card No._________________________ Exp. Date __________


Fall 2003 – Class Notes

Piper Peteet-Kilgore was accepted into the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s master’s in mass communication and journalism program.

1999 Cynthia Singleton is vice president of organizational development at Grand Rapids Community College. Cynthia was named to the Leadership Grand Rapids Class of 2003 in January.

2000 Luis Beteta is the director of hispanic ministry for the Diocese of Grand Rapids. In January he was named to the Leadership Grand Rapids Class of 2003.

2001 Lanae Gill received her master’s in college student affairs leadership from Grand Valley in May 2003.

2002 Josie Inbody is attending Western Michigan University pursuing her master’s in school counseling. Molly Jo Rose is using her creative side to earn some cash while in grad school at Iowa State. Molly Jo and several of her classmates double as poets for rent. They handle birthdays, anniversaries, and special occasions. For a minimal fee, tonguetied romantics send a gift from the heart. Ronda (Bolitho) Varnesdeel was named WHAC Coach of the Year for the varsity softball spring 2003 season at Aquinas. This was Ronda’s first year as head coach after being a four-year player and oneyear assistant coach. Michelle Vera is living in Boston on a one-year service trip through Americorp VISTA, in a program called MA Campus Compact. VISTA is similar to the Peace Corp, but within the U.S.A. She works with students to promote volunteerism and giving back to the community.

Marriages ’92 Becky Sprague to Jon Metelonis, June 21, 2003 ’93 Laura Wanbaugh to Jeffery Abraham, Sept. 7, 2002 ’95 Jennifer Evans to John P. Eardley, June 21, 2003

’96 Kaleen Feenie to Keith Early, June 21, 2003 ’96 Amber Pell to John Langan, March 1, 2003 ’98 Daphne Crozier to John Oly ’01, June 8, 2002 ’99 Diana Peffer to Allen Johnson, March 28, 2003 ’00 Melanie Charbonneau to David Prominski, June 21, 2003 ’00 Christine Garthe to Shawn Veenstra, June 6, 2003 ’00 Heather Scollon to Stephen Lentine, May 31, 2003 ’01 Crystal Miller to Kevin Frens, April 26, 2003 ’01 Jamie Opperman to Jeffrey Johnson ’03, May 31, 2003 ’02 Brandy Lovelady to Mark Mitchell, March 29, 2003 ’02 Krisy Debski to Jason P. Vogel, June 14, 2003 ’02 Katie Enders to Curt Weaver, May 31, 2003 ’02 Josie Inbody to Jon Joseph DeJong, March 8, 2003 ’02 Sue San Gregory to Andrew Edler, May 10, 2003 ’02 Joan Riordan to Ryan Bergman, June 7, 2003 ’03 Amber Holcomb to Kevin Wiersum, May 24, 2003 ’03 Tammy Scott to Ken Hartings, June 21, 2003

Births ’55 Frank Schmidt, a granddaughter, Celeste Claire Schmidt, April 2003 ’92 Julie (Trybus ’93) and Joseph Petersen, a boy, Scott Matthew, August 21, 2002 ’93 Nora (Viene) and Michael Berninger, a girl, Evelyn Rose, February 11, 2003 ’97 Melissa McDowell and Vern Johnson, a boy, Amery Walter, August 3, 2002 ’98 Audrey (Czerew) and Casey Negreiff, a girl, Maud Irene, December 15, 2002 ’99 Sara (Berger) and Michael LaForest, a boy, Gavin Michael, Sept. 8, 2002

Deaths ’35 Bernadette R. Schmitt September 11, 2002 ’40 John E. Herrmann, December 24, 2002

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’42 Leslie N. Prangley, September 20, 2002 ’44 Martha E. Kupinski, March 30, 2003 ’60 Sr. Joan Lehman, May 5, 2003 ’67 Lucia Fritsch Barkwell, mother of Sr. Joellen Barkwell, O.P., February 21, 2003 ’71 Anne Painter, November 27, 2002 ’74 Donald W. Miller, November 18, 2002 ’76 Marjorie Hendricks, March 24, 2003 ’76 Mary Hier, December 28, 2003 ’79 William J. Gaugier, June 26, 2002 ’80 Arneta J. Van Oeveren March 8, 2003 ’81 Cassie Gruner, August 29, 2002 ’82 Kenneth Tolman, February 10, 2003 ’83 Barbara J. Graves, February 27, 2003 ’89 Diane I. Casey, February 17, 2003 ’93 Lauren Borgeld, sister of Matt Russo, June of 2002 ’95 Daniel Caswell, father of Bethany (Caswell) Vargas, February 4, 2003 ’01 Daniel Caswell, father of Timothy Caswell and current student Krystal Caswell, February 4, 2003

In Memoriam (2003) Margery “Mudge” Joppe of Grand Rapids, passed away February 14. She worked at Aquinas for 16 years, from 1971 to1988, in the registration and academic advising area of Community Education (now called Continuing Ed). John McCaffery of Grand Rapids, a former professor who taught theatre and speech at Aquinas in the 1960s and 70s, died May 9 following a three-year battle with cancer. Hugh D. Allen of Kalamazoo, died May 1. Allen served as Vice President of Development in the 1970s before retiring from Aquinas in 1977. He was instrumental in the development of Emeritus College, Aquinas’ lifelong learning center established in 1975.

AQUINAS FALL 2003

– Fall 2003

VOLUME 2, NUMBER 2

CONTENTS HOMECOMING 2003

INSERT

President’s Message

page 5

Campus News Sister Aquinas Retires Nursing Program Commencement 2003 Performing Arts Center

page 6 page 8 page 12 page 18

Student News Student Satisfaction at Aquinas Service Learning Projects AQ Club Night

page 28 page 22 page 32

News from the Deans

page 33

Faculty News U.S. Math Educators Watching Aquinas

page 28

Athletics Hammer, New Head Basketball Coach Sixth Straight President’s Cup Senior Athletes of the Year

page 30 page 31 page 32

Admissions Recruitment Staff—What’s in Common?

page 34

Alumni News Alumni Mentor Program Henry Saverson ’57 Annual Golf Outing

page 46 page 47 page 48

Emeritus College Emeritus Evening

page 50

Development Evening of Elegance Reflection Award Recipient Selected Aquinas Fund

page 53 page 54 page 55

Trustee Profiles Tom Church, New Board Chairperson

page 58

Class Notes

page 60

3

Sr Aquinas retires Pg. 6

Community Ministries Pg. 31

Basketball Coach Hammer, Pg. 38

Saverson in museum exhibit, Pg. 47

Erhardts honored Pg. 51

Cover: Nursing program student Erin Mulligan discusses assignments with instructor Maggie Carriker, R.N., M.S.N. (Photo by Andris Visockis)


Fall 2003 –

Class Notes – Fall 2003

1985

Editor’s Note As we get ready for the 2003-04 school year, I can’t help but think back proudly on the recently completed year, reviewing the strides we’ve made here at Aquinas. Last September, we launched the First Annual Hall of Fame Gala to recognize those whose contributions have helped make the College what it is today—whether we talk about academics, athletics or community service. We take great pride in recognizing those achievements. Our Alumni receptions continue to attract more new faces from among our graduates. We are encouraged by growing attendance and by the renewed interest alumni are taking in their alma mater. New programs are taking our curricula to new levels. Programs like the collaborative Nursing Program established in conjunction with University of Detroit Mercy and the Saint Mary’s Mercy Medical Center;

the new sustainable business major, which launches this fall; and, the Deaconate program for those seeking a greater involvement in the work of the Catholic Church are creating new opportunities for students, expanding their career choices. The opening of the new Performing Arts Center on July 28 will be the highlight of the year. After years of fundraising and developing another unique collaboration, this time with Community Circle Theatre and the Catholic Secondary Schools, we will soon see our theatre program move to new heights. The state-of-the-art facility will provide our students, faculty and staff with new and exciting experiences. I am especially looking forward to the start of this school year with enthusiasm as we welcome the freshman class of students, among them my daughter, Courtney. But our responsibility here is not only to every

freshman, but ever y new and returning student, as well, along with parents, donors, faculty, staff and administration and the community at large. Aquinas College has a tremendous responsibility to maintain its reputation in the Catholic Dominican tradition of teaching, service, leadership and inclusiveness. These charisms establish the foundation for everything we do here. We take our responsibilities seriously. Our graduates—your sons, daughters, neighbors, friends and colleagues—form our measuring stick. It is by that yardstick that we ask you to judge us and the work we do here. It is my hope that when you look carefully, you will see that there coninues to be a full measure of care given to every student at Aquinas College. – Marty Fahey, Senior Editor

Corrections In the spring 2003 Aquinas magazine article on Clement Chiwaya two photographs were misidentified.

(page 19) Monsignor Terrance Stewart is pictured with Chiwaya, not Bishop Robert Rose as identified. (page19) The naming order of the Sisters pictured was reversed.

The Dominican Sisters provided funds to Chiwaya for his Malawi Project. They include: (back row, l-r) Sisters Janet Mish, Diane Dehn, Ottilia Schaub, and Jean Kramer; (front row, l-r) Sr. Mary Lucille, Chiwaya and Sr. M. Aquinas Weber.

4

Recognition should also be given to Victoria Hargenrader who was instrumental in writing a grant proposal that eventually was approved for funding of the College’s AQ Club Night featured in the spring 2003 edition (page 23) of Aquinas. Also involved in the grant opportunity were Steven de Polo, associate director/grant writer in Development for Aquinas, Kristi Pavlak, and Randy MacGeorge, director of Residence Life.

William Van Wyngaarden earned his doctorate in applied ministry through the Graduate Theological Foundation. He has helped raise more than $50 million while encouraging thousands of people to volunteer. Currently, he is responsible for raising about 30 percent of Inspiration Ministries budget—a total $3 million campaign. Steven C. Wichmann joined the Bloomfield Hills, Michigan office of Rader, Fishman & Grauer PLLC as an associate in January of 2003. Linda Zarzecki was promoted to director of human resources at the Van Andel Institute in Grand Rapids.

1988 Matt Eichhorn, helped co-found the nonprofit Epilepsy Council of West Michigan in October of 2002. “The Council wants people to be aware of what epilepsy is and understand it so they are not afraid,” Eichhorn says. A main reason for starting the Council was the allocating of funding. In Michigan, the east side of the state was seeing plenty of funding while Grand Rapids was overlooked, according to Eichhorn. Since the Council was formed the money raised in West Michigan will stay in West Michigan. The Council provides education opportunities, support groups and financial help for epilepsy sufferers. It will be sponsoring several upcoming events throughout the summer and fall. Please see the Aquinas alumni Web site more details at www.aquinas.edu/alumni.

Robert Winter is a commercial real estate broker specializing in office property sales and leasing and investment property sales with Taatjes, Termaat & Tol in Grandville, Michigan.

1991 Janet Wyllie is the program manager for business services at the Grand Rapids Area Chamber of Commerce. Janet was named to the Leadership Grand Rapids Class of 2003 in January.

1992 Joseph Petersen is currently employed as a senior manufacturing cost analyst at Elmer’s Products, Inc. in Columbus, Ohio. Joe is also working on his MBA from Otterbein College in Westerville, Ohio. Joe and his wife, Julie (Trybus ’93), just celebrated their 10th wedding anniversary in October.

1993 Tania E. (Dee Dee) Fuller is an associate attorney at Miller, Johnson, Snell & Cummiskey, PLC. She was named to the Leadership Grand Rapids Class of 2003 in January. Tracey Gaughran-Perez received her master’s in English from Michigan State in 1997, and has been working on her doctorate ever since. Her writing has recently appeared in the San Francisco Bay Guardian, Bridge Magazine, and N.com. She teaches English at Northern Virginia Community College, in Woodbridge, Virginia. Julie (Trybus) Petersen graduated with her master of library/information science & archival administration from Wayne State in 1999. She was promoted to audiovisual curator for the Ohio State University Photo Archives in Columbus, Ohio, in August 2001. Julie and her husband, Joe Petersen ’92, recently celebrated their 10th wedding anniversary.

1994 Johann Vaz joined the South Florida Sun-Sentinel in February of 2003 as the vice president/chief technology officer. Johann recently relocated to Coral Springs, Florida with his wife, Audra, and children, Brenna and Derrick.

Judy (Arndt) Agarwal lives in the San Francisco Bay area with husband Jay. She is a manager at a biotechnology firm and Jay is an investment banker. She is also enrolled at the University of California at Berkeley, studying public health.

61

Marisa Fernando, a former CAVA coordinator has worked for her native country since returning to Sri Lanka in 1995. She helped rural weavers in the southern region form cooperatives. “Only the poorest families are involved in that trade. (Now) they have better bargaining power with traders and middlemen,” Fernando said. She also works with German Technical Cooperation, which gives vocational training to women and children from poor and middleincome families in masonry, welding, baking and food processing. Membership has grown from 500 women to 1,000 families. She credits a lot of that success to Aquinas. “I grew up, gained self-confidence, gained new skills, improved old skills, took part in some inspiring service-learning trips and made very special friends,” she says. “Working as the coordinator for CAVA and within Campus Ministry continues to guide me in my daily work.”

1995 RaeAnn (Johnson) Collins and her husband Patrick have two sons, Andrew, 18 months, and Samuel, five months. Samuel was born 13 weeks early and has Down’s Syndrome. He will have a second bowel surgery in June and heart surgery this fall. Sam is a little fighter but he can still use all of our prayers.

1997 Debra Langlois received her doctor of medicine degree from Wayne State School of Medicine in June 2002 and is completing her residency in pediatrics at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.

1998 Jessica (Fegan) Ciranni earned her master’s in the art of teaching from Oakland University in May of 2003. She is currently teaching middle school language arts classes. She and husband, Pietro, live in Warren.


8

57

Does it get complicated when three highly reputable, timehonored institutions join forces to create a joint educational program? “Oh, yeah!” said Robi Thomas, struggling to control her laughter. Thomas, assistant professor of nursing and chair of the Grand Rapids campuses of the UDM McAuley School of Nursing, is at the hub of a partnership between Aquinas College, the University of Detroit Mercy (UDM), and Saint Mary’s Mercy Medical Center. The partnership was created to bring a bachelor’s degree nursing program with a primary health care focus to West Michigan. The curriculum is divided evenly between Aquinas and UDM, with Aquinas handling the liberal arts and sciences and UDM the advanced nursing science and clinical courses. Complex though it may be, the program “is going great,” Thomas said. “I’m expecting approximately 90 students by this August.” The program began in fall 2000 with eight students and “was designed to have no more than 32 students per year, because one of the things UDM and Aquinas pride them-selves on is their ability

to give indithey are in it and wouldn’t trade vidualized the experience for any other.” attention to “To me, the best part of it is the the students,” students—watching them grow she said. The and develop and realize that they inaugural are wanting to give back to the class, which community,” Thomas said. “The had an averstudents who are attracted to this Nursing students (l-r) Melissa Bauer, Jennifer Gable, Jennifer Kragt age GPA of program are really special students. and Kristi Koetje 3.5 at the end They are wonderful scholars but of last semester, has increased to they’re also very giving people. 12. They will graduate in May They do a lot of volunteer work 2004 with a bachelor of science on their own.” in nursing from UDM, which has And they also get more time conducted its School of Nursing with patients, which is something for 63 years. junior Erin Mulligan appreciates. While this program may be Unlike most four-year nursing relatively new, the College’s programs which begin clinical involvement in nursing sciences isn’t. In fact, beginning in 1932, Saint Mary’s Hospital School of Nursing students attended Catholic Junior College (now Aquinas) to earn college credit as part of their nursing education, said Aquinas College Archivist Sr. Jean Milhaupt, O.P., who taught them English in the early 1950s and said the program ran until 20 Student Jennifer Gable checks on patient at Saint or 30 years ago. “Our faculty who teach Mary’s Mercy Medical Center. nursing students all say the students are very good, very work in the third year of training, dedicated and work awfully hard,” “we begin patient-related work in said Arts and Sciences Dean the first year and start clinicals in Shirley Lewis, Ed.D., “The stuthe second year,” she said, “so I will dents consistently report they get a lot more clinical time.” This didn’t know how demanding the experience takes place at Saint nursing curriculum would be when Mary’s, both in the hospital and in they enrolled in it, but all are glad primary care settings.

Aquinas College Endowment Society members and guests were treated to a presentation on “Shakespeare’s GlobeTheater: A Living Model” by English Department Chairman Gary Eberle. Other miniclasses included “Poetry 111: No Experience Necessary” by Assistant Professor Vicki McMillan and “Cinema: Tips for Budding Film Reviewers” by Professor Emeritus Andrew Jefchak. The dinner recognized the English Department and the Patrick Gill Memorial Scholarship that is awarded to an outstanding English major.

English Department Featured at ACES Dinner English Department Chair Gary Eberle shows a model of the Globe Theatre to attendees at the May Endowment Society Dinner. (L-R) Dave Kamm ’64; Kathy Fore, director of Special Gifts; Sr. Aquinas Weber ’58; Michael O’Connor ’77; Joseph Boomgard ’03; and, Claire Waltman ’03 Barbara McCargar, chair of the Music Department, and Mark Rehl, an adjunct instructor, look over the equipment in the College’s new recording studio.

By Laura Bennett-Kimble ‘95, Contributing Writer

Collaborative Nursing Program Enters Its Fourth Year

The renovated music recording studio was unveiled by Department Chairperson, Barbara Witham McCargar, at the luncheon held for the Friends of the Music at Aquinas College. The college raised $20,000 to equip the studio. The old equipment was often breaking down and was not suitable for students. Recording studio classes are important since

future performers and teachers will need to know the fundamentals and principles of recording sound. Our graduates will be going into schools that have sound systems for both performing and practicing. Mark Rehl is the adjunct faculty who teaches both introductory and intermediate classes. Mark is a recording professional who has taught at Aquinas since 1999.

New Recording Studio Attracts Students

Campus News

Class Notes

Development – Fall 2003 1968 John Cybulskis a physics teacher at Niles High School in southern Michigan is pioneering a curriculum known as The Infinity Project—a hands-on computerbased class that gives students exposure to engineering for the first time anywhere at the high school level.

1970

The deadline for submitting

Kathleen Plato, Ph.D., recently received the 2003 “Champion for Kids” award from the TOGETHER organization of Olympia, Washington, for her decade of volunteer service and leadership on the board of directors of Community Youth Services. Her career work for education programs at the Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction was also recognized.

1971

class notes for the spring

James Woroniecki left his position as vice-president of Subaru in Indiana to become a senior vice-president with Denso in Tennessee. James and his wife, Nancy, live on a lake at the foot of the Smokey Mountains. Planning to retire in about six years, they have no plans to move from their lakefront home.

Aquinas magazine

______ alumni@aquinas.edu (616) 459-8281

1979 Edward Mann announces the publication of his second work of fiction Long River, which came out in April. Look for Long River and his first book, Shadow Wind, on amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com. Michael Waters completed his urological surgery residency at Michigan State in 2000 and is currently a practicing urologist with Maine Coast Urology in the Ellsworth/ Bar Harbor region and plans to start Frenchman Bay Urology in the summer of 2003. He was named vicepresident of Maine Lithotripsy Services, LLC in April of 2003. Michael and his wife, Michelle, were married in August 2000 and reside in Ellsworth, Maine. Lawrence Wilson is a Lieutenant Colonel in the Judge Advocate General Corps and is currently serving on active military duty in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin.

1982 Mary McCaffery is a speech-language pathologist for the Flint Community Schools. She has two sons, Harley and Jack. Harley just returned from a year as an exchange student in Japan; Jack is in his second year at MTU in Houghton.

1983 1972

is December 1, 2003.

Matthew also volunteers as a track coach at Union High School in Grand Rapids.

Shirley (Smith) Kupiecki was among five people honored in May 2003 by the Galesburg-Augusta Community Forum for years of dedication and service in helping to build a healthy community.

1974 Gregory Knowles, Ph.D., record producer, is based in New York and Los Angeles. He is past president and trustee of the Recording Academy (Grammy Awards) and on the music faculty of the Julliard School in New York. Greg and his wife, Katie, commute between Coasts.

1976 Matthew Meyer has been employed with Spectrum Health for the past 15 years. He and wife Maryhave two boys, both freshmen at North Park University in Chicago.

60

William F. Roth and his wife Colleen (Leonard) Roth ’84 became the proud parents of quads, Braden, William IV, Aishlin, and Colin, in June of 2002. Beyond the challenge of raising four small children, Bill and Colleen were also faced with Bill’s bone marrow transplant last fall. “If there has been anything evident from the past 18 months in the lives of both Colleen and I, it has been the power of faith and prayers,” he says. The hardest part for him was spending four months away from Colleen and the quads while recovering in an isolation type environment. Bill works for BDO Siedman, and the company connected his apartment in Chicago and the family home in Grand Rapids with Web cams so Bill could see Colleen and the quads, and they could see him as well.

This edition of AQ magazine comes to you as the 2003-04 academic year is nearly underway. The articles you’ll be perusing reflect the past year’s experiences that students and other members of the College community gained in our myriad academic, service and student activity programs. From conductive education to nursing to migrant tutoring, the programs and people featured in this issue also reflect the vibrancy of the campus our visitors readily notice and the energy that is moving this new academic year forward. One of our summer visitors was President Harry J. Knopke Bruce Weitz, an Emmy Awardwinning actor who resided in our Ravine apartments while he starred in Circle Theatre’s production of “Prisoner of Second Avenue.” His visit here is recalled on page 9. While he was pleased to have the lead in the next-to-last Circle production in John Ball Park before its move to our new Performing Art Center here in July, he stated several times during his stay that he hopes to return to perform in the new theatre. In an exchange with Grand Rapids Rotary members, he described our newest building as arguably the finest community theatre in the country, an actor’s theatre that any good actor would do anything to perform in. Our student actors, directors and production specialists now have this outstanding facility at their disposal; we’re all looking forward to the countless artistic and creative additions they will be making to the life of the College in the months and years ahead. While the theatre and other new programs evolve to become integral parts of the campus this year, they will be doing so without the daily guidance and support of Sr. Aquinas Weber who retired this summer after 25 years of devotion and exceptional service to Aquinas College. An all-too-brief summary of her background and accomplishments is found on page 6. Now Emeritus Chancellor, Sr. Aquinas continues to embody the spirit and the purpose of the College as she did in her daily work on behalf of the students and all other members of the College community. Fortunately, her retirement does not mean a complete cessation of her relationship with the College; she’s agreed to continue her active participation on selected committees of our Board of Trustees as well as to share her insights and perspective with some special ad hoc College committees. Over many years, Sr. Aquinas has been instrumental in fostering the Catholic identity of Aquinas College and in helping it maintain its Dominican emphases on academic rigor, inclusiveness and involvement with the community. I’m particularly grateful that we will continue to benefit from her presence here as we all work to pursue truth with an open mind and an open heart.

5

Fall 2003 –

Aquinas College was remembered by our honored alumnus, Jerome C. Byrne ’48, through a gift from his Beverly Hills, California estate. A portion from the sale of the beautiful villa brought a gift of $1.6 million to provide funding for projects that were special to Jerry. The Byrne Professorship in Early Childhood Education and the Byrne Distinguished Faculty Fund will help Aquinas recruit and support outstanding faculty in the School of Education. The Jerome C. Byrne Scholarship will also provide awards to outstanding students who maintain a 3.7 GPA. After Aquinas College, Byrne attended Harvard University where he was the editor of the Law Review. He later served as special counsel to the Governor of California, where he investigated student unrest and made recommendations for the restructuring of the University of California educational system during the 1960s. Mr. Byrne died of cancer on October 24, 2001.

Former Trustee Honors Aquinas with Bequest Sr. Joellen Barkwell, O.P., is the vocational director/associate director for the Grand Rapids Dominican Sisters at Marywood.

President’s Message

1967


58

Tom Church,Chairperson, Aquinas College Board ofTrustees

Trustee Profiles

7

The Aquinas College Board of Trustees has a new chairman, and considering that he’s been a partner with the accounting firm of Deloitte & Touche for 12 of the last 22 years, it’s not surprising that one of Thomas D. Church’s goals is “ensuring the financial well-being of the College.” The CPA first became involved with the College a few years back when President Knopke and Sr. Aquinas Weber “got me involved with the Development Committee,” he said. From there, Church became chair of the Business and Finance Committee. “I saw it as an opportunity to bring my interest in education, Catholic faith and financial acumen to the school.” He joined the Board of Trustees in 1998, and also is currently chair of the Student and Religious Affairs Committee. Church said he enjoys working with Aquinas College because “it is truly a collective effort with tremendous donors—they give from the heart.” He said that he’s seen the school’s contributions, facilities, and enrollment grow, and he wants to see that continue during his chairmanship. Referring to Aquinas as a hidden gem, Church said he’d like to see it get more national recognition as a premier liberal arts college in the Midwest. One of the things Church has enjoyed at Aquinas is seeing how it works with other organizations. By joining forces with Circle Theatre and Catholic Secondary Schools, the College helped to create the new Performing Arts Center. And by working with the University of Detroit and St. Mary’s Mercy Medical Center, Aquinas has helped to create a bachelor’s degree program for nursing students. These programs are unique, he said, because of their nature and their numbers. Although Church did not attend Aquinas, he said, “I’m a product of Catholic education and a believer in faith-based education,” and when the opportunity to become involved with Aquinas appeared, he took it. He had moved to the area about ten years ago, he said, from the southeast side of the state. He and his wife Nancy have three children, Joe, Katie, and Michael. When asked about his life outside of work, he said, “My activities really center around my family.” Church freely admitted to being a busy man, and rued that he was sitting with his cell phone in LaGuardia Airport during the interview for this story rather than comfortably chatting in a Grand Rapids coffeehouse. But this is his life, and he makes no apologies for it. In fact, he said that taking on the new responsibilities as chair of the board is not a concern. “When it’s a priority, when it’s important—you make the time,” he said. Plus, he doesn’t view himself as “out there on my own” with this Board, because the group works so well as a team. The bottom line? The goals of the Board of Trustees and the people who make up Aquinas College are shared by Church, who said, “I’ve enjoyed the people I’ve met, and I enjoy their mission. It’s a very inclusive community.” By Laura Bennett-Kimble ‘95, Contributing Writer

Tom Church: Taking the Reins

things, because I think everybody had such strong feelings about her. She was in a sense a quiet leader of the school.” He paused. “She just has a draw about her because she’s so reliable.” That draw has enabled her to help the College in many ways, including financially. Through her efforts in the Development office and as a special assistant to the president, she has helped grow the College into the thriving institution it is today. To the relief of many, Sr. Aquinas will stay involved with the College. “The president has asked me to do a couple of things,” she said. “I will serve on a couple of committees and still work a bit at Emeritus College, and I can pick and choose what I want to do– that’s the beauty of retirement.” Sr. Aquinas has received numerous awards, including the 1999 Edward J. Frey Sr. Distinguished Achievement Award, the 1997 National Kidney Foundation Galaxy Award, the 1993 Aquinas College Reflection Award, and the 1990 Jewish National Fund Tr ee of Life Award. Former Aquinas College President Norbert Hruby once said, “This is a lady who can do it all.” And as she enjoys her retirement, she will surely do even more, whether it’s helping out at the College, traveling to visit her relatives or seeing the country (“I do want to go to Alaska,” she said), volunteering, or just relaxing with a good book. She said retirement will allow more time for prayer, reflection and renewal of her spirit. Whatever she does, though, one can assume she will do it well.

Bottom right: Sr. Aquinas with her 1990 University of Notre Dame Award of the Year Bottom left: Sr. Aquinas at her retirement luncheon held in the Holmdene Board Room in May. Middle: Sr. Aquinas receives the 1990 Tree of Life Award from the National Jewish Foundation. Included in the picture (from left) are Aquinas Trustee Pat Quinn ’58, the late Hy Berkowitz, Trustee Emeritus John Canepa,Sr. Aquinas, Trustee Emeritus Raymond Knape, Jerry Subar and Larry Meyer. Right: Sr. Mary Aquinas Weber, O.P., ’58 (1974)

Campus News

Campus News Trustee Profiles – Fall 2003

Sister Aquinas Weber Retires By Laura Bennett-Kimble ’95, Contributing Writer

Aquinas College Chancellor Sr. Mary Aquinas Weber, O.P., turned 80 in May, and decided after 25 years at the College, it was time to retire. Her retirement took effect at the end of June. “I thought about it through the [previous] year and knew my answer by December,” she said. “ I never questioned it, that it was the right thing to do. It’s best to go when you’re on top of things, and that’s the way I feel.” One might argue that the quiet and steady Sr. Aquinas has been on top of things most of her life. One of 11 children, she became a Dominican Sister in 1944. Why? “I felt a calling,” she said, “and followed through.” After teaching and serving as a principal in Detroit and Bay City, Sr. Aquinas was Prioress of the Marywood Dominican Sisters from 1966 to 1972, and then she served as the director of the newly formed Eastown Neighborhood Project from 1973 until 1976, when she was elected treasurer of the Dominican Sisters. Sr. Aquinas became a chairperson of the Aquinas College Board of Trustees in 1966, and has been a presence on campus ever since. She served as vice president President Knopke and Sr. Aquinas Weber of Development with Aquinas from 1983 to 1988, and was appointed as the College’s first chancellor in 1987. When asked what she had found most satisfying in her career, Sr. Aquinas said, “the Eastown Neighborhood Project.” In addition, she said, “my work at

6

Aquinas in the Emeritus program,” which she led as director from 1980-1983 and again from 19881991. Also, “Teaching was very satisfying for me; I think I did well at it and I think I was a good principal.” Marty Allen, chairman of the Board of Trustees for the Gerald R. Ford Museum and a retired executive from Old Kent Bank, first knew Sr. Aquinas as a teacher: “She was my sixth grade teacher at St. Stephen’s. Little did we know that what we were getting instilled in us was a part of our values system that would last all our lives. At the time, she was, in our minds, a very stern taskmaster.” Very active in her community, this taskmaster has been on a number of boards, including St. John’s Home, Por ter Hills Presbyterian Village, and Salvation Army. As the first woman on the Board of Directors of Old Kent Bank, Sr. Aquinas initially rattled Allen during his presentations to the board, the Aquinas College Trustee Emeritus said, as he “was a bit nervous because I had my sixth grade teacher back observing me.” At Aquinas, Allen said, “What I saw as a sixth grader still exists. She won’t back down from anything. She will stand up for what is right in that stern way. But it’s not a negative trait, it’s a trait people recognize for who said it and what was said, because she has a history of being right. “Whenever there was a special need that was critical to the survival of Aquinas or when there was an issue, she was always placed in that position to rectify those

The Aquinas College Board of Trustees said farewell to three of its longest-term members, outgoing Chair Kate Pew Wolters ’78, Bob Vander Weide ’81, and Awards Committee Chair Martin J. Allen Jr., but welcomed each in their new capacity as Trustee Emeriti. Wolters also will continue on the Board for the coming year as Immediate Past President. During their service to the College, the three trustees have been involved in significant growth at Aquinas: the addition of Jarecki Center, the addition of the campus apartments, construction of the new Aquinas College Performing Arts Center, and the inclusion of several new academic programs and community initiatives. Wolters is a member of the Steelcase Board of Directors and President of the Kate and Richard Wolters Foundation and has just completed her presidential appointment to the National Council on Disability.

College Salutes Outgoing Trustees

Marty Allen

Bob Vander Weide

Kate Wolters

Allen has served the Board as chair of both the Awards and Development Committees. He is chairman of the Gerald R. Ford Foundation Board of Trustees, and continues to serve on numerous national and regional boards. VanderWeide is President/ CEO of RDV Sports/Orlando Magic and resided with his family for many years in Orlando, Florida, where he was also active in numerous community organizations there. He continues his involvement with RDV Sports, but with his move back to Grand Rapids this past year is now also able to spend more time with his several businesses in the Grand Rapids area. At the May Board meeting, Trustees formally recognized Wolters, Allen and VanderWeide for their service. Aquinas is grateful to each of them for their continued service and support of the College.

Trustee Goes the Distance! In last spring’s (2003) issue, we introduced you to Trustee Lori Bush of Holland, a runner who finished the New York Marathon last November. with a time of 3:54, putting her in the top quarter of all 31,835 runners and 1,297 out of 10,210 females competing. In Boston, last April, she continued to improve her time, setting a personal best time of 3:40:02. “I really did not plan on going out for a personal best, but knew at about mile 15 that I was feeling very good and it was worth a shot,” she recalled. Bush said it was a warm day and a number of people suffered from heat exhaustion. Typically, she said, people run the Boston 10 to15 minutes slower because of the difficult course conditions. Her finishing time automatically qualifies her to run next year’s 26.2 mile marathon in Bean Town. And she says, “I will.” Meanwhile, eighteen days later, Bush ran the Fifth Third River Bank run, here in Grand Rapids, where she notched another personal best of 2:03:53 in the 25K run. Immediately after that race, she came to Aquinas where she

59

Trustee Lori Bush in Boston

took part in Commencement ceremonies, giving no hint that she had just finished a marathon run that morning.


Tom Church,Chairperson, Aquinas College Board ofTrustees

58

Trustee Profiles

The Aquinas College Board of Trustees has a new chairman, and considering that he’s been a partner with the accounting firm of Deloitte & Touche for 12 of the last 22 years, it’s not surprising that one of Thomas D. Church’s goals is “ensuring the financial well-being of the College.” The CPA first became involved with the College a few years back when President Knopke and Sr. Aquinas Weber “got me involved with the Development Committee,” he said. From there, Church became chair of the Business and Finance Committee. “I saw it as an opportunity to bring my interest in education, Catholic faith and financial acumen to the school.” He joined the Board of Trustees in 1998, and also is currently chair of the Student and Religious Affairs Committee. Church said he enjoys working with Aquinas College because “it is truly a collective effort with tremendous donors—they give from the heart.” He said that he’s seen the school’s contributions, facilities, and enrollment grow, and he wants to see that continue during his chairmanship. Referring to Aquinas as a hidden gem, Church said he’d like to see it get more national recognition as a premier liberal arts college in the Midwest. One of the things Church has enjoyed at Aquinas is seeing how it works with other organizations. By joining forces with Circle Theatre and Catholic Secondary Schools, the College helped to create the new Performing Arts Center. And by working with the University of Detroit and St. Mary’s Mercy Medical Center, Aquinas has helped to create a bachelor’s degree program for nursing students. These programs are unique, he said, because of their nature and their numbers. Although Church did not attend Aquinas, he said, “I’m a product of Catholic education and a believer in faith-based education,” and when the opportunity to become involved with Aquinas appeared, he took it. He had moved to the area about ten years ago, he said, from the southeast side of the state. He and his wife Nancy have three children, Joe, Katie, and Michael. When asked about his life outside of work, he said, “My activities really center around my family.” Church freely admitted to being a busy man, and rued that he was sitting with his cell phone in LaGuardia Airport during the interview for this story rather than comfortably chatting in a Grand Rapids coffeehouse. But this is his life, and he makes no apologies for it. In fact, he said that taking on the new responsibilities as chair of the board is not a concern. “When it’s a priority, when it’s important—you make the time,” he said. Plus, he doesn’t view himself as “out there on my own” with this Board, because the group works so well as a team. The bottom line? The goals of the Board of Trustees and the people who make up Aquinas College are shared by Church, who said, “I’ve enjoyed the people I’ve met, and I enjoy their mission. It’s a very inclusive community.” By Laura Bennett-Kimble ‘95, Contributing Writer

Tom Church: Taking the Reins

things, because I think everybody had such strong feelings about her. She was in a sense a quiet leader of the school.” He paused. “She just has a draw about her because she’s so reliable.” That draw has enabled her to help the College in many ways, including financially. Through her efforts in the Development office and as a special assistant to the president, she has helped grow the College into the thriving institution it is today. To the relief of many, Sr. Aquinas will stay involved with the College. “The president has asked me to do a couple of things,” she said. “I will serve on a couple of committees and still work a bit at Emeritus College, and I can pick and choose what I want to do– that’s the beauty of retirement.” Sr. Aquinas has received numerous awards, including the 1999 Edward J. Frey Sr. Distinguished Achievement Award, the 1997 National Kidney Foundation Galaxy Award, the 1993 Aquinas College Reflection Award, and the 1990 Jewish National Fund Tr ee of Life Award. Former Aquinas College President Norbert Hruby once said, “This is a lady who can do it all.” And as she enjoys her retirement, she will surely do even more, whether it’s helping out at the College, traveling to visit her relatives or seeing the country (“I do want to go to Alaska,” she said), volunteering, or just relaxing with a good book. She said retirement will allow more time for prayer, reflection and renewal of her spirit. Whatever she does, though, one can assume she will do it well.

7

Bottom right: Sr. Aquinas with her 1990 University of Notre Dame Award of the Year Bottom left: Sr. Aquinas at her retirement luncheon held in the Holmdene Board Room in May. Middle: Sr. Aquinas receives the 1990 Tree of Life Award from the National Jewish Foundation. Included in the picture (from left) are Aquinas Trustee Pat Quinn ’58, the late Hy Berkowitz, Trustee Emeritus John Canepa,Sr. Aquinas, Trustee Emeritus Raymond Knape, Jerry Subar and Larry Meyer. Right: Sr. Mary Aquinas Weber, O.P., ’58 (1974)

Campus News

Campus News Trustee Profiles – Fall 2003

Sister Aquinas Weber Retires By Laura Bennett-Kimble ’95, Contributing Writer

Aquinas College Chancellor Sr. Mary Aquinas Weber, O.P., turned 80 in May, and decided after 25 years at the College, it was time to retire. Her retirement took effect at the end of June. “I thought about it through the [previous] year and knew my answer by December,” she said. “ I never questioned it, that it was the right thing to do. It’s best to go when you’re on top of things, and that’s the way I feel.” One might argue that the quiet and steady Sr. Aquinas has been on top of things most of her life. One of 11 children, she became a Dominican Sister in 1944. Why? “I felt a calling,” she said, “and followed through.” After teaching and serving as a principal in Detroit and Bay City, Sr. Aquinas was Prioress of the Marywood Dominican Sisters from 1966 to 1972, and then she served as the director of the newly formed Eastown Neighborhood Project from 1973 until 1976, when she was elected treasurer of the Dominican Sisters. Sr. Aquinas became a chairperson of the Aquinas College Board of Trustees in 1966, and has been a presence on campus ever since. She served as vice president President Knopke and Sr. Aquinas Weber of Development with Aquinas from 1983 to 1988, and was appointed as the College’s first chancellor in 1987. When asked what she had found most satisfying in her career, Sr. Aquinas said, “the Eastown Neighborhood Project.” In addition, she said, “my work at

Aquinas in the Emeritus program,” which she led as director from 1980-1983 and again from 19881991. Also, “Teaching was very satisfying for me; I think I did well at it and I think I was a good principal.” Marty Allen, chairman of the Board of Trustees for the Gerald R. Ford Museum and a retired executive from Old Kent Bank, first knew Sr. Aquinas as a teacher: “She was my sixth grade teacher at St. Stephen’s. Little did we know that what we were getting instilled in us was a part of our values system that would last all our lives. At the time, she was, in our minds, a very stern taskmaster.” Very active in her community, this taskmaster has been on a number of boards, including St. John’s Home, Por ter Hills Presbyterian Village, and Salvation Army. As the first woman on the Board of Directors of Old Kent Bank, Sr. Aquinas initially rattled Allen during his presentations to the board, the Aquinas College Trustee Emeritus said, as he “was a bit nervous because I had my sixth grade teacher back observing me.” At Aquinas, Allen said, “What I saw as a sixth grader still exists. She won’t back down from anything. She will stand up for what is right in that stern way. But it’s not a negative trait, it’s a trait people recognize for who said it and what was said, because she has a history of being right. “Whenever there was a special need that was critical to the survival of Aquinas or when there was an issue, she was always placed in that position to rectify those

The Aquinas College Board of Trustees said farewell to three of its longest-term members, outgoing Chair Kate Pew Wolters ’78, Bob Vander Weide ’81, and Awards Committee Chair Martin J. Allen Jr., but welcomed each in their new capacity as Trustee Emeriti. Wolters also will continue on the Board for the coming year as Immediate Past President. During their service to the College, the three trustees have been involved in significant growth at Aquinas: the addition of Jarecki Center, the addition of the campus apartments, construction of the new Aquinas College Performing Arts Center, and the inclusion of several new academic programs and community initiatives. Wolters is a member of the Steelcase Board of Directors and President of the Kate and Richard Wolters Foundation and has just completed her presidential appointment to the National Council on Disability.

College Salutes Outgoing Trustees

Marty Allen

Bob Vander Weide

Kate Wolters

Allen has served the Board as chair of both the Awards and Development Committees. He is chairman of the Gerald R. Ford Foundation Board of Trustees, and continues to serve on numerous national and regional boards. VanderWeide is President/ CEO of RDV Sports/Orlando Magic and resided with his family for many years in Orlando, Florida, where he was also active in numerous community organizations there. He continues his involvement with RDV Sports, but with his move back to Grand Rapids this past year is now also able to spend more time with his several businesses in the Grand Rapids area. At the May Board meeting, Trustees formally recognized Wolters, Allen and VanderWeide for their service. Aquinas is grateful to each of them for their continued service and support of the College.

Trustee Goes the Distance! In last spring’s (2003) issue, we introduced you to Trustee Lori Bush of Holland, a runner who finished the New York Marathon last November. with a time of 3:54, putting her in the top quarter of all 31,835 runners and 1,297 out of 10,210 females competing. In Boston, last April, she continued to improve her time, setting a personal best time of 3:40:02. “I really did not plan on going out for a personal best, but knew at about mile 15 that I was feeling very good and it was worth a shot,” she recalled. Bush said it was a warm day and a number of people suffered from heat exhaustion. Typically, she said, people run the Boston 10 to15 minutes slower because of the difficult course conditions. Her finishing time automatically qualifies her to run next year’s 26.2 mile marathon in Bean Town. And she says, “I will.” Meanwhile, eighteen days later, Bush ran the Fifth Third River Bank run, here in Grand Rapids, where she notched another personal best of 2:03:53 in the 25K run. Immediately after that race, she came to Aquinas where she

6

Trustee Lori Bush in Boston

took part in Commencement ceremonies, giving no hint that she had just finished a marathon run that morning.

59


8

to give indithey are in it and wouldn’t trade vidualized the experience for any other.” attention to “To me, the best part of it is the the students,” students—watching them grow she said. The and develop and realize that they inaugural are wanting to give back to the class, which community,” Thomas said. “The had an averstudents who are attracted to this Nursing students (l-r) Melissa Bauer, Jennifer Gable, Jennifer Kragt age GPA of program are really special students. and Kristi Koetje 3.5 at the end They are wonderful scholars but of last semester, has increased to they’re also very giving people. Does it get complicated when 12. They will graduate in May They do a lot of volunteer work three highly reputable, time2004 with a bachelor of science on their own.” honored institutions join forces to in nursing from UDM, which has And they also get more time create a joint educational program? conducted its School of Nursing with patients, which is something “Oh, yeah!” said Robi Thomas, for 63 years. junior Erin Mulligan appreciates. struggling to control her laughter. While this program may be Unlike most four-year nursing Thomas, assistant professor of relatively new, the College’s programs which begin clinical nursing and chair of the Grand involvement in nursing Rapids campuses of the UDM sciences isn’t. In fact, McAuley School of Nursing, is at beginning in 1932, Saint the hub of a partnership between Mary’s Hospital School of Aquinas College, the University of Nursing students atDetroit Mercy (UDM), and Saint tended Catholic Junior Mary’s Mercy Medical Center. College (now Aquinas) to The partnership was created to earn college credit as part bring a bachelor’s degree nursing of their nursing eduprogram with a primary health cation, said Aquinas care focus to West Michigan. The College Archivist Sr. Jean curriculum is divided evenly Milhaupt, O.P., who between Aquinas and UDM, with taught them English in Aquinas handling the liberal arts the early 1950s and said and sciences and UDM the the program ran until 20 advanced nursing science and Student Jennifer Gable checks on patient at Saint or 30 years ago. clinical courses. Complex though “Our faculty who teach Mary’s Mercy Medical Center. it may be, the program “is going nursing students all say great,” Thomas said. “I’m expecting the students are very good, very work in the third year of training, approximately 90 students by this dedicated and work awfully hard,” “we begin patient-related work in August.” said Arts and Sciences Dean the first year and start clinicals in The program began in fall 2000 Shirley Lewis, Ed.D., “The stuthe second year,” she said, “so I will with eight students and “was dents consistently report they get a lot more clinical time.” This designed to have no more than 32 didn’t know how demanding the experience takes place at Saint students per year, because one of nursing curriculum would be when Mary’s, both in the hospital and in the things UDM and Aquinas they enrolled in it, but all are glad primary care settings. pride them-selves on is their ability

57

Aquinas College Endowment Society members and guests were treated to a presentation on “Shakespeare’s GlobeTheater: A Living Model” by English Department Chairman Gary Eberle. Other miniclasses included “Poetry 111: No Experience Necessary” by Assistant Professor Vicki McMillan and “Cinema: Tips for Budding Film Reviewers” by Professor Emeritus Andrew Jefchak. The dinner recognized the English Department and the Patrick Gill Memorial Scholarship that is awarded to an outstanding English major.

English Department Featured at ACES Dinner English Department Chair Gary Eberle shows a model of the Globe Theatre to attendees at the May Endowment Society Dinner. (L-R) Dave Kamm ’64; Kathy Fore, director of Special Gifts; Sr. Aquinas Weber ’58; Michael O’Connor ’77; Joseph Boomgard ’03; and, Claire Waltman ’03

Aquinas College was remembered by our honored alumnus, Jerome C. Byrne ’48, through a gift from his Beverly Hills, California estate. A portion from the sale of the beautiful villa brought a gift of $1.6 million to provide funding for projects that were special to Jerry. The Byrne Professorship in Early Childhood Education and the Byrne Distinguished Faculty Fund will help Aquinas recruit and support outstanding faculty in the School of Education. The Jerome C. Byrne Scholarship will also provide awards to outstanding students who maintain a 3.7 GPA. After Aquinas College, Byrne attended Harvard University where he was the editor of the Law Review. He later served as special counsel to the Governor of California, where he investigated student unrest and made recommendations for the restructuring of the University of California educational system during the 1960s. Mr. Byrne died of cancer on October 24, 2001.

Former Trustee Honors Aquinas with Bequest Barbara McCargar, chair of the Music Department, and Mark Rehl, an adjunct instructor, look over the equipment in the College’s new recording studio.

By Laura Bennett-Kimble ‘95, Contributing Writer

Collaborative Nursing Program Enters Its Fourth Year

The renovated music recording studio was unveiled by Department Chairperson, Barbara Witham McCargar, at the luncheon held for the Friends of the Music at Aquinas College. The college raised $20,000 to equip the studio. The old equipment was often breaking down and was not suitable for students. Recording studio classes are important since

future performers and teachers will need to know the fundamentals and principles of recording sound. Our graduates will be going into schools that have sound systems for both performing and practicing. Mark Rehl is the adjunct faculty who teaches both introductory and intermediate classes. Mark is a recording professional who has taught at Aquinas since 1999.

New Recording Studio Attracts Students

Campus News

Development – Fall 2003 1967 Sr. Joellen Barkwell, O.P., is the vocational director/associate director for the Grand Rapids Dominican Sisters at Marywood.

1968 John Cybulskis a physics teacher at Niles High School in southern Michigan is pioneering a curriculum known as The Infinity Project—a hands-on computerbased class that gives students exposure to engineering for the first time anywhere at the high school level.

1970

The deadline for submitting

Kathleen Plato, Ph.D., recently received the 2003 “Champion for Kids” award from the TOGETHER organization of Olympia, Washington, for her decade of volunteer service and leadership on the board of directors of Community Youth Services. Her career work for education programs at the Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction was also recognized.

1971

class notes for the spring

James Woroniecki left his position as vice-president of Subaru in Indiana to become a senior vice-president with Denso in Tennessee. James and his wife, Nancy, live on a lake at the foot of the Smokey Mountains. Planning to retire in about six years, they have no plans to move from their lakefront home.

Aquinas magazine

Matthew also volunteers as a track coach at Union High School in Grand Rapids.

1979 Edward Mann announces the publication of his second work of fiction Long River, which came out in April. Look for Long River and his first book, Shadow Wind, on amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com. Michael Waters completed his urological surgery residency at Michigan State in 2000 and is currently a practicing urologist with Maine Coast Urology in the Ellsworth/ Bar Harbor region and plans to start Frenchman Bay Urology in the summer of 2003. He was named vicepresident of Maine Lithotripsy Services, LLC in April of 2003. Michael and his wife, Michelle, were married in August 2000 and reside in Ellsworth, Maine. Lawrence Wilson is a Lieutenant Colonel in the Judge Advocate General Corps and is currently serving on active military duty in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin.

1982 Mary McCaffery is a speech-language pathologist for the Flint Community Schools. She has two sons, Harley and Jack. Harley just returned from a year as an exchange student in Japan; Jack is in his second year at MTU in Houghton.

1983 1972

is December 1, 2003. ______ alumni@aquinas.edu (616) 459-8281

Shirley (Smith) Kupiecki was among five people honored in May 2003 by the Galesburg-Augusta Community Forum for years of dedication and service in helping to build a healthy community.

1974 Gregory Knowles, Ph.D., record producer, is based in New York and Los Angeles. He is past president and trustee of the Recording Academy (Grammy Awards) and on the music faculty of the Julliard School in New York. Greg and his wife, Katie, commute between Coasts.

1976 Matthew Meyer has been employed with Spectrum Health for the past 15 years. He and wife Maryhave two boys, both freshmen at North Park University in Chicago.

William F. Roth and his wife Colleen (Leonard) Roth ’84 became the proud parents of quads, Braden, William IV, Aishlin, and Colin, in June of 2002. Beyond the challenge of raising four small children, Bill and Colleen were also faced with Bill’s bone marrow transplant last fall. “If there has been anything evident from the past 18 months in the lives of both Colleen and I, it has been the power of faith and prayers,” he says. The hardest part for him was spending four months away from Colleen and the quads while recovering in an isolation type environment. Bill works for BDO Siedman, and the company connected his apartment in Chicago and the family home in Grand Rapids with Web cams so Bill could see Colleen and the quads, and they could see him as well.

This edition of AQ magazine comes to you as the 2003-04 academic year is nearly underway. The articles you’ll be perusing reflect the past year’s experiences that students and other members of the College community gained in our myriad academic, service and student activity programs. From conductive education to nursing to migrant tutoring, the programs and people featured in this issue also reflect the vibrancy of the campus our visitors readily notice and the energy that is moving this new academic year forward. One of our summer visitors was President Harry J. Knopke Bruce Weitz, an Emmy Awardwinning actor who resided in our Ravine apartments while he starred in Circle Theatre’s production of “Prisoner of Second Avenue.” His visit here is recalled on page 9. While he was pleased to have the lead in the next-to-last Circle production in John Ball Park before its move to our new Performing Art Center here in July, he stated several times during his stay that he hopes to return to perform in the new theatre. In an exchange with Grand Rapids Rotary members, he described our newest building as arguably the finest community theatre in the country, an actor’s theatre that any good actor would do anything to perform in. Our student actors, directors and production specialists now have this outstanding facility at their disposal; we’re all looking forward to the countless artistic and creative additions they will be making to the life of the College in the months and years ahead. While the theatre and other new programs evolve to become integral parts of the campus this year, they will be doing so without the daily guidance and support of Sr. Aquinas Weber who retired this summer after 25 years of devotion and exceptional service to Aquinas College. An all-too-brief summary of her background and accomplishments is found on page 6. Now Emeritus Chancellor, Sr. Aquinas continues to embody the spirit and the purpose of the College as she did in her daily work on behalf of the students and all other members of the College community. Fortunately, her retirement does not mean a complete cessation of her relationship with the College; she’s agreed to continue her active participation on selected committees of our Board of Trustees as well as to share her insights and perspective with some special ad hoc College committees. Over many years, Sr. Aquinas has been instrumental in fostering the Catholic identity of Aquinas College and in helping it maintain its Dominican emphases on academic rigor, inclusiveness and involvement with the community. I’m particularly grateful that we will continue to benefit from her presence here as we all work to pursue truth with an open mind and an open heart.

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President’s Message

Class Notes

Fall 2003 –

5


12

53

Tom and Nancy Church (left) share a lighter moment with Mary Ellen Rogers of Deloitte and Touche (second from right) and John Kennedy of Autocam.

Saturday, May 10, was not unlike any other spring day unless you were one of the 559 students receiving diplomas from Aquinas College. The 63rd annual Commencement drew a large audience to the College’s Field House. Honorary degrees were conferred on three individuals. Trustee Emeritus John Canepa received an honorary doctor of business administration. He was recognized for his years of service in Grand Rapids and, especially, for his long, distinguished record of leadership in both business and service to the community. In his remarks, he told graduates that he believes “a strong social conscience, a sense of individual responsibility, of renewed integrity, a commitment to community and a respect for others will be the rule for your generation of leaders.” “Success,” he told them, “will be defined not only by monetary success, but equally important by a deep social commitment, by making the world a better place to live in for you and your community.” Trustee Emerita Katherine S. Donnelly was also recognized during the ceremony, receiving an honorary doctor of humane letters degree for her generous contributions of time and resources to many worthy community organizations. The Board of Trustees selected Roger Wilkins, a son of Grand Rapids to give the commencement address and receive an honorary degree to recognize his life’s work as a Pulitzer-Prize-winning journalist, educator and civil rights

activist. His scheduled attendance had drawn criticism from the conservative Washington-based Cardinal Newman Society, which cited his pro-choice stance. However, Wilkins canceled his appearance two days before the ceremony due to the death of his mother-in-law in Virginia. Instead, his sister, Judith Claytor, attended to accept his honorary doctor of laws degree. Wilkins’ mother, Helen Claytor, received an honorary degree from Aquinas in 1985, thus becoming the first mother-son dyad to receive the degrees from the College. Wilkins’ prepared remarks for the graduates were shared by President Knopke. In them, he noted that September 11, 2001, and this year’s Iraq war have “elicited remarkable displays of patriotism all over the country.” He stated that “it’s been an ‘us against them’ brand of patriotism, which is to be expected in times of war or national peril.” His message encouraged the graduates to consider another kind of patriotism, “the long term kind that is necessary to sustain a democracy over the centuries...” noting that it is the kind that our country’s founding fathers recommended. Following some perspective on America’s founding history, Wilkins noted in his remarks that “flag waving and chest thumping during times of high national stress are fine, but doing that and little more does amount to hitching a free ride on the planet.” Our founders, he continued, “found the daily work of keeping the republic, improving

(L-R) Trustee Pat Quinn ’58, Bishop Kevin Britt and Rita Quinn

Judith Claytor, sister of Roger Wilkins, expresses her appreciation on his behalf after accepting his honorary doctor of laws degree. Trustee Dave Bottrall and his wife, Michelle ’97, welcome friends of Aquinas College to their CascadeTownship home. President Harry Knopke introduces Trustee Emerita Kay Donnelly before presenting her with her honorary doctor of humane letters degree. Aquinas Trustee Emeritus John Canepa delivers remarks after receiving his honorary doctor of business administration degree.

C ommencement,

Students got financial support in the amount of $60,000 thanks to April’s Evening of Elegance. A sold-out crowd gathered to raise scholarship money for Catholic education at the home of hosts David Bottrall, an Aquinas Trustee, and his wife, Michelle Bottrall ‘97. President Harry Knopke and Greg Alksnis ‘71, a trustee and Evening of Elegance chair, spoke to visitors who roamed through the Bottrall’s leafy veranda, richly hued living room and collection of Star Trek memorabilia. The luxury was a warm welcome, but Michelle Bottrall summarized the event’s true importance when she remembered the pride she felt upon receiving her degree. “I’ll never forget that day. I was the first grandchild in my family to earn a bachelors degree,” Bottrall told guests, who included Bishops Kevin Britt and Robert Rose from the Diocese of Grand Rapids. “One quarter of Aquinas students are the first in their families to attend college and to receive degrees. You’re putting an awful lot of kids through school.”

(L-R) Bishop Robert Rose, President Harry Knopke and Bishop Kevin Britt Trustee Emerita/Former Board Chair Kate Pew Wolters ’78 and Jeanne Kapenga, M.D. (L-R) Nancy Church; Sr. Maribeth Holst, O.P, Dominican Prioress/Aquinas Trustee; Sr. Aquinas Weber ’58; and Trustee/Board Chairman Tom Church

By Tonya Schafer ’02, Contributing Writer

M ay 2003 Evening of Elegance

Development Development

President’s Reception

(L-R) President Harry Knopke, Sheila Knopke,Trustee Karen Palmore ’89 and Bill Palmore

Sanel Fazlic, senior, shares his family’s struggle to flee Bosnia with attendees at an Aquinas Fund reception in June.

Appreciation Events a Huge Success! The President’s Reception hosted by new trustee Karen Palmore’89 and her husband, Bill, and the President’s Dinner hosted by Kate Pew Wolters ’78, outgoing Chair of the Board of Trustees, were a success in conveying the deep appreciation to benefactors of the College. This year has been a triumph in finalizing the new Performing Arts Center and a record setting Aquinas Fund campaign. In addition, new endowed scholarships and special gifts have significantly increased, as well. Special thanks to all Society, Circle and Gift Club members who have made this achievement possible. Also, our sincerest appreciation to Sr. M. Aquinas Weber, Chancellor of the College, whose unwavering dedication to development efforts have helped to make our success a reality.

President’s Recognition Dinner

Hostess/former Board Chairperson Kate Wolters shares a moment with Fred Meijer.

“Primary care is a distinctive, special focus of this program,” President Knopke said, and it has secured significant financial aid for the students. “This is also one of only three nursing undergraduate degree programs in the country that offer co-op placements—in other words, students work for pay in clinical settings while earning course credit after their junior year.” Mulligan said the program has its complications. “Financial aid is frustrating,” she said, because the two schools had had conflicting information regarding her status as a full-time student. “I did talk to Harry Knopke about it, and he has been extremely helpful,” she said, noting that such complications aren’t surprising in a new program. Knopke agreed, stating, “There are start-up refinements one would expect with a new program, especially one that is conducted by three different partners.” The partners have a lot in common, though. Like Aquinas, UDM has an “emphasis on the cultural and spiritual aspects of life,” Thomas said. “And so we attract students who are interested in the cultural and spiritual aspects of care, along with the physiologic and psychologic [ones].” Also, “St. Mary’s has a very good reputation as far as their extensive program with the inpatient, the clinics, the ambulatory centers, and their focus on spirituality and cultural diversity. “It’s sort of the best of both worlds,” Thomas said, “particularly since Aquinas has such a great reputation for its liberal arts.”

Actor Bruce Weitz Resident at Aquinas By Laura Bennett-Kimble ‘95, Contributing Writer

Emmy Award-winning actor Bruce Weitz spent a few weeks living on campus in late spring, Sr. Aquinas Weber (left) and Emmy Award winning actor thanks to the collaboration Bruce Weitz (right) pose with Stella and Chuck Royce between the College and during a picnic in Weitz’s honor held at the president’s Community Circle Theatre. He residence, Willowbrook. performed in the Neil Simon production, The Prisoner of Second Avenue, which was directed by Rodney Vaccaro, his long-time friend and a former Grand Rapids resident. Although he works onstage at least once a year, Weitz, known more for his portrayal of Detective Mick Belker on NBC’s “Hill Street Blues” (1981-87), said that the production was his first community theater work. At a picnic held in his honor in June at Willowbrook, President Knopke’s home, Weitz explained how he ended up here. “[Rodney and I] worked together as writer, producer on a couple of projects that never got made,” Weitz said, “but that’s where our friendship started. Now our families are very friendly; we share a beach house in the summer. And he’s been talking about Grand Rapids and the theater here for years, and telling me that there was a fairly extensive talent pool of good people.” Vaccaro said when he talked to Weitz about Circle Theatre at the beach house last year, Weitz asked, “Would they be interested in me coming there?” Having Weitz headline one of the theater’s productions was “quite a coup for us,” said Community Circle Theatre Executive Director Joe Dulin. “This has been wonderful working on the play,” Weitz said. “It’s fun. What I saw was a level of commitment that I don’t think you see in most communities… I found that quite astonishing, actually.” The new theater on campus, a collaboration with the College, Circle Theatre and Catholic Secondary Schools, drew raves from both Weitz and Vaccaro, who said he’d never thought of the association. He said when Dulin called him to talk about the idea, “I thought, God, that’s just perfect. My experience with Aquinas is that it’s sort of a bastion of liberalism. It’s an absolutely perfect collaboration. The new theater is the single most perfect theater I’ve ever seen. I’m aching Bruce Weitz and President Knopke to [direct] in the new space.” (right) exchange thoughts on the College’s new Performing Arts Center. Weitz, who keeps busy with recurring roles on both ER and Judging Amy, received his undergraduate degree from Carnegie Institute of Technology, and later earned an M.F.A. at Yale. He has more than 100 movie and film credits, including Half Past Dead and Deep Impact.

(L-R) Fred Meijer, Ulrika Wege,Trustee Emeritus Peter Wege and Sheila Knopke

The dinner honored the College’s special friends. 56

9


10

Sr. Rosemary O’Donnell leads a class discussion.

Aquinas College is known for many things, but did you know that we have been serving the educational needs of the adult student since 1969? Today, one quarter of the student body at Aquinas College comprises adult students attending classes in the undergraduate or master’s programs. These dedicated individuals can often be found hustling into the Academic Building or Jarecki Center around six o’clock each evening, Monday thru Thursday. Some log onto Michigan Virtual University to discuss topics with their Web course classmates. No matter the class format or time, you will find our adult students have a special place in their hearts for Aquinas. As Thora Wease, a current continuing education (CE) student graduating in May 2004 so generously stated, “My time at Aquinas has been the most rewarding and exquisitely delightful of any educational experience I have ever had. The classes are challenging and the learning opportunities incredible. I have been encouraged to dream my dream and have been given the tools necessary to make it come true. For that I will be forever grateful.” Nationwide, 73 percent of all undergraduates are considered

non-traditional in some way— they work, have children, are independent of parents or didn’t enroll into college right after high school. Further, 40 percent of those are working adults over the age of 25 and 56 percent of all adult college students are female. That number is expected to rise to 58 percent by 2011, according to the Non-Traditional Student Report issued in May 2003. It is important that we at Aquinas continue to meet the needs and provide the services necessary for our current and prospective students—services like the Academic Achievement Center, that assist our adult students with building and refreshing math and writing skills. The Career and Counseling Center provides guidance and skills needed for our students‘ future jobs, and helps with anxious feelings about returning to school. The biggest concern our adult students face is how to fund their education. Primary sources of assistance come from employer tuition-reimbursement programs or federal aid. Aquinas also offers two privately funded scholarships for adult students—the John F. Donnelly Scholarship and the Norbert J. Hruby Scholarship. You can find out more informa-

tion on these opportunities by visiting the Aquinas Web site at www.aquinas.edu. With flexible scheduling, a variety of class formats and assistance with financial aid, adult students can fulfill those dreams of returning to school for a degree or taking classes purely for exploration and interest. Interested in attending Aquinas College as a continuing education or master’s student? Please call (616) 459-8281 for an individual appointment or visit the College’s Web site at www.aquinas.edu.

A scholarship to help minority students who have an interest in theological studies and human service programs was funded through a bequest left to Aquinas by Fr. Bernard Hall. Fr. Hall was ordained a Catholic priest in 1977. He was active in diocesan Catholic schools in the area of curriculum development. He

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The Rev. Bernard Hall

helped establish the African American Apostolate for Grand Rapids. Fr. Hall served as pastor of St. Joseph’s Parish, Muskegon, St. Mary’s Parish, and our Lady of Sorrow’s Church, Grand Rapids. In 1996, Fr. Hall retired for medical reasons and moved to St. Ann’s Home. He joined his Heavenly Father on March 23, 2002.

Scholarship Established for Fr. Bernard Hall

Robert Fiori (L-R) Erika Vann and Amanda Saenz Janice Noel

What or who is at the heart and soul of Aquinas College? If you ask alumni, parents, faculty or friends of the College the same answer is reiterated each time— students! And at the cornerstone of student financial assistance is the Aquinas Fund, which helps to fund nearly $1.7 million dollars in scholarships. The Fund has seen dramatic increases in support recently. It is a testimony to the fact that, together, we can make a difference in the lives of students. Donors small and large have sacrificed and, in turn, the students are blessed. Leo Kunkel, parent of alumnus John T. Kunkel ’90 and father-inlaw to Theresa Schulte Kunkel ’91, has been a regular Thomist Club member ($500-$999 contributor) for years. He echoes the sentiments of many Aquinas Fund contributors. When asked why he continues his strong support of the College, Kunkel said, “You attract high caliber students here [at Aquinas].

Being a Notre Dame graduate, I always thought Notre Dame was it! My late wife, Betty, wanted to be a donor to Aquinas even after John graduated. Catholic colleges were so important to her. We got to know Aquinas, visited the campus, got to know John’s friends and I realized what a difference our gift makes for students coming to Cecilia Cunningham

Aquinas. I am extremely happy with the education [John] re-ceived at Aquinas! It is a good Catholic college, John fit here where the professors and students have a close relationship,” he added. Kunkel believes in higher education, “I am sort of a nut when it comes to education. Not only does it open doors for a better job. It gives you insight into life itself. It’s the key to one’s very existence. Education is not inexpensive today. It is very difficult for a lot of families. To me that’s a sacrifice worth every penny.” When asked about consistently giving Kunkel said, “I’ve contributed to Notre Dame for 55 years, Betty gave to St. Mary’s as well. It is paramount for each (alumni) to do it, to carry on the legacy. It is an absolute. Aquinas alumni owe it to themselves to make sure the first class education is passed on to another…it is a pleasure to support students through the Aquinas Fund!”

By Cecilia Cunningham, Director of the Aquinas Fund

By Lisa Piatek ‘97, Director of Adult Student Recruitment

Aquinas Fund: Heart and Soul

Continuing Education…Still Thriving Campus News – Fall 2003

Fall 2003 – Development

Fall 2003 – Campus News

Development – Fall 2003

Aquinas Selects Trustee Emeritus Marty Allen for Reflection Award Trustee Emeritus Martin J. Allen, Jr. will be the recipient of the 11th Annual Reflection Award to be presented on Wednesday, September 3. The award is one of the highest honors given by Aquinas College and is bestowed upon those who, like Allen, reflect the Aquinas values of commitment, vision, service, loyalty and integrity. The honorary co-chairs of the Reflection Dinner are President and Mrs. Gerald R. Ford and the event co-chairs are Trustee Emeritus John C. Canepa and his wife, Marie. Allen, a 1958 Notre Dame University alumnus, as those who have seen his car’s license plate know, is Chairman of the Gerald R. Ford Foundation Board of Trustees and co-chair of the National Archives on Presidential Libraries. He spent his 30-year career at Old Kent Bank, heading the bank’s marketing department, and was a driving force behind the Old Kent River Bank Run and Old Kent Park, both of which have taken on

Developer/Preservationist John Knott Jr. speaks to a full house in the Wege Student Center Ballroom .

the name of the bank’s successor, Fifth Third Bank. He has been part of the community’s major fund-raising initiatives, helping to build the Van Andel Arena and the city’s latest addition, DeVos Place, the new convention center set to open later this fall. Allen is a lifelong Grand Rapids resident, who attended St. Stephen’s Elementary School, Grand Rapids Catholic Central High School, Notre Dame and Michigan State University. He also served in the United States Navy. He has been recognized for his leadership by the West Michigan Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals, which presented him with its “Executive Leader Award,” and by Notr e Dame University, which presented him with the Harvey G. Foster Award for distinguished athletic endeavors and community service. Allen is a past president of the Notre Dame Club of Grand Rapids. He and his wife, Susan, have two sons and a daughter: Steven

Sue and Marty Allen

(Aquinas ’90), Michael (Notre Dame), and Kathleen (Duke University and University of Michigan Law School). Previous Reflection honorees are: Peter and Pat Cook, Dr. Luis A. Tomatis, John S. Jackoboice, Sally Gleason, Peter M. Wege, Clare Jarecki, John Canepa, Raymond E. Knape, John Cummiskey, and Sr. M. Aquinas Weber. Aquinas alumni, friends of the College and friends of the honoree are encouraged to attend this exciting night. Individual tickets for the Reflection Dinner may be purchased for $150/each by calling Ellen Harburn at (616) 459-8281 or e-mailing her at hurbuell@aquinas.edu.

U.S. Rep. Ehlers Shares Views on Religion, Politics By Joe Boomgaard ‘03, Assistant Editor (From The Aquinas Times, May 5, 2003 - Reprinted with permission.)

“I try to make it a policy never to discuss religion and politics, but that’s what I’m here to do,” said Third District Congressional Representative Vern Ehlers, RGrand Rapids,to a gathering of students and faculty on April 28. “I’m often asked, ‘Is our government Christian?’ It is Christian in its foundation and in terms of philosophy and ideals of government, but we are not a theocracy,” Ehlers said.

“People,” he noted, “often misconstrue that [first] amendment as guaranteeing separation of church and state,” but said, “the first amendment says nothing about the separation of church and state. It says that Congress shall make no law establishing a state religion— something that leaders have long tried to prevent.” Ehlers revealed that religious beliefs do play a role in his political

U.S. Representative Vern Ehlers, RGrand Rapids, speaks in Lacks Center.

decisions. “…I look at issues through a Christian perspective— my core beliefs come from my religion. I think people realize that when they elect politicians.”

Urban Preservationist Urges Sustainability By Nicole Selzer, Staff Writer

“Put the face of your children and grandchildren on each decision you make.” John Knott Jr., CEO and director of the South Carolinabased Noisette Company, offered that advice at the Seventh Annual Wege Speaker Series in April. Knott comes from a long line of builder/developers whose family has been involved in urban and historical restoration since 1908. He employs the seven principles of sustainability—the Sanborn Principles—throughout his works, including the Noisette Project, which is the largest urban renewal development of its kind in the nation, and the Dewees Island project, which restored a storm battered island to a thriving natural habitat and residential community. The Sanborn Principles were created by a group called together by the National Renewable Resources Laboratory (NREL). According to these principles each design project must provide a healthy living environment for occupants and be ecologically

54

thinking. ”People understand durability, health, efficiency and comfort,“ he said. ”What we need to understand is that sustainability equals those qualities in the end.“ According to Knott, the biggest issue we face is making short term decisions for the benefit of a few at the detriment of many. This is true in business, he pointed out, and in our personal and public lives. We have forgotten what our purpose is in this life. “As a result, the social structures of community, the value systems in our lives, and the health of our children and environJohn Knott Jr. (left) and Peter M. Wege, trustee ment are threatened. emeritus and creator of the Wege Speaker Series. What we don’t seem to realize is that the problem isn’t out there,” says Knott. “It’s in here (pointing to his chest), in each of us, stemming from the decisions we make everyday. We are not making the connection between action and consequence.” Knott’s speech was inspiring. Changing the world is a daunting task, he noted, one that can be disheartening, reminding them, too, that one person can make a difference. “If every one of you leaves today and changes three things that you are doing in your every day lives, that’s a lot of change for the better.” For more information on John Knott Jr’s projects visit… www.noisettesc.com and www.deweesisland.com.

healthy, socially just, culturally creative, beautiful, physically and economically accessible, and evolutionary. Using these principles, the NREL is confident that it is possible to renew and restore areas once thought to be beyond help. Following his speech, Knott responded to questions, telling a packed Wege Center ballroom audience that “although most of you don’t know this, Grand Rapids is one of the major sustainable centers in the country.” He encouraged Grand Rapidians to keep doing what they’re doing. “It’s intimidating, but how many of us go through our days thinking green, so to speak? Sustainability can be a slippery concept to grasp,” he stated. Aquinas’ new sustainable business major fits in with Knott’s

11


10

Sr. Rosemary O’Donnell leads a class discussion.

Aquinas College is known for many things, but did you know that we have been serving the educational needs of the adult student since 1969? Today, one quarter of the student body at Aquinas College comprises adult students attending classes in the undergraduate or master’s programs. These dedicated individuals can often be found hustling into the Academic Building or Jarecki Center around six o’clock each evening, Monday thru Thursday. Some log onto Michigan Virtual University to discuss topics with their Web course classmates. No matter the class format or time, you will find our adult students have a special place in their hearts for Aquinas. As Thora Wease, a current continuing education (CE) student graduating in May 2004 so generously stated, “My time at Aquinas has been the most rewarding and exquisitely delightful of any educational experience I have ever had. The classes are challenging and the learning opportunities incredible. I have been encouraged to dream my dream and have been given the tools necessary to make it come true. For that I will be forever grateful.” Nationwide, 73 percent of all undergraduates are considered

non-traditional in some way— they work, have children, are independent of parents or didn’t enroll into college right after high school. Further, 40 percent of those are working adults over the age of 25 and 56 percent of all adult college students are female. That number is expected to rise to 58 percent by 2011, according to the Non-Traditional Student Report issued in May 2003. It is important that we at Aquinas continue to meet the needs and provide the services necessary for our current and prospective students—services like the Academic Achievement Center, that assist our adult students with building and refreshing math and writing skills. The Career and Counseling Center provides guidance and skills needed for our students‘ future jobs, and helps with anxious feelings about returning to school. The biggest concern our adult students face is how to fund their education. Primary sources of assistance come from employer tuition-reimbursement programs or federal aid. Aquinas also offers two privately funded scholarships for adult students—the John F. Donnelly Scholarship and the Norbert J. Hruby Scholarship. You can find out more informa-

55

tion on these opportunities by visiting the Aquinas Web site at www.aquinas.edu. With flexible scheduling, a variety of class formats and assistance with financial aid, adult students can fulfill those dreams of returning to school for a degree or taking classes purely for exploration and interest. Interested in attending Aquinas College as a continuing education or master’s student? Please call (616) 459-8281 for an individual appointment or visit the College’s Web site at www.aquinas.edu.

The Rev. Bernard Hall

A scholarship to help minority students who have an interest in theological studies and human service programs was funded through a bequest left to Aquinas by Fr. Bernard Hall. Fr. Hall was ordained a Catholic priest in 1977. He was active in diocesan Catholic schools in the area of curriculum development. He

helped establish the African American Apostolate for Grand Rapids. Fr. Hall served as pastor of St. Joseph’s Parish, Muskegon, St. Mary’s Parish, and our Lady of Sorrow’s Church, Grand Rapids. In 1996, Fr. Hall retired for medical reasons and moved to St. Ann’s Home. He joined his Heavenly Father on March 23, 2002.

Scholarship Established for Fr. Bernard Hall

Robert Fiori (L-R) Erika Vann and Amanda Saenz Janice Noel

What or who is at the heart and soul of Aquinas College? If you ask alumni, parents, faculty or friends of the College the same answer is reiterated each time— students! And at the cornerstone of student financial assistance is the Aquinas Fund, which helps to fund nearly $1.7 million dollars in scholarships. The Fund has seen dramatic increases in support recently. It is a testimony to the fact that, together, we can make a difference in the lives of students. Donors small and large have sacrificed and, in turn, the students are blessed. Leo Kunkel, parent of alumnus John T. Kunkel ’90 and father-inlaw to Theresa Schulte Kunkel ’91, has been a regular Thomist Club member ($500-$999 contributor) for years. He echoes the sentiments of many Aquinas Fund contributors. When asked why he continues his strong support of the College, Kunkel said, “You attract high caliber students here [at Aquinas].

Being a Notre Dame graduate, I always thought Notre Dame was it! My late wife, Betty, wanted to be a donor to Aquinas even after John graduated. Catholic colleges were so important to her. We got to know Aquinas, visited the campus, got to know John’s friends and I realized what a difference our gift makes for students coming to Cecilia Cunningham

Aquinas. I am extremely happy with the education [John] re-ceived at Aquinas! It is a good Catholic college, John fit here where the professors and students have a close relationship,” he added. Kunkel believes in higher education, “I am sort of a nut when it comes to education. Not only does it open doors for a better job. It gives you insight into life itself. It’s the key to one’s very existence. Education is not inexpensive today. It is very difficult for a lot of families. To me that’s a sacrifice worth every penny.” When asked about consistently giving Kunkel said, “I’ve contributed to Notre Dame for 55 years, Betty gave to St. Mary’s as well. It is paramount for each (alumni) to do it, to carry on the legacy. It is an absolute. Aquinas alumni owe it to themselves to make sure the first class education is passed on to another…it is a pleasure to support students through the Aquinas Fund!”

By Cecilia Cunningham, Director of the Aquinas Fund

By Lisa Piatek ‘97, Director of Adult Student Recruitment

Aquinas Fund: Heart and Soul

Continuing Education…Still Thriving

Development – Fall 2003

Fall 2003 – Campus News

Fall 2003 – Development

Campus News – Fall 2003

Aquinas Selects Trustee Emeritus Marty Allen for Reflection Award Trustee Emeritus Martin J. Allen, Jr. will be the recipient of the 11th Annual Reflection Award to be presented on Wednesday, September 3. The award is one of the highest honors given by Aquinas College and is bestowed upon those who, like Allen, reflect the Aquinas values of commitment, vision, service, loyalty and integrity. The honorary co-chairs of the Reflection Dinner are President and Mrs. Gerald R. Ford and the event co-chairs are Trustee Emeritus John C. Canepa and his wife, Marie. Allen, a 1958 Notre Dame University alumnus, as those who have seen his car’s license plate know, is Chairman of the Gerald R. Ford Foundation Board of Trustees and co-chair of the National Archives on Presidential Libraries. He spent his 30-year career at Old Kent Bank, heading the bank’s marketing department, and was a driving force behind the Old Kent River Bank Run and Old Kent Park, both of which have taken on

the name of the bank’s successor, Fifth Third Bank. He has been part of the community’s major fund-raising initiatives, helping to build the Van Andel Arena and the city’s latest addition, DeVos Place, the new convention center set to open later this fall. Allen is a lifelong Grand Rapids resident, who attended St. Stephen’s Elementary School, Grand Rapids Catholic Central High School, Notre Dame and Michigan State University. He also served in the United States Navy. He has been recognized for his leadership by the West Michigan Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals, which presented him with its “Executive Leader Award,” and by Notr e Dame University, which presented him with the Harvey G. Foster Award for distinguished athletic endeavors and community service. Allen is a past president of the Notre Dame Club of Grand Rapids. He and his wife, Susan, have two sons and a daughter: Steven

Developer/Preservationist John Knott Jr. speaks to a full house in the Wege Student Center Ballroom .

Sue and Marty Allen

(Aquinas ’90), Michael (Notre Dame), and Kathleen (Duke University and University of Michigan Law School). Previous Reflection honorees are: Peter and Pat Cook, Dr. Luis A. Tomatis, John S. Jackoboice, Sally Gleason, Peter M. Wege, Clare Jarecki, John Canepa, Raymond E. Knape, John Cummiskey, and Sr. M. Aquinas Weber. Aquinas alumni, friends of the College and friends of the honoree are encouraged to attend this exciting night. Individual tickets for the Reflection Dinner may be purchased for $150/each by calling Ellen Harburn at (616) 459-8281 or e-mailing her at hurbuell@aquinas.edu.

U.S. Rep. Ehlers Shares Views on Religion, Politics By Joe Boomgaard ‘03, Assistant Editor (From The Aquinas Times, May 5, 2003 - Reprinted with permission.)

“I try to make it a policy never to discuss religion and politics, but that’s what I’m here to do,” said Third District Congressional Representative Vern Ehlers, RGrand Rapids,to a gathering of students and faculty on April 28. “I’m often asked, ‘Is our government Christian?’ It is Christian in its foundation and in terms of philosophy and ideals of government, but we are not a theocracy,” Ehlers said.

“People,” he noted, “often misconstrue that [first] amendment as guaranteeing separation of church and state,” but said, “the first amendment says nothing about the separation of church and state. It says that Congress shall make no law establishing a state religion— something that leaders have long tried to prevent.” Ehlers revealed that religious beliefs do play a role in his political

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U.S. Representative Vern Ehlers, RGrand Rapids, speaks in Lacks Center.

decisions. “…I look at issues through a Christian perspective— my core beliefs come from my religion. I think people realize that when they elect politicians.”

Urban Preservationist Urges Sustainability By Nicole Selzer, Staff Writer

“Put the face of your children and grandchildren on each decision you make.” John Knott Jr., CEO and director of the South Carolinabased Noisette Company, offered that advice at the Seventh Annual Wege Speaker Series in April. Knott comes from a long line of builder/developers whose family has been involved in urban and historical restoration since 1908. He employs the seven principles of sustainability—the Sanborn Principles—throughout his works, including the Noisette Project, which is the largest urban renewal development of its kind in the nation, and the Dewees Island project, which restored a storm battered island to a thriving natural habitat and residential community. The Sanborn Principles were created by a group called together by the National Renewable Resources Laboratory (NREL). According to these principles each design project must provide a healthy living environment for occupants and be ecologically

thinking. ”People understand durability, health, efficiency and comfort,“ he said. ”What we need to understand is that sustainability equals those qualities in the end.“ According to Knott, the biggest issue we face is making short term decisions for the benefit of a few at the detriment of many. This is true in business, he pointed out, and in our personal and public lives. We have forgotten what our purpose is in this life. “As a result, the social structures of community, the value systems in our lives, and the health of our children and environJohn Knott Jr. (left) and Peter M. Wege, trustee ment are threatened. emeritus and creator of the Wege Speaker Series. What we don’t seem to realize is that the healthy, socially just, culturally problem isn’t out there,” says creative, beautiful, physically and Knott. economically accessible, and evo“It’s in here (pointing to his lutionary. Using these principles, chest), in each of us, stemming the NREL is confident that it is from the decisions we make possible to renew and restore areas everyday. We are not making the once thought to be beyond help. connection between action and Following his speech, Knott consequence.” responded to questions, telling a Knott’s speech was inspiring. packed Wege Center ballroom Changing the world is a daunting audience that “although most of task, he noted, one that can be you don’t know this, Grand Rapids disheartening, reminding them, is one of the major sustainable too, that one person can make a centers in the country.” He difference. “If every one of you encouraged Grand Rapidians to leaves today and changes three keep doing what they’re doing. things that you are doing in your “It’s intimidating, but how many every day lives, that’s a lot of of us go through our days thinking change for the better.” green, so to speak? Sustainability For more information on John can be a slippery concept to grasp,” Knott Jr’s projects visit… he stated. www.noisettesc.com Aquinas’ new sustainable busiand ness major fits in with Knott’s www.deweesisland.com. 11


Saturday, May 10, was not unlike any other spring day unless you were one of the 559 students receiving diplomas from Aquinas College. The 63rd annual Commencement drew a large audience to the College’s Field House. Honorary degrees were conferred on three individuals. Trustee Emeritus John Canepa received an honorary doctor of business administration. He was recognized for his years of service in Grand Rapids and, especially, for his long, distinguished record of leadership in both business and service to the community. In his remarks, he told graduates that he believes “a strong social conscience, a sense of individual responsibility, of renewed integrity, a commitment to community and a respect for others will be the rule for your generation of leaders.” “Success,” he told them, “will be defined not only by monetary success, but equally important by a deep social commitment, by making the world a better place to live in for you and your community.” Trustee Emerita Katherine S. Donnelly was also recognized during the ceremony, receiving an honorary doctor of humane letters degree for her generous contributions of time and resources to many worthy community organizations. The Board of Trustees selected Roger Wilkins, a son of Grand Rapids to give the commencement address and receive an honorary degree to recognize his life’s work as a Pulitzer-Prize-winning journalist, educator and civil rights

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Tom and Nancy Church (left) share a lighter moment with Mary Ellen Rogers of Deloitte and Touche (second from right) and John Kennedy of Autocam.

activist. His scheduled attendance had drawn criticism from the conservative Washington-based Cardinal Newman Society, which cited his pro-choice stance. However, Wilkins canceled his appearance two days before the ceremony due to the death of his mother-in-law in Virginia. Instead, his sister, Judith Claytor, attended to accept his honorary doctor of laws degree. Wilkins’ mother, Helen Claytor, received an honorary degree from Aquinas in 1985, thus becoming the first mother-son dyad to receive the degrees from the College. Wilkins’ prepared remarks for the graduates were shared by President Knopke. In them, he noted that September 11, 2001, and this year’s Iraq war have “elicited remarkable displays of patriotism all over the country.” He stated that “it’s been an ‘us against them’ brand of patriotism, which is to be expected in times of war or national peril.” His message encouraged the graduates to consider another kind of patriotism, “the long term kind that is necessary to sustain a democracy over the centuries...” noting that it is the kind that our country’s founding fathers recommended. Following some perspective on America’s founding history, Wilkins noted in his remarks that “flag waving and chest thumping during times of high national stress are fine, but doing that and little more does amount to hitching a free ride on the planet.” Our founders, he continued, “found the daily work of keeping the republic, improving

(L-R) Trustee Pat Quinn ’58, Bishop Kevin Britt and Rita Quinn

Judith Claytor, sister of Roger Wilkins, expresses her appreciation on his behalf after accepting his honorary doctor of laws degree. Trustee Dave Bottrall and his wife, Michelle ’97, welcome friends of Aquinas College to their CascadeTownship home. President Harry Knopke introduces Trustee Emerita Kay Donnelly before presenting her with her honorary doctor of humane letters degree. Aquinas Trustee Emeritus John Canepa delivers remarks after receiving his honorary doctor of business administration degree.

C ommencement,

Students got financial support in the amount of $60,000 thanks to April’s Evening of Elegance. A sold-out crowd gathered to raise scholarship money for Catholic education at the home of hosts David Bottrall, an Aquinas Trustee, and his wife, Michelle Bottrall ‘97. President Harry Knopke and Greg Alksnis ‘71, a trustee and Evening of Elegance chair, spoke to visitors who roamed through the Bottrall’s leafy veranda, richly hued living room and collection of Star Trek memorabilia. The luxury was a warm welcome, but Michelle Bottrall summarized the event’s true importance when she remembered the pride she felt upon receiving her degree. “I’ll never forget that day. I was the first grandchild in my family to earn a bachelors degree,” Bottrall told guests, who included Bishops Kevin Britt and Robert Rose from the Diocese of Grand Rapids. “One quarter of Aquinas students are the first in their families to attend college and to receive degrees. You’re putting an awful lot of kids through school.”

(L-R) Bishop Robert Rose, President Harry Knopke and Bishop Kevin Britt Trustee Emerita/Former Board Chair Kate Pew Wolters ’78 and Jeanne Kapenga, M.D. (L-R) Nancy Church; Sr. Maribeth Holst, O.P, Dominican Prioress/Aquinas Trustee; Sr. Aquinas Weber ’58; and Trustee/Board Chairman Tom Church

By Tonya Schafer ’02, Contributing Writer

M ay 2003 Evening of Elegance

Development Development

President’s Reception

(L-R) President Harry Knopke, Sheila Knopke,Trustee Karen Palmore ’89 and Bill Palmore

Sanel Fazlic, senior, shares his family’s struggle to flee Bosnia with attendees at an Aquinas Fund reception in June.

Appreciation Events a Huge Success! The President’s Reception hosted by new trustee Karen Palmore’89 and her husband, Bill, and the President’s Dinner hosted by Kate Pew Wolters ’78, outgoing Chair of the Board of Trustees, were a success in conveying the deep appreciation to benefactors of the College. This year has been a triumph in finalizing the new Performing Arts Center and a record setting Aquinas Fund campaign. In addition, new endowed scholarships and special gifts have significantly increased, as well. Special thanks to all Society, Circle and Gift Club members who have made this achievement possible. Also, our sincerest appreciation to Sr. M. Aquinas Weber, Chancellor of the College, whose unwavering dedication to development efforts have helped to make our success a reality.

President’s Recognition Dinner

Hostess/former Board Chairperson Kate Wolters shares a moment with Fred Meijer.

“Primary care is a distinctive, special focus of this program,” President Knopke said, and it has secured significant financial aid for the students. “This is also one of only three nursing undergraduate degree programs in the country that offer co-op placements—in other words, students work for pay in clinical settings while earning course credit after their junior year.” Mulligan said the program has its complications. “Financial aid is frustrating,” she said, because the two schools had had conflicting information regarding her status as a full-time student. “I did talk to Harry Knopke about it, and he has been extremely helpful,” she said, noting that such complications aren’t surprising in a new program. Knopke agreed, stating, “There are start-up refinements one would expect with a new program, especially one that is conducted by three different partners.” The partners have a lot in common, though. Like Aquinas, UDM has an “emphasis on the cultural and spiritual aspects of life,” Thomas said. “And so we attract students who are interested in the cultural and spiritual aspects of care, along with the physiologic and psychologic [ones].” Also, “St. Mary’s has a very good reputation as far as their extensive program with the inpatient, the clinics, the ambulatory centers, and their focus on spirituality and cultural diversity. “It’s sort of the best of both worlds,” Thomas said, “particularly since Aquinas has such a great reputation for its liberal arts.”

Actor Bruce Weitz Resident at Aquinas By Laura Bennett-Kimble ‘95, Contributing Writer

Emmy Award-winning actor Bruce Weitz spent a few weeks living on campus in late spring, Sr. Aquinas Weber (left) and Emmy Award winning actor thanks to the collaboration Bruce Weitz (right) pose with Stella and Chuck Royce between the College and during a picnic in Weitz’s honor held at the president’s Community Circle Theatre. He residence, Willowbrook. performed in the Neil Simon production, The Prisoner of Second Avenue, which was directed by Rodney Vaccaro, his long-time friend and a former Grand Rapids resident. Although he works onstage at least once a year, Weitz, known more for his portrayal of Detective Mick Belker on NBC’s “Hill Street Blues” (1981-87), said that the production was his first community theater work. At a picnic held in his honor in June at Willowbrook, President Knopke’s home, Weitz explained how he ended up here. “[Rodney and I] worked together as writer, producer on a couple of projects that never got made,” Weitz said, “but that’s where our friendship started. Now our families are very friendly; we share a beach house in the summer. And he’s been talking about Grand Rapids and the theater here for years, and telling me that there was a fairly extensive talent pool of good people.” Vaccaro said when he talked to Weitz about Circle Theatre at the beach house last year, Weitz asked, “Would they be interested in me coming there?” Having Weitz headline one of the theater’s productions was “quite a coup for us,” said Community Circle Theatre Executive Director Joe Dulin. “This has been wonderful working on the play,” Weitz said. “It’s fun. What I saw was a level of commitment that I don’t think you see in most communities… I found that quite astonishing, actually.” The new theater on campus, a collaboration with the College, Circle Theatre and Catholic Secondary Schools, drew raves from both Weitz and Vaccaro, who said he’d never thought of the association. He said when Dulin called him to talk about the idea, “I thought, God, that’s just perfect. My experience with Aquinas is that it’s sort of a bastion of liberalism. It’s an absolutely perfect collaboration. The new theater is the single most perfect theater I’ve ever seen. I’m aching Bruce Weitz and President Knopke to [direct] in the new space.” (right) exchange thoughts on the College’s new Performing Arts Center. Weitz, who keeps busy with recurring roles on both ER and Judging Amy, received his undergraduate degree from Carnegie Institute of Technology, and later earned an M.F.A. at Yale. He has more than 100 movie and film credits, including Half Past Dead and Deep Impact.

(L-R) Fred Meijer, Ulrika Wege,Trustee Emeritus Peter Wege and Sheila Knopke

The dinner honored the College’s special friends. 56

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In a testament to the powers of determination, continuing education (CE) student LaTanga (pronounced “LaTanya”) Joseph, age 45, graduated in May after years of challenges. “LaTanga has persevered in her quest to finish her bachelor’s By Laura Bennett-Kimble ‘95, Contributing Writer

How to Reach Graduation in Just 28 Years

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degree with a major in communication while facing daunting obstacles, health concerns and, in general, the passage of 28 years,” said Pat Kozal, Joseph’s college advisor. The road to graduation hasn’t been smooth. For the past four years Joseph drove back and forth from Chicago every weekend to a part-time job. She suffered a mild heart attack in the fall of 2001, and her mother died of cancer after a short illness in August 2002. “Sometimes you have to do whatever it takes to reach your goals,” said Joseph, who graduated from Benton Harbor High School in 1975 and took classes at various schools over the years. She received her Associate in Arts diploma from Grand Rapids Community College in 2000.

“I believe that my family has always been pro-education, especially as African-Americans. It’s always been important to be the best you can be,” said Joseph, who was inducted into Alpha Sigma Lambda, the national honor society for CE students. “LaTanga’s story is one of many,” Kozal said. “But what makes her stand out from the crowd are her personal qualities of courage, cheerfulness, persistence, and personal responsibility.” “I love learning and I could not have chosen a better school,” Joseph said. Then she laughed. “I sound like an advertisement for Aquinas, but it’s true.”

Right: Joseph is hooded by Dean Shirley Lewis, Ed.D., during May’s graduation ceremonies. Pictured left: President Knopke poses with LaTanga Joseph during induction ceremonies of the national honor society for CE students.

it and passing it on to the next generation one of the best possible ways to live.” And he posted a challenge to the graduates embarking on life’s 2003 graduates carry out the traditional turning of the tassel.

journey, saying that they “could do no better than to emulate the people who brought us our democracy.” During the cere- Sr. Aquinas Weber ’58 is recognized for her 25 years of service mony, President Knopke to the College; she retired June 30. also took time to recognize, and Gary Konow, Ph.D., for 35 years thank, two long-standing as a College faculty member. members of the Aquinas com(Full texts of the Wilkins and munity scheduled to retire at the Canepa remarks are available at: end of the year—Sr. Mary www.aquinas.edu/president/ Aquinas Weber, Chancellor, commencement.) after 25 years of service, and

M ay 2003 Fall 2003 – Campus News

Members of the ITS team (from left) Brad Vedders, Greg Vedders, Director Joyce LaFleur and Tom Ferratt huddle to develop options for dealing with a potentially damaging virus.

Technology at Aquinas By Joyce LaFleur, B.S.B.A. ’82, M.M. ’95, Director Information Technology and Services

Development

It’s Time…

Technology resources and services at Aquinas College are continually being upgraded and expanded to meet the needs of students, faculty and staff. Educause, the professional information technology association for colleges and universities, publishes a guide for prospective students to evaluate information technology at colleges and universities they are considering. Aquinas stacks up very well in the various aspects of the guide, including Academic Experience, Administrative Experience, Social Experience, Requirements and Services & Costs. Most notable are our course support Web pages, library resources available online, computer and information literacy courses, online access to college catalog and policies, computer labs throughout campus, residential hall network, student news, information and organizational Web portal and refresh plans for keeping systems current. The Hardware Refresh Leasing Plan allows College equipment to

Julie Ridenour Vice President of Development

When I first came to Aquinas College three-plus years ago, the most frequent remark I heard from our alumni was, “I never hear from Aquinas College.” My, how things have changed in a few years! With the advent of Aquinas magazine, concentrated work on our alumni database, and regular contact with our alums through various efforts, including the electronic media, I’m happy to report I haven’t heard that comment in more than a year. And now the comment most frequently heard is one that brings smiles rather than cringes: “It’s time for Aquinas!” That’s what you are saying, and that’s what all departments of the College are working to make happen. Within the next five years major changes will take place at Aquinas, changes that will enhance the Aquinas experience, and help the College even better prepare our students for their lives. Among the changes will be upgrades to the library, Field House, expanded endowment to support faculty and scholarship, and growth in annual operational support for Aquinas College. Within the Development Department, in collaboration with the academic departments and facilities, and under the direction of President Knopke, we are preparing the groundwork that will provide the direction for these needed expansions. But the most important ingredient in all the preparation is you. If you’re reading this, you’ve heard from Aquinas College, and now Aquinas College wants to hear from By Julie Ridenour Vice President of Development

you. We want to know that your experience at Aquinas altered your life by providing the education and direction that sets you apart in your job. We want to know that you share our vision for an institution that embraces the Dominican way, and that you want to see your alma mater have the resources and facilities that will ensure the College’s position among the nation’s premiere Catholic colleges. How can you help? There are so many ways: • Visit the Aquinas College Web site, and keep apprised of activities at Aquinas; • Know a great high school senior? Encourage him or her to attend Aquinas College, and contact our Admissions Office to let them know about your admissions prospect; • Participate in the Aquinas College Alumni Association; • Join the Aquinas College Career Network. Help other alums achieve their career objectives through your support; • And please, above all, give back to the College when asked. Aquinas College enjoys an exceptionally high level of graduate satisfaction for their educational experience. And more than 90 percent of our students received financial assistance to attend Aquinas. Let that satisfaction translate to giving back to Aquinas— you can make a difference! For information about how to give to Aquinas College, please call the Office of the Vice President for Development (616-459-8281), or visit the development Web site at www.aquinas.edu/development. You’ve heard from us—we want to hear from you. Make it “Time for Aquinas.”

C ommencement,

Alumni News – Fall 2003

to aid faculty-led classroom be replaced every three years. instruction as well as student Web-based courses and applicapresentations. Videoconferencing tions, including academic research, facilities located in the Jarecki library holdings, and e-mail via the Center for Advanced Learning can Web, allow for access to many be utilized by individuals, small information resources from an groups or class activities. off-campus Internet connection. A 24-hour online knowledge Campus portals ACORN, Alumni, center and help desk system augment and The Moose connect students, training and help desk services. A faculty, staff and alumni to campus College technology council, crenews, events, resources and each ated in 1997, consisting of faculty, other from on or off campus. staff and student representatives, Resident students may connect meets monthly to identify and their personally owned PC to the prioritize technology needs. Resident Hall Network (RESNET) The Aquinas network faces a for access to these and many other constant threat from virus laced Web-based resources from the electronic information and convenience of their room. intrusion attempts by malicious There are also ports in various hackers. Several layers of proteclocations around campus, tive technology and internal policy including a net-work in the Cook thwarted over 10,000 potential Carriage House with wireless incidents last year alone. laptops for check-out, which Every incoming e-mail message allows students, faculty and staff to is scanned for viruses before it is connect to the RESNET system for delivered. Updates to the virus research and communication. protection software, both for e-mail and for data files, are checked several times each day for updated definitions of new threats. Intrusion detection software runs continuously at the server level and reports on each attempt at unauthorized access—a daily occurrence. While technologiThe ITS team discuss the processes of containing the cal methods of provirus and restoring the College computer network to tecting the Aquinas a secure state, which was achieved within five days. network are essential, so too are policies governing use and user awareness of individual responsibilities. Good electronic community citizenship is not intuitive and has been clarified in the College’s Acceptable Use Policy (AUP).

In addition, computer labs are available in the residence halls, student center, library and academic center for student use. All classrooms are wired for network access and deluxe multimedia mobile instructor carts are available

Adler Has the Look for Burt’s Bees New Line

Chesley, Dr. Raikes, Mr. Eberle and Dr. Brooks…all have been major influences. I cannot say enough for how important they have each been in my life,” Southard relates.

his next novel, Cassandra on the Island. Since graduating from Aquinas, Southard has studied at Michigan State University and the University of Southern California, where he earned a master’s degree in writing. His stage play will premiere off-Broadway this year. One of Southard’s proudest moments was his marriage in December 2002 to Heather Vaughan. “Convincing her to marry me was a great accomplishment on my part!” he says. The Los Angeles resident learned much at Aquinas. “Dr.

promote her company’s new skincare line. “If you look closely at the boxes,” Adler said in a Grand Rapids Press article (March 4, 2003), “you’ll see they didn’t airbrush the crow’s feet off my face. They wanted me to look achievable. Fresh and natural, but not perfect. Because perfect is not attainable.”

Tracy Lint Soltis Adler ’89, is the new face for Burt’s Bees Healthy Treatment skin-care products. And it all happened by chance when Burt’s Bees owner, Roxanne Quimby walked into the North Carolina restaurant Adler owns with her husband, Mitchell. Adler caught Quimby’s eye as a woman aging with grace and confidence— just the look Quimby wanted to

Alum Designs Poster for Festival of Arts Virginia Rose Kane ’84, and her husband Manuel Gentile, both artists, created the winning poster for Festival of the Arts 2003, a celebration of arts held in downtown Grand Rapids annually in June. Their poster is a threedimensional collage of downtown

landmarks with Alexander “Sandy” Calder in the center. Calder is the creator of “La Grande Vitesse” which stands tall next to city hall in the downtown area. The original poster was on display at the Festival and at the Grand Rapids Art Museum.

Southard’s Work Spans Many Genres “Everyone in Heaven writes an autobiography sooner or later,” says Scott D. Southard ‘88, explaining why he chose that theme for his first novel, 3 Days In Rome. In 2001, the Heeken Novel Writing Fellowship for Work in Progress honored his book about a young man who relates his earthly and heavenly travails while perched behind the Pearly Gates. Southard also received awards for The Dante Experience, a 10episode radio series that receives play on National Public Radio. He is currently scouting publishers for

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Dr. Albert M. Lewis Emeritus College Director

Emeritus College

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I am delighted to share with you the enthusiasm of the Aquinas Emeritus College Board of Governors and staff. Charged with enhancing and further developing a program that has served the Grand Rapids community for 28 years, we have combined our efforts to create new programs and partnerships. We have successfully negotiated contracts for lifelong learning courses with Porter Hills, the Clark Retirement Community and Breton Woods. Our class offerings at the Browne Center have increased. We now offer evening classes in June and early fall. Working with FifthThird Bank we have offered a class titled—“Pre-retirement Planning: It’s more than just the money.” In a course evaluation a participant wrote: “Great program …sparkling personalities… three cheers to 5/3 Bank and Aquinas Emeritus College.” We plan to offer this program again in the fall. Charley Honey, a writer for The Grand Rapids Press, has actively reported on our programs, especially the course on the Prodigal Son, taught by Monsignor Gaspar Ancona. And, John Loeks of Celebration Cinema has made it possible for Dr. Andrew Jefchak to teach a course on modern film at Celebration Cinema in the fall. We expect all of our fall classes to fill quickly and encourage early registrations! The Aquinas Emeritus Board is now challenged to reach out to the

many people who do not know about us, and to people in the 40to-50-year-old range. We hope to achieve this through evening course offerings in the fall—“The Civil War,” “So, You’ve Always Wanted to be an Entrepreneur,” and “Lewis and Clark”—and to advertise more effectively. Toward that end, our new promotional brochure will be distributed to all our constituents very soon. With the Aquinas College Department of Languages, we are considering an intergenerational trip to France in May 2004. We are also reviewing new opportunities for our program in Naples, Florida, and considering a new program in Traverse City. Our Emeritus Evening Award honoring Larry and Nancy Erhardt was a very successful event in all respects; the largest turnout ever enjoyed being present to see Larry and Nancy accept the Aquinas Emeritus Award. The Emeritus Evening Award is always the highlight of our year; our Board could not have chosen individuals who better exemplify the values of Aquinas College and the Dominican traditions. Finally, the Development Committee of our Board of Governors is busy organizing the initial phases of its campaign to raise a $1 million endowment to secure the future of the Aquinas Emeritus College. We look forward to seeing you in our classes! For course and registration information, please call 616-459-8281.

Where can a collector go to locate information on Kenner dolls? On Oct. 1, 2003, collectors and dealers alike will be waiting for the opportunity to get their hands on a hardcover copy of the Collectible Kenner Dolls Identification and Value Guide. Aquinas College Applications Specialist Amy Sprouse, herself an avid doll collector, authored the handy guidebook as a tool for dealers and collectors to identify Kenner dolls along with the original packaging and accessories. The 176-page book contains more than 600 full-color photographs of Kenner dolls, produced from 1971 to 1981, in their original outfits. “I started collecting in 1998 and found dolls I had played with as a girl that were brand new and still in the original packaging,” said Sprouse. “The quality of Kenner figures is higher than other toys of that time and they still hold up 20 years later, which is a testament to the durability of Kenner products.” As a pioneer for Kenner-related collectibles, Sprouse has shared her knowledge with other enthusiasts by writing articles for several doll collector magazines. As she prepared for writing her guidebook, she had the opportunity to contact some of the original designers to learn more about the development of the Kenner doll products. According to the publisher, Collector Books, this guidebook will be the first to focus entirely on Kenner dolls. Chapters of the

Amy Sprouse poses with just a few of the hundreds of Kenner Dolls she collects and for which she authored a resource book on identification and value for collectors and dealers.

book are devoted to separate doll lines including Darci, Bionic Woman, Hardy Boys, Star Wars, Indiana Jones, Mad Cap Molly, Strawberry Shortcake and many others. Other chapters cover the care of Kenner dolls, online tips and trade show transactions related to dolls. “I found that there was no complete resource on Kenner, so I figured that if no one else will write it, I’m going to do it,” said Sprouse. “I have a rare opportunity to fill an untapped market. “This book appeals to collectors and buyers because of the descriptions and prices, but it caters to everyone.” Collectible Kenner Dolls Identification and Value Guide will be available via www.collectorbooksonline.com, starting this October. Retail price will be $24.95 ($14.95 for dealers.)

Promotional photo of the cover of Sprouse’s book.

By Curtis R. Burdette, Contributing Writer

By Dr. Albert M. Lewis, Director

AQ Staffer Pens Ultimate Guide to Collecting Kenner Dolls

Emeritus College–Committed to Lifelong Learning

Campus News – Fall 2003 Fall 2003 – Campus News

Emeritus College – Fall 2003

Aquinas College Graduates First Class of POHI Majors By Kathy Barker, Assistant Professor of Education, and David Dvorak, Executive Director CLC

The Conductive Learning Center is the sort of program that never fails to give visitors a lumpin-the-throat feeling that good things happen there, much of it through the efforts of Aquinas students. In May 2005, Aquinas College will graduate its first physically and/or otherwise health impaired (POHI) majors. The POHI major is offered within the School of Education and is an endorsement in an additional area of expertise that is earned along with the elementary teacher certification. Aquinas College is one of two colleges/universities in the state of Michigan that offers this teaching endorsement. The curriculum utilized for this teacher preparation is unique. Dr. Andras Peto developed this method in Budapest, Hungary, over fifty years ago and teachers have been trained at the International Peto Institute/Teachers College since that time. Aquinas College is now the sole provider of this training on the American continents. The program’s focus is on working with those with motoricrelated disabilities, such as cerebral palsy and spina bifida. What makes this training unique from others? One distinct difference is the quantity of handson application experience that is required of the college student. POHI majors spend a minimum of 120 hours per semester within the classrooms of the Conductive Learning Center, a non-profit school affiliated with Aquinas

Aquinas College students Clare Avery, Andrea Gainok, Melissa Kelly and Jamieson McCormick visited the International Peto Institute in Budapest, Hungary, in May.

College. Here, students work under the direction of Aquinas College and Peto Teachers College instructors. Experience includes the leading of activities within the day, working as a member of the instructional team, planning curriculum and working with assessments. Classroom instruction includes biomedical and educational content stressing active participation in each portion of the day. The emphasis is on development of the whole person versus focus on only the motor issue of disability. The future for these students is promising, with multiple options for employment. They may work as special education teachers within the public schools, or be employed as conductor-teachers within the international conductive education field, or as general education teachers. It is anticipated that the demand for teachers prepared with these skills will only increase. This is due, in part, to the success the medical field is having in saving premature

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babies and the potential related disabilities that may result. Also there is a limited number of conductor-teachers being prepared to maintain the demand of existing service programs in Canada, U.S.A., Europe and Asia. Requests for qualified candidates teaching conductive education are already coming in. Anxious to know when Aquinas will graduate its first class of teachers of conductive education. Aquinas has been recognized for its efforts to bring new thinking and skills to the field of teaching the physically impaired. Educational leadership within the state of Michigan is keeping the program’s progress on its radar screen and is eager to see positive results for students. The Superintendent of Education for the state of Michigan has observed the process in action and supports the innovation this brings. It is one more example of how vision, hard work and patience can bring positive change to the lives of many.

Ronald Urbanski, Emeritus College Board member, offers a toast in honor of Larry and Nancy Erhardt (left) who were presented with the 2003 Emeritus Award. Also on stage are Al Lewis (second from right) and President Knopke (right).

Erhardts Honored by Emeritus College By Laura Bennett-Kimble ‘95, Contributing Writer

On May 21, Nancy and Larry Erhardt received the Emeritus Award. The proclamation which President Harry Knopke read at the annual Aquinas Emeritus Evening stated, in part, that “Larry and Nancy embrace and represent the values of Aquinas College and its mission as an inclusive educational community rooted in the Catholic Dominican tradition.” Formal as that proclamation may sound, the message came through loud and clear: These two people have worked hard to better their world. The event itself bubbled over with warmth and goodwill as some 300 friends, relatives and well-wishers celebrated with the couple. Bernard (Bernie) Malewitz, owner of River City Mechan-ical and longtime friend of Larry’s,

teased his old friend a bit before stating, “I have never in all my life in construction known a more ethical person than Larry Erhardt.” As CEO of Erhardt Construction, Larry has been involved with a number of significant area construction projects, including the Aquinas College Performing Arts Center, the Aquinas College Field House, Van Andel Arena, St. Robert of Newminster Church, Van Andel Research Institute and the new $20 million Devos Place Convention Center. Larry attended Aquinas as a preengineering student for two years before transferring to the University of Detroit, where he earned his degree in engineering. Nancy became involved at Aquinas after she received her bachelor of science degree from Siena Heights College in Adrian.

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She has always been a “gracious, kind, and caring” woman with “a servant’s heart,” said Cynthia VanGelderen, dean of the School of Management, who pointed out Nancy’s involvement with the Circle Theatre project, her membership on the Aquinas College Board of Trustees Development Committee, and her volunteer work with Villa Elizabeth Nursing Home. Ronald Urbanski, Emeritus College Board of Governors member, gave the toast. He described the Erhardts as the “kindest, gentlest, most loving, unselfish, charitable, and trustworthy people you could know. These many years I have never heard a negative word said about them. And these many years, I have never heard them say a negative word about others. What goes around comes around,” he said, raising his glass.


Dr. Albert M. Lewis Emeritus College Director

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Emeritus College

I am delighted to share with you the enthusiasm of the Aquinas Emeritus College Board of Governors and staff. Charged with enhancing and further developing a program that has served the Grand Rapids community for 28 years, we have combined our efforts to create new programs and partnerships. We have successfully negotiated contracts for lifelong learning courses with Porter Hills, the Clark Retirement Community and Breton Woods. Our class offerings at the Browne Center have increased. We now offer evening classes in June and early fall. Working with FifthThird Bank we have offered a class titled—“Pre-retirement Planning: It’s more than just the money.” In a course evaluation a participant wrote: “Great program …sparkling personalities… three cheers to 5/3 Bank and Aquinas Emeritus College.” We plan to offer this program again in the fall. Charley Honey, a writer for The Grand Rapids Press, has actively reported on our programs, especially the course on the Prodigal Son, taught by Monsignor Gaspar Ancona. And, John Loeks of Celebration Cinema has made it possible for Dr. Andrew Jefchak to teach a course on modern film at Celebration Cinema in the fall. We expect all of our fall classes to fill quickly and encourage early registrations! The Aquinas Emeritus Board is now challenged to reach out to the

many people who do not know about us, and to people in the 40to-50-year-old range. We hope to achieve this through evening course offerings in the fall—“The Civil War,” “So, You’ve Always Wanted to be an Entrepreneur,” and “Lewis and Clark”—and to advertise more effectively. Toward that end, our new promotional brochure will be distributed to all our constituents very soon. With the Aquinas College Department of Languages, we are considering an intergenerational trip to France in May 2004. We are also reviewing new opportunities for our program in Naples, Florida, and considering a new program in Traverse City. Our Emeritus Evening Award honoring Larry and Nancy Erhardt was a very successful event in all respects; the largest turnout ever enjoyed being present to see Larry and Nancy accept the Aquinas Emeritus Award. The Emeritus Evening Award is always the highlight of our year; our Board could not have chosen individuals who better exemplify the values of Aquinas College and the Dominican traditions. Finally, the Development Committee of our Board of Governors is busy organizing the initial phases of its campaign to raise a $1 million endowment to secure the future of the Aquinas Emeritus College. We look forward to seeing you in our classes! For course and registration information, please call 616-459-8281.

Where can a collector go to locate information on Kenner dolls? On Oct. 1, 2003, collectors and dealers alike will be waiting for the opportunity to get their hands on a hardcover copy of the Collectible Kenner Dolls Identification and Value Guide. Aquinas College Applications Specialist Amy Sprouse, herself an avid doll collector, authored the handy guidebook as a tool for dealers and collectors to identify Kenner dolls along with the original packaging and accessories. The 176-page book contains more than 600 full-color photographs of Kenner dolls, produced from 1971 to 1981, in their original outfits. “I started collecting in 1998 and found dolls I had played with as a girl that were brand new and still in the original packaging,” said Sprouse. “The quality of Kenner figures is higher than other toys of that time and they still hold up 20 years later, which is a testament to the durability of Kenner products.” As a pioneer for Kenner-related collectibles, Sprouse has shared her knowledge with other enthusiasts by writing articles for several doll collector magazines. As she prepared for writing her guidebook, she had the opportunity to contact some of the original designers to learn more about the development of the Kenner doll products. According to the publisher, Collector Books, this guidebook will be the first to focus entirely on Kenner dolls. Chapters of the

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Amy Sprouse poses with just a few of the hundreds of Kenner Dolls she collects and for which she authored a resource book on identification and value for collectors and dealers.

book are devoted to separate doll lines including Darci, Bionic Woman, Hardy Boys, Star Wars, Indiana Jones, Mad Cap Molly, Strawberry Shortcake and many others. Other chapters cover the care of Kenner dolls, online tips and trade show transactions related to dolls. “I found that there was no complete resource on Kenner, so I figured that if no one else will write it, I’m going to do it,” said Sprouse. “I have a rare opportunity to fill an untapped market. “This book appeals to collectors and buyers because of the descriptions and prices, but it caters to everyone.” Collectible Kenner Dolls Identification and Value Guide will be available via www.collectorbooksonline.com, starting this October. Retail price will be $24.95 ($14.95 for dealers.)

Promotional photo of the cover of Sprouse’s book.

Emeritus College–Committed to Lifelong Learning

AQ Staffer Pens Ultimate Guide to Collecting Kenner Dolls

By Dr. Albert M. Lewis, Director

By Curtis R. Burdette, Contributing Writer

Campus News – Fall 2003 Fall 2003 – Campus News

Emeritus College – Fall 2003

Aquinas College Graduates First Class of POHI Majors By Kathy Barker, Assistant Professor of Education, and David Dvorak, Executive Director CLC

The Conductive Learning Center is the sort of program that never fails to give visitors a lumpin-the-throat feeling that good things happen there, much of it through the efforts of Aquinas students. In May 2005, Aquinas College will graduate its first physically and/or otherwise health impaired (POHI) majors. The POHI major is offered within the School of Education and is an endorsement in an additional area of expertise that is earned along with the elementary teacher certification. Aquinas College is one of two colleges/universities in the state of Michigan that offers this teaching endorsement. The curriculum utilized for this teacher preparation is unique. Dr. Andras Peto developed this method in Budapest, Hungary, over fifty years ago and teachers have been trained at the International Peto Institute/Teachers College since that time. Aquinas College is now the sole provider of this training on the American continents. The program’s focus is on working with those with motoricrelated disabilities, such as cerebral palsy and spina bifida. What makes this training unique from others? One distinct difference is the quantity of handson application experience that is required of the college student. POHI majors spend a minimum of 120 hours per semester within the classrooms of the Conductive Learning Center, a non-profit school affiliated with Aquinas

Aquinas College students Clare Avery, Andrea Gainok, Melissa Kelly and Jamieson McCormick visited the International Peto Institute in Budapest, Hungary, in May.

College. Here, students work under the direction of Aquinas College and Peto Teachers College instructors. Experience includes the leading of activities within the day, working as a member of the instructional team, planning curriculum and working with assessments. Classroom instruction includes biomedical and educational content stressing active participation in each portion of the day. The emphasis is on development of the whole person versus focus on only the motor issue of disability. The future for these students is promising, with multiple options for employment. They may work as special education teachers within the public schools, or be employed as conductor-teachers within the international conductive education field, or as general education teachers. It is anticipated that the demand for teachers prepared with these skills will only increase. This is due, in part, to the success the medical field is having in saving premature

babies and the potential related disabilities that may result. Also there is a limited number of conductor-teachers being prepared to maintain the demand of existing service programs in Canada, U.S.A., Europe and Asia. Requests for qualified candidates teaching conductive education are already coming in. Anxious to know when Aquinas will graduate its first class of teachers of conductive education. Aquinas has been recognized for its efforts to bring new thinking and skills to the field of teaching the physically impaired. Educational leadership within the state of Michigan is keeping the program’s progress on its radar screen and is eager to see positive results for students. The Superintendent of Education for the state of Michigan has observed the process in action and supports the innovation this brings. It is one more example of how vision, hard work and patience can bring positive change to the lives of many.

Ronald Urbanski, Emeritus College Board member, offers a toast in honor of Larry and Nancy Erhardt (left) who were presented with the 2003 Emeritus Award. Also on stage are Al Lewis (second from right) and President Knopke (right).

Erhardts Honored by Emeritus College By Laura Bennett-Kimble ‘95, Contributing Writer

On May 21, Nancy and Larry Erhardt received the Emeritus Award. The proclamation which President Harry Knopke read at the annual Aquinas Emeritus Evening stated, in part, that “Larry and Nancy embrace and represent the values of Aquinas College and its mission as an inclusive educational community rooted in the Catholic Dominican tradition.” Formal as that proclamation may sound, the message came through loud and clear: These two people have worked hard to better their world. The event itself bubbled over with warmth and goodwill as some 300 friends, relatives and well-wishers celebrated with the couple. Bernard (Bernie) Malewitz, owner of River City Mechan-ical and longtime friend of Larry’s,

teased his old friend a bit before stating, “I have never in all my life in construction known a more ethical person than Larry Erhardt.” As CEO of Erhardt Construction, Larry has been involved with a number of significant area construction projects, including the Aquinas College Performing Arts Center, the Aquinas College Field House, Van Andel Arena, St. Robert of Newminster Church, Van Andel Research Institute and the new $20 million Devos Place Convention Center. Larry attended Aquinas as a preengineering student for two years before transferring to the University of Detroit, where he earned his degree in engineering. Nancy became involved at Aquinas after she received her bachelor of science degree from Siena Heights College in Adrian.

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She has always been a “gracious, kind, and caring” woman with “a servant’s heart,” said Cynthia VanGelderen, dean of the School of Management, who pointed out Nancy’s involvement with the Circle Theatre project, her membership on the Aquinas College Board of Trustees Development Committee, and her volunteer work with Villa Elizabeth Nursing Home. Ronald Urbanski, Emeritus College Board of Governors member, gave the toast. He described the Erhardts as the “kindest, gentlest, most loving, unselfish, charitable, and trustworthy people you could know. These many years I have never heard a negative word said about them. And these many years, I have never heard them say a negative word about others. What goes around comes around,” he said, raising his glass.

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When I first came to Aquinas College three-plus years ago, the most frequent remark I heard from our alumni was, “I never hear from Aquinas College.” My, how things have changed in a few years! With the advent of Aquinas magazine, concentrated work on our alumni database, and regular contact with our alums through various efforts, including the electronic media, I’m happy to report I haven’t heard that comment in more than a year. And now the comment most frequently heard is one that brings smiles rather than cringes: “It’s time for Aquinas!” That’s what you are saying, and that’s what all departments of the College are working to make happen. Within the next five years major changes will take place at Aquinas, changes that will enhance the Aquinas experience, and help the College even better prepare our students for their lives. Among the changes will be upgrades to the library, Field House, expanded endowment to support faculty and scholarship, and growth in annual operational support for Aquinas College. Within the Development Department, in collaboration with the academic departments and facilities, and under the direction of President Knopke, we are preparing the groundwork that will provide the direction for these needed expansions. But the most important ingredient in all the preparation is you. If you’re reading this, you’ve heard from Aquinas College, and now Aquinas College wants to hear from By Julie Ridenour Vice President of Development

you. We want to know that your experience at Aquinas altered your life by providing the education and direction that sets you apart in your job. We want to know that you share our vision for an institution that embraces the Dominican way, and that you want to see your alma mater have the resources and facilities that will ensure the College’s position among the nation’s premiere Catholic colleges. How can you help? There are so many ways: • Visit the Aquinas College Web site, and keep apprised of activities at Aquinas; • Know a great high school senior? Encourage him or her to attend Aquinas College, and contact our Admissions Office to let them know about your admissions prospect; • Participate in the Aquinas College Alumni Association; • Join the Aquinas College Career Network. Help other alums achieve their career objectives through your support; • And please, above all, give back to the College when asked. Aquinas College enjoys an exceptionally high level of graduate satisfaction for their educational experience. And more than 90 percent of our students received financial assistance to attend Aquinas. Let that satisfaction translate to giving back to Aquinas— you can make a difference! For information about how to give to Aquinas College, please call the Office of the Vice President for Development (616-459-8281), or visit the development Web site at www.aquinas.edu/development. You’ve heard from us—we want to hear from you. Make it “Time for Aquinas.”

C ommencement, It’s Time…

In a testament to the powers of determination, continuing education (CE) student LaTanga (pronounced “LaTanya”) Joseph, age 45, graduated in May after years of challenges. “LaTanga has persevered in her quest to finish her bachelor’s By Laura Bennett-Kimble ‘95, Contributing Writer

How to Reach Graduation in Just 28 Years

degree with a major in communication while facing daunting obstacles, health concerns and, in general, the passage of 28 years,” said Pat Kozal, Joseph’s college advisor. The road to graduation hasn’t been smooth. For the past four years Joseph drove back and forth from Chicago every weekend to a part-time job. She suffered a mild heart attack in the fall of 2001, and her mother died of cancer after a short illness in August 2002. “Sometimes you have to do whatever it takes to reach your goals,” said Joseph, who graduated from Benton Harbor High School in 1975 and took classes at various schools over the years. She received her Associate in Arts diploma from Grand Rapids Community College in 2000.

“I believe that my family has always been pro-education, especially as African-Americans. It’s always been important to be the best you can be,” said Joseph, who was inducted into Alpha Sigma Lambda, the national honor society for CE students. “LaTanga’s story is one of many,” Kozal said. “But what makes her stand out from the crowd are her personal qualities of courage, cheerfulness, persistence, and personal responsibility.” “I love learning and I could not have chosen a better school,” Joseph said. Then she laughed. “I sound like an advertisement for Aquinas, but it’s true.”

Right: Joseph is hooded by Dean Shirley Lewis, Ed.D., during May’s graduation ceremonies. Pictured left: President Knopke poses with LaTanga Joseph during induction ceremonies of the national honor society for CE students.

it and passing it on to the next generation one of the best possible ways to live.” And he posted a challenge to the graduates embarking on life’s 2003 graduates carry out the traditional turning of the tassel.

journey, saying that they “could do no better than to emulate the people who brought us our democracy.” During the cere- Sr. Aquinas Weber ’58 is recognized for her 25 years of service mony, President Knopke to the College; she retired June 30. also took time to recognize, and Gary Konow, Ph.D., for 35 years thank, two long-standing as a College faculty member. members of the Aquinas com(Full texts of the Wilkins and munity scheduled to retire at the Canepa remarks are available at: end of the year—Sr. Mary www.aquinas.edu/president/ Aquinas Weber, Chancellor, commencement.) after 25 years of service, and

M ay 2003 Technology at Aquinas By Joyce LaFleur, B.S.B.A. ’82, M.M. ’95, Director Information Technology and Services

Technology resources and services at Aquinas College are continually being upgraded and expanded to meet the needs of students, faculty and staff. Educause, the professional information technology association for colleges and universities, publishes a guide for prospective students to evaluate information technology at colleges and universities they are considering. Aquinas stacks up very well in the various aspects of the guide, including Academic Experience, Administrative Experience, Social Experience, Requirements and Services & Costs. Most notable are our course support Web pages, library resources available online, computer and information literacy courses, online access to college catalog and policies, computer labs throughout campus, residential hall network, student news, information and organizational Web portal and refresh plans for keeping systems current. The Hardware Refresh Leasing Plan allows College equipment to

Julie Ridenour Vice President of Development

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Members of the ITS team (from left) Brad Vedders, Greg Vedders, Director Joyce LaFleur and Tom Ferratt huddle to develop options for dealing with a potentially damaging virus.

Development

Fall 2003 – Campus News

Alumni News – Fall 2003

to aid faculty-led classroom instruction as well as student presentations. Videoconferencing facilities located in the Jarecki Center for Advanced Learning can be utilized by individuals, small groups or class activities. A 24-hour online knowledge center and help desk system augment training and help desk services. A College technology council, created in 1997, consisting of faculty, staff and student representatives, meets monthly to identify and prioritize technology needs. The Aquinas network faces a constant threat from virus laced electronic information and intrusion attempts by malicious hackers. Several layers of protective technology and internal policy thwarted over 10,000 potential incidents last year alone. Every incoming e-mail message is scanned for viruses before it is delivered. Updates to the virus protection software, both for e-mail and for data files, are checked several times each day for updated definitions of new threats. Intrusion detection software runs continuously at the server level and reports on each attempt at unauthorized access—a daily occurrence. While technologiThe ITS team discuss the processes of containing the cal methods of provirus and restoring the College computer network to tecting the Aquinas a secure state, which was achieved within five days. network are essential, so too are policies governing use In addition, computer labs are and user awareness of individual available in the residence halls, responsibilities. Good electronic student center, library and community citizenship is not academic center for student use. All intuitive and has been clarified in classrooms are wired for network the College’s Acceptable Use access and deluxe multimedia Policy (AUP). mobile instructor carts are available be replaced every three years. Web-based courses and applications, including academic research, library holdings, and e-mail via the Web, allow for access to many information resources from an off-campus Internet connection. Campus portals ACORN, Alumni, and The Moose connect students, faculty, staff and alumni to campus news, events, resources and each other from on or off campus. Resident students may connect their personally owned PC to the Resident Hall Network (RESNET) for access to these and many other Web-based resources from the convenience of their room. There are also ports in various locations around campus, including a net-work in the Cook Carriage House with wireless laptops for check-out, which allows students, faculty and staff to connect to the RESNET system for research and communication.

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Adler Has the Look for Burt’s Bees New Line Tracy Lint Soltis Adler ’89, is the new face for Burt’s Bees Healthy Treatment skin-care products. And it all happened by chance when Burt’s Bees owner, Roxanne Quimby walked into the North Carolina restaurant Adler owns with her husband, Mitchell. Adler caught Quimby’s eye as a woman aging with grace and confidence— just the look Quimby wanted to

promote her company’s new skincare line. “If you look closely at the boxes,” Adler said in a Grand Rapids Press article (March 4, 2003), “you’ll see they didn’t airbrush the crow’s feet off my face. They wanted me to look achievable. Fresh and natural, but not perfect. Because perfect is not attainable.”

Alum Designs Poster for Festival of Arts Virginia Rose Kane ’84, and her husband Manuel Gentile, both artists, created the winning poster for Festival of the Arts 2003, a celebration of arts held in downtown Grand Rapids annually in June. Their poster is a threedimensional collage of downtown

landmarks with Alexander “Sandy” Calder in the center. Calder is the creator of “La Grande Vitesse” which stands tall next to city hall in the downtown area. The original poster was on display at the Festival and at the Grand Rapids Art Museum.

Southard’s Work Spans Many Genres “Everyone in Heaven writes an autobiography sooner or later,” says Scott D. Southard ‘88, explaining why he chose that theme for his first novel, 3 Days In Rome. In 2001, the Heeken Novel Writing Fellowship for Work in Progress honored his book about a young man who relates his earthly and heavenly travails while perched behind the Pearly Gates. Southard also received awards for The Dante Experience, a 10episode radio series that receives play on National Public Radio. He is currently scouting publishers for

his next novel, Cassandra on the Island. Since graduating from Aquinas, Southard has studied at Michigan State University and the University of Southern California, where he earned a master’s degree in writing. His stage play will premiere off-Broadway this year. One of Southard’s proudest moments was his marriage in December 2002 to Heather Vaughan. “Convincing her to marry me was a great accomplishment on my part!” he says. The Los Angeles resident learned much at Aquinas. “Dr.

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Chesley, Dr. Raikes, Mr. Eberle and Dr. Brooks…all have been major influences. I cannot say enough for how important they have each been in my life,” Southard relates.


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1952 “Down in the Valley” production. It was performed at the Ladies Literary Club. 1968 “An Evening with Ionesco” and “An Evening Albee” were performed in the Carriage House. 1967 “Under Milk Wood” was performed in the Carriage House and directed by Sister Mary de Chantal. Gary Konow, chair of the theatre department, joined the faculty. 1966 The Carriage House Theatre makes its debut with Moliere’s “Tartuffe.” 1952 “Down In The Valley” and “Solomon and Balchis” were performed at the Ladies Literary Club in downtown Grand Rapids. 1950 Lacordaires presented “City of Kings” at the St. Cecilia Auditorium. 1949 “Rise and Shine” was performed at the St. Cecelia Auditorium and directed by Tony Brink. 1945 Aquinas moved to the Robinson Road campus and the Lacordaires, a student dramatic club, presented short plays in the upper floor of the one-time stable, now Bukowski chapel. 1940s Name changed to Aquinas College and students continued to present original plays and skits. 1930s Catholic Junior College produced skits and workshop plays. Variety shows such as “Campus Silluettes” were performed at St. Cecelia Auditorium.

help, first from a part time professor, then from more full time instructors who taught a series of popular courses. “We didn’t have a huge number of majors, but many students got inolved,” Konow remembers. “We had musicals and straight stage shows. Students perRehearsing a scene from the 1970 production formed and worked of Jean Anouilh’s “Antigone,” performed at the backstage. It was Carriage House. (L-R foreground) Sam Joseph, Sarah Gallagher,Ted Badgerow, and Bill Noble quite effective.” Konow can name a number of alumni—majors and non-majors alike—who went on to make names for themselves in the performance world. Fred Sebulske ’65 retired as director of the theatre program at Grand Rapids Community College and is the managing director of Actor’s Theatre. Andy Way ’79 became technical director at a community theatre in Florida. Cynthia Donnelly ’70 designs costumes on the east coast—her

Aquinas’ Theatre History

Be sure to check the AQ Web site for details on these events and others at www.aquinas.edu.

(L-R) Bob Wick ’85, Maureen Carlson and Ed Carlson ’69

For additional information on any listed event, please call the Alumni & Parent Relations Office at 616-459-8281or e-mail to alumni@aquinas.edu. (Seated l-r) Amy Lalewicz ’59, and Mar tha Weaver ’02 Chicago Bus Trip

(Standing l-r) Nathan Plum ’02 and Brian Milliron ’02

Alumni & Friends

Saturday November 22 Detroit Golf Club Detroit-Area Alumni Reception

R E C E P T I O N S

Traverse City

Wednesday October 29 Arizona Alumni Reception

Date TBA, October Golden Saints Alumni Reunion— all alumni of Classes 1930-53

Sheila Knopke (center) poses with Tannisha Whitehead ’99 (left) and Hattie D. IrvinPookrum ’99 (right).

Class of ’78, ’88 and ’98 Reunions Theatre Program Reunion Willowbrook Reunion Aquinas College Alumni Association Awards

(L-R) James Pelon ’58, Beth (Geller ’58) Burns, Mollie (Brenner ’53) Pelon, and John Burns ’58 share a light moment.

Induction of honorees into Aquinas College’s Hall of Fame and Athletic Hall of Fame

Homecoming & Gala Weekend

Friday-Sunday September 26-28

2003

Alumni Calendar

Detroit What better way to welcome the first day of summer than at the Aquinas College Alumni Association’s 37th Golf Outing. The event at Grand Rapids’ Boulder Creek Golf Club attracted a crowd of golfers—all alumni and friends of the College. Following registration, the group took to the course for the 8 a.m. shotgun start. The picturesque day on the links was made possible with the support of several sponsors: Mika, Myers, Beckett & Jones; Varnum, Riddering, Schmidt & Howlett; Jim ’75 and Linda Payne; and Plante & Moran.

Scrambles invoke a rarity on the links… team members actually hope their teammates’ putts go in.

(L-R) Fred Hesse ’63, joined by Tom Timlin and Larry Spetoskey, enjoys his 24th consecutive alumni golf outing.

1957 Sister Mary de Chantal Luke, O.P., joined the faculty in 1957. Her first production was Moliere’s “The Miser” followed by “Medea,” “The Importance of Being Earnest” and “Cyrano de Bergerac.”

name appeared in the credits for Woody Allen’s movie, Manhattan. Many alumni keep in touch with their former professor. “I was only six, seven, eight years older than they were,” Konow says. “We have a lot of contact.” The theatre major ended at Aquinas in 1976 when the fire marshal said the Carriage House was not safe for student organizations to use. Yet Konow offers other reasons for the program’s collapse. “There was a downward trend in the study of theatre in general. People were interested in business, and college theatre programs were hurting,” Konow says. “The only way we could resurrect the major was if the College entered into some sort of collaboration with another program.” Enter Circle Theatre. When Harry Knopke became president of Aquinas College in 1997, he consulted with Joe Dulin, director of Circle Theatre. The company was looking to move out of its cramped quarters at John Ball Park. A partnership was born in which Aquinas would build a

Campus News – Fall 2003

37th Annual Aquinas College Alumni Association Golf Outing

Top honors of the day with a 12-underpar 60 went to the foursome led by (L to R) Pete Smith, featuring his two sons, Justin Smith ’98 and Ryan Smith ’00, and accompanied by “ringer” Matt Eldred. (The mixed foursome award went to the team of Rick Chapla ’75, Tom Breihof ’75, Tracy Breihof and Dave Breihof.)

1963 “Arms and the Man” by George Bernard Shaw was performed at the Civic Theatre and directed by Sr. Mary de Chantal and Jack Rang.

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Fall 2003 – Alumni News

Voted “Best Mulligan Salesperson, ” Michelle Bottrall ’97 pitches her most difficult sell of the day to her husband, David, a College Trustee.

L to R: Bing Goel, Rick Huisman and Trustee Pat Miles, Jr. ’88 celebrated along with teammate Pat Miles, Sr. ’95 as he clinched the Closestto-the-Pin contest sponsored by Tom and Joyce Wisner.

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Golfers did their best to win a Chevrolet Impala from Kool Chevrolet on Hole No. 13; Bob Mason ’90 missed by only a few inches. Golfers also missed their chance to relax in their own spa, which was put up by Emerald Spa on Hole No. 3. All participants left with something in hand thanks to the many prize sponsors and friends of Aquinas. If you’d like to join us next year, look for information on the 38th Annual Aquinas College Alumni Association Golf Outing in the Spring 2004 Aquinas magazine.

As the ITS staff scanned the network, it uncovered numerous violations of the College’s AUP relating to software installation and use. Included was the unauthorized installation of a Klez-infected program by an unsuspecting employee, which circumvented the established anti-virus protocol. While ITS discovered its vulnerability the hard way, it became clear early on in this incident that its staff is prepared and experienced enough to successfully respond to threats.

With all of the threats bombarding the network daily, only one actually penetrated the network—the Klez virus—last November. System administrators acted quickly and shut down all access to stop the exponential effects and limit the infection to only 12 PCs on the network. The computer network, and the campus, was brought to its knees, causing a widespread disruption of communications and tasking assignments that lasted for five days.

Information Technology and Services (ITS) contained the problem by shutting down the entire system. The staff worked feverishly in the following hours and days to isolate the virus and begin correcting the problem. Every campus computer was checked. Fortunately, the damage was minimal. Still, the virus had a profound impact on campus operations, impacting fundraising, financial records, admissions applications, internal communications and lost work time.

Japanese Seek Economic Future in Grand Rapids

representatives, Sakiyama challenged the group to think beyond standard terms to include the consideration of paradigm changes and “recalibrations” of how an economy is viewed and measured. Emphasis was placed on the Japanese state of mind and the reasons Representatives from a Japanese Consortium meet with West Michigan businesspeople and those with money will not business scholars in a day-long forum hosted by spend. This was followed by Aquinas College.Aquinas Economics Professor a description of specific Masato Yamazaki, Ph.D., (rear left), a native of Japan who organized the forum, addresses consumer initiatives underparticipants. taken by the firm Asahi Elles. The question and answer session revolved around the balance of that followed the presentation gave public sector and private sector the American academicians and activities, with some consensus business people an opportunity to developing around the idea that put the Japanese economy in Japanese “guided capitalism” may context so that it could be better have created a regulatory understood and evaluated. This environment too discouraging to was followed by American entrepreneurs. Discussion of the recommendations for the Japanese vision for future market economies economy, which varied from short included the environmental term pragmatic ideas about credit problem with numerous sugmanagement to ideas concerning gestions made concerning how a new vision for all future market environmental costs might be economies. Some discussion recognized.

By Woody Hoover, Ph.D. Professor, Business Administration

Japan has been struggling to restart its stalled economy for more than a decade. In April, Aquinas College hosted representatives of the Japanese Corporate Consortium for Creating New Consumer Industries in a forum designed to share ideas from business scholars from west Michigan colleges and universities and successful American entrepreneurs. During the day-long conference held at Marywood on April 25, representatives of the Japanese Consortium reviewed the state of their economy in standard economic terms to include discussions of monetary and fiscal policies together with economic reform packages. They also shared a paper prepared by Tsuguo Sakiyama, who serves as an advisor to the Japanese Prime Minister. In his report, presented by one of his

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Think back to your junior and senior years at Aquinas— competing for internships, struggling with your resume, attending endless job fairs… and just trying to get your foot in the door. Wouldn’t it have been great to be able to know a little more before jumping right in? Well, the Alumni Office and the Career and Counseling Services Office are teaming up to start an Alumni Mentor Network, available to students in September and we need you! This is a Web-based program called eRecruiting that you will find on the Aquinas homepage (www.aquinas.edu/) under Career and Counseling Services. Registered users—Aquinas students and Alumni—will be able to locate and network with people and businesses in their field of work and in different regional areas if they are planning to relocate. As a mentor, you are able to control the amount of time you want to make available, and what types of things you would like to help them with. A student will perform a search with specific details and all matching profiles will appear with your preferred method of contact information. If you would only like to be contacted once a month, your name will not appear after a student picks you until the next month. No other contact information is given to the student beyond what you choose to disclose. It is the student’s responsibility to contact you. If this sounds like something you would like to be involved in, please give us a call at 616-459-8281.

Mentor Network

19

A room rate discount of 20 percent applies to Aquinas College students, alumni and their immediate families.

Campus Facility Reservations The Alumni Web Site offers the latest information regarding Aquinas Alumni Association activities and events as well as campus news. Alumni can also easily update their contact information and keep connected to their alma mater. (www.aquinas.edu/alumni)

Aquinas Alumni Web Site Published bi-annually, the Aquinas magazine keeps alumni current with campus news. Each issue also includes in-depth features and profiles of our alumni and friends.

Aquinas Magazine

Aquinas’ theatre program has bred actors, directors, costume designers, clowns—even a few romances. Jim Chervenka ‘70 and Linda McLeod-Chervenka ’72 didn’t meet on the floorboards of the Carriage House stage, but they did marry there “because that’s where our love was,” Linda says. They had gone to high school in Dayton, Ohio and gotten involved in theatre at Aquinas. John was the leading man, stoic and silly in a number of roles. Linda was a supporting player. Yet, the college program that started their careers

ended a few years after they graduated. Now, 30 years later, John is technical director for Grand Rapids Civic Theatre, while Linda directs high school plays and children’s productions. The rebirth of theatre as an academic program at Aquinas has been decades in the making, says Gary Konow, Ph.D., ’82 who was chair of the theatre program then and who retired at the end of the recently completed fiscal year. “What is a liberal arts college without theatre? Especially a Catholic college?” Konow asks. “Theatre confronts issues that

cover the entire spectrum of a liberal arts education. That’s why a theatre program is critical.” Sister Mary de Chantal, O.P., recognized that 40 years ago when, as a speech/drama professor, she had a vision for more student involvement in the performing arts. de Chantal asked Konow to head a theatre major for the college. Konow put together a curriculum and students performed in the Carriage House, which at that time had a thrust stage. de Chantal left the college a year or so later, but Konow had plenty of

By Tonya Schafer ’02, Contributing Writer

Alumni Benefits & Services

Theatre Program Fosters Talent and Romance

Alumni Office 616-459-8281 • alumni@aquinas.edu

Albert Doherty (l) and Neola Wolfe in scene from 1952 production of “Solomon and Balchis” performed at the Ladies Literary Club in downtown Grand Rapids.

Seating: limited to first 55 guests; payment reserves seat. Cost: $50. Includes muffins, juice, snacks and door prizes.

(All times are Eastern Standard Times.)

7:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m. 11:30 p.m.

Bus departs from Aquinas Arrive in Chicago Depart for Grand Rapids Arrive at Aquinas

Saturday, November 22, 2003 Alumni & Friends Chicago Trip

Jim Chervenka ’70 (l) and Jessica Starr ’72 rehearse a scene from the 1967 production of Dylan Thomas’ “Under Milkwood,” directed by Sr. Mary de Chantal, O.P., at the Carriage House.

Don’t Miss the Bus!

Fall 2003 – Alumni News

Campus News – Fall 2003

Alumni News – Fall 2003

Volunteers Make It Happen While the combined efforts to build a state-of-the-art theatre facility at Aquinas College have come to fruition, the real collaboration of art and education is just beginning. Aquinas College, Circle Theatre and the Catholic Secondary Schools are now moving ahead with productions that will bring amateurs and community professionals together under one roof to provide audiences with a truly unique theatre experience. Our many thanks to all who have made the Aquinas College Performing Arts Center a reality for students and community theatre performers. Our deepest gratitude goes out to the hundreds of volunteers from Circle Theatre, Aquinas College and Catholic Secondary Schools who worked on the campaign raising funds, planning the weeklong Grand Opening (July 29 to August 2) events, and collaborating on a vigorous performance schedule. Steering and Grand Opening Committee members (some pictured at right) include Andy Angelo, Brian Annable, Penny Avery, Reed Bretz, Kimberly Bruyn, Lawrence Burns, Rick Cassard, Deb Cleland-Nowakowski, Steven de Polo, Joseph Dulin, Marty Fahey, Duane Feldpausch, Kathryn Fore, Cynthia Goldman, Ellen Harburn, Gary Hensch, Kyle Irwin, Marjorie Kindel, Gary Konow, Harry Knopke, Barb Koning, the Rev. James Kowalski, Connie Kowalsyk, Eric Messing, Lyle Morrison, Dauvan Mulally, Lisa Nawrocki, Deb O’Donnell, Catherine

Alum/Former GR Black Sox Player Honored in Exhibit By Tonya Schafer ’02, Contributing Writer

Aquinas College Performing Arts Center Grand Opening Planning Committee

Aquinas College Performing Arts Center Steering Committee

Pearce, Sally Reeves, Julie Ridenour, Phillip Rios, Bob Rose, James Schipper, Bill Shefferly, Sharon Smith, Tom Sullivan, Tom Summers, David Weinandy, and Jim Wisnewski.

Aquinas College Performing Arts Center Performance Schedule 2003-04 Date

2003

2004

Event/performance

Group

August 6–31 Sept. 10–28 Oct. 9–11 Oct. 23–25 Oct. 25 Nov. 6–8 Nov. 8 Nov. 20–22 Dec. 4–20

“BeeHIVE” “Proof ” “Our Town” “Dracula” “Dracula” “Thurber3” “Thurber3” “Flowers for Algernon” Holiday Show

Circle Theatre Circle Theatre Aquinas College Players West Catholic High School (7:30 p.m.) West Catholic (2:30 p.m.) Catholic Central High School (7:30 p.m.) Catholic Central (2:30 p.m.) Aquinas College Thespians (A.C.T.) (7:00 p.m.) Circle Theatre / Aquinas College

Jan. 29–31 Jan. 31 Feb. 12–14 Feb. 26–28 March 18–20 March 20 April 1–3 April 21–23 April 23 May 5–30 June 9–27 July 7–Aug. 1 Aug. 11–22 Sept. 1–26

“The Comedy of Errors” “The Comedy of Errors” Black History Month “Pippen” “Guys and Dolls” “Guys and Dolls” Children’s Play “Grease” “Grease” Main Stage Main Stage Main Stage Main Stage Main Stage

West Catholic / Catholic Central (7:30 p.m.) West Catholic / Catholic Central (2:30 p.m.) Aquinas College Aquinas College West Catholic (7:30p.m.) West Catholic (2:30 p.m.) Circle Theatre / Aquinas College Catholic Central (7:30 p.m.) Catholic Central (2:30 p.m.) Circle Theatre Circle Theatre Ticket Information Circle Theatre Circle Theatre (616) 456-6656 Circle Theatre

18

It’s ironic, but Henry Saverson ’57 didn’t play baseball at Aquinas —his student job at the Peninsular Club in downtown Grand Rapids kept him too busy for batting practices and double headers on the College ball field. The former Grand Rapids Black Sox player took away something even more important from his undergraduate years—a sociology major and a career helping disadvantaged kids enjoy the same benefits he had throughout his introduction to adulthood. “My childhood experiences showed me a lot of things could be done to help children in the community,” said Saverson, who still lives in Grand Rapids. “I grew up in a poor environment, and that made me able to concentrate on studying and getting a decent job. I wanted to motivate young folks to go on and get further education.” For Saverson, the place to do that was Aquinas. “Some of the staff—especially Sister Gonzaga— went out of their way to make us feel comfortable. Not many African Americans were at the school at that time, and someone always helped us whenever we needed assistance,” Saverson said. “The quality of education was important, too,” he added. “The professors were helpful and the classes were not large. Aquinas was small enough that you could know people intimately.” Saverson kept busy in the summer months playing baseball

Henry Saverson ’57 (left) is pictured with Reuben Smartt during the unveiling last January of a special exhibit at the VanAndel Museum Center honoring the Grand Rapids Black Sox. PHOTO BY © THE GRAND RAPIDS.

and breaking barriers with the Grand Rapids Black Sox, a semiprofessional league for African Americans that the Van Andel Museum Center recently honored with a special exhibit. The second baseman—who had honed his skills in junior baseball leagues as a child and later with teams at City High School and Grand Rapids Community College—spent three years with the Detroit Stars and the Kansas City Monarchs as part of the Negro American League. (Both teams belonged to Black Sox owner Ted Rasberry.) Saverson left his baseball days behind when he joined the service, and later earned a master’s degree in social work from Michigan State University. He got a job with the juvenile courts and then with the State of Michigan’s Child Welfare Licensing Division. After five years he became a supervisor and then a

47

regional manager. Saverson retired from state service in 1992. Since then, he has done volunteer work with the Grand Rapids Community Foundation, continuing his commitment to kids by helping conduct statewide studies of adoption policies and creating policies that ensure children get permanent placements in loving, dedicated homes. Saverson has been accompanied in his journey by his wife, Naomi, daughter, Suzann, and their son, Henry Jr., who is now deceased. Despite his array of accomplishments both professional and athletic, Saverson’s Aquinas days are never far from mind. Recently he met with old chums to reminisce about the days he spent in Grand Rapids as a Saint. “I had been told Aquinas was a good school. I always felt comfortable and accepted there,” he said.


Think back to your junior and senior years at Aquinas— competing for internships, struggling with your resume, attending endless job fairs… and just trying to get your foot in the door. Wouldn’t it have been great to be able to know a little more before jumping right in? Well, the Alumni Office and the Career and Counseling Services Office are teaming up to start an Alumni Mentor Network, available to students in September and we need you! This is a Web-based program called eRecruiting that you will find on the Aquinas homepage (www.aquinas.edu/) under Career and Counseling Services. Registered users—Aquinas students and Alumni—will be able to locate and network with people and businesses in their field of work and in different regional areas if they are planning to relocate. As a mentor, you are able to control the amount of time you want to make available, and what types of things you would like to help them with. A student will perform a search with specific details and all matching profiles will appear with your preferred method of contact information. If you would only like to be contacted once a month, your name will not appear after a student picks you until the next month. No other contact information is given to the student beyond what you choose to disclose. It is the student’s responsibility to contact you. If this sounds like something you would like to be involved in, please give us a call at 616-459-8281.

Mentor Network

46

A room rate discount of 20 percent applies to Aquinas College students, alumni and their immediate families.

Campus Facility Reservations The Alumni Web Site offers the latest information regarding Aquinas Alumni Association activities and events as well as campus news. Alumni can also easily update their contact information and keep connected to their alma mater. (www.aquinas.edu/alumni)

Aquinas Alumni Web Site Published bi-annually, the Aquinas magazine keeps alumni current with campus news. Each issue also includes in-depth features and profiles of our alumni and friends.

Aquinas Magazine

Alumni Benefits & Services Alumni Office 616-459-8281 • alumni@aquinas.edu

Aquinas’ theatre program has bred actors, directors, costume designers, clowns—even a few romances. Jim Chervenka ‘70 and Linda McLeod-Chervenka ’72 didn’t meet on the floorboards of the Carriage House stage, but they did marry there “because that’s where our love was,” Linda says. They had gone to high school in Dayton, Ohio and gotten involved in theatre at Aquinas. John was the leading man, stoic and silly in a number of roles. Linda was a supporting player. Yet, the college program that started their careers

19

ended a few years after they graduated. Now, 30 years later, John is technical director for Grand Rapids Civic Theatre, while Linda directs high school plays and children’s productions. The rebirth of theatre as an academic program at Aquinas has been decades in the making, says Gary Konow, Ph.D., ’82 who was chair of the theatre program then and who retired at the end of the recently completed fiscal year. “What is a liberal arts college without theatre? Especially a Catholic college?” Konow asks. “Theatre confronts issues that

cover the entire spectrum of a liberal arts education. That’s why a theatre program is critical.” Sister Mary de Chantal, O.P., recognized that 40 years ago when, as a speech/drama professor, she had a vision for more student involvement in the performing arts. de Chantal asked Konow to head a theatre major for the college. Konow put together a curriculum and students performed in the Carriage House, which at that time had a thrust stage. de Chantal left the college a year or so later, but Konow had plenty of

By Tonya Schafer ’02, Contributing Writer

Theatre Program Fosters Talent and Romance Albert Doherty (l) and Neola Wolfe in scene from 1952 production of “Solomon and Balchis” performed at the Ladies Literary Club in downtown Grand Rapids.

Seating: limited to first 55 guests; payment reserves seat. Cost: $50. Includes muffins, juice, snacks and door prizes.

(All times are Eastern Standard Times.)

7:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m. 11:30 p.m.

Bus departs from Aquinas Arrive in Chicago Depart for Grand Rapids Arrive at Aquinas

Saturday, November 22, 2003 Alumni & Friends Chicago Trip

Jim Chervenka ’70 (l) and Jessica Starr ’72 rehearse a scene from the 1967 production of Dylan Thomas’ “Under Milkwood,” directed by Sr. Mary de Chantal, O.P., at the Carriage House.

Don’t Miss the Bus!

Fall 2003 – Alumni News

Campus News – Fall 2003

Alumni News – Fall 2003

Volunteers Make It Happen While the combined efforts to build a state-of-the-art theatre facility at Aquinas College have come to fruition, the real collaboration of art and education is just beginning. Aquinas College, Circle Theatre and the Catholic Secondary Schools are now moving ahead with productions that will bring amateurs and community professionals together under one roof to provide audiences with a truly unique theatre experience. Our many thanks to all who have made the Aquinas College Performing Arts Center a reality for students and community theatre performers. Our deepest gratitude goes out to the hundreds of volunteers from Circle Theatre, Aquinas College and Catholic Secondary Schools who worked on the campaign raising funds, planning the weeklong Grand Opening (July 29 to August 2) events, and collaborating on a vigorous performance schedule. Steering and Grand Opening Committee members (some pictured at right) include Andy Angelo, Brian Annable, Penny Avery, Reed Bretz, Kimberly Bruyn, Lawrence Burns, Rick Cassard, Deb Cleland-Nowakowski, Steven de Polo, Joseph Dulin, Marty Fahey, Duane Feldpausch, Kathryn Fore, Cynthia Goldman, Ellen Harburn, Gary Hensch, Kyle Irwin, Marjorie Kindel, Gary Konow, Harry Knopke, Barb Koning, the Rev. James Kowalski, Connie Kowalsyk, Eric Messing, Lyle Morrison, Dauvan Mulally, Lisa Nawrocki, Deb O’Donnell, Catherine

Alum/Former GR Black Sox Player Honored in Exhibit By Tonya Schafer ’02, Contributing Writer

Aquinas College Performing Arts Center Grand Opening Planning Committee

Aquinas College Performing Arts Center Steering Committee

Pearce, Sally Reeves, Julie Ridenour, Phillip Rios, Bob Rose, James Schipper, Bill Shefferly, Sharon Smith, Tom Sullivan, Tom Summers, David Weinandy, and Jim Wisnewski.

Aquinas College Performing Arts Center Performance Schedule 2003-04 Date

2003

2004

Event/performance

Group

“The Comedy of Errors” “The Comedy of Errors” Black History Month “Pippen” “Guys and Dolls” “Guys and Dolls” Children’s Play “Grease” “Grease” Main Stage Main Stage Main Stage Main Stage Main Stage

Jan. 29–31 Jan. 31 Feb. 12–14 Feb. 26–28 March 18–20 March 20 April 1–3 April 21–23 April 23 May 5–30 June 9–27 July 7–Aug. 1 Aug. 11–22 Sept. 1–26

“BeeHIVE” “Proof ” “Our Town” “Dracula” “Dracula” “Thurber3” “Thurber3” “Flowers for Algernon” Holiday Show

August 6–31 Sept. 10–28 Oct. 9–11 Oct. 23–25 Oct. 25 Nov. 6–8 Nov. 8 Nov. 20–22 Dec. 4–20

Circle Theatre Circle Theatre Aquinas College Players West Catholic High School (7:30 p.m.) West Catholic (2:30 p.m.) Catholic Central High School (7:30 p.m.) Catholic Central (2:30 p.m.) Aquinas College Thespians (A.C.T.) (7:00 p.m.) Circle Theatre / Aquinas College West Catholic / Catholic Central (7:30 p.m.) West Catholic / Catholic Central (2:30 p.m.) Aquinas College Aquinas College West Catholic (7:30p.m.) West Catholic (2:30 p.m.) Circle Theatre / Aquinas College Catholic Central (7:30 p.m.) Catholic Central (2:30 p.m.) Circle Theatre Circle Theatre Ticket Information Circle Theatre Circle Theatre (616) 456-6656 Circle Theatre

It’s ironic, but Henry Saverson ’57 didn’t play baseball at Aquinas —his student job at the Peninsular Club in downtown Grand Rapids kept him too busy for batting practices and double headers on the College ball field. The former Grand Rapids Black Sox player took away something even more important from his undergraduate years—a sociology major and a career helping disadvantaged kids enjoy the same benefits he had throughout his introduction to adulthood. “My childhood experiences showed me a lot of things could be done to help children in the community,” said Saverson, who still lives in Grand Rapids. “I grew up in a poor environment, and that made me able to concentrate on studying and getting a decent job. I wanted to motivate young folks to go on and get further education.” For Saverson, the place to do that was Aquinas. “Some of the staff—especially Sister Gonzaga— went out of their way to make us feel comfortable. Not many African Americans were at the school at that time, and someone always helped us whenever we needed assistance,” Saverson said. “The quality of education was important, too,” he added. “The professors were helpful and the classes were not large. Aquinas was small enough that you could know people intimately.” Saverson kept busy in the summer months playing baseball

Henry Saverson ’57 (left) is pictured with Reuben Smartt during the unveiling last January of a special exhibit at the VanAndel Museum Center honoring the Grand Rapids Black Sox. PHOTO BY © THE GRAND RAPIDS.

and breaking barriers with the Grand Rapids Black Sox, a semiprofessional league for African Americans that the Van Andel Museum Center recently honored with a special exhibit. The second baseman—who had honed his skills in junior baseball leagues as a child and later with teams at City High School and Grand Rapids Community College—spent three years with the Detroit Stars and the Kansas City Monarchs as part of the Negro American League. (Both teams belonged to Black Sox owner Ted Rasberry.) Saverson left his baseball days behind when he joined the service, and later earned a master’s degree in social work from Michigan State University. He got a job with the juvenile courts and then with the State of Michigan’s Child Welfare Licensing Division. After five years he became a supervisor and then a

18

regional manager. Saverson retired from state service in 1992. Since then, he has done volunteer work with the Grand Rapids Community Foundation, continuing his commitment to kids by helping conduct statewide studies of adoption policies and creating policies that ensure children get permanent placements in loving, dedicated homes. Saverson has been accompanied in his journey by his wife, Naomi, daughter, Suzann, and their son, Henry Jr., who is now deceased. Despite his array of accomplishments both professional and athletic, Saverson’s Aquinas days are never far from mind. Recently he met with old chums to reminisce about the days he spent in Grand Rapids as a Saint. “I had been told Aquinas was a good school. I always felt comfortable and accepted there,” he said.

47


20

45

performed at the Ladies Literary Club.

help, first from a part time professor, then from more full time instructors who taught a series of popular courses. “We didn’t have a huge number of majors, but many students got inolved,” Konow remembers. “We had musicals and straight stage shows. Students perRehearsing a scene from the 1970 production formed and worked of Jean Anouilh’s “Antigone,” performed at the backstage. It was Carriage House. (L-R foreground) Sam Joseph, Sarah Gallagher,Ted Badgerow, and Bill Noble quite effective.” Konow can name name appeared in the credits for a number of alumni—majors and Woody Allen’s movie, Manhattan. non-majors alike—who went on Many alumni keep in touch to make names for themselves in with their former professor. “I was the performance world. only six, seven, eight years older Fred Sebulske ’65 retired as than they were,” Konow says. “We director of the theatre program at have a lot of contact.” Grand Rapids Community College The theatre major ended at and is the managing director of Aquinas in 1976 when the fire Actor’s Theatre. marshal said the Carriage House Andy Way ’79 became techwas not safe for student nical director at a community organizations to use. Yet Konow theatre in Florida. offers other reasons for the Cynthia Donnelly ’70 designs program’s collapse. “There was a costumes on the east coast—her downward trend in the study of theatre in general. People were interested in business, and college theatre programs were hurting,” Konow says. “The only way we could resurrect the major was if the College entered into some sort of collaboration with another program.” Enter Circle Theatre. When Harry Knopke became president of Aquinas College in 1997, he consulted with Joe Dulin, director of Circle Theatre. The company was looking to move out of its cramped quarters at John Ball Park. A partnership was born in 1952 “Down in the Valley” production. It was which Aquinas would build a

R E C E P T I O N S

Be sure to check the AQ Web site for details on these events and others at www.aquinas.edu.

(L-R) Bob Wick ’85, Maureen Carlson and Ed Carlson ’69

For additional information on any listed event, please call the Alumni & Parent Relations Office at 616-459-8281or e-mail to alumni@aquinas.edu. (Seated l-r) Amy Lalewicz ’59, and Mar tha Weaver ’02 Chicago Bus Trip

(Standing l-r) Nathan Plum ’02 and Brian Milliron ’02

Alumni & Friends

Saturday November 22 Detroit Golf Club Detroit-Area Alumni Reception

Traverse City

Wednesday October 29 Arizona Alumni Reception

Date TBA, October Golden Saints Alumni Reunion— all alumni of Classes 1930-53

Sheila Knopke (center) poses with Tannisha Whitehead ’99 (left) and Hattie D. IrvinPookrum ’99 (right).

Class of ’78, ’88 and ’98 Reunions Theatre Program Reunion Willowbrook Reunion Aquinas College Alumni Association Awards

(L-R) James Pelon ’58, Beth (Geller ’58) Burns, Mollie (Brenner ’53) Pelon, and John Burns ’58 share a light moment.

Induction of honorees into Aquinas College’s Hall of Fame and Athletic Hall of Fame

Homecoming & Gala Weekend

Friday-Sunday September 26-28

2003

Alumni Calendar

Detroit Fall 2003 – Alumni News

Campus News – Fall 2003

37th Annual Aquinas College Alumni Association Golf Outing

Top honors of the day with a 12-underpar 60 went to the foursome led by (L to R) Pete Smith, featuring his two sons, Justin Smith ’98 and Ryan Smith ’00, and accompanied by “ringer” Matt Eldred. (The mixed foursome award went to the team of Rick Chapla ’75, Tom Breihof ’75, Tracy Breihof and Dave Breihof.)

What better way to welcome the first day of summer than at the Aquinas College Alumni Association’s 37th Golf Outing. The event at Grand Rapids’ Boulder Creek Golf Club attracted a crowd of golfers—all alumni and friends of the College. Following registration, the group took to the course for the 8 a.m. shotgun start. The picturesque day on the links was made possible with the support of several sponsors: Mika, Myers, Beckett & Jones; Varnum, Riddering, Schmidt & Howlett; Jim ’75 and Linda Payne; and Plante & Moran.

Golfers did their best to win a Chevrolet Impala from Kool Chevrolet on Hole No. 13; Bob Mason ’90 missed by only a few inches. Golfers also missed their chance to relax in their own spa, which was put up by Emerald Spa on Hole No. 3. All participants left with something in hand thanks to the many prize sponsors and friends of Aquinas. If you’d like to join us next year, look for information on the 38th Annual Aquinas College Alumni Association Golf Outing in the Spring 2004 Aquinas magazine.

With all of the threats bombarding the network daily, only one actually penetrated the network—the Klez virus—last November. System administrators acted quickly and shut down all access to stop the exponential effects and limit the infection to only 12 PCs on the network. The computer network, and the campus, was brought to its knees, causing a widespread disruption of communications and tasking assignments that lasted for five days.

Japanese Seek Economic Future in Grand Rapids By Woody Hoover, Ph.D. Professor, Business Administration

Scrambles invoke a rarity on the links… team members actually hope their teammates’ putts go in.

(L-R) Fred Hesse ’63, joined by Tom Timlin and Larry Spetoskey, enjoys his 24th consecutive alumni golf outing.

1968 “An Evening with Ionesco” and “An Evening Albee” were performed in the Carriage House. 1967 “Under Milk Wood” was performed in the Carriage House and directed by Sister Mary de Chantal. Gary Konow, chair of the theatre department, joined the faculty. 1966 The Carriage House Theatre makes its debut with Moliere’s “Tartuffe.” 1963 “Arms and the Man” by George Bernard Shaw was performed at the Civic Theatre and directed by Sr. Mary de Chantal and Jack Rang. 1957 Sister Mary de Chantal Luke, O.P., joined the faculty in 1957. Her first production was Moliere’s “The Miser” followed by “Medea,” “The Importance of Being Earnest” and “Cyrano de Bergerac.” 1952 “Down In The Valley” and “Solomon and Balchis” were performed at the Ladies Literary Club in downtown Grand Rapids. 1950 Lacordaires presented “City of Kings” at the St. Cecilia Auditorium. 1949 “Rise and Shine” was performed at the St. Cecelia Auditorium and directed by Tony Brink. 1945 Aquinas moved to the Robinson Road campus and the Lacordaires, a student dramatic club, presented short plays in the upper floor of the one-time stable, now Bukowski chapel. 1940s Name changed to Aquinas College and students continued to present original plays and skits. 1930s Catholic Junior College produced skits and workshop plays. Variety shows such as “Campus Silluettes” were performed at St. Cecelia Auditorium.

Aquinas’ Theatre History Japan has been struggling to restart its stalled economy for more than a decade. In April, Aquinas College hosted representatives of the Japanese Corporate Consortium for Creating New Consumer Industries in a forum designed to share ideas from business scholars from west Michigan colleges and universities and successful American entrepreneurs. During the day-long conference held at Marywood on April 25, representatives of the Japanese Consortium reviewed the state of their economy in standard economic terms to include discussions of monetary and fiscal policies together with economic reform packages. They also shared a paper prepared by Tsuguo Sakiyama, who serves as an advisor to the Japanese Prime Minister. In his report, presented by one of his

Voted “Best Mulligan Salesperson, ” Michelle Bottrall ’97 pitches her most difficult sell of the day to her husband, David, a College Trustee.

L to R: Bing Goel, Rick Huisman and Trustee Pat Miles, Jr. ’88 celebrated along with teammate Pat Miles, Sr. ’95 as he clinched the Closestto-the-Pin contest sponsored by Tom and Joyce Wisner.

48

Information Technology and Services (ITS) contained the problem by shutting down the entire system. The staff worked feverishly in the following hours and days to isolate the virus and begin correcting the problem. Every campus computer was checked. Fortunately, the damage was minimal. Still, the virus had a profound impact on campus operations, impacting fundraising, financial records, admissions applications, internal communications and lost work time.

As the ITS staff scanned the network, it uncovered numerous violations of the College’s AUP relating to software installation and use. Included was the unauthorized installation of a Klez-infected program by an unsuspecting employee, which circumvented the established anti-virus protocol. While ITS discovered its vulnerability the hard way, it became clear early on in this incident that its staff is prepared and experienced enough to successfully respond to threats.

representatives, Sakiyama challenged the group to think beyond standard terms to include the consideration of paradigm changes and “recalibrations” of how an economy is viewed and measured. Emphasis was placed on the Japanese state of mind and the reasons Representatives from a Japanese Consortium meet with West Michigan businesspeople and those with money will not business scholars in a day-long forum hosted by spend. This was followed by Aquinas College.Aquinas Economics Professor a description of specific Masato Yamazaki, Ph.D., (rear left), a native of Japan who organized the forum, addresses consumer initiatives underparticipants. taken by the firm Asahi Elles. The question and answer session revolved around the balance of that followed the presentation gave public sector and private sector the American academicians and activities, with some consensus business people an opportunity to developing around the idea that put the Japanese economy in Japanese “guided capitalism” may context so that it could be better have created a regulatory understood and evaluated. This environment too discouraging to was followed by American entrepreneurs. Discussion of the recommendations for the Japanese vision for future market economies economy, which varied from short included the environmental term pragmatic ideas about credit problem with numerous sugmanagement to ideas concerning gestions made concerning how a new vision for all future market environmental costs might be economies. Some discussion recognized.

17


Bob Niedzielski, Ph.D., ’58 Alumni Board President

44

Alumni News

Dear Fellow Alums, The Aquinas College Alumni Association is on the move! Ample evidence of that can be found in this section of the magazine. One year ago, 15 new members were welcomed to the Alumni Association Board of Directors. They made up a good crosssection of Aquinas alums, with degrees ranging from the associate level to the master of management, and they have been engaged in a wide variety of professions. Every decade from the 1950s on was represented on the total Board membership of 22, from a 1950 graduate, to one from the class of 2001. In addition to the Grand Rapids area, Board members reside in the Detroit area and in Frederic, Michigan, as well as in Toledo, Ohio, and Mesa, Arizona. This Board has been very active, particularly at the committee level. Much progress has been made during this year of reorganization and new bylaws. In the works is a benefits package for Aquinas alums. We also hope to broaden the scope of alumni events. Alumni are involved with Development, Admissions, and the Career and Counseling Services Offices. The Alumni Walk has been reinstituted. The Golden Saints alumni group, for those who graduated fifty or more years ago, is now a reality. Additionally, a seat has been purchased in the new Performing Arts Center through the donations of Alumni Board members. There is still work to be done, however. The endowment for the Sister Anne Keating Alumni Scholarship, sponsored by the Alumni Association, needs to be strengthened.

From the Alumni Board of Directors’ President

Last April, alumni from across the state of Michigan gathered to look back on their times at Aquinas and catch a glimpse of their alma mater’s future. John F. ‘58 and Beth (Geller) Burns ‘58 hosted a reception for Detroit-area alumni and friends on April 8 at the Skyline Club in Southfield, Michigan. Northern Michigan alumni and friends enjoyed connecting with the College and each other at their reception hosted by Edward Carlson ’69 held April 24 at the Waterfront Inn located in Traverse City. Both evenings were filled with memories and excitement for the future initiatives of Aquinas College. Plans are already underway for upcoming events. Mark your calendars for the October 29 Detroit-area reception hosted by Michael P. Smith ‘80. More information will follow. If you would like to host an alumni reception in your area, please contact the Alumni & Parent Relations Office at 616-459-8281 or access us online at… alumni@aquinas.edu.

Alumni Receptions… Keeping in Touch I strongly encourage you to reserve September 26-28 for Homecoming. If you haven’t been on campus in some time, you’ll be pleasantly surprised at the changes at Aquinas since you graduated. You can keep up with the Alumni Association and with the College, in general, at the Aquinas Web site, www.aquinas.edu. As always, your comments and suggestions are welcomed. - Bob Niedzielski

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Dress rehearsal for cast of 1967 production of “Bells Are Ringing.” 2003 Opening week of the Performing Arts Center was July 29 through August 2. Community Circle Theatre (formerly Circle theatre) has a full, fall line-up of performances scheduled. 2002 Ground broken for the new Aquinas College Performing Arts Center in May, fulfilling a dream made possible by the collaboration of Circle Theatre, Catholic Secondary Schools, and Aquinas College. 2000 The theatre major restored and Gary Konow resumed direction of full-length plays through the 2003 school year. “Oedipus Rex,” “The Elephant Man,” a repeat of “The Contrast” and “A Doll’s House” were offered.

Performing Arts Center on campus and Circle Theatre would manage it. Actors from both organizations would use the facility thr oughout the year. Catholic Secondary Schools later joined the part-nership, gaining use of the space for its students and allowing collaboration between Aquinas, Circle Theatre and area Catholic high schools. Construction of the $7 million facility began on acreage near Albertus Hall in April 2002. Crews finished their work in July of this year, and a weeklong gala ceremony was planned to welcome the center to campus, starting July 29. The theatre curriculum was resurrected in August 2001 and while it doesn’t have many participants yet, it is growing, Konow says. In the interim between the two programs, Aquinas offered acting

courses and communication Professor Penny Avery had headed the Aquinas College Thespians (ACT). Like their predecessors, these actors staged productions in the renovated Carriage House and other locations around campus. The new Performing Arts Center offers a better venue for them and the thousands of actors, stagehands and audience members who will benefit from—maybe even fall in love among—the bright lights and velvet curtains of their new digs. Jim and Linda Chervenka plan to celebrate with the Aquinas community the renewal of the College’s theatre program, a new Performing Arts Center and the arrival of Circle Theatre on campus. “We’ve been looking forward to it,” Jim says. “The ideal is coming together,” Konow says.

1990s Students in the Insignis program provided medieval drama during the St. Thomas Week celebration. Students sometimes wrote an annual Black History Month play. 1980s After the closing of the Carriage House, theatre was discontinued as a major and drama at the college was limited to student productions by the Drama Club, the Theatre Club, and Aquinas College Thespians (ACT). Kretchmer Recital Hall and the Wege Center Ballroom were the new locations. 1976 The first American drama, Royall Tyler’s “The Contrast,” was the last production in the Carriage House. The fire marshall banned the use for plays soon after the performance. 1972 “Yerma” was presented in the Carriage House and directed by Gary Konow. 1971 “The Hostage” was performed in the Carriage House. Sister Rosemar y O’Donnell, O.P., joined the faculty. She later directed “J.B.” in 1972. 1969 Speech and Drama, which had been a minor, became a theatre and communication major.

Aquinas’ Theatre History

CAMPUS CAMPUS EVENTS EVENTS

September 2003 1-28, Mon-Fri Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit Chris LaPorte ’96, Recent Works

3, Wednesday Reflection Award Dinner

10, Wednesday AQ Contemporary Writers Series Kurtis Lamkin, Poet & Musician 7:30 p.m.• Wege Center Ballroom

23,Tuesday Aquinas College M.A. in Education w/ Initial Certification Info Session Call 616-459-8281

26, Friday Percussion Group Concert Hall of Fame Gala

27-28, Sat-Sun Homecoming Weekend

28, Sunday Homecoming Jazz Brunch

By Damon Bouwkamp ’00, Contributing Writer

In 1997 Dr. Tony Foster ’73 and Linda Nemec Foster ’72 gave a generous grant to establish the Aquinas College Contemporary Writers Series, a series of readings by well-known authors. The desire for an Aquinas writers’ series began while Linda, poet laureate of Grand Rapids, was a student at Aquinas. She thought that she and other students would benefit from having well-known writers visit the campus. Once the Series was underway, the Fosters major goal was to establish an endowment so the Series would be ongoing, free and open to the public. The Fosters have now met their goal and the future of the Series is guaranteed with the endowment in place. Four acclaimed writers visit Aquinas each academic year and

Impressive Tennis

Contemporary Writers Series

AQ Welcomes Alpha Epsilon Delta Three years of preparatory work by Aquinas premedical students culminated in the chartering of the Michigan Zeta chapter of Alpha Epsilon Delta (AED), the National Premedical Honor Society at Aquinas College. On April 11, premedical advisors from universities as far away as Texas and Virginia joined national officers of the

Members of the newly established Alpha Epsilon Delta Honorary Premedical Society with representatives of the national organization at the April Induction Dinner.

(L-R)Tony Foster ’73, Bob Pastan (awardwinning poet), Linda Pastan, Linda Nemec Foster ’72

the Series has developed a large following. In addition to the readings, the visiting writers along with the readings meet with creative writing students in workshops and offer class readings for students in the College’s first and second year core courses. Contemporary Writers schedules can be found at http://www.aquinas.edu/library/ CW/writers.html.

Society, Aquinas faculty and staff, and families and friends of 13 Aquinas students in establishing the 185th chapter of AED. Students were inducted as members and seven faculty as honorary members. The chartering ceremony was highlighted by a speech on the practice of medicine given by Trustee Dr. Luis Tomatis. AED is the oldest and most respected premedical honor society in the country. Each chapter is completely student organized as it carries out the society’s purpose to encourage and to recognize excellence in premedical studies and to promote service that benefits the entire health care community. Sr. Katrina Hartman, chair of the Chemistry Department, and President Knopke serve as the chapter’s faculty advisors.

After losing two seniors that accounted for 300 victories over four years, the 2003 men’s tennis season could have been a year of rebuilding for Head Coach Jerry Hendricks. But with a 5-3 win over Lindsey Wilson College at the NAIA National Championships in Peachtree City, Georgia, this past May, Hendricks continued the strong run of the Saints’ tennis program. Led by sophomores Jason Walsh (Grandville) and Matt Garner (Grand Rapids), the Saints went 20-7 for the season with a Region VIII Championship. Sealing the regional win was a 5-4 victory over 12th-ranked Indiana Wesleyan University to move onto the National Championships. Also leading the Saints to a top-20 ranking for much of the season were juniors Nate Price (Holland), Jason Winegar (Midland) and Roger Lourido (Grand Rapids), and sophomore Jared Flick (Muskegon). Walsh became the fastest Saints player to reach 100 career victories in just his second season, while junior Brian Ahmedani (Kentwood) was named to the NAIA Academic All-American team after earning at least a 3.5 GPA while contributing to the team. Now five dual match victories away from 200 career victories with an overall record of 195-77, Hendricks has led the Saints to three straight appearances at the NAIA National Championships. The victory over Lindsey Wilson is the first in Aquinas tennis history in National Championship play. After advancing to the Round of 16, the season ended against topranked Azusa Pacific University.

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32 Student-Athletes Recognized in 2002-03 All-Americans (12) Laura Beattie – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Michelle Borek – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Sarah Ellis – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Henr y Holmes – Men’s Indoor Track and Field Kerry Lucas – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field John MacLeod – Baseball Jon Mies – Men’s Soccer De-Ale-Jo Roberts – Men’s Indoor Track and Field Chuck Schuba – Men’s Basketball T.J. Shimek – Men’s Indoor Track and Field Andy Steketee – Men’s Basketball Jenny Ziegler – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Academic All-Americans (20) Brian Ahmedani – Men’s Tennis Laura Beattie – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Michelle Borek – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Brett Cagney – Baseball Sanel Fazlic – Men’s Soccer Kara Ferguson – Women’s Tennis Leo Foley – Men’s Cross Country Jeremy Frost – Baseball Tamara Harnden – Volleyball Eric Johnson – Men’s Cross Country, Men’s Outdoor Track and Field Nate Kaiser – Men’s Cross Country Val Kunde – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Kerry Lucas – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Josh May – Men’s Cross Country John Moceri – Baseball Lars Petzke – Men’s Cross Country, Men’s Outdoor Track and Field Nathan Rose – Men’s Soccer Julie Roy – Women’s Soccer T.J. Shimek – Men’s Outdoor Track and Field Jeff White – Men’s Soccer

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WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Nov 7, 8 @ St. Francis Tourney (Indiana) Nov 13 Davenport Nov 15 Rochester Nov 21, 22 Aquinas Classic Nov 25 @ Huntington Nov 29 Kalamazoo College Dec 2 @ Taylor Dec 6 @ Trinity Christian Dec 9 Calvin Dec 13 Goshen Dec 19 Trinity International Jan 2, 3 @ Palm Beach Atlantic Jan 7 @ Michigan - Dearborn Jan 10 @ Madonna Jan 14 Indiana Tech Jan 17 Concordia Jan 21 @ Spring Arbor Jan 24 Cornerstone Jan 28 @ Siena Heights Jan 31 Michigan - Dearborn Feb 4 Madonna Feb 7 @ Indiana Tech Feb 11 @ Concordia Feb 14 Spring Arbor Feb 18 @ Cornerstone Feb 21 Siena Heights Feb 26 WHAC Tournament - 1 st Round Feby 28 WHAC Tournament - Semi-finals March 2 WHAC Tournament - Finals March 11-17 NAIA National Tournament

MEN’S BASKETBALL Nov 11 Davenport Nov 15 Grace Bible Nov 18 Rochester Nov 21, 22 @ Marian Tournament (Indiana) Nov 25 @ Calvin Dec 5, 6 @ Hope Tournament Dec 12, 13 Brann’s Aquinas Classic Dec 19-21 St. Xavier Tournament (Illinois) Jan 2, 3 @ Embry Riddle Tournament (Florida) Jan 7 @ Michigan - Dearborn Jan 10 Madonna Jan 14 @ Indiana Tech Jan 17 @ Concordia Jan 21 Spring Arbor Jan 24 Cornerstone Jan 28 @ Siena Heights Jan 31 Michigan - Dearborn Feb 4 @ Madonna Feb 7 Indiana Tech Feb 11 Concordia Feb 14 @ Spring Arbor Feb 18 @ Cornerstone Feb 21 Siena Heights Feb 25 WHAC Tournament - 1st Round Feb 28 WHAC Tournament Semi-finals March 1 WHAC Tournament Finals

MEN’S GOLF Sept 3 Madonna/Fox Creek GC Sept 5,6 Olivet Invitational Sept 16 Cornerstone/Thousand Oaks CC Sept 20 Siena Heights/Lenawee CC Sept 22 Aquinas/L.E. Kaufman Sept 25 Spring Arbor/Cascades GC Oct 1 Spring Arbor Invitational Oct 3 Aquinas/L.E. Kaufman Oct 11 Tri-State A.C. Eddy Invitational/Zollner GC


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Also Special Campus Days • Student-Athletes Saturday, January 24, 2004 • Nursing Students Friday, February 6, 2004 Friday, November 14, 2003 Friday, November 21, 2003 Friday, April 23, 2004

CAMPUS DAYS 2003-04

Admissions

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Paula Meehan, Tom Mikowski, Angie Schlosser Bacon, Dana Samotis, Brigid Avery, Jeremy Wood, Josh Greenwald and Omar Flores all have many things in common. The most obvious is that they all work in the Admissions Office. But, perhaps not so obvious is that they are all Aquinas graduates! Recruiting students to Aquinas is a natural for all of them because they each spent four great years on this campus and are eager to spread the good word about their alma mater. Each brings to the table different Aquinas experiences, but all share one common feeling and that is their love for Aquinas. Paula Meehan lays claim to being the first female intern hired by the admissions office in 1974. She celebrated 27 years with the college in June. Tom Mikowski hails from Traverse City, Michigan and celebrates 14 years with the College. Angie Schlosser Bacon graduated in 1996 and came to Aquinas to play soccer. Paula, Angie and Tom are also married to AQ alums. (Paula to Ross Meehan ‘80, Angie to Scott

Bacon ‘97 and Tom to Becky Miller Mikowski ‘88). Dana Samotis came to Aquinas to play basketball and graduated in 1999. So great was her experience that she convinced sister Jamie this was the place for her too. Brigid Avery, like Dana, influenced her younger sister Clare to attend Aquinas. Brigid is a 2001 graduate. Jeremy Wood graduated in 1999 and was a long-serving member of the Aquinas student tour guide group before joining the staff as a full-time counselor. Most recent members of the staff are Josh Greenwald ‘01 and Omar Flores ‘02. Both, coincidentally, are engaged to AQ graduates and spent some time as roommates. Josh is engaged to Jessica Buck ‘03 and Omar is engaged to Elizabeth Schmiedicke ‘00. When the staff gets together they like to share stories of their time at AQ, dating back to 1971. Over these 30 years, staff members concur that Aquinas just keeps getting better all the time, and the students they have recruited are carrying on the tradition that makes AQ such a special place.

By Paula Meehan ’75, Dean of Admissions

What Do All of These People Have in Common? (L-R) Dana Samotis, Omar Flores,Angie Schlosser Bacon, Josh Greenwald, Paula Meehan, Brigid Aver y,Tom Mikowski and Jeremy Wood pause during a break at a recent In-Service Planning session.

Dr. Gary Konow retired after a total of 35 years at Aquinas in the Communication and Theatre Departments

Chuck Frydrych, Physics Dept. Dr. Gary Konow, Theatre Dept. Sr. Amata Fabbro, Theology Dept.

Thirty-Five Years… Terry Bocian, Athletic Dept. Dr. Glenn Barkan, Political Science Gary Robertson, Economics Dept.

Thirty Years… Silvija Visockis, College Relations

Fifteen Years…

Cindy Chapman, Science Dept. Sr. M. Aquinas Weber, Chancellor Dave Zenk, Physical Plant Tom Dooley, College Computing Dr. Woody Hoover, School of Management Joyce LaFleur, ITS

Penny Blickle, Physical Plant Tim Moerland, Physical Plant

Ten Years…

Pam Luebke, Library Dr. Burt Ozarow, Psychology Dept. Ron Pederson, Art Dept. Steve Schousen, Art Dept. Len Smith, College Computing

Dr. Anna Bates, History Dept. JoAnne Gorant, Athletics Stacey Jackson, Campus Life Dr. Harry Knopke, President Thad Salter, Physical Plant Bill Shefferly, Finance/Operations Greg Vedders, ITS

Twenty Years…

Five years…

Twenty-Five Years…

Aquinas College took time on May 12 to recognize employees, faculty and staff who have reached milestones in their service to the school. Twenty-seven employees with a cumulative 515 years of service were honored at the Employee Service Awards Celebration at Donnelly Conference Center for their contributions of time and talent to the College. Honorees are listed below.

Employee Service to Aquinas Recognized Campus News – Fall 2003 Fall 2003 – Campus News

Admissions – Fall 2003

Spectrum Scholarship Competition Gathers Top Scholars for Fall 2003 Women of Aquinas Recognized By Gail Gromaski, Senior

Sr. Celeste Miller

Pat Anderson

National Women’s History Month is a time to acknowledge women in our nation’s history that have made significant contributions in our society. Therefore, the faculty and staff of the Jane Hibbard Idema Women’s Studies Center decided to create an annual Outstanding Aquinas Woman Award to give recognition for the efforts of women in the Aquinas community. The Center received 30 nominations.The Women’s

Studies faculty and staff created three Awar d categories: Faculty, Staff/Administrators and Students/Alumni. At a reception on March 28,each nominee was presented with a rose and recognized for her contributions. The Award winners were: Sr. Marie Celeste Miller, O.P., associate professor in-theCollege; Pat Anderson, manager of the Wege Center Corner Café; and Amanda Caldwell, international studies and Spanish major.

Amanda Caldwell

Student Support Services Recognizes MI-MAEOPP Scholarship Recipients By Jill Straub ’00, Writing Specialist, Student Support Services

Each spring the Michigan Chapter of the Mid-America Association of Educational Opportunity Program Personnel (MI-MAEOPP) awards qualified students with $500 scholarships. Student Support Services selects a few students each year as potential candidates for this scholarship. Qualified students must be member of the Student Support Services’ program, and they are required to write an essay describing personal obstacles they overcame to achieve either

academic progress or academic success. This year, Student Support Services honored Tiffany Albro and Julia Wojciechowski with $500 scholarships at the Shanty Creek Ski Resort in Bellaire, Michigan, on March 7, 2003, at a formal dinner banquet. Tiffany Albro, a junior, worked in Student Support Services as a program Peer Mentor, creating quarterly newsletters, planning cultural events, and building closer relationships with the students. She also participates in Project Open Heart, a disabilities awareness group on campus. She further extends her compassion for people in her volunteer work at the Grand Rapids Children’s Museum. Julia Wojciechowski, a sophomore, has been involved in many cultural events, including a trip to

22

Student Support Services Award winners Julia Wojciechowski (left) and Tiffany Albro.

Chicago. She also participated in Jammin’ Fashion Show, Project Open Heart, Into the Streets, painting a shelter for the homeless, and World Vision’s 30-Hour Famine. Julia works extremely hard, and her grades are well earned. The Student Support Services’ staff is not only inspired by Julia’s dedication, but also by her humorous wit, which allows her to view the lighter side of life.

Eleven years ago, when the Spectrum Scholarship Competition was initiated, the Admissions Office hosted just over 60 students. Since that time the number has more than doubled, making the event one of the largest admissionssponsored events of the year. The scholarship competition was designed by faculty who were looking at ways to reward these academically talented students, while at the same time ascertaining additional attributes which cannot be determined by a high school transcript. On February 15, the top applicants to the freshman class came to compete for the Jerome Byrne full-tuition and room scholarship, the John Veneklasen full-tuition scholarship, three R.Paul Nelson full-tuition scholarships, five $500 St. Catherine scholarships, and five $500 St. Anselm scholarships. Student eligibility is based on a calculation derived from grade point average and and the ACT composite. If the sum equals or is greater than 61 the student automatically receives a $7,500 merit award. Nearly 130 students from more than six states were put through a

variety of assessment tests including a writing sample, a decisionmaking exercise and a critical thinking/problem solving assessment. The competition also involved participation from 30 faculty members who serve as judges during the decision-making exercise. The event is a full day of activity, culminating in a president‘s reception for parents and students. Concurrently parents have a program of events with various panels, campus tours and an introduction to the city of Grand Rapids. One of the unexpected results of the Spectrum Competition is that students who come to campus to compete begin to form friendships with potential future classmates. This has resulted in an over 60 percent enrollment rate of scholarship participants and has also served to raise the cumulative grade point average and test scores of incoming students. Scholarship winners who have confirmed their enrollment are: John Veneklasen Scholarship (full tuition)—Monica Walen, Catholic Central High School (Grand Rapids); R. Paul Nelson Scholar-

ship (full tuition)—Katherine Fannon, Novi High School (Novi, Mich.), Laura Bertram, West Catholic High School (Grand Rapids) and Erika Hoenke, Marquette High School (Marquette, Mich.); St. Catherine Scholarship ($500)—Kathryn Firlik, City High School (Grand Rapids) and Tricia Betts, Holt High School (Holt, Mich.); and, the St. Anselm Scholarship ($500)—Natalie Kent, Lowell High School (Lowell, Mich.). The recipients presented a cumulative 3.9 grade point average and an ACT composite score of 30. In addition they bring an impressive resume of extracurricular involvement, which will surely be continued at the college level. These students join the nearly 50 students who have competed in the past and are now either current Aquinas students or alumni who have joined the work world or are attending graduate school. If your son or daughter meets the qualifications for this competition, please contact the Admissions Office for more information.

Legacy Days By Jeremy Wood ’99, Admissions Representative

Are you a parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle, or friend of a potential Aquinas student? The Admissions Office will be sponsoring the first annual Legacy Day during this year’s Homecoming Weekend (Sept. 26-28). At the time of printing, details are still being hammered out but look for the event to include activities for “Saints-in-Training” of all ages as well as a campus tour designed to highlight some of the newer features of campus. Don’t forget to stop by with your future AQ student! If you’re going to attend Homecoming and would like to participate in Legacy Day, help us plan by calling the Admissions Office at 1-800-678-9593.

43


Also Special Campus Days • Student-Athletes Saturday, January 24, 2004 • Nursing Students Friday, February 6, 2004 Friday, November 14, 2003 Friday, November 21, 2003 Friday, April 23, 2004

CAMPUS DAYS 2003-04

42

Admissions

Paula Meehan, Tom Mikowski, Angie Schlosser Bacon, Dana Samotis, Brigid Avery, Jeremy Wood, Josh Greenwald and Omar Flores all have many things in common. The most obvious is that they all work in the Admissions Office. But, perhaps not so obvious is that they are all Aquinas graduates! Recruiting students to Aquinas is a natural for all of them because they each spent four great years on this campus and are eager to spread the good word about their alma mater. Each brings to the table different Aquinas experiences, but all share one common feeling and that is their love for Aquinas. Paula Meehan lays claim to being the first female intern hired by the admissions office in 1974. She celebrated 27 years with the college in June. Tom Mikowski hails from Traverse City, Michigan and celebrates 14 years with the College. Angie Schlosser Bacon graduated in 1996 and came to Aquinas to play soccer. Paula, Angie and Tom are also married to AQ alums. (Paula to Ross Meehan ‘80, Angie to Scott

Bacon ‘97 and Tom to Becky Miller Mikowski ‘88). Dana Samotis came to Aquinas to play basketball and graduated in 1999. So great was her experience that she convinced sister Jamie this was the place for her too. Brigid Avery, like Dana, influenced her younger sister Clare to attend Aquinas. Brigid is a 2001 graduate. Jeremy Wood graduated in 1999 and was a long-serving member of the Aquinas student tour guide group before joining the staff as a full-time counselor. Most recent members of the staff are Josh Greenwald ‘01 and Omar Flores ‘02. Both, coincidentally, are engaged to AQ graduates and spent some time as roommates. Josh is engaged to Jessica Buck ‘03 and Omar is engaged to Elizabeth Schmiedicke ‘00. When the staff gets together they like to share stories of their time at AQ, dating back to 1971. Over these 30 years, staff members concur that Aquinas just keeps getting better all the time, and the students they have recruited are carrying on the tradition that makes AQ such a special place.

By Paula Meehan ’75, Dean of Admissions

What Do All of These People Have in Common? (L-R) Dana Samotis, Omar Flores,Angie Schlosser Bacon, Josh Greenwald, Paula Meehan, Brigid Aver y,Tom Mikowski and Jeremy Wood pause during a break at a recent In-Service Planning session.

23

Dr. Gary Konow retired after a total of 35 years at Aquinas in the Communication and Theatre Departments

Chuck Frydrych, Physics Dept. Dr. Gary Konow, Theatre Dept. Sr. Amata Fabbro, Theology Dept.

Thirty-Five Years… Terry Bocian, Athletic Dept. Dr. Glenn Barkan, Political Science Gary Robertson, Economics Dept.

Thirty Years… Silvija Visockis, College Relations

Fifteen Years…

Cindy Chapman, Science Dept. Sr. M. Aquinas Weber, Chancellor Dave Zenk, Physical Plant Tom Dooley, College Computing Dr. Woody Hoover, School of Management Joyce LaFleur, ITS

Penny Blickle, Physical Plant Tim Moerland, Physical Plant

Ten Years… Five years…

Twenty Years…

Dr. Anna Bates, History Dept. JoAnne Gorant, Athletics Stacey Jackson, Campus Life Dr. Harry Knopke, President Thad Salter, Physical Plant Bill Shefferly, Finance/Operations Greg Vedders, ITS

Pam Luebke, Library Dr. Burt Ozarow, Psychology Dept. Ron Pederson, Art Dept. Steve Schousen, Art Dept. Len Smith, College Computing

Twenty-Five Years…

Aquinas College took time on May 12 to recognize employees, faculty and staff who have reached milestones in their service to the school. Twenty-seven employees with a cumulative 515 years of service were honored at the Employee Service Awards Celebration at Donnelly Conference Center for their contributions of time and talent to the College. Honorees are listed below.

Employee Service to Aquinas Recognized Campus News – Fall 2003 Fall 2003 – Campus News

Admissions – Fall 2003

Spectrum Scholarship Competition Gathers Top Scholars for Fall 2003 Women of Aquinas Recognized By Gail Gromaski, Senior

Sr. Celeste Miller

Pat Anderson

National Women’s History Month is a time to acknowledge women in our nation’s history that have made significant contributions in our society. Therefore, the faculty and staff of the Jane Hibbard Idema Women’s Studies Center decided to create an annual Outstanding Aquinas Woman Award to give recognition for the efforts of women in the Aquinas community. The Center received 30 nominations.The Women’s

Studies faculty and staff created three Awar d categories: Faculty, Staff/Administrators and Students/Alumni. At a reception on March 28,each nominee was presented with a rose and recognized for her contributions. The Award winners were: Sr. Marie Celeste Miller, O.P., associate professor in-theCollege; Pat Anderson, manager of the Wege Center Corner Café; and Amanda Caldwell, international studies and Spanish major.

Amanda Caldwell

Student Support Services Recognizes MI-MAEOPP Scholarship Recipients By Jill Straub ’00, Writing Specialist, Student Support Services

Each spring the Michigan Chapter of the Mid-America Association of Educational Opportunity Program Personnel (MI-MAEOPP) awards qualified students with $500 scholarships. Student Support Services selects a few students each year as potential candidates for this scholarship. Qualified students must be member of the Student Support Services’ program, and they are required to write an essay describing personal obstacles they overcame to achieve either

academic progress or academic success. This year, Student Support Services honored Tiffany Albro and Julia Wojciechowski with $500 scholarships at the Shanty Creek Ski Resort in Bellaire, Michigan, on March 7, 2003, at a formal dinner banquet. Tiffany Albro, a junior, worked in Student Support Services as a program Peer Mentor, creating quarterly newsletters, planning cultural events, and building closer relationships with the students. She also participates in Project Open Heart, a disabilities awareness group on campus. She further extends her compassion for people in her volunteer work at the Grand Rapids Children’s Museum. Julia Wojciechowski, a sophomore, has been involved in many cultural events, including a trip to

Student Support Services Award winners Julia Wojciechowski (left) and Tiffany Albro.

Chicago. She also participated in Jammin’ Fashion Show, Project Open Heart, Into the Streets, painting a shelter for the homeless, and World Vision’s 30-Hour Famine. Julia works extremely hard, and her grades are well earned. The Student Support Services’ staff is not only inspired by Julia’s dedication, but also by her humorous wit, which allows her to view the lighter side of life.

Eleven years ago, when the Spectrum Scholarship Competition was initiated, the Admissions Office hosted just over 60 students. Since that time the number has more than doubled, making the event one of the largest admissionssponsored events of the year. The scholarship competition was designed by faculty who were looking at ways to reward these academically talented students, while at the same time ascertaining additional attributes which cannot be determined by a high school transcript. On February 15, the top applicants to the freshman class came to compete for the Jerome Byrne full-tuition and room scholarship, the John Veneklasen full-tuition scholarship, three R.Paul Nelson full-tuition scholarships, five $500 St. Catherine scholarships, and five $500 St. Anselm scholarships. Student eligibility is based on a calculation derived from grade point average and and the ACT composite. If the sum equals or is greater than 61 the student automatically receives a $7,500 merit award. Nearly 130 students from more than six states were put through a

variety of assessment tests including a writing sample, a decisionmaking exercise and a critical thinking/problem solving assessment. The competition also involved participation from 30 faculty members who serve as judges during the decision-making exercise. The event is a full day of activity, culminating in a president‘s reception for parents and students. Concurrently parents have a program of events with various panels, campus tours and an introduction to the city of Grand Rapids. One of the unexpected results of the Spectrum Competition is that students who come to campus to compete begin to form friendships with potential future classmates. This has resulted in an over 60 percent enrollment rate of scholarship participants and has also served to raise the cumulative grade point average and test scores of incoming students. Scholarship winners who have confirmed their enrollment are: John Veneklasen Scholarship (full tuition)—Monica Walen, Catholic Central High School (Grand Rapids); R. Paul Nelson Scholar-

ship (full tuition)—Katherine Fannon, Novi High School (Novi, Mich.), Laura Bertram, West Catholic High School (Grand Rapids) and Erika Hoenke, Marquette High School (Marquette, Mich.); St. Catherine Scholarship ($500)—Kathryn Firlik, City High School (Grand Rapids) and Tricia Betts, Holt High School (Holt, Mich.); and, the St. Anselm Scholarship ($500)—Natalie Kent, Lowell High School (Lowell, Mich.). The recipients presented a cumulative 3.9 grade point average and an ACT composite score of 30. In addition they bring an impressive resume of extracurricular involvement, which will surely be continued at the college level. These students join the nearly 50 students who have competed in the past and are now either current Aquinas students or alumni who have joined the work world or are attending graduate school. If your son or daughter meets the qualifications for this competition, please contact the Admissions Office for more information.

Legacy Days By Jeremy Wood ’99, Admissions Representative

Are you a parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle, or friend of a potential Aquinas student? The Admissions Office will be sponsoring the first annual Legacy Day during this year’s Homecoming Weekend (Sept. 26-28). At the time of printing, details are still being hammered out but look for the event to include activities for “Saints-in-Training” of all ages as well as a campus tour designed to highlight some of the newer features of campus. Don’t forget to stop by with your future AQ student! If you’re going to attend Homecoming and would like to participate in Legacy Day, help us plan by calling the Admissions Office at 1-800-678-9593.

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Bob Niedzielski, Ph.D., ’58 Alumni Board President

Alumni News

Dear Fellow Alums, The Aquinas College Alumni Association is on the move! Ample evidence of that can be found in this section of the magazine. One year ago, 15 new members were welcomed to the Alumni Association Board of Directors. They made up a good crosssection of Aquinas alums, with degrees ranging from the associate level to the master of management, and they have been engaged in a wide variety of professions. Every decade from the 1950s on was represented on the total Board membership of 22, from a 1950 graduate, to one from the class of 2001. In addition to the Grand Rapids area, Board members reside in the Detroit area and in Frederic, Michigan, as well as in Toledo, Ohio, and Mesa, Arizona. This Board has been very active, particularly at the committee level. Much progress has been made during this year of reorganization and new bylaws. In the works is a benefits package for Aquinas alums. We also hope to broaden the scope of alumni events. Alumni are involved with Development, Admissions, and the Career and Counseling Services Offices. The Alumni Walk has been reinstituted. The Golden Saints alumni group, for those who graduated fifty or more years ago, is now a reality. Additionally, a seat has been purchased in the new Performing Arts Center through the donations of Alumni Board members. There is still work to be done, however. The endowment for the Sister Anne Keating Alumni Scholarship, sponsored by the Alumni Association, needs to be strengthened.

From the Alumni Board of Directors’ President

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Last April, alumni from across the state of Michigan gathered to look back on their times at Aquinas and catch a glimpse of their alma mater’s future. John F. ‘58 and Beth (Geller) Burns ‘58 hosted a reception for Detroit-area alumni and friends on April 8 at the Skyline Club in Southfield, Michigan. Northern Michigan alumni and friends enjoyed connecting with the College and each other at their reception hosted by Edward Carlson ’69 held April 24 at the Waterfront Inn located in Traverse City. Both evenings were filled with memories and excitement for the future initiatives of Aquinas College. Plans are already underway for upcoming events. Mark your calendars for the October 29 Detroit-area reception hosted by Michael P. Smith ‘80. More information will follow. If you would like to host an alumni reception in your area, please contact the Alumni & Parent Relations Office at 616-459-8281 or access us online at… alumni@aquinas.edu.

Alumni Receptions… Keeping in Touch I strongly encourage you to reserve September 26-28 for Homecoming. If you haven’t been on campus in some time, you’ll be pleasantly surprised at the changes at Aquinas since you graduated. You can keep up with the Alumni Association and with the College, in general, at the Aquinas Web site, www.aquinas.edu. As always, your comments and suggestions are welcomed. - Bob Niedzielski

Dress rehearsal for cast of 1967 production of “Bells Are Ringing.” 2003 Opening week of the Performing Arts Center was July 29 through August 2. Community Circle Theatre (formerly Circle theatre) has a full, fall line-up of performances scheduled. 2002 Ground broken for the new Aquinas College Performing Arts Center in May, fulfilling a dream made possible by the collaboration of Circle Theatre, Catholic Secondary Schools, and Aquinas College. 2000 The theatre major restored and Gary Konow resumed direction of full-length plays through the 2003 school year. “Oedipus Rex,” “The Elephant Man,” a repeat of “The Contrast” and “A Doll’s House” were offered.

Performing Arts Center on campus and Circle Theatre would manage it. Actors from both organizations would use the facility thr oughout the year. Catholic Secondary Schools later joined the part-nership, gaining use of the space for its students and allowing collaboration between Aquinas, Circle Theatre and area Catholic high schools. Construction of the $7 million facility began on acreage near Albertus Hall in April 2002. Crews finished their work in July of this year, and a weeklong gala ceremony was planned to welcome the center to campus, starting July 29. The theatre curriculum was resurrected in August 2001 and while it doesn’t have many participants yet, it is growing, Konow says. In the interim between the two programs, Aquinas offered acting

courses and communication Professor Penny Avery had headed the Aquinas College Thespians (ACT). Like their predecessors, these actors staged productions in the renovated Carriage House and other locations around campus. The new Performing Arts Center offers a better venue for them and the thousands of actors, stagehands and audience members who will benefit from—maybe even fall in love among—the bright lights and velvet curtains of their new digs. Jim and Linda Chervenka plan to celebrate with the Aquinas community the renewal of the College’s theatre program, a new Performing Arts Center and the arrival of Circle Theatre on campus. “We’ve been looking forward to it,” Jim says. “The ideal is coming together,” Konow says.

1990s Students in the Insignis program provided medieval drama during the St. Thomas Week celebration. Students sometimes wrote an annual Black History Month play. 1980s After the closing of the Carriage House, theatre was discontinued as a major and drama at the college was limited to student productions by the Drama Club, the Theatre Club, and Aquinas College Thespians (ACT). Kretchmer Recital Hall and the Wege Center Ballroom were the new locations. 1976 The first American drama, Royall Tyler’s “The Contrast,” was the last production in the Carriage House. The fire marshall banned the use for plays soon after the performance. 1972 “Yerma” was presented in the Carriage House and directed by Gary Konow. 1971 “The Hostage” was performed in the Carriage House. Sister Rosemar y O’Donnell, O.P., joined the faculty. She later directed “J.B.” in 1972. 1969 Speech and Drama, which had been a minor, became a theatre and communication major.

Aquinas’ Theatre History

CAMPUS CAMPUS EVENTS EVENTS

September 2003 1-28, Mon-Fri Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit Chris LaPorte ’96, Recent Works

3, Wednesday Reflection Award Dinner

10, Wednesday AQ Contemporary Writers Series Kurtis Lamkin, Poet & Musician 7:30 p.m.• Wege Center Ballroom

23,Tuesday Aquinas College M.A. in Education w/ Initial Certification Info Session Call 616-459-8281

26, Friday Percussion Group Concert Hall of Fame Gala

27-28, Sat-Sun Homecoming Weekend

28, Sunday Homecoming Jazz Brunch

Contemporary Writers Series

Impressive Tennis

In 1997 Dr. Tony Foster ’73 and Linda Nemec Foster ’72 gave a generous grant to establish the Aquinas College Contemporary Writers Series, a series of readings by well-known authors. The desire for an Aquinas writers’ series began while Linda, poet laureate of Grand Rapids, was a student at Aquinas. She thought that she and other students would benefit from having well-known writers visit the campus. Once the Series was underway, the Fosters major goal was to establish an endowment so the Series would be ongoing, free and open to the public. The Fosters have now met their goal and the future of the Series is guaranteed with the endowment in place. Four acclaimed writers visit Aquinas each academic year and

By Damon Bouwkamp ’00, Contributing Writer

AQ Welcomes Alpha Epsilon Delta Three years of preparatory work by Aquinas premedical students culminated in the chartering of the Michigan Zeta chapter of Alpha Epsilon Delta (AED), the National Premedical Honor Society at Aquinas College. On April 11, premedical advisors from universities as far away as Texas and Virginia joined national officers of the

Members of the newly established Alpha Epsilon Delta Honorary Premedical Society with representatives of the national organization at the April Induction Dinner.

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(L-R)Tony Foster ’73, Bob Pastan (awardwinning poet), Linda Pastan, Linda Nemec Foster ’72

the Series has developed a large following. In addition to the readings, the visiting writers along with the readings meet with creative writing students in workshops and offer class readings for students in the College’s first and second year core courses. Contemporary Writers schedules can be found at http://www.aquinas.edu/library/ CW/writers.html.

Society, Aquinas faculty and staff, and families and friends of 13 Aquinas students in establishing the 185th chapter of AED. Students were inducted as members and seven faculty as honorary members. The chartering ceremony was highlighted by a speech on the practice of medicine given by Trustee Dr. Luis Tomatis. AED is the oldest and most respected premedical honor society in the country. Each chapter is completely student organized as it carries out the society’s purpose to encourage and to recognize excellence in premedical studies and to promote service that benefits the entire health care community. Sr. Katrina Hartman, chair of the Chemistry Department, and President Knopke serve as the chapter’s faculty advisors.

After losing two seniors that accounted for 300 victories over four years, the 2003 men’s tennis season could have been a year of rebuilding for Head Coach Jerry Hendricks. But with a 5-3 win over Lindsey Wilson College at the NAIA National Championships in Peachtree City, Georgia, this past May, Hendricks continued the strong run of the Saints’ tennis program. Led by sophomores Jason Walsh (Grandville) and Matt Garner (Grand Rapids), the Saints went 20-7 for the season with a Region VIII Championship. Sealing the regional win was a 5-4 victory over 12th-ranked Indiana Wesleyan University to move onto the National Championships. Also leading the Saints to a top-20 ranking for much of the season were juniors Nate Price (Holland), Jason Winegar (Midland) and Roger Lourido (Grand Rapids), and sophomore Jared Flick (Muskegon). Walsh became the fastest Saints player to reach 100 career victories in just his second season, while junior Brian Ahmedani (Kentwood) was named to the NAIA Academic All-American team after earning at least a 3.5 GPA while contributing to the team. Now five dual match victories away from 200 career victories with an overall record of 195-77, Hendricks has led the Saints to three straight appearances at the NAIA National Championships. The victory over Lindsey Wilson is the first in Aquinas tennis history in National Championship play. After advancing to the Round of 16, the season ended against topranked Azusa Pacific University.

32 Student-Athletes Recognized in 2002-03 All-Americans (12) Laura Beattie – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Michelle Borek – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Sarah Ellis – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Henr y Holmes – Men’s Indoor Track and Field Kerry Lucas – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field John MacLeod – Baseball Jon Mies – Men’s Soccer De-Ale-Jo Roberts – Men’s Indoor Track and Field Chuck Schuba – Men’s Basketball T.J. Shimek – Men’s Indoor Track and Field Andy Steketee – Men’s Basketball Jenny Ziegler – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Academic All-Americans (20) Brian Ahmedani – Men’s Tennis Laura Beattie – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Michelle Borek – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Brett Cagney – Baseball Sanel Fazlic – Men’s Soccer Kara Ferguson – Women’s Tennis Leo Foley – Men’s Cross Country Jeremy Frost – Baseball Tamara Harnden – Volleyball Eric Johnson – Men’s Cross Country, Men’s Outdoor Track and Field Nate Kaiser – Men’s Cross Country Val Kunde – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Kerry Lucas – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Josh May – Men’s Cross Country John Moceri – Baseball Lars Petzke – Men’s Cross Country, Men’s Outdoor Track and Field Nathan Rose – Men’s Soccer Julie Roy – Women’s Soccer T.J. Shimek – Men’s Outdoor Track and Field Jeff White – Men’s Soccer

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WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Nov 7, 8 @ St. Francis Tourney (Indiana) Nov 13 Davenport Nov 15 Rochester Nov 21, 22 Aquinas Classic Nov 25 @ Huntington Nov 29 Kalamazoo College Dec 2 @ Taylor Dec 6 @ Trinity Christian Dec 9 Calvin Dec 13 Goshen Dec 19 Trinity International Jan 2, 3 @ Palm Beach Atlantic Jan 7 @ Michigan - Dearborn Jan 10 @ Madonna Jan 14 Indiana Tech Jan 17 Concordia Jan 21 @ Spring Arbor Jan 24 Cornerstone Jan 28 @ Siena Heights Jan 31 Michigan - Dearborn Feb 4 Madonna Feb 7 @ Indiana Tech Feb 11 @ Concordia Feb 14 Spring Arbor Feb 18 @ Cornerstone Feb 21 Siena Heights Feb 26 WHAC Tournament - 1 st Round Feby 28 WHAC Tournament - Semi-finals March 2 WHAC Tournament - Finals March 11-17 NAIA National Tournament

MEN’S BASKETBALL Nov 11 Davenport Nov 15 Grace Bible Nov 18 Rochester Nov 21, 22 @ Marian Tournament (Indiana) Nov 25 @ Calvin Dec 5, 6 @ Hope Tournament Dec 12, 13 Brann’s Aquinas Classic Dec 19-21 St. Xavier Tournament (Illinois) Jan 2, 3 @ Embry Riddle Tournament (Florida) Jan 7 @ Michigan - Dearborn Jan 10 Madonna Jan 14 @ Indiana Tech Jan 17 @ Concordia Jan 21 Spring Arbor Jan 24 Cornerstone Jan 28 @ Siena Heights Jan 31 Michigan - Dearborn Feb 4 @ Madonna Feb 7 Indiana Tech Feb 11 Concordia Feb 14 @ Spring Arbor Feb 18 @ Cornerstone Feb 21 Siena Heights Feb 25 WHAC Tournament - 1st Round Feb 28 WHAC Tournament Semi-finals March 1 WHAC Tournament Finals

MEN’S GOLF Sept 3 Madonna/Fox Creek GC Sept 5,6 Olivet Invitational Sept 16 Cornerstone/Thousand Oaks CC Sept 20 Siena Heights/Lenawee CC Sept 22 Aquinas/L.E. Kaufman Sept 25 Spring Arbor/Cascades GC Oct 1 Spring Arbor Invitational Oct 3 Aquinas/L.E. Kaufman Oct 11 Tri-State A.C. Eddy Invitational/Zollner GC


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Junior Lesley Malkowski (center) is pictured with Nancy and Ray Loeschner, underwriters of the award.

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Junior Lesley Malkowski was selected this past spring as the 2002 winner of the Loeschner TwoDimensional Art Competition in Grand Rapids. The competition is hosted by the Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park. Malkowski’s photograph was selected from among 40 finalists. The Freesoil, Michigan native received a $1,000 cash award, which is funded through the Ray Loeschner Foundation.

Lesley Malkowski: Art Competition Winner

- “Women and the Holocaust” April 6, 2004 - “Baroque and Classical Era Women and Their Music” March 23, 2004 - “Building the Nest Egg: Issues in Retirement Planning” February 17, 2003 - “Sinai Bedouin Women Make Films” February 3, 2004 - “China: A Nation of Contrasts” November 18, 2003 - “The Global Village: An Emerging Humanities Landscape” November 4, 2003

Student News

Measuring the quality of the Aquinas experience has always been a multifaceted task. We use many objective and subjective measures to improve the events and services we offer. Sometimes, it is asking students what they thought of Spring Fling or graduation. Often, it is a systematic survey of students by a department or the Provost’s Office (every course at Aquinas is evaluated by students). Every few years we look at using national instruments to compare our students’ experience with students at other four-year private colleges. This past year, I administered the Student Satisfaction Survey, a national instrument published by the Noel-Levitz Group ,which is the most popular instrument in use nationally to gauge whether students are generally satisfied with their college experience. We used this instrument in 1994, 1995, 1996 and, most recently, in 1998. A random sample from each class was generated and the survey was administered before Christmas 2002. It was encouraging to find that Aquinas College was rated so high by our students. In every scale but two, our students were significantly more satisfied with Aquinas than students attending other four-year private colleges. And, of these two scales (academic advising and safety) we are now at the national average as compared to the last time when we were lower than the national average on these two scales. We have improved significantly in the past five years in how our students evaluate their own satisfaction with the Aquinas experience—the instruction, the people, the services, the atmosphere, the facilities and the campus climate. We will be able to use the results further in this upcoming year to continue to improve the quality of the Aquinas experience. We are truly appreciative of the feedback we receive from our graduates about what went well and what we could improve. Keep the notes and letters coming. By Brad Winkler, Dean of Student Affairs

Student Satisfaction at Aquinas

- “Scenes From Us, A Play in Progress” October 14, 2003 - “Call Me Illya: A Creative Nonfiction Confession of Childhood Espionage” October 27, 2003 - “A Reading from Take On the Seasons, a New Poetry Manuscript” September 16, 2003

The Aquinas Lecture Series Tuesdays in the Wege Student Center Ballroom 12:30–1:20 p.m. principal of Child Discovery Center (Reggio Charter School chartered by Grand Rapids Public Schools) and the Aquinas College Child Development Center to study teaching and learning in these environments. Tim Bennett, director of the master in science education faculty and curriculum, is completing his third year as science education

consultant with the East Grand Rapids Public Schools. Luthene Chappell, Ph.D., has been working on the board of the Northroek Academy, which is a college program for developmentally disabled adults in western Michigan. Carol Winkle, Ph.D., is working with MDOE in developing statewide surveys regarding the percep-

tions of the quality of teacher preparation (to be used with Title II and possibly PR/PE). Sue Liberatore, Director of the Reading Clinic, has added an offsite reading clinic in a Grand Rapids elementary school. Jim Garofalo, Ph.D., dean of the School of Education, continues as a reading/accreditation consultant withWyoming Public Schools.

Faculty Notes - School of Education cont. Faculty New – Fall 2003 MEN’S SOCCER Aug 25 Grace Bible Aug 30 @ Columbia (Mo.) Aug 31 @ Lindenwood (Mo.) Sept 6 @ Alma Sept 9 @ Calvin Sept 13 IndianaTech Sept 20 @ Madonna Sept 21 St. Xavier Sept 23 @ Spring Arbor Sept 27 Concordia Sept 30 Siena Heights Oct 4 @ Cornerstone Oct 5 @ Saginaw Valley State Oct 7 @ Indiana Tech Oct 14 Madonna Oct 18 Spring Arbor Oct 21 @ Concordia Oct 25 @ Siena Heights Oct 28 Cornerstone WOMEN’S SOCCER Aug26 St. Francis Aug 29 @ McKendree (Ill.) Aug 30 @ Newman (Mo.) Sept 5 Taylor Sept 6 @ Alma Sept 9 @ Ferris State Sept 13 Indiana Tech Sept 18 Grand Valley State Sept 20 @ Madonna Sept 24 @ Spring Arbor Sept 27 Concordia (Homecoming) Oct 1 Siena Heights Oct 4 @ Cornerstone Oct 8 @ Indiana Tech Oct 15 Madonna Oct 18 Spring Arbor Oct 20 Hope Oct 22 @ Concordia Oct 25 Siena Heights Oct 29 Cornerstone

VOLLEYBALL Aug 29, 30 @Cornerstone Tournament Sept 5,6 @ Cedarville Tournament (Ohio) Sept 10 @ Goshen (Indiana) Sept 12, 13 @ St. Xavier Tournament (Ill.) Sept 16 Spring Arbor Sept 19 Siena Heights Sept 20 Aquinas Invitational Sept 23 Concordia Sept 25 Albion Sept 29 Great Lakes Christian Oct 2 @ Spring Arbor Oct 4 @ Siena Heights Oct 7 Madonna Oct 11 @ Kalamazoo College Oct 14 @ Cornerstone Oct 18 @ Huntington Tournament (Ind.) Oct 21 @ Concordia Oct 24, 25 @ Calvin Tournament Oct 28 @ Madonna Nov 4 Cornerstone Nov 11 WHAC Tournament - 1 st Round Nov 14, 15 WHAC Final Four Tournament

Top Senior Student-Athletes Recognized Baker Award. He is a fourKerry Lucas and Lars year letter winner in both Petzke, were selected as the cross country and track 2002-03 Senior Student and field and has taken Athletes—the top female home numerous honors and male senior studentduring that time, including athletes who demonstrated All-American in track academic strength, service (2002), Academic Allto other people and athletic Kerry Lucas American in track (2002), involvement and success. cross country (2000-02). Lucas, a senior from Petzke graduated with Lakeview, received the Sr. a history major and a geoHelen Louise Brogger graphy minor while mainAward. A four-year letter taining a 3.65 GPA and winner in track and field, completing his teaching she earned All-American certification. At Aquinas, honors from 2000-02 and Petzke was active in the Stuwas honored as an AcadeLars Petzke dent Senate, the Studentmic All-American in 2002. Athlete Advisory Board and Phi Lucas graduated with a major Alpha Theta, as its vice president. in chemistry and a minor in “Kerry and Lars are tremendous mathematics. She maintained a ambassadors for Aquinas College, 3.75 GPA and was involved in Casa not only in athletics, but also in the Hogar, several service learning trips classroom,” said Head Track and Field and was a member of the Aquinas Coach Dave Wood.“ They emulate College Ambassadors. the true meaning and spirit of the Petzke, a senior from Saint award.” Joseph,was awarded the Joseph

Gragg Named WHAC Softball Player-of-the-Year Cassi Gragg, a senior from Grant, was named the WHAC Softball Playerof-the-Year leading Aquinas to a 34-16 record (21-7 WHAC) and the WHAC Championship for the third time in her four years as a Saint. While starting in all 50 of the team’s games, she finished the regular season with a team-high 65 hits in 154 at-bats, for a team-high .426 batting average. While being named WHAC Player-of-the-Week twice, Gragg totaled 21 doubles (new single-season record), three triples, one homerun and a teamhigh 44 RBIs, while only striking out five times. Also excelling on the mound, Gragg led the team with a 2.01 ERA in 21 appearances, going 12-7 with 14 complete games and two shutouts. Opponents hit .221 against her while striking out 65 times

CROSS COUNTRY SCHEDULE Sept 12 Aquinas College Invitational Sept 19 National Catholic Invitational Sept 27 Pre-National Meet Oct 10 Michigan Intercollegiate Oct 26 WHAC Championships Nov 8 NAIA Regionals Nov 22 NAIA Championships

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Grand Rapids South Bend, Ind. Louisville , Ky. Hudsonville Grand Rapids Grand Rapids Kenosha,Wis.

AQ AND YOU Program Repeating the success of last year, the AQ AND YOU Summer Program 2003 was held the week of June 23. Twenty students came to campus as part of the Rewarding Youth Achievement Program (RYAP), which serves students in the Detroit Public Schools. Brigid Avery, a College admissions representative, developed the program last year to expose students from the Detroit area to Aquinas and the many opportunities throughout West Michigan.

Included in this year’s program was an Inquiry and Expression class focusing on The Hip Hop Generation taught by Aquinas Director of Campus Life Jessie Grant. The students went for a ride aboard the Grand Haven Harbor Steamer riverboat for an evening cruise, exposing them to the beautiful West Michigan shoreline. Their challenge for the week ended with a team-building exercise at Higher Ground, an indoor rock climbing facility in Grand Rapids.

CAMPUS CAMPUS EVENTS EVENTS

October 2003 2,Thursday Music Department Sampler Concert 12:30 p.m. • Wege Center Ballroom

5-31, Mon-Fri Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit Bill Hosterman, Printmaking 5, Sunday • Reception, 2-4 p.m.

(Left) Some of the 20 students from the AQ AND YOU Summer Program take a moment to pose for a picture in the gardens at Marywood.

(Below) Raymonda Davis (left rear) and Diane Ngabire, an Aquinas sophomore, pose with Sisters (l-r) Mar y Morang, Lois Schaffer, and Yvonne Richard at Aquinata Hall at Marywood during an ice cream social service project in which the AQ AND YOU students participated.

Women/Men – 6 p.m./5 p.m. Women/Men – 4:15 p.m./ 5 p.m. Women/Men – 9:30 a.m. /10:30 a.m. 3:30 Women/Men – 12 noon/12:45 p.m. Women/Men - 12 noon/12:45 p.m. Women/Men – 10:30/11:45 a.m. (CST)

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6, Monday Jane Hibbard Idema Women’s Studies Center Event 12 noon –1:30 p.m. • Sandra Steingraber, Ph.D. “Environment Threats to Fertility, Pregnancy, Breast Milk and Babies: The Myth of Living Safely in a Toxic World” Open to the Public Wege Center Ballroom

9-11, Thurs-Sat Aquinas Players present “OurTown” Performing Arts Center

30, Thursday AQ Contemporary Writers Series Leslie Ulman Wege Ballroom


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“… an

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Dave Hammer jumped into college basketball coaching more than 25 years ago as an assistant at Delta College. Now, after more than two decades with both boy’s high school and several other notable college programs, Hammer has shifted his sights to West Michigan where he will now lead the Saints basketball program. Hammer, 54, was selected for the head coaching position in early June following a month-long search process that followed the resignation of Rick Albro who left Aquinas in May after 13 years to take an assistant coaching post at Cleveland State University. Hammer, who assumed his duties on July 1, will also be responsible for the College‘s intramural program. “Dave brings a tremendous amount of basketball knowledge and expertise to Aquinas,” said Terry Bocian, director of athletics. “His leadership skills will be an excellent asset to the athletic program; he is an ideal fit for the overall community at Aquinas College.” Hammer comes to Aquinas from Coldwater, Michigan where he had served as athletic director since 1993 and as boy’s basketball coach from 1997-2002. His Coldwater career included a Class B semi-final berth in 1999 and a Class B Coach of the Year award in 1999. During his five years as basketball coach, Hammer led the Cardinals to a 66-45 record, including school records of 24 victories and a winning streak of 18 games in 1999. Before that, Hammer was an assistant coach at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas from 1989-1993. Under the leadership of Mustangs Head Coach John Shumate, Hammer helped to transform the team from the league cellar to the Southwest Conference championship and an NCAA Tournament berth in 1993 (20-8 overall, 12-2 SWC). From 1978 to 1980, Hammer served as an assistant coach at Delta College in University Center. Then, he assumed head coaching duties at Bridgeport High Athletic Director Terry Bocian and new Head School. He left a year later, returning to Delta in 1981 Basketball Coach Dave Hammer as its head coach. His teams earned a 57-24 record during his three years, which included leading the Pioneers to an Eastern Conference Championship in 1982. In 1984, he joined the University of Michigan program as an assistant ideal fit …” under Coach Bill Frieder. As a member of the U-of-M basketball staff, his teams won two consecutive Big Ten titles and earned four NCAA post-Bocian season berths while amassing an overall 100-27 record. Hammer also served as assistant coach at Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene, Texas from 1988 to 1989. “When looking for the right fit to get back into college coaching, Aquinas College met all my criteria, including a strong academic background for the players, a close college community, supportive staff members inside

Athletics

Former Wolverine Assistant Coach to Lead Saints Men’s Basketball

Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit All-Media, Juried Student Show Continues

1-26, Mon-Fri (Below) Vendor tables filled the upper level of Wege Student Center.

March 2003 Aquinas Players Present “Pippin” Performing Arts Center

26-28, Thurs-Sat Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit All-Media, Juried Student Show 22, Sunday • Reception, 2-4 p.m.

22-28, Sun-Fri Doreen Ferne (left) from Escape Mind & Body Relax Center explains the newest relaxation products.

Conferencing Services and Aquinas College’s food service (HDS Catering) trumped expectations in its first annual Bridal Show that saw over 300 people in attendance at the March event. Attendees took advantage of the opportunity to talk personally to vendors and gather ideas from the beautiful displays of gowns, cakes, flowers, photos and other related wedding items that filled the upper level of Wege Center. The Catering Department (HDS) showcased some of its most popular food items. Attendees could not get enough of the pork tenderloin and lamb chops. Because of the overwhelmingly positive response from vendors and attendees, the size of next year’s show will be expanded. It is set for Saturday, March 6, 2004. If you are interested in being a vendor next year, contact Conference Coordinator Judi Creamer at (616) 459-8281 or via e-mail at creamjud@aquinas.edu for more information. By Judi Creamer, Conferencing Services

Black History Month Play Performing Arts Center

12-14, Thurs-Sat 1-13, Sun-Fri Bachelor of Fine Arts Student Exhibit Continues

February 2003 Bachelor of Fine Arts Student Exhibit 18, Sunday • Reception, 2-4 p.m.

18-31, Sun-Fri

January 2004

CAMPUS CAMPUS EVENTS EVENTS

Bridal Show Highlights AQ Amenities

Athletics – Fall 2003

CAMPUS CAMPUS EVENTS EVENTS November 2003 1-7, Sat-Fri Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit Bill Hosterman, Printmaking

16-30, Mon-Fri Miriam Pederson and Ron Pederson A Collaborative Exhibition of Poetry and Sculpture 16, Sunday • Opening Reception Art & Music Center Gallery

20-22,Thurs-Sat Aquinas College Thespians present “Flowers for Algernon” Performing Arts Center

23 Sunday • 3 p.m. Choral Concert withValenti Handbell Choir St. Robert of Newminster Church,Ada

December 2003 1-19, Mon-Fri Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit Miriam Pederson and Ron Pederson A Collaborative Exhibition of Poetry and Sculpture

2,Tuesday • 7:30 p.m. Fall Jazz Night Vocal Jazz, Jazz Combo, Big Band Art & Music Center

Aquinas Jazz Festival 2003 Hits High Note By Kate Luce, Contributing Writer (From The AquinasTimes, Apr. 9, 2003. Reprinted with permission.)

Nearly a dozen jazz ensembles and acts from all over Michigan came to Aquinas March 28-30 to perform for the 30th annual Jazz Festival. The mood was upbeat throughout the weekend as various artists took the stage. Acts included performances by ensembles from Aquinas College, Cornerstone University, Grand Valley State University, Newaygo High School, Community High School, Lansing Community College as well as other schools from throughout Michigan. In the evening, jazz concerts brought many professional jazz musicians and highlighted faculty members of the Aquinas Music Department including Director of Instrumental Music Dr. Paul Brewer and Adjunct Faculty Steve Talaga and Dr. Robin Connell. A small combo from Community High School, featuring piano, bass, trumpets, drums and an upright bass were among the highlights. Tunes ranged from a swingy number called “Israel,” to a catchy Bossa Nova tune.

To complement the early afternoon performances, the festival also featured well-known acts such as jazz vocalist Sunny Wilkinson, who appeared Saturday evening. Wilkinson teaches vocal jazz at Michigan State and Western Michigan University, and performs at festivals and venues all over the country. Her latest CD “High Wire,” featuring big-band music, has been a great success. Sunday night performances, held at Wealthy Theater, featured the Grand Rapids Jazz Orchestra’s debut under the direction of Brewer and a performance by renowned trumpeter Randy Brecker. Brecker helped to form the successful band Blood Sweat and Tears, playing with them for a year. Besides sizzling performances, the festival also allowed aspiring musicians to get in on the act. Brewer led a clinic that focused on big band rehearsal techniques. Sunday featured a clinic with Brecker, as well as Tim Froncek on drums, Dave Spring on bass, and Steve Talaga on piano. It was a weekend filled with music to the enjoyment of attendees. The performances were lively and the clinics provided an opportunity for musicians to learn more about jazz techniques.

One of the many participating jazz bands performs at the Art and Music Center.

4-20,Thurs-Fri Aquinas College and Community Circle Theatre “Holiday Extravaganza” Performing Arts Center

7, Sunday • 4 p.m. Holiday Collage Concert Aquinas College Chorus, Chamber Choir, College Band, Student Soloists Art & Music Center

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the athletic department and excellent leadership throughout the college,” Hammer noted. “I am looking forward to maintaining the level of quality within our student-athletes and helping the basketball program progress into the future for Aquinas College.” Hammer graduated in 1970 from Central Michigan University with a B.A. in political science and earned a master’s in educational administration at CMU in 1976.

Meanwhile, during his 13 seasons as the Saints men’s head basketball coach, Albro posted seven winning seasons that included two WHAC conference co-championships. His best season was in 1999-2000 when the Saints posted a 23-10 record, the most wins in AQ’s men’s basketball history. Last year’s squad recorded an 18-14 mark, which included victories over Hope, Calvin, Ferris State and Division I Indiana-Purdue-Fort Wayne.

Albro coached more games than any men’s basketball coach in Aquinas history (406) and recorded the most wins (199). His career record at Aquinas was 199207. Bocian praised Albro’s dedication, “Rick gave Aquinas College and its student-athletes 13 years of outstanding effort and commitment. We are appreciative and wish him nothing but the best in his new position at the Division I level.”

Aquinas Wins Sixth Straight All-Sports Award By Damon Bouwkamp ‘00, Contributing Writer

Aquinas College has won the Wolverine Hoosier Athletic Conference (WHAC) AllSports Trophy for an unprecedented 6th consecutive year. Aquinas began its consecutive run of President’s Cup awards in 1997-98. No other WHAC school has won the award more than three times. Aquinas continued its dominance of the WHAC with a conferencehigh 36 league championships over that time. “What an accomplishment! It is the culmination of a great deal of time, energy and commitment on behalf of our staff and our student/athletes,” stated Director of Athletics Terry Bocian. “We are proud to offer the most comprehensive athletic program in the WHAC and to have earned the success we’ve worked hard for is an outstanding reward,” he added. Fourteen sports are recognized as league sanctioned sports. Aquinas won titles this past year in women’s indoor and outdoor track and field, women’s softball, men’s cross country and

men’s indoor track and field. Combined with one of three second-place finishes in men’s soccer, men’s outdoor track and field or baseball, the Saints earned 47 points to Cornerstone University’s 44 points. “This is a great achievement for our entire department,” said Bocian. “Winning our sixth straight trophy is a tribute to all of our studentathletes.” The WHAC, which originated in 1992, is comprised of Aquinas College, Concordia University, Cornerstone University, Indiana Technical University, Madonna University, Siena Heights University, Spring Arbor University, and Tri-State University. The WHAC All-Sports Champion is determined by each institution’s top finish in any six WHAC sports (three men and three women). Sport champions are awarded eight points (seven for runner-up, six for third, etc.) and the school with the most points is the All-Sports Champion.

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“… an

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Athletics

Dave Hammer jumped into college basketball coaching more than 25 years ago as an assistant at Delta College. Now, after more than two decades with both boy’s high school and several other notable college programs, Hammer has shifted his sights to West Michigan where he will now lead the Saints basketball program. Hammer, 54, was selected for the head coaching position in early June following a month-long search process that followed the resignation of Rick Albro who left Aquinas in May after 13 years to take an assistant coaching post at Cleveland State University. Hammer, who assumed his duties on July 1, will also be responsible for the College‘s intramural program. “Dave brings a tremendous amount of basketball knowledge and expertise to Aquinas,” said Terry Bocian, director of athletics. “His leadership skills will be an excellent asset to the athletic program; he is an ideal fit for the overall community at Aquinas College.” Hammer comes to Aquinas from Coldwater, Michigan where he had served as athletic director since 1993 and as boy’s basketball coach from 1997-2002. His Coldwater career included a Class B semi-final berth in 1999 and a Class B Coach of the Year award in 1999. During his five years as basketball coach, Hammer led the Cardinals to a 66-45 record, including school records of 24 victories and a winning streak of 18 games in 1999. Before that, Hammer was an assistant coach at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas from 1989-1993. Under the leadership of Mustangs Head Coach John Shumate, Hammer helped to transform the team from the league cellar to the Southwest Conference championship and an NCAA Tournament berth in 1993 (20-8 overall, 12-2 SWC). From 1978 to 1980, Hammer served as an assistant coach at Delta College in University Center. Then, he assumed head coaching duties at Bridgeport High Athletic Director Terry Bocian and new Head School. He left a year later, returning to Delta in 1981 Basketball Coach Dave Hammer as its head coach. His teams earned a 57-24 record during his three years, which included leading the Pioneers to an Eastern Conference Championship in 1982. In 1984, he joined the University of Michigan program as an assistant ideal fit …” under Coach Bill Frieder. As a member of the U-of-M basketball staff, his teams won two consecutive Big Ten titles and earned four NCAA post-Bocian season berths while amassing an overall 100-27 record. Hammer also served as assistant coach at Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene, Texas from 1988 to 1989. “When looking for the right fit to get back into college coaching, Aquinas College met all my criteria, including a strong academic background for the players, a close college community, supportive staff members inside

Former Wolverine Assistant Coach to Lead Saints Men’s Basketball

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Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit All-Media, Juried Student Show Continues

1-26, Mon-Fri (Below) Vendor tables filled the upper level of Wege Student Center.

March 2003 Aquinas Players Present “Pippin” Performing Arts Center

26-28, Thurs-Sat Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit All-Media, Juried Student Show 22, Sunday • Reception, 2-4 p.m.

22-28, Sun-Fri Doreen Ferne (left) from Escape Mind & Body Relax Center explains the newest relaxation products.

Conferencing Services and Aquinas College’s food service (HDS Catering) trumped expectations in its first annual Bridal Show that saw over 300 people in attendance at the March event. Attendees took advantage of the opportunity to talk personally to vendors and gather ideas from the beautiful displays of gowns, cakes, flowers, photos and other related wedding items that filled the upper level of Wege Center. The Catering Department (HDS) showcased some of its most popular food items. Attendees could not get enough of the pork tenderloin and lamb chops. Because of the overwhelmingly positive response from vendors and attendees, the size of next year’s show will be expanded. It is set for Saturday, March 6, 2004. If you are interested in being a vendor next year, contact Conference Coordinator Judi Creamer at (616) 459-8281 or via e-mail at creamjud@aquinas.edu for more information. By Judi Creamer, Conferencing Services

Black History Month Play Performing Arts Center

12-14, Thurs-Sat 1-13, Sun-Fri Bachelor of Fine Arts Student Exhibit Continues

February 2003 Bachelor of Fine Arts Student Exhibit 18, Sunday • Reception, 2-4 p.m.

18-31, Sun-Fri

January 2004

CAMPUS CAMPUS EVENTS EVENTS

Bridal Show Highlights AQ Amenities

Athletics – Fall 2003

CAMPUS CAMPUS EVENTS EVENTS November 2003 1-7, Sat-Fri Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit Bill Hosterman, Printmaking

16-30, Mon-Fri Miriam Pederson and Ron Pederson A Collaborative Exhibition of Poetry and Sculpture 16, Sunday • Opening Reception Art & Music Center Gallery

20-22,Thurs-Sat Aquinas College Thespians present “Flowers for Algernon” Performing Arts Center

23 Sunday • 3 p.m. Choral Concert withValenti Handbell Choir St. Robert of Newminster Church,Ada

December 2003 1-19, Mon-Fri Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit Miriam Pederson and Ron Pederson A Collaborative Exhibition of Poetry and Sculpture

2,Tuesday • 7:30 p.m. Fall Jazz Night Vocal Jazz, Jazz Combo, Big Band Art & Music Center

Aquinas Jazz Festival 2003 Hits High Note By Kate Luce, Contributing Writer (From The AquinasTimes, Apr. 9, 2003. Reprinted with permission.)

Nearly a dozen jazz ensembles and acts from all over Michigan came to Aquinas March 28-30 to perform for the 30th annual Jazz Festival. The mood was upbeat throughout the weekend as various artists took the stage. Acts included performances by ensembles from Aquinas College, Cornerstone University, Grand Valley State University, Newaygo High School, Community High School, Lansing Community College as well as other schools from throughout Michigan. In the evening, jazz concerts brought many professional jazz musicians and highlighted faculty members of the Aquinas Music Department including Director of Instrumental Music Dr. Paul Brewer and Adjunct Faculty Steve Talaga and Dr. Robin Connell. A small combo from Community High School, featuring piano, bass, trumpets, drums and an upright bass were among the highlights. Tunes ranged from a swingy number called “Israel,” to a catchy Bossa Nova tune.

To complement the early afternoon performances, the festival also featured well-known acts such as jazz vocalist Sunny Wilkinson, who appeared Saturday evening. Wilkinson teaches vocal jazz at Michigan State and Western Michigan University, and performs at festivals and venues all over the country. Her latest CD “High Wire,” featuring big-band music, has been a great success. Sunday night performances, held at Wealthy Theater, featured the Grand Rapids Jazz Orchestra’s debut under the direction of Brewer and a performance by renowned trumpeter Randy Brecker. Brecker helped to form the successful band Blood Sweat and Tears, playing with them for a year. Besides sizzling performances, the festival also allowed aspiring musicians to get in on the act. Brewer led a clinic that focused on big band rehearsal techniques. Sunday featured a clinic with Brecker, as well as Tim Froncek on drums, Dave Spring on bass, and Steve Talaga on piano. It was a weekend filled with music to the enjoyment of attendees. The performances were lively and the clinics provided an opportunity for musicians to learn more about jazz techniques.

One of the many participating jazz bands performs at the Art and Music Center.

4-20,Thurs-Fri Aquinas College and Community Circle Theatre “Holiday Extravaganza” Performing Arts Center

7, Sunday • 4 p.m. Holiday Collage Concert Aquinas College Chorus, Chamber Choir, College Band, Student Soloists Art & Music Center

the athletic department and excellent leadership throughout the college,” Hammer noted. “I am looking forward to maintaining the level of quality within our student-athletes and helping the basketball program progress into the future for Aquinas College.” Hammer graduated in 1970 from Central Michigan University with a B.A. in political science and earned a master’s in educational administration at CMU in 1976.

Meanwhile, during his 13 seasons as the Saints men’s head basketball coach, Albro posted seven winning seasons that included two WHAC conference co-championships. His best season was in 1999-2000 when the Saints posted a 23-10 record, the most wins in AQ’s men’s basketball history. Last year’s squad recorded an 18-14 mark, which included victories over Hope, Calvin, Ferris State and Division I Indiana-Purdue-Fort Wayne.

Albro coached more games than any men’s basketball coach in Aquinas history (406) and recorded the most wins (199). His career record at Aquinas was 199207. Bocian praised Albro’s dedication, “Rick gave Aquinas College and its student-athletes 13 years of outstanding effort and commitment. We are appreciative and wish him nothing but the best in his new position at the Division I level.”

Aquinas Wins Sixth Straight All-Sports Award By Damon Bouwkamp ‘00, Contributing Writer

Aquinas College has won the Wolverine Hoosier Athletic Conference (WHAC) AllSports Trophy for an unprecedented 6th consecutive year. Aquinas began its consecutive run of President’s Cup awards in 1997-98. No other WHAC school has won the award more than three times. Aquinas continued its dominance of the WHAC with a conferencehigh 36 league championships over that time. “What an accomplishment! It is the culmination of a great deal of time, energy and commitment on behalf of our staff and our student/athletes,” stated Director of Athletics Terry Bocian. “We are proud to offer the most comprehensive athletic program in the WHAC and to have earned the success we’ve worked hard for is an outstanding reward,” he added. Fourteen sports are recognized as league sanctioned sports. Aquinas won titles this past year in women’s indoor and outdoor track and field, women’s softball, men’s cross country and

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men’s indoor track and field. Combined with one of three second-place finishes in men’s soccer, men’s outdoor track and field or baseball, the Saints earned 47 points to Cornerstone University’s 44 points. “This is a great achievement for our entire department,” said Bocian. “Winning our sixth straight trophy is a tribute to all of our studentathletes.” The WHAC, which originated in 1992, is comprised of Aquinas College, Concordia University, Cornerstone University, Indiana Technical University, Madonna University, Siena Heights University, Spring Arbor University, and Tri-State University. The WHAC All-Sports Champion is determined by each institution’s top finish in any six WHAC sports (three men and three women). Sport champions are awarded eight points (seven for runner-up, six for third, etc.) and the school with the most points is the All-Sports Champion.

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Junior Lesley Malkowski (center) is pictured with Nancy and Ray Loeschner, underwriters of the award.

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Lesley Malkowski: Art Competition Winner

- “China: A Nation of Contrasts” November 18, 2003

Junior Lesley Malkowski was selected this past spring as the 2002 winner of the Loeschner TwoDimensional Art Competition in Grand Rapids. The competition is hosted by the Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park. Malkowski’s photograph was selected from among 40 finalists. The Freesoil, Michigan native received a $1,000 cash award, which is funded through the Ray Loeschner Foundation.

- “Sinai Bedouin Women Make Films” February 3, 2004

- “Women and the Holocaust” April 6, 2004 - “Baroque and Classical Era Women and Their Music” March 23, 2004 - “Building the Nest Egg: Issues in Retirement Planning” February 17, 2003 - “The Global Village: An Emerging Humanities Landscape” November 4, 2003

Student News

Measuring the quality of the Aquinas experience has always been a multifaceted task. We use many objective and subjective measures to improve the events and services we offer. Sometimes, it is asking students what they thought of Spring Fling or graduation. Often, it is a systematic survey of students by a department or the Provost’s Office (every course at Aquinas is evaluated by students). Every few years we look at using national instruments to compare our students’ experience with students at other four-year private colleges. This past year, I administered the Student Satisfaction Survey, a national instrument published by the Noel-Levitz Group ,which is the most popular instrument in use nationally to gauge whether students are generally satisfied with their college experience. We used this instrument in 1994, 1995, 1996 and, most recently, in 1998. A random sample from each class was generated and the survey was administered before Christmas 2002. It was encouraging to find that Aquinas College was rated so high by our students. In every scale but two, our students were significantly more satisfied with Aquinas than students attending other four-year private colleges. And, of these two scales (academic advising and safety) we are now at the national average as compared to the last time when we were lower than the national average on these two scales. We have improved significantly in the past five years in how our students evaluate their own satisfaction with the Aquinas experience—the instruction, the people, the services, the atmosphere, the facilities and the campus climate. We will be able to use the results further in this upcoming year to continue to improve the quality of the Aquinas experience. We are truly appreciative of the feedback we receive from our graduates about what went well and what we could improve. Keep the notes and letters coming. By Brad Winkler, Dean of Student Affairs

Student Satisfaction at Aquinas

- “Scenes From Us, A Play in Progress” October 14, 2003 - “Call Me Illya: A Creative Nonfiction Confession of Childhood Espionage” October 27, 2003 - “A Reading from Take On the Seasons, a New Poetry Manuscript” September 16, 2003

The Aquinas Lecture Series Tuesdays in the Wege Student Center Ballroom 12:30–1:20 p.m. principal of Child Discovery Center (Reggio Charter School chartered by Grand Rapids Public Schools) and the Aquinas College Child Development Center to study teaching and learning in these environments. Tim Bennett, director of the master in science education faculty and curriculum, is completing his third year as science education

consultant with the East Grand Rapids Public Schools. Luthene Chappell, Ph.D., has been working on the board of the Northroek Academy, which is a college program for developmentally disabled adults in western Michigan. Carol Winkle, Ph.D., is working with MDOE in developing statewide surveys regarding the percep-

tions of the quality of teacher preparation (to be used with Title II and possibly PR/PE). Sue Liberatore, Director of the Reading Clinic, has added an offsite reading clinic in a Grand Rapids elementary school. Jim Garofalo, Ph.D., dean of the School of Education, continues as a reading/accreditation consultant withWyoming Public Schools.

Faculty Notes - School of Education cont. Faculty New – Fall 2003 MEN’S SOCCER Aug 25 Grace Bible Aug 30 @ Columbia (Mo.) Aug 31 @ Lindenwood (Mo.) Sept 6 @ Alma Sept 9 @ Calvin Sept 13 IndianaTech Sept 20 @ Madonna Sept 21 St. Xavier Sept 23 @ Spring Arbor Sept 27 Concordia Sept 30 Siena Heights Oct 4 @ Cornerstone Oct 5 @ Saginaw Valley State Oct 7 @ Indiana Tech Oct 14 Madonna Oct 18 Spring Arbor Oct 21 @ Concordia Oct 25 @ Siena Heights Oct 28 Cornerstone

Top Senior Student-Athletes Recognized Baker Award. He is a fourKerry Lucas and Lars year letter winner in both Petzke, were selected as the cross country and track 2002-03 Senior Student and field and has taken Athletes—the top female home numerous honors and male senior studentduring that time, including athletes who demonstrated All-American in track academic strength, service (2002), Academic Allto other people and athletic Kerry Lucas American in track (2002), involvement and success. cross country (2000-02). Lucas, a senior from Petzke graduated with Lakeview, received the Sr. a history major and a geoHelen Louise Brogger graphy minor while mainAward. A four-year letter taining a 3.65 GPA and winner in track and field, completing his teaching she earned All-American certification. At Aquinas, honors from 2000-02 and Petzke was active in the Stuwas honored as an AcadeLars Petzke dent Senate, the Studentmic All-American in 2002. Athlete Advisory Board and Phi Lucas graduated with a major Alpha Theta, as its vice president. in chemistry and a minor in “Kerry and Lars are tremendous mathematics. She maintained a ambassadors for Aquinas College, 3.75 GPA and was involved in Casa not only in athletics, but also in the Hogar, several service learning trips classroom,” said Head Track and Field and was a member of the Aquinas Coach Dave Wood.“ They emulate College Ambassadors. the true meaning and spirit of the Petzke, a senior from Saint award.” Joseph,was awarded the Joseph

WOMEN’S SOCCER Aug26 St. Francis Aug 29 @ McKendree (Ill.) Aug 30 @ Newman (Mo.) Sept 5 Taylor Sept 6 @ Alma Sept 9 @ Ferris State Sept 13 Indiana Tech Sept 18 Grand Valley State Sept 20 @ Madonna Sept 24 @ Spring Arbor Sept 27 Concordia (Homecoming) Siena Heights @ Cornerstone @ Indiana Tech Madonna Spring Arbor Hope @ Concordia Siena Heights Cornerstone Oct 1 Oct 4 Oct 8 Oct 15 Oct 18 Oct 20 Oct 22 Oct 25 Oct 29

AQ AND YOU Program Repeating the success of last year, the AQ AND YOU Summer Program 2003 was held the week of June 23. Twenty students came to campus as part of the Rewarding Youth Achievement Program (RYAP), which serves students in the Detroit Public Schools. Brigid Avery, a College admissions representative, developed the program last year to expose students from the Detroit area to Aquinas and the many opportunities throughout West Michigan.

Cassi Gragg, a senior from Grant, was named the WHAC Softball Playerof-the-Year leading Aquinas to a 34-16 record (21-7 WHAC) and the WHAC Championship for the third time in her four years as a Saint. While starting in all 50 of the team’s games, she finished the regular season with a team-high 65 hits in 154 at-bats, for a team-high .426 batting average. While being named WHAC Player-of-the-Week twice, Gragg totaled 21 doubles (new single-season record), three triples, one homerun and a teamhigh 44 RBIs, while only striking out five times. Also excelling on the mound, Gragg led the team with a 2.01 ERA in 21 appearances, going 12-7 with 14 complete games and two shutouts. Opponents hit .221 against her while striking out 65 times

CROSS COUNTRY SCHEDULE Sept 12 Aquinas College Invitational Sept 19 National Catholic Invitational Sept 27 Pre-National Meet Oct 10 Michigan Intercollegiate Oct 26 WHAC Championships Nov 8 NAIA Regionals Nov 22 NAIA Championships

Grand Rapids South Bend, Ind. Louisville , Ky. Hudsonville Grand Rapids Grand Rapids Kenosha,Wis.

Included in this year’s program was an Inquiry and Expression class focusing on The Hip Hop Generation taught by Aquinas Director of Campus Life Jessie Grant. The students went for a ride aboard the Grand Haven Harbor Steamer riverboat for an evening cruise, exposing them to the beautiful West Michigan shoreline. Their challenge for the week ended with a team-building exercise at Higher Ground, an indoor rock climbing facility in Grand Rapids.

CAMPUS CAMPUS EVENTS EVENTS

October 2003 2,Thursday Music Department Sampler Concert 12:30 p.m. • Wege Center Ballroom

5-31, Mon-Fri Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit Bill Hosterman, Printmaking 5, Sunday • Reception, 2-4 p.m.

(Left) Some of the 20 students from the AQ AND YOU Summer Program take a moment to pose for a picture in the gardens at Marywood.

(Below) Raymonda Davis (left rear) and Diane Ngabire, an Aquinas sophomore, pose with Sisters (l-r) Mar y Morang, Lois Schaffer, and Yvonne Richard at Aquinata Hall at Marywood during an ice cream social service project in which the AQ AND YOU students participated.

Gragg Named WHAC Softball Player-of-the-Year

VOLLEYBALL Aug 29, 30 @Cornerstone Tournament Sept 5,6 @ Cedarville Tournament (Ohio) Sept 10 @ Goshen (Indiana) Sept 12, 13 @ St. Xavier Tournament (Ill.) Sept 16 Spring Arbor Sept 19 Siena Heights Sept 20 Aquinas Invitational Sept 23 Concordia Sept 25 Albion Sept 29 Great Lakes Christian Oct 2 @ Spring Arbor Oct 4 @ Siena Heights Oct 7 Madonna Oct 11 @ Kalamazoo College Oct 14 @ Cornerstone Oct 18 @ Huntington Tournament (Ind.) Oct 21 @ Concordia Oct 24, 25 @ Calvin Tournament Oct 28 @ Madonna Nov 4 Cornerstone Nov 11 WHAC Tournament - 1 st Round Nov 14, 15 WHAC Final Four Tournament

6, Monday Jane Hibbard Idema Women’s Studies Center Event 12 noon –1:30 p.m. • Sandra Steingraber, Ph.D. “Environment Threats to Fertility, Pregnancy, Breast Milk and Babies: The Myth of Living Safely in a Toxic World” Open to the Public Wege Center Ballroom

9-11, Thurs-Sat Aquinas Players present “OurTown” Performing Arts Center

30, Thursday AQ Contemporary Writers Series Leslie Ulman Wege Ballroom

Women/Men – 6 p.m./5 p.m. Women/Men – 4:15 p.m./ 5 p.m. Women/Men – 9:30 a.m. /10:30 a.m. 3:30 Women/Men – 12 noon/12:45 p.m. Women/Men - 12 noon/12:45 p.m. Women/Men – 10:30/11:45 a.m. (CST)

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(L-R) Rachel Hackett, Matt Stansfield, Theresa Page and Ken Sokolowski compete in the euchre tournament.

AQ Club Night II – Keeps Getting Better Three Aquinas students were honored by the Michigan Campus Compact (MCC) for their outstanding community service work. Junior Timothy “TJ” Burdick and seniors Mary “Bridie” Kent and Mary “Bridget” Clark were recognized by MCC with its 2003 Outstanding Student Service Awards at a state conference on April 12 in East Lansing. T.J. Burdick received MCC’s Heart & Soul Award, which recognizes students for time, effort and personal commitment to their

Students Recognized for Outstanding Community Service

equity—practices that improve the long-term stability of businesses. Our new degree program includes coursework in business, science and environmental studies and will prepare students to contribute to organizations as they pursue both economic growth and responsible environmental policies. In both our undergraduate programs and the master of management program we will continue to provide outstanding educational opportunities, with a

As we look forward to the new academic year we are excited to greet both the students who will begin academic programs at Aquinas College as well as those who are returning. It’s going to be another busy year. This fall the Business Department will be inaugurating a new undergraduate degree in sustainable business. Sustainable business practices involve strategies that increase profits, protect the environment and build social

fruit that is sweet and fulfilling. A liberal arts education is the focal point of Aquinas College; it is living, learning and adapting to change, personally and professionally. It is taking elements of history, philosophy, humanities, psychology, music, art, natural sciences, English, theology and modern languages and integrating these into the vital individuals we call Aquinas students. All of these disciplines and others shape our students and prepare them for the workplace—

As the seasons take shape, changing the landscape and transitioning to the next season, the students in the School of Arts and Sciences grow and change together with the seasons. Seeds of learning are planted in several areas of a liberal arts education; some grow to fruition, others end after they are introduced. But each brings with it a heritage, color, fragrance and

Plans are being discussed to make a six-week work period at the Peto part of the program. The Michigan Department of Education has been adjusting most endorsement programs’ requirements over the last three years. Its faculty and staff have been working with Aquinas’ faculty to revise, add or drop courses as needed to meet current requirements. A new requirement for CPR training as a teacher certification requirement is still being discussed.

It’s all fun and games in the pool!

community through service projects. Bridie Kent received the MCC Commitment to Service Award for multiple contributions she has made to Aquinas and the community through community service involvement. Bridget Clark is Aquinas’ MCC award recipients (l-r) Mary Bridget Clark, one of five students in Timothy James “TJ” Burdick and Mary “Bridie” Kent the State to receive community resources. Part of the MCC Outstanding ComBridget’s award, a $200 monetary munity Impact Award for making award, will be given to a nonservice an integral part of her profit agency of Bridget’s college experience through sigchoice. nificant investment in enhancing

values-based perspective intended to build management and leadership skills. We will continue to review our curricula in order to be responsive to changes in business, accounting and technology. We appreciate the connections with our alumni. Please keep in touch with faculty and stop by the School of Management office in Jarecki to say hello. a workplace supplemented by beautiful works of art and music, reading, writing and critical thinking. Knowing the value of a liberal arts education is knowing the value of the individual and all that he/she is capable of doing. To grow and change with the seasons is to transition through life. It is with peace and a need to make the world a better place that we align ourselves with the ever flowing seasons and the gifts that come from an Aquinas College education.

News from the Deans

Fall 2003 – Student News

School of Management

By Maryann Matzke, Junior

students arrived at East Hills Athletic Club and participated in a variety of physical activities like swimming, basketball and tennis as well as in low-contact events such as board games and X-Box tournaments. Funding for the event came through a grant from the Prevention Network as well as donations from numerous campus organizations and local businesses.

programs into models of constructivist teaching. The learning disabilities endorsement major has become the single largest choice for a majority of Aquinas College education students. We currently have over 900 enrolled students. Students enrolled in the physically or otherwise health impaired endorsement program (POHI) spent two weeks in May working at the Peto Institute in Budapest, Hungary.

We have been working steadily over the last three years with the Child Development Center (Pre-school Aquinas College program), Child Discovery Center (chartered with Grand Rapids Public Schools) and the East Academy for Young Children (a partner school with Wyoming Public Schools) to facilitate the growth of the teachers and the

Student News – Fall 2003

Enlightenment: Constructing Publics in the Early Modern German Lands (Aldershot, Hampshire: Ashgate Press, 2002). Susan Haworth-Hoeppner, Ph.D. (Sociology Department), Rebecca Coogan, Ph.D. (English Department), and Michelle DeRose, Ph.D. (Insignis Program), attended the National Women’s Studies Association Annual Conference in New Orleans from June 19–22. Each of them is involved in teaching courses contributing to the women’s studies minor. Barbara Witham McCargar, chair of the Music Department, and instructor Carol Grady, attended a national music retreat/ meeting at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon, in June. Staff Recognition. During the April 23rd Faculty/Staff Apprecia-

FACULTY

AQ Club Night II proved to be bigger and better than the original! This drug- and alcoholfree event included more prizes, more food and more fun at no cost to those who attended. On Friday March 28, from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m., more than 200

Shirley Lewis, Ed.D.

School of Arts and Sciences

AQ Club Night II volunteers (l-r) Matt Krevda, Jamie Toth, Sara Koster, MaryAnn Matzke and Megan Alford

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School of Education

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V. James Garofalo, Ph.D.

Cynthia VanGelderen

Fall 2003 – Faculty News

tion Luncheon organized by the Student Senate, three faculty members from the School of Arts and Sciences were recognized: Gary Eberle, Curt Bechler, Ph.D., and Nanette Clatterbuck. Congratulations to the winners of these awards! Pam Waterbury, an assistant professor of English and teacher of education courses “Youth Literature” and “Practicum Writing,” contributed to a new textbook, Children’s Literature: An Invitation to the World, which was published in October 2002. Pam’s contributions to this text were in the areas of idea generation, revisions and editing. • The Grand Rapids-based Nokomis Foundation has awarded a $2,000 grant to Deb Wickering, Ph.D., and Barbara Roos of Grand Valley State

University to support the Tarabiin Bedouin women’s film project. Wickering, a professor in-theCollege at Aquinas, initiated the project several years ago. The trio travelled to Egypt in May to begin preparations for filming. • Many music faculty are in the process or have recently finished a CD recording, including: Roger MacNaughton (Blue Muse, featuring The Roger MacNaughton Trio); Steve Talaga (with Mind’s Eye); Paul Brewer, Ph.D., (with his wife and son, Robin Connell and Matthew Brewer); and Barbara Witham McCargar (with the medieval chant quartet, Vox Angelica, performing Hildegard von Bingen works, and in solo performance of works by women composers, with Mary Hurd and Sr. Catherine Williams, O.P.).

School of Education (SOE)

NOTES Nancy Schmiedicke, Gayle Hulswit, Cindy Blair, Sandy Rademaker and Elizabeth Schmiedicke continued the streak of exceeding the projected fall enrollment goals in School of Education courses for the 14th year in a row. Elizabeth Schmiedicke, certification officer, is teaching Spanish both as adjunct instructor for the Aquinas College Foreign Language Department and the Emeritus Center. Sandy Rademaker, coordinator of Graduate SOE programs, completed a three-year practicum in Spiritual Direction last May. She is currently very busy with this ministry. In addition she is cofacilitating a 33-week JustFaith program.

Melissa King joined the School of Education in November 2002 as its administrative assistant. Sr. Mary Navarre, O.P., and Cathy Tucci, Ph.D., both SOE faculty members, are serving on a Michigan Department of Education (MDOE) committee that oversees the Michigan Test for teachers of reading. Julia Reynolds, director of Introduction to Education program, has been working with the MDOE on its secondary reading work, is serving as president of the National Council of Teachers in English, Michigan Chapter, coordinated their fall state conference and is a reading consultant with the Wyoming Public Schools. Kathy Burgis, with the Math Department and SOE, has been

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working with the MDOE committee that oversees the math curriculum for teachers. Kathy Barker, Director of Special Education Endorsement Programs in SOE, has been working the MDOE Special Education Office, on assessing programs and training special education staffs around the state. Nkechy Ezeh has continued to work with area schools teachers to increase their effectiveness in working with minority students and young children in the community. David Kelly, consultant to our two Reggio Emilia inspired K-5 partner programs, has been working with Steelcase Corporation’s (Grand Rapids) social anthropologists and Susan Lukaart,

Project PRIDE By Elissa Sangalli, Sophomore

Sara Frees joined Aquinas College in June as student assistant activities director in the Campus Life Dept. Frees comes from Eastern Michigan University where she graduated with a master’s degree in counseling. She will serve as a co-advisor to the Student Senate Programming Board and Leadership Training and also manage the Moose Café. Sara Frees

Beyond the Classroom: Oaxaca, Mexico By Kathleen McFadden, Junior

Last December’s Christmas Break signaled the end of classes for the fall semester at Aquinas, but one class was not quite finished. The three-credit class taken by participants in the Oaxaca (pron: WAH-hock-ah) Service-Learning program was over, but the service component was just about to begin. During the Christmas Break, students traveled to Oaxaca, Mexico, to work among the people there for about 10 days. This experience stretches far beyond the classroom. At Aquinas, students learn about Mexico’s history, economics, politics and culture throughout the semester, but in Oaxaca, students learn what cannot be taught from a textbook. A lesson in humility is that of the generosity of poverty stricken families who have next to nothing, yet who are willing to share it all. This brings Philippians 2:3 to life: “Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit, but in humility consider others better than yourselves.”

Sophomore Kathleen McFadden (left) listens as Maria (a Oaxacan girl), reads from a Spanish language book.

Students were able to spend quality time with families of Oaxaca, learning their names and stories and playing with the children. They paired with students from Villanova University (Pennsylvania) to tutor children in English as a Second Language, to strengthen Spanish skills while playing with children, and to visit a nursing home. Students learned about the difference one person can make with faith and trust in God under His direction. The Oaxaca ServiceLearning trip is one of countless opportunities for Aquinas students to begin to make a difference with God’s help.

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Mother Theresa once stated that “We can do no great things, only small things with great love.” On the morning of April 12, nearly 100 Aquinas students and staff and over 50 Heartside residents congregated at Heartside Ministries. Donning kelly green T-shirts emblazed with the white “Project PRIDE” emblem, the group prayed in thanksgiving for all of God’s blessings and then hit the streets of the Heartside District. Working together to conquer litter from Fulton to Logan, and U.S. 131 to Jamison, Aquinas people and Heartside residents swept, raked and sweated away. Originally Project PRIDE’s sole mission was environmental improvement. Now, in Aquinas and Heartside’s fifth collaborative year, PRIDE’s purpose emerged successfully as something new—the integration and peer-education of people from diverse racial, religious and socieconomic backgrounds.

2003 PlanningTeam (l-r) Rick Frederick; Elissa Sangalli, CAVA coordinator; Eric Bridge ’92, Service Learning director; and William Holmes.

Members of the Project Pride team who took on clean-up duties in the Heartside neighborhood.


30

Seniors Robin Mankel (left) and Tom Eggleston (second from right) enjoy a moment with a few Sigsbee Elementary School students.

The Sigsbee Elementary School Playground was in desperate need of some attention this past fall. With paint chipping from playground equipment, benches falling apart, graffiti and a storage shed that had become quite an eyesore, senior Robin Mankel decided to organize a beautification project. With the collaboration of the City of Grand Rapids Parks and Recreation Department, Grand Rapids Public Schools, Sigsbee

Elementary and Aquinas, the necessity became a reality. With both small and large projects requiring attention, the program was split into two days with different goals. Aquinas students spent the first day tackling the simple projects with the help of Sigsbee Elementary students. Ranging from kindergarten to fifth grade, the students volunteered their skills to paint benches, barrels and poles on the school

grounds. The students felt proud of their contribution to the project and enjoyed working with the Aquinas volunteers. Working very hard all day on the following Saturday, Aquinas students undertook the larger projects with great success. Leaving Sigsbee Elementary Playground looking clean and colorful for everyone to appreciate, both the Aquinas and Sigsbee students were amazed by their beautiful accomplishment.

By Robin Mankel, Senior

Students Lead School Beautification Project Aquinas College’s Service Learning program was the beneficiary this past year of gifts from the Steelcase Foundation and Alticor, formerly Amway. The Steelcase gift of $50,000 was made in recognition of the 50th anniversary of the foundation; anniversary gifts were made to a selected number of organizations whose mission and purposes reflect that of the foundation. With this gift, President Knopke established the Steelcase Foundation Endowed Service Learning Fund to provide ongoing support for this core function of the College. In addition, the $5,000 grant from Alticor enabled Campus Ministry to fund several student-directed service projects in and around the Grand Rapids community. The following stories detail how those grant dollars were put to work on three of the projects: Sigsbee Elementary School, Community Ministries and Project Listo.

Steelcase, Alticor Funds Help Service Learning Projects

Robb Bajema, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology, recently participated in a professional conference sponsored by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. His paper “Using Science to Assess Environmental Vulnerabilities” presented research activities that focused on the measuring, monitoring, diagnosing, forecasting and restoration activities of environmental conditions. Kurt Kaiser, chair of the Art Department, and Mike Williams, Ph.D., advisor for the Community Leadership and Urban Studies programs, attended the Council of Colleges of Arts & Sciences (CCAS) Seminar for Department Chairs in Minneapolis on July 10-12, 2003. The 2003 seminar focused on such issues as Academic Leadership; Conflict and Resource Management; and the Recruitment, Retention and Development of Faculty. In addition, Mike Williams received the Michigan Campus Compact’s Outstanding Faculty in Service Learning Award, which was presented to him February 14 at Central Michigan University. He also spoke to MCC’s Service Learning Directors about the community leadership major at their March 28 meeting at Aquinas. Mike McDaniel, Ph.D., chair of the Math Department, recently had an article published in the April 2003 issue of Mathematics Teacher (vol. 96, No. 4). In his article, Mike posits that an important mathematical theorem

35

Anthony Guest joined Aquinas in July as an assistant professor of theatre in the Communication Department and as the new director of the Aquinas College Theatre Program. Guest had been an adjunct assistant professor at the University of Michigan-Flint and theatre director/manager of the Bronner Performing Arts Center at Frankenmuth High School (Mich.). He earned his master of fine arts in acting and directing from the Professional Actor Training Company at the University of Missouri-Kansas City in 2000. He will teach a variety of theatre courses based on his New York acting and directing experience, his teaching experience as well as his graduate and professional work. has history, culture, influence and age. When an instructor presents such a theorem, he/she presents the students with a tremendous opportunity to participate in the intellectual development of civilization.

In 2002, Chad Gunnoe also published the article “The Debate between Johann Weyer and Thomas Erastus on the Punishment of Witches,” in Cultures of Communication from Reformation to Chad Gunnoe, chair of the History Department, is an editor of, and has an article in, the recently published Paraclesian Moments: Science, Medicine, and Astrology in Early Modern Europe (Truman State University Press). Paracelsus was a 16th century German physician whose religiousalchemical worldview served as inspiration for scientific innovators. The book includes studies regarding scientific and magical ideas in the early modern period. Chad’s article, “Paracelsus’ Biography Among His Detractors,” is an overview of the effort to impugn his character by the humanist physicians who opposed him.

NOTES FACULTY

School of Arts and Sciences

Fall 2003 – Student News

Faculty News

– Fall 2003

Student News – Fall 2003

U.S. Math Educators Watching Aquinas with Keen Interest

Faculty News

By Curtis R. Burdette, Student, Contributing Writer

Math educators across the nation are listening to the ideas presented by Aquinas College Assistant Professor of Mathematics Kathy Burgis. In January 2002, Burgis and Associate Professor of Mathematics Joe Spencer, Ph.D., presented a talk titled “Collaborative Teaching of Math Courses for Elementary Teachers” at the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators Conference meeting in San Antonio, Texas. “What has made it interesting is that Joe is a mathematician and I am a math educator. Those are two communities that don’t get along very well,” Burgis said. “Aquinas is lucky because both are represented in the Mathematics Department and that has given Aquinas students a strong position in the math education field.” Chair of the Mathematics Department Michael McDaniel, Ph.D., and the Mathematics Department have sponsored several events launched by Burgis. “Her work in math education is focused on teaching math teachers. And nationally they are paying attention to what she’s doing,” McDaniel said. Burgis initiated a Family Math Night at Palmer Elementary School in Grand Rapids. The event was held in the gymnasium because of the large turnout. Students and faculty from the Aquinas math program ran the events. Dozens of elementary students came with their families to participate in games and festivities that required math skills. “To the families, it allows parents to see mathematics can be fun for children. And just because the parents weren’t any good at math, their kids might be,” Burgis said. “It’s a nice experience for Aquinas students to employ the skills that they learn in the math education courses. It shows them that teaching doesn’t have to be standing in front of the classrooms assigning tasks for the students to complete.” Presentations made by Burgis and Spencer have caught the attention of other professionals because of the unique hands-on approach offered to Aquinas math education students. “On the national level, these courses are taught as math courses that don’t relate. Our students use elementary math textbooks to learn how to teach elementary math,” said Burgis. “Everything that we do in the course relates to what they will do in the classroom as teachers.”

Community Ministries: Helping Children Feel God’s Love By Jessica Olson, Senior, Family and Elementary Coordinator -Community Ministries

Ten years ago, a segment of Grand Rapids near the southeast side was identified as “at risk” due to high level of police activity. The concern for the safety and well being of children in the neighborhood prompted five adults and 25 kids to form Community Ministries at Trinity United Methodist Church. Their mission is to “provide a safe place for children to feel God’s love through consistent adults who care about them.” Since its inception, Community Ministries has grown to over 100 volunteers and more than 150 neighborhood children. The majority of the children and teens that we work with are living at or below the poverty level so they are considered to be “at risk.” With God’s guidance and a growing vision, Community Ministries now provides programming for grades 1-12. The programs include: Kids’ Club, Teen Club, Mentoring, Tutoring, Parent Programming, Prayer Partners for each child, Summer programs, Basketball, Scholarships, Family Club and a Partnership with Congress Elementary School.

Jessie Olson (second from left) with (l-r) Stephanie, Keazia and Lamont during a field trip to the John Ball Park Zoo (Photo: Libby Hews)

I have been a part of Community Ministries for almost three years now and it has truly touched my life. I started as an intern with only the expectation of completing my 60 hours and then moving on. But once I began to work with these children, they became part of my life. It has been an incredible experience for me and I have learned so much about diversity and being a part of the community. As a coordinator, I recruit volunteers and mentors to be a part of our programs and I also work

with many of the children. I feel that I have taught these kids a lot about life and have given them new experiences and opportunities. At the same time, they have also taught me so much about life and my own opportunities. These children have taught me to be thankful for what I have and to not take life for granted. When I moved here from Traverse City to attend Aquinas College, I felt very lost and unsure of what I wanted to do with my life. Now that I have been a part of Community Ministries, I trust that I am exactly where I am supposed to be. Working with these children and families has reassured me that I have chosen the right career path for myself. At the end of the day, I feel very blessed to be able to put my time and energy into something so positive and uplifting. We do have our challenging days and encounter some very serious issues with our kids, but we work hard to fill their needs with integrity and compassion. We believe the challenging times are worth it if we touch even one child’s life.

Project Listo Migrant Tutoring By Thomas Eggleston, Senior

Larry Kielich, Ph.D. (1944-2003)

As we were going to print, we learned of the death July 3 of Larry Kielich, Ph.D., 59, professor of sociology at Aquinas since 1974. Kielich fought a long and brave battle against cancer. He was a former chairman of the Sociology Department and authored numerous articles in sociology journals. A memorial service was held July 19 on the Aquinas campus to honor and remember Dr. Kielich.

Seasonal travel is an essential part of the life of migrant workers and their families. The children of a migrant worker transfer to a different school at least twice per year—sometimes more than that, as the families move in search of agricultural work. This constant switching of school districts and curricula causes the school-age children to fall behind in their schooling, year after year. With that knowledge, I founded and coordinated Project Listo—a program to tutor and mentor the children of migrant workers. Teaming up with Sparta Public Schools, which has a program teaching English to adult migrants, Aquinas students cared for the children at the migrant camp while their parents were in class. Aquinas volunteers helped kids with their homework, read books with the children and organized games. Another important part of the program was simply to be present with the children, mentoring them and supplying them with the confidence needed to continue in their education.

34

31


30

35

Seniors Robin Mankel (left) and Tom Eggleston (second from right) enjoy a moment with a few Sigsbee Elementary School students.

The Sigsbee Elementary School Playground was in desperate need of some attention this past fall. With paint chipping from playground equipment, benches falling apart, graffiti and a storage shed that had become quite an eyesore, senior Robin Mankel decided to organize a beautification project. With the collaboration of the City of Grand Rapids Parks and Recreation Department, Grand Rapids Public Schools, Sigsbee

Elementary and Aquinas, the necessity became a reality. With both small and large projects requiring attention, the program was split into two days with different goals. Aquinas students spent the first day tackling the simple projects with the help of Sigsbee Elementary students. Ranging from kindergarten to fifth grade, the students volunteered their skills to paint benches, barrels and poles on the school

grounds. The students felt proud of their contribution to the project and enjoyed working with the Aquinas volunteers. Working very hard all day on the following Saturday, Aquinas students undertook the larger projects with great success. Leaving Sigsbee Elementary Playground looking clean and colorful for everyone to appreciate, both the Aquinas and Sigsbee students were amazed by their beautiful accomplishment.

By Robin Mankel, Senior

Students Lead School Beautification Project Aquinas College’s Service Learning program was the beneficiary this past year of gifts from the Steelcase Foundation and Alticor, formerly Amway. The Steelcase gift of $50,000 was made in recognition of the 50th anniversary of the foundation; anniversary gifts were made to a selected number of organizations whose mission and purposes reflect that of the foundation. With this gift, President Knopke established the Steelcase Foundation Endowed Service Learning Fund to provide ongoing support for this core function of the College. In addition, the $5,000 grant from Alticor enabled Campus Ministry to fund several student-directed service projects in and around the Grand Rapids community. The following stories detail how those grant dollars were put to work on three of the projects: Sigsbee Elementary School, Community Ministries and Project Listo.

Steelcase, Alticor Funds Help Service Learning Projects

Robb Bajema, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology, recently participated in a professional conference sponsored by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. His paper “Using Science to Assess Environmental Vulnerabilities” presented research activities that focused on the measuring, monitoring, diagnosing, forecasting and restoration activities of environmental conditions. Kurt Kaiser, chair of the Art Department, and Mike Williams, Ph.D., advisor for the Community Leadership and Urban Studies programs, attended the Council of Colleges of Arts & Sciences (CCAS) Seminar for Department Chairs in Minneapolis on July 10-12, 2003. The 2003 seminar focused on such issues as Academic Leadership; Conflict and Resource Management; and the Recruitment, Retention and Development of Faculty. In addition, Mike Williams received the Michigan Campus Compact’s Outstanding Faculty in Service Learning Award, which was presented to him February 14 at Central Michigan University. He also spoke to MCC’s Service Learning Directors about the community leadership major at their March 28 meeting at Aquinas. Mike McDaniel, Ph.D., chair of the Math Department, recently had an article published in the April 2003 issue of Mathematics Teacher (vol. 96, No. 4). In his article, Mike posits that an important mathematical theorem

Anthony Guest joined Aquinas in July as an assistant professor of theatre in the Communication Department and as the new director of the Aquinas College Theatre Program. Guest had been an adjunct assistant professor at the University of Michigan-Flint and theatre director/manager of the Bronner Performing Arts Center at Frankenmuth High School (Mich.). He earned his master of fine arts in acting and directing from the Professional Actor Training Company at the University of Missouri-Kansas City in 2000. He will teach a variety of theatre courses based on his New York acting and directing experience, his teaching experience as well as his graduate and professional work. has history, culture, influence and age. When an instructor presents such a theorem, he/she presents the students with a tremendous opportunity to participate in the intellectual development of civilization.

In 2002, Chad Gunnoe also published the article “The Debate between Johann Weyer and Thomas Erastus on the Punishment of Witches,” in Cultures of Communication from Reformation to Chad Gunnoe, chair of the History Department, is an editor of, and has an article in, the recently published Paraclesian Moments: Science, Medicine, and Astrology in Early Modern Europe (Truman State University Press). Paracelsus was a 16th century German physician whose religiousalchemical worldview served as inspiration for scientific innovators. The book includes studies regarding scientific and magical ideas in the early modern period. Chad’s article, “Paracelsus’ Biography Among His Detractors,” is an overview of the effort to impugn his character by the humanist physicians who opposed him.

NOTES FACULTY

School of Arts and Sciences

Fall 2003 – Student News

Faculty News

– Fall 2003

Faculty News

Student News – Fall 2003

U.S. Math Educators Watching Aquinas with Keen Interest By Curtis R. Burdette, Student, Contributing Writer

Math educators across the nation are listening to the ideas presented by Aquinas College Assistant Professor of Mathematics Kathy Burgis. In January 2002, Burgis and Associate Professor of Mathematics Joe Spencer, Ph.D., presented a talk titled “Collaborative Teaching of Math Courses for Elementary Teachers” at the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators Conference meeting in San Antonio, Texas. “What has made it interesting is that Joe is a mathematician and I am a math educator. Those are two communities that don’t get along very well,” Burgis said. “Aquinas is lucky because both are represented in the Mathematics Department and that has given Aquinas students a strong position in the math education field.” Chair of the Mathematics Department Michael McDaniel, Ph.D., and the Mathematics Department have sponsored several events launched by Burgis. “Her work in math education is focused on teaching math teachers. And nationally they are paying attention to what she’s doing,” McDaniel said. Burgis initiated a Family Math Night at Palmer Elementary School in Grand Rapids. The event was held in the gymnasium because of the large turnout. Students and faculty from the Aquinas math program ran the events. Dozens of elementary students came with their families to participate in games and festivities that required math skills. “To the families, it allows parents to see mathematics can be fun for children. And just because the parents weren’t any good at math, their kids might be,” Burgis said. “It’s a nice experience for Aquinas students to employ the skills that they learn in the math education courses. It shows them that teaching doesn’t have to be standing in front of the classrooms assigning tasks for the students to complete.” Presentations made by Burgis and Spencer have caught the attention of other professionals because of the unique hands-on approach offered to Aquinas math education students. “On the national level, these courses are taught as math courses that don’t relate. Our students use elementary math textbooks to learn how to teach elementary math,” said Burgis. “Everything that we do in the course relates to what they will do in the classroom as teachers.”

Community Ministries: Helping Children Feel God’s Love By Jessica Olson, Senior, Family and Elementary Coordinator -Community Ministries

Ten years ago, a segment of Grand Rapids near the southeast side was identified as “at risk” due to high level of police activity. The concern for the safety and well being of children in the neighborhood prompted five adults and 25 kids to form Community Ministries at Trinity United Methodist Church. Their mission is to “provide a safe place for children to feel God’s love through consistent adults who care about them.” Since its inception, Community Ministries has grown to over 100 volunteers and more than 150 neighborhood children. The majority of the children and teens that we work with are living at or below the poverty level so they are considered to be “at risk.” With God’s guidance and a growing vision, Community Ministries now provides programming for grades 1-12. The programs include: Kids’ Club, Teen Club, Mentoring, Tutoring, Parent Programming, Prayer Partners for each child, Summer programs, Basketball, Scholarships, Family Club and a Partnership with Congress Elementary School.

Jessie Olson (second from left) with (l-r) Stephanie, Keazia and Lamont during a field trip to the John Ball Park Zoo (Photo: Libby Hews)

I have been a part of Community Ministries for almost three years now and it has truly touched my life. I started as an intern with only the expectation of completing my 60 hours and then moving on. But once I began to work with these children, they became part of my life. It has been an incredible experience for me and I have learned so much about diversity and being a part of the community. As a coordinator, I recruit volunteers and mentors to be a part of our programs and I also work

with many of the children. I feel that I have taught these kids a lot about life and have given them new experiences and opportunities. At the same time, they have also taught me so much about life and my own opportunities. These children have taught me to be thankful for what I have and to not take life for granted. When I moved here from Traverse City to attend Aquinas College, I felt very lost and unsure of what I wanted to do with my life. Now that I have been a part of Community Ministries, I trust that I am exactly where I am supposed to be. Working with these children and families has reassured me that I have chosen the right career path for myself. At the end of the day, I feel very blessed to be able to put my time and energy into something so positive and uplifting. We do have our challenging days and encounter some very serious issues with our kids, but we work hard to fill their needs with integrity and compassion. We believe the challenging times are worth it if we touch even one child’s life.

Project Listo Migrant Tutoring By Thomas Eggleston, Senior

Larry Kielich, Ph.D. (1944-2003)

As we were going to print, we learned of the death July 3 of Larry Kielich, Ph.D., 59, professor of sociology at Aquinas since 1974. Kielich fought a long and brave battle against cancer. He was a former chairman of the Sociology Department and authored numerous articles in sociology journals. A memorial service was held July 19 on the Aquinas campus to honor and remember Dr. Kielich.

34

Seasonal travel is an essential part of the life of migrant workers and their families. The children of a migrant worker transfer to a different school at least twice per year—sometimes more than that, as the families move in search of agricultural work. This constant switching of school districts and curricula causes the school-age children to fall behind in their schooling, year after year. With that knowledge, I founded and coordinated Project Listo—a program to tutor and mentor the children of migrant workers. Teaming up with Sparta Public Schools, which has a program teaching English to adult migrants, Aquinas students cared for the children at the migrant camp while their parents were in class. Aquinas volunteers helped kids with their homework, read books with the children and organized games. Another important part of the program was simply to be present with the children, mentoring them and supplying them with the confidence needed to continue in their education.

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33

V. James Garofalo, Ph.D.

As the seasons take shape, changing the landscape and transitioning to the next season, the students in the School of Arts and Sciences grow and change together with the seasons. Seeds of learning are planted in several areas of a liberal arts education; some grow to fruition, others end after they are introduced. But each brings with it a heritage, color, fragrance and

fruit that is sweet and fulfilling. A liberal arts education is the focal point of Aquinas College; it is living, learning and adapting to change, personally and professionally. It is taking elements of history, philosophy, humanities, psychology, music, art, natural sciences, English, theology and modern languages and integrating these into the vital individuals we call Aquinas students. All of these disciplines and others shape our students and prepare them for the workplace—

As we look forward to the new academic year we are excited to greet both the students who will begin academic programs at Aquinas College as well as those who are returning. It’s going to be another busy year. This fall the Business Department will be inaugurating a new undergraduate degree in sustainable business. Sustainable business practices involve strategies that increase profits, protect the environment and build social

equity—practices that improve the long-term stability of businesses. Our new degree program includes coursework in business, science and environmental studies and will prepare students to contribute to organizations as they pursue both economic growth and responsible environmental policies. In both our undergraduate programs and the master of management program we will continue to provide outstanding educational opportunities, with a

We have been working steadily over the last three years with the Child Development Center (Pre-school Aquinas College program), Child Discovery Center (chartered with Grand Rapids Public Schools) and the East Academy for Young Children (a partner school with Wyoming Public Schools) to facilitate the growth of the teachers and the

programs into models of constructivist teaching. The learning disabilities endorsement major has become the single largest choice for a majority of Aquinas College education students. We currently have over 900 enrolled students. Students enrolled in the physically or otherwise health impaired endorsement program (POHI) spent two weeks in May working at the Peto Institute in Budapest, Hungary.

Plans are being discussed to make a six-week work period at the Peto part of the program. The Michigan Department of Education has been adjusting most endorsement programs’ requirements over the last three years. Its faculty and staff have been working with Aquinas’ faculty to revise, add or drop courses as needed to meet current requirements. A new requirement for CPR training as a teacher certification requirement is still being discussed.

School of Education

(L-R) Rachel Hackett, Matt Stansfield, Theresa Page and Ken Sokolowski compete in the euchre tournament. It’s all fun and games in the pool!

Cynthia VanGelderen

values-based perspective intended to build management and leadership skills. We will continue to review our curricula in order to be responsive to changes in business, accounting and technology. We appreciate the connections with our alumni. Please keep in touch with faculty and stop by the School of Management office in Jarecki to say hello.

Shirley Lewis, Ed.D.

a workplace supplemented by beautiful works of art and music, reading, writing and critical thinking. Knowing the value of a liberal arts education is knowing the value of the individual and all that he/she is capable of doing. To grow and change with the seasons is to transition through life. It is with peace and a need to make the world a better place that we align ourselves with the ever flowing seasons and the gifts that come from an Aquinas College education.

School of Management

students arrived at East Hills Athletic Club and participated in a variety of physical activities like swimming, basketball and tennis as well as in low-contact events such as board games and X-Box tournaments. Funding for the event came through a grant from the Prevention Network as well as donations from numerous campus organizations and local businesses.

community through service projects. Bridie Kent received the MCC Commitment to Service Award for multiple contributions she has made to Aquinas and the community through community service involvement. Bridget Clark is Aquinas’ MCC award recipients (l-r) Mary Bridget Clark, one of five students in Timothy James “TJ” Burdick and Mary “Bridie” Kent the State to receive community resources. Part of the MCC Outstanding ComBridget’ s award, a $200 monetary munity Impact Award for making award, will be given to a nonservice an integral part of her profit agency of Bridget’s college experience through sigchoice. nificant investment in enhancing

School of Arts and Sciences

32

AQ Club Night II volunteers (l-r) Matt Krevda, Jamie Toth, Sara Koster, MaryAnn Matzke and Megan Alford

Fall 2003 – Faculty News

Student News – Fall 2003

tion Luncheon organized by the Student Senate, three faculty members from the School of Arts and Sciences were recognized: Gary Eberle, Curt Bechler, Ph.D., and Nanette Clatterbuck. Congratulations to the winners of these awards! Pam Waterbury, an assistant professor of English and teacher of education courses “Youth Literature” and “Practicum Writing,” contributed to a new textbook, Children’s Literature: An Invitation to the World, which was published in October 2002. Pam’s contributions to this text were in the areas of idea generation, revisions and editing. • The Grand Rapids-based Nokomis Foundation has awarded a $2,000 grant to Deb Wickering, Ph.D., and Barbara Roos of Grand Valley State

Enlightenment: Constructing Publics in the Early Modern German Lands (Aldershot, Hampshire: Ashgate Press, 2002). Susan Haworth-Hoeppner, Ph.D. (Sociology Department), Rebecca Coogan, Ph.D. (English Department), and Michelle DeRose, Ph.D. (Insignis Program), attended the National Women’s Studies Association Annual Conference in New Orleans from June 19–22. Each of them is involved in teaching courses contributing to the women’s studies minor. Barbara Witham McCargar, chair of the Music Department, and instructor Carol Grady, attended a national music retreat/ meeting at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon, in June. Staff Recognition. During the April 23rd Faculty/Staff Apprecia-

FACULTY

AQ Club Night II proved to be bigger and better than the original! This drug- and alcoholfree event included more prizes, more food and more fun at no cost to those who attended. On Friday March 28, from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m., more than 200 By Maryann Matzke, Junior

AQ Club Night II – Keeps Getting Better Three Aquinas students were honored by the Michigan Campus Compact (MCC) for their outstanding community service work. Junior Timothy “TJ” Burdick and seniors Mary “Bridie” Kent and Mary “Bridget” Clark were recognized by MCC with its 2003 Outstanding Student Service Awards at a state conference on April 12 in East Lansing. T.J. Burdick received MCC’s Heart & Soul Award, which recognizes students for time, effort and personal commitment to their

Students Recognized for Outstanding Community Service

News from the Deans

Fall 2003 – Student News

University to support the Tarabiin Bedouin women’s film project. Wickering, a professor in-theCollege at Aquinas, initiated the project several years ago. The trio travelled to Egypt in May to begin preparations for filming. • Many music faculty are in the process or have recently finished a CD recording, including: Roger MacNaughton (Blue Muse, featuring The Roger MacNaughton Trio); Steve Talaga (with Mind’s Eye); Paul Brewer, Ph.D., (with his wife and son, Robin Connell and Matthew Brewer); and Barbara Witham McCargar (with the medieval chant quartet, Vox Angelica, performing Hildegard von Bingen works, and in solo performance of works by women composers, with Mary Hurd and Sr. Catherine Williams, O.P.).

Project PRIDE

School of Education (SOE) Melissa King joined the School of Education in November 2002 as its administrative assistant. Sr. Mary Navarre, O.P., and Cathy Tucci, Ph.D., both SOE faculty members, are serving on a Michigan Department of Education (MDOE) committee that oversees the Michigan Test for teachers of reading. Julia Reynolds, director of Introduction to Education program, has been working with the MDOE on its secondary reading work, is serving as president of the National Council of Teachers in English, Michigan Chapter, coordinated their fall state conference and is a reading consultant with the Wyoming Public Schools. Kathy Burgis, with the Math Department and SOE, has been

By Elissa Sangalli, Sophomore

Sara Frees joined Aquinas College in June as student assistant activities director in the Campus Life Dept. Frees comes from Eastern Michigan University where she graduated with a master’s degree in counseling. She will serve as a co-advisor to the Student Senate Programming Board and Leadership Training and also manage the Moose Café. Sara Frees

Beyond the Classroom: Oaxaca, Mexico By Kathleen McFadden, Junior

Last December’s Christmas Break signaled the end of classes for the fall semester at Aquinas, but one class was not quite finished. The three-credit class taken by participants in the Oaxaca (pron: WAH-hock-ah) Service-Learning program was over, but the service component was just about to begin. During the Christmas Break, students traveled to Oaxaca, Mexico, to work among the people there for about 10 days. This experience stretches far beyond the classroom. At Aquinas, students learn about Mexico’s history, economics, politics and culture throughout the semester, but in Oaxaca, students learn what cannot be taught from a textbook. A lesson in humility is that of the generosity of poverty stricken families who have next to nothing, yet who are willing to share it all. This brings Philippians 2:3 to life: “Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit, but in humility consider others better than yourselves.”

NOTES Nancy Schmiedicke, Gayle Hulswit, Cindy Blair, Sandy Rademaker and Elizabeth Schmiedicke continued the streak of exceeding the projected fall enrollment goals in School of Education courses for the 14th year in a row. Elizabeth Schmiedicke, certification officer, is teaching Spanish both as adjunct instructor for the Aquinas College Foreign Language Department and the Emeritus Center. Sandy Rademaker, coordinator of Graduate SOE programs, completed a three-year practicum in Spiritual Direction last May. She is currently very busy with this ministry. In addition she is cofacilitating a 33-week JustFaith program.

working with the MDOE committee that oversees the math curriculum for teachers. Kathy Barker, Director of Special Education Endorsement Programs in SOE, has been working the MDOE Special Education Office, on assessing programs and training special education staffs around the state. Nkechy Ezeh has continued to work with area schools teachers to increase their effectiveness in working with minority students and young children in the community. David Kelly, consultant to our two Reggio Emilia inspired K-5 partner programs, has been working with Steelcase Corporation’s (Grand Rapids) social anthropologists and Susan Lukaart,

Sophomore Kathleen McFadden (left) listens as Maria (a Oaxacan girl), reads from a Spanish language book.

Students were able to spend quality time with families of Oaxaca, learning their names and stories and playing with the children. They paired with students from Villanova University (Pennsylvania) to tutor children in English as a Second Language, to strengthen Spanish skills while playing with children, and to visit a nursing home. Students learned about the difference one person can make with faith and trust in God under His direction. The Oaxaca ServiceLearning trip is one of countless opportunities for Aquinas students to begin to make a difference with God’s help.

36

Mother Theresa once stated that “We can do no great things, only small things with great love.” On the morning of April 12, nearly 100 Aquinas students and staff and over 50 Heartside residents congregated at Heartside Ministries. Donning kelly green T-shirts emblazed with the white “Project PRIDE” emblem, the group prayed in thanksgiving for all of God’s blessings and then hit the streets of the Heartside District. Working together to conquer litter from Fulton to Logan, and U.S. 131 to Jamison, Aquinas people and Heartside residents swept, raked and sweated away. Originally Project PRIDE’s sole mission was environmental improvement. Now, in Aquinas and Heartside’s fifth collaborative year, PRIDE’s purpose emerged successfully as something new—the integration and peer-education of people from diverse racial, religious and socieconomic backgrounds.

2003 PlanningTeam (l-r) Rick Frederick; Elissa Sangalli, CAVA coordinator; Eric Bridge ’92, Service Learning director; and William Holmes.

Members of the Project Pride team who took on clean-up duties in the Heartside neighborhood.

29


33

V. James Garofalo, Ph.D.

As the seasons take shape, changing the landscape and transitioning to the next season, the students in the School of Arts and Sciences grow and change together with the seasons. Seeds of learning are planted in several areas of a liberal arts education; some grow to fruition, others end after they are introduced. But each brings with it a heritage, color, fragrance and

fruit that is sweet and fulfilling. A liberal arts education is the focal point of Aquinas College; it is living, learning and adapting to change, personally and professionally. It is taking elements of history, philosophy, humanities, psychology, music, art, natural sciences, English, theology and modern languages and integrating these into the vital individuals we call Aquinas students. All of these disciplines and others shape our students and prepare them for the workplace—

As we look forward to the new academic year we are excited to greet both the students who will begin academic programs at Aquinas College as well as those who are returning. It’s going to be another busy year. This fall the Business Department will be inaugurating a new undergraduate degree in sustainable business. Sustainable business practices involve strategies that increase profits, protect the environment and build social

equity—practices that improve the long-term stability of businesses. Our new degree program includes coursework in business, science and environmental studies and will prepare students to contribute to organizations as they pursue both economic growth and responsible environmental policies. In both our undergraduate programs and the master of management program we will continue to provide outstanding educational opportunities, with a

We have been working steadily over the last three years with the Child Development Center (Pre-school Aquinas College program), Child Discovery Center (chartered with Grand Rapids Public Schools) and the East Academy for Young Children (a partner school with Wyoming Public Schools) to facilitate the growth of the teachers and the

programs into models of constructivist teaching. The learning disabilities endorsement major has become the single largest choice for a majority of Aquinas College education students. We currently have over 900 enrolled students. Students enrolled in the physically or otherwise health impaired endorsement program (POHI) spent two weeks in May working at the Peto Institute in Budapest, Hungary.

Plans are being discussed to make a six-week work period at the Peto part of the program. The Michigan Department of Education has been adjusting most endorsement programs’ requirements over the last three years. Its faculty and staff have been working with Aquinas’ faculty to revise, add or drop courses as needed to meet current requirements. A new requirement for CPR training as a teacher certification requirement is still being discussed.

School of Education

(L-R) Rachel Hackett, Matt Stansfield, Theresa Page and Ken Sokolowski compete in the euchre tournament. It’s all fun and games in the pool!

Cynthia VanGelderen

values-based perspective intended to build management and leadership skills. We will continue to review our curricula in order to be responsive to changes in business, accounting and technology. We appreciate the connections with our alumni. Please keep in touch with faculty and stop by the School of Management office in Jarecki to say hello.

Shirley Lewis, Ed.D.

a workplace supplemented by beautiful works of art and music, reading, writing and critical thinking. Knowing the value of a liberal arts education is knowing the value of the individual and all that he/she is capable of doing. To grow and change with the seasons is to transition through life. It is with peace and a need to make the world a better place that we align ourselves with the ever flowing seasons and the gifts that come from an Aquinas College education.

School of Management

students arrived at East Hills Athletic Club and participated in a variety of physical activities like swimming, basketball and tennis as well as in low-contact events such as board games and X-Box tournaments. Funding for the event came through a grant from the Prevention Network as well as donations from numerous campus organizations and local businesses.

community through service projects. Bridie Kent received the MCC Commitment to Service Award for multiple contributions she has made to Aquinas and the community through community service involvement. Bridget Clark is Aquinas’ MCC award recipients (l-r) Mary Bridget Clark, one of five students in Timothy James “TJ” Burdick and Mary “Bridie” Kent the State to receive community resources. Part of the MCC Outstanding ComBridget’ s award, a $200 monetary munity Impact Award for making award, will be given to a nonservice an integral part of her profit agency of Bridget’s college experience through sigchoice. nificant investment in enhancing

School of Arts and Sciences

32

AQ Club Night II volunteers (l-r) Matt Krevda, Jamie Toth, Sara Koster, MaryAnn Matzke and Megan Alford

Fall 2003 – Faculty News

Student News – Fall 2003

tion Luncheon organized by the Student Senate, three faculty members from the School of Arts and Sciences were recognized: Gary Eberle, Curt Bechler, Ph.D., and Nanette Clatterbuck. Congratulations to the winners of these awards! Pam Waterbury, an assistant professor of English and teacher of education courses “Youth Literature” and “Practicum Writing,” contributed to a new textbook, Children’s Literature: An Invitation to the World, which was published in October 2002. Pam’s contributions to this text were in the areas of idea generation, revisions and editing. • The Grand Rapids-based Nokomis Foundation has awarded a $2,000 grant to Deb Wickering, Ph.D., and Barbara Roos of Grand Valley State

Enlightenment: Constructing Publics in the Early Modern German Lands (Aldershot, Hampshire: Ashgate Press, 2002). Susan Haworth-Hoeppner, Ph.D. (Sociology Department), Rebecca Coogan, Ph.D. (English Department), and Michelle DeRose, Ph.D. (Insignis Program), attended the National Women’s Studies Association Annual Conference in New Orleans from June 19–22. Each of them is involved in teaching courses contributing to the women’s studies minor. Barbara Witham McCargar, chair of the Music Department, and instructor Carol Grady, attended a national music retreat/ meeting at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon, in June. Staff Recognition. During the April 23rd Faculty/Staff Apprecia-

FACULTY

AQ Club Night II proved to be bigger and better than the original! This drug- and alcoholfree event included more prizes, more food and more fun at no cost to those who attended. On Friday March 28, from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m., more than 200 By Maryann Matzke, Junior

AQ Club Night II – Keeps Getting Better Three Aquinas students were honored by the Michigan Campus Compact (MCC) for their outstanding community service work. Junior Timothy “TJ” Burdick and seniors Mary “Bridie” Kent and Mary “Bridget” Clark were recognized by MCC with its 2003 Outstanding Student Service Awards at a state conference on April 12 in East Lansing. T.J. Burdick received MCC’s Heart & Soul Award, which recognizes students for time, effort and personal commitment to their

Students Recognized for Outstanding Community Service

News from the Deans

Fall 2003 – Student News

University to support the Tarabiin Bedouin women’s film project. Wickering, a professor in-theCollege at Aquinas, initiated the project several years ago. The trio travelled to Egypt in May to begin preparations for filming. • Many music faculty are in the process or have recently finished a CD recording, including: Roger MacNaughton (Blue Muse, featuring The Roger MacNaughton Trio); Steve Talaga (with Mind’s Eye); Paul Brewer, Ph.D., (with his wife and son, Robin Connell and Matthew Brewer); and Barbara Witham McCargar (with the medieval chant quartet, Vox Angelica, performing Hildegard von Bingen works, and in solo performance of works by women composers, with Mary Hurd and Sr. Catherine Williams, O.P.).

Project PRIDE

School of Education (SOE) Melissa King joined the School of Education in November 2002 as its administrative assistant. Sr. Mary Navarre, O.P., and Cathy Tucci, Ph.D., both SOE faculty members, are serving on a Michigan Department of Education (MDOE) committee that oversees the Michigan Test for teachers of reading. Julia Reynolds, director of Introduction to Education program, has been working with the MDOE on its secondary reading work, is serving as president of the National Council of Teachers in English, Michigan Chapter, coordinated their fall state conference and is a reading consultant with the Wyoming Public Schools. Kathy Burgis, with the Math Department and SOE, has been

By Elissa Sangalli, Sophomore

Sara Frees joined Aquinas College in June as student assistant activities director in the Campus Life Dept. Frees comes from Eastern Michigan University where she graduated with a master’s degree in counseling. She will serve as a co-advisor to the Student Senate Programming Board and Leadership Training and also manage the Moose Café. Sara Frees

Beyond the Classroom: Oaxaca, Mexico By Kathleen McFadden, Junior

Last December’s Christmas Break signaled the end of classes for the fall semester at Aquinas, but one class was not quite finished. The three-credit class taken by participants in the Oaxaca (pron: WAH-hock-ah) Service-Learning program was over, but the service component was just about to begin. During the Christmas Break, students traveled to Oaxaca, Mexico, to work among the people there for about 10 days. This experience stretches far beyond the classroom. At Aquinas, students learn about Mexico’s history, economics, politics and culture throughout the semester, but in Oaxaca, students learn what cannot be taught from a textbook. A lesson in humility is that of the generosity of poverty stricken families who have next to nothing, yet who are willing to share it all. This brings Philippians 2:3 to life: “Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit, but in humility consider others better than yourselves.”

NOTES Nancy Schmiedicke, Gayle Hulswit, Cindy Blair, Sandy Rademaker and Elizabeth Schmiedicke continued the streak of exceeding the projected fall enrollment goals in School of Education courses for the 14th year in a row. Elizabeth Schmiedicke, certification officer, is teaching Spanish both as adjunct instructor for the Aquinas College Foreign Language Department and the Emeritus Center. Sandy Rademaker, coordinator of Graduate SOE programs, completed a three-year practicum in Spiritual Direction last May. She is currently very busy with this ministry. In addition she is cofacilitating a 33-week JustFaith program.

working with the MDOE committee that oversees the math curriculum for teachers. Kathy Barker, Director of Special Education Endorsement Programs in SOE, has been working the MDOE Special Education Office, on assessing programs and training special education staffs around the state. Nkechy Ezeh has continued to work with area schools teachers to increase their effectiveness in working with minority students and young children in the community. David Kelly, consultant to our two Reggio Emilia inspired K-5 partner programs, has been working with Steelcase Corporation’s (Grand Rapids) social anthropologists and Susan Lukaart,

Sophomore Kathleen McFadden (left) listens as Maria (a Oaxacan girl), reads from a Spanish language book.

Students were able to spend quality time with families of Oaxaca, learning their names and stories and playing with the children. They paired with students from Villanova University (Pennsylvania) to tutor children in English as a Second Language, to strengthen Spanish skills while playing with children, and to visit a nursing home. Students learned about the difference one person can make with faith and trust in God under His direction. The Oaxaca ServiceLearning trip is one of countless opportunities for Aquinas students to begin to make a difference with God’s help.

36

Mother Theresa once stated that “We can do no great things, only small things with great love.” On the morning of April 12, nearly 100 Aquinas students and staff and over 50 Heartside residents congregated at Heartside Ministries. Donning kelly green T-shirts emblazed with the white “Project PRIDE” emblem, the group prayed in thanksgiving for all of God’s blessings and then hit the streets of the Heartside District. Working together to conquer litter from Fulton to Logan, and U.S. 131 to Jamison, Aquinas people and Heartside residents swept, raked and sweated away. Originally Project PRIDE’s sole mission was environmental improvement. Now, in Aquinas and Heartside’s fifth collaborative year, PRIDE’s purpose emerged successfully as something new—the integration and peer-education of people from diverse racial, religious and socieconomic backgrounds.

2003 PlanningTeam (l-r) Rick Frederick; Elissa Sangalli, CAVA coordinator; Eric Bridge ’92, Service Learning director; and William Holmes.

Members of the Project Pride team who took on clean-up duties in the Heartside neighborhood.

29


30

35

Seniors Robin Mankel (left) and Tom Eggleston (second from right) enjoy a moment with a few Sigsbee Elementary School students.

The Sigsbee Elementary School Playground was in desperate need of some attention this past fall. With paint chipping from playground equipment, benches falling apart, graffiti and a storage shed that had become quite an eyesore, senior Robin Mankel decided to organize a beautification project. With the collaboration of the City of Grand Rapids Parks and Recreation Department, Grand Rapids Public Schools, Sigsbee

Elementary and Aquinas, the necessity became a reality. With both small and large projects requiring attention, the program was split into two days with different goals. Aquinas students spent the first day tackling the simple projects with the help of Sigsbee Elementary students. Ranging from kindergarten to fifth grade, the students volunteered their skills to paint benches, barrels and poles on the school

grounds. The students felt proud of their contribution to the project and enjoyed working with the Aquinas volunteers. Working very hard all day on the following Saturday, Aquinas students undertook the larger projects with great success. Leaving Sigsbee Elementary Playground looking clean and colorful for everyone to appreciate, both the Aquinas and Sigsbee students were amazed by their beautiful accomplishment.

By Robin Mankel, Senior

Students Lead School Beautification Project Aquinas College’s Service Learning program was the beneficiary this past year of gifts from the Steelcase Foundation and Alticor, formerly Amway. The Steelcase gift of $50,000 was made in recognition of the 50th anniversary of the foundation; anniversary gifts were made to a selected number of organizations whose mission and purposes reflect that of the foundation. With this gift, President Knopke established the Steelcase Foundation Endowed Service Learning Fund to provide ongoing support for this core function of the College. In addition, the $5,000 grant from Alticor enabled Campus Ministry to fund several student-directed service projects in and around the Grand Rapids community. The following stories detail how those grant dollars were put to work on three of the projects: Sigsbee Elementary School, Community Ministries and Project Listo.

Steelcase, Alticor Funds Help Service Learning Projects

Robb Bajema, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology, recently participated in a professional conference sponsored by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. His paper “Using Science to Assess Environmental Vulnerabilities” presented research activities that focused on the measuring, monitoring, diagnosing, forecasting and restoration activities of environmental conditions. Kurt Kaiser, chair of the Art Department, and Mike Williams, Ph.D., advisor for the Community Leadership and Urban Studies programs, attended the Council of Colleges of Arts & Sciences (CCAS) Seminar for Department Chairs in Minneapolis on July 10-12, 2003. The 2003 seminar focused on such issues as Academic Leadership; Conflict and Resource Management; and the Recruitment, Retention and Development of Faculty. In addition, Mike Williams received the Michigan Campus Compact’s Outstanding Faculty in Service Learning Award, which was presented to him February 14 at Central Michigan University. He also spoke to MCC’s Service Learning Directors about the community leadership major at their March 28 meeting at Aquinas. Mike McDaniel, Ph.D., chair of the Math Department, recently had an article published in the April 2003 issue of Mathematics Teacher (vol. 96, No. 4). In his article, Mike posits that an important mathematical theorem

Anthony Guest joined Aquinas in July as an assistant professor of theatre in the Communication Department and as the new director of the Aquinas College Theatre Program. Guest had been an adjunct assistant professor at the University of Michigan-Flint and theatre director/manager of the Bronner Performing Arts Center at Frankenmuth High School (Mich.). He earned his master of fine arts in acting and directing from the Professional Actor Training Company at the University of Missouri-Kansas City in 2000. He will teach a variety of theatre courses based on his New York acting and directing experience, his teaching experience as well as his graduate and professional work. has history, culture, influence and age. When an instructor presents such a theorem, he/she presents the students with a tremendous opportunity to participate in the intellectual development of civilization.

In 2002, Chad Gunnoe also published the article “The Debate between Johann Weyer and Thomas Erastus on the Punishment of Witches,” in Cultures of Communication from Reformation to Chad Gunnoe, chair of the History Department, is an editor of, and has an article in, the recently published Paraclesian Moments: Science, Medicine, and Astrology in Early Modern Europe (Truman State University Press). Paracelsus was a 16th century German physician whose religiousalchemical worldview served as inspiration for scientific innovators. The book includes studies regarding scientific and magical ideas in the early modern period. Chad’s article, “Paracelsus’ Biography Among His Detractors,” is an overview of the effort to impugn his character by the humanist physicians who opposed him.

NOTES FACULTY

School of Arts and Sciences

Fall 2003 – Student News

Faculty News

– Fall 2003

Faculty News

Student News – Fall 2003

U.S. Math Educators Watching Aquinas with Keen Interest By Curtis R. Burdette, Student, Contributing Writer

Math educators across the nation are listening to the ideas presented by Aquinas College Assistant Professor of Mathematics Kathy Burgis. In January 2002, Burgis and Associate Professor of Mathematics Joe Spencer, Ph.D., presented a talk titled “Collaborative Teaching of Math Courses for Elementary Teachers” at the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators Conference meeting in San Antonio, Texas. “What has made it interesting is that Joe is a mathematician and I am a math educator. Those are two communities that don’t get along very well,” Burgis said. “Aquinas is lucky because both are represented in the Mathematics Department and that has given Aquinas students a strong position in the math education field.” Chair of the Mathematics Department Michael McDaniel, Ph.D., and the Mathematics Department have sponsored several events launched by Burgis. “Her work in math education is focused on teaching math teachers. And nationally they are paying attention to what she’s doing,” McDaniel said. Burgis initiated a Family Math Night at Palmer Elementary School in Grand Rapids. The event was held in the gymnasium because of the large turnout. Students and faculty from the Aquinas math program ran the events. Dozens of elementary students came with their families to participate in games and festivities that required math skills. “To the families, it allows parents to see mathematics can be fun for children. And just because the parents weren’t any good at math, their kids might be,” Burgis said. “It’s a nice experience for Aquinas students to employ the skills that they learn in the math education courses. It shows them that teaching doesn’t have to be standing in front of the classrooms assigning tasks for the students to complete.” Presentations made by Burgis and Spencer have caught the attention of other professionals because of the unique hands-on approach offered to Aquinas math education students. “On the national level, these courses are taught as math courses that don’t relate. Our students use elementary math textbooks to learn how to teach elementary math,” said Burgis. “Everything that we do in the course relates to what they will do in the classroom as teachers.”

Community Ministries: Helping Children Feel God’s Love By Jessica Olson, Senior, Family and Elementary Coordinator -Community Ministries

Ten years ago, a segment of Grand Rapids near the southeast side was identified as “at risk” due to high level of police activity. The concern for the safety and well being of children in the neighborhood prompted five adults and 25 kids to form Community Ministries at Trinity United Methodist Church. Their mission is to “provide a safe place for children to feel God’s love through consistent adults who care about them.” Since its inception, Community Ministries has grown to over 100 volunteers and more than 150 neighborhood children. The majority of the children and teens that we work with are living at or below the poverty level so they are considered to be “at risk.” With God’s guidance and a growing vision, Community Ministries now provides programming for grades 1-12. The programs include: Kids’ Club, Teen Club, Mentoring, Tutoring, Parent Programming, Prayer Partners for each child, Summer programs, Basketball, Scholarships, Family Club and a Partnership with Congress Elementary School.

Jessie Olson (second from left) with (l-r) Stephanie, Keazia and Lamont during a field trip to the John Ball Park Zoo (Photo: Libby Hews)

I have been a part of Community Ministries for almost three years now and it has truly touched my life. I started as an intern with only the expectation of completing my 60 hours and then moving on. But once I began to work with these children, they became part of my life. It has been an incredible experience for me and I have learned so much about diversity and being a part of the community. As a coordinator, I recruit volunteers and mentors to be a part of our programs and I also work

with many of the children. I feel that I have taught these kids a lot about life and have given them new experiences and opportunities. At the same time, they have also taught me so much about life and my own opportunities. These children have taught me to be thankful for what I have and to not take life for granted. When I moved here from Traverse City to attend Aquinas College, I felt very lost and unsure of what I wanted to do with my life. Now that I have been a part of Community Ministries, I trust that I am exactly where I am supposed to be. Working with these children and families has reassured me that I have chosen the right career path for myself. At the end of the day, I feel very blessed to be able to put my time and energy into something so positive and uplifting. We do have our challenging days and encounter some very serious issues with our kids, but we work hard to fill their needs with integrity and compassion. We believe the challenging times are worth it if we touch even one child’s life.

Project Listo Migrant Tutoring By Thomas Eggleston, Senior

Larry Kielich, Ph.D. (1944-2003)

As we were going to print, we learned of the death July 3 of Larry Kielich, Ph.D., 59, professor of sociology at Aquinas since 1974. Kielich fought a long and brave battle against cancer. He was a former chairman of the Sociology Department and authored numerous articles in sociology journals. A memorial service was held July 19 on the Aquinas campus to honor and remember Dr. Kielich.

34

Seasonal travel is an essential part of the life of migrant workers and their families. The children of a migrant worker transfer to a different school at least twice per year—sometimes more than that, as the families move in search of agricultural work. This constant switching of school districts and curricula causes the school-age children to fall behind in their schooling, year after year. With that knowledge, I founded and coordinated Project Listo—a program to tutor and mentor the children of migrant workers. Teaming up with Sparta Public Schools, which has a program teaching English to adult migrants, Aquinas students cared for the children at the migrant camp while their parents were in class. Aquinas volunteers helped kids with their homework, read books with the children and organized games. Another important part of the program was simply to be present with the children, mentoring them and supplying them with the confidence needed to continue in their education.

31


30

Seniors Robin Mankel (left) and Tom Eggleston (second from right) enjoy a moment with a few Sigsbee Elementary School students.

The Sigsbee Elementary School Playground was in desperate need of some attention this past fall. With paint chipping from playground equipment, benches falling apart, graffiti and a storage shed that had become quite an eyesore, senior Robin Mankel decided to organize a beautification project. With the collaboration of the City of Grand Rapids Parks and Recreation Department, Grand Rapids Public Schools, Sigsbee

Elementary and Aquinas, the necessity became a reality. With both small and large projects requiring attention, the program was split into two days with different goals. Aquinas students spent the first day tackling the simple projects with the help of Sigsbee Elementary students. Ranging from kindergarten to fifth grade, the students volunteered their skills to paint benches, barrels and poles on the school

grounds. The students felt proud of their contribution to the project and enjoyed working with the Aquinas volunteers. Working very hard all day on the following Saturday, Aquinas students undertook the larger projects with great success. Leaving Sigsbee Elementary Playground looking clean and colorful for everyone to appreciate, both the Aquinas and Sigsbee students were amazed by their beautiful accomplishment.

By Robin Mankel, Senior

Students Lead School Beautification Project Aquinas College’s Service Learning program was the beneficiary this past year of gifts from the Steelcase Foundation and Alticor, formerly Amway. The Steelcase gift of $50,000 was made in recognition of the 50th anniversary of the foundation; anniversary gifts were made to a selected number of organizations whose mission and purposes reflect that of the foundation. With this gift, President Knopke established the Steelcase Foundation Endowed Service Learning Fund to provide ongoing support for this core function of the College. In addition, the $5,000 grant from Alticor enabled Campus Ministry to fund several student-directed service projects in and around the Grand Rapids community. The following stories detail how those grant dollars were put to work on three of the projects: Sigsbee Elementary School, Community Ministries and Project Listo.

Steelcase, Alticor Funds Help Service Learning Projects

Robb Bajema, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology, recently participated in a professional conference sponsored by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. His paper “Using Science to Assess Environmental Vulnerabilities” presented research activities that focused on the measuring, monitoring, diagnosing, forecasting and restoration activities of environmental conditions. Kurt Kaiser, chair of the Art Department, and Mike Williams, Ph.D., advisor for the Community Leadership and Urban Studies programs, attended the Council of Colleges of Arts & Sciences (CCAS) Seminar for Department Chairs in Minneapolis on July 10-12, 2003. The 2003 seminar focused on such issues as Academic Leadership; Conflict and Resource Management; and the Recruitment, Retention and Development of Faculty. In addition, Mike Williams received the Michigan Campus Compact’s Outstanding Faculty in Service Learning Award, which was presented to him February 14 at Central Michigan University. He also spoke to MCC’s Service Learning Directors about the community leadership major at their March 28 meeting at Aquinas. Mike McDaniel, Ph.D., chair of the Math Department, recently had an article published in the April 2003 issue of Mathematics Teacher (vol. 96, No. 4). In his article, Mike posits that an important mathematical theorem

35

Anthony Guest joined Aquinas in July as an assistant professor of theatre in the Communication Department and as the new director of the Aquinas College Theatre Program. Guest had been an adjunct assistant professor at the University of Michigan-Flint and theatre director/manager of the Bronner Performing Arts Center at Frankenmuth High School (Mich.). He earned his master of fine arts in acting and directing from the Professional Actor Training Company at the University of Missouri-Kansas City in 2000. He will teach a variety of theatre courses based on his New York acting and directing experience, his teaching experience as well as his graduate and professional work. has history, culture, influence and age. When an instructor presents such a theorem, he/she presents the students with a tremendous opportunity to participate in the intellectual development of civilization.

In 2002, Chad Gunnoe also published the article “The Debate between Johann Weyer and Thomas Erastus on the Punishment of Witches,” in Cultures of Communication from Reformation to Chad Gunnoe, chair of the History Department, is an editor of, and has an article in, the recently published Paraclesian Moments: Science, Medicine, and Astrology in Early Modern Europe (Truman State University Press). Paracelsus was a 16th century German physician whose religiousalchemical worldview served as inspiration for scientific innovators. The book includes studies regarding scientific and magical ideas in the early modern period. Chad’s article, “Paracelsus’ Biography Among His Detractors,” is an overview of the effort to impugn his character by the humanist physicians who opposed him.

NOTES FACULTY

School of Arts and Sciences

Fall 2003 – Student News

Faculty News

– Fall 2003

Student News – Fall 2003

U.S. Math Educators Watching Aquinas with Keen Interest

Faculty News

By Curtis R. Burdette, Student, Contributing Writer

Math educators across the nation are listening to the ideas presented by Aquinas College Assistant Professor of Mathematics Kathy Burgis. In January 2002, Burgis and Associate Professor of Mathematics Joe Spencer, Ph.D., presented a talk titled “Collaborative Teaching of Math Courses for Elementary Teachers” at the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators Conference meeting in San Antonio, Texas. “What has made it interesting is that Joe is a mathematician and I am a math educator. Those are two communities that don’t get along very well,” Burgis said. “Aquinas is lucky because both are represented in the Mathematics Department and that has given Aquinas students a strong position in the math education field.” Chair of the Mathematics Department Michael McDaniel, Ph.D., and the Mathematics Department have sponsored several events launched by Burgis. “Her work in math education is focused on teaching math teachers. And nationally they are paying attention to what she’s doing,” McDaniel said. Burgis initiated a Family Math Night at Palmer Elementary School in Grand Rapids. The event was held in the gymnasium because of the large turnout. Students and faculty from the Aquinas math program ran the events. Dozens of elementary students came with their families to participate in games and festivities that required math skills. “To the families, it allows parents to see mathematics can be fun for children. And just because the parents weren’t any good at math, their kids might be,” Burgis said. “It’s a nice experience for Aquinas students to employ the skills that they learn in the math education courses. It shows them that teaching doesn’t have to be standing in front of the classrooms assigning tasks for the students to complete.” Presentations made by Burgis and Spencer have caught the attention of other professionals because of the unique hands-on approach offered to Aquinas math education students. “On the national level, these courses are taught as math courses that don’t relate. Our students use elementary math textbooks to learn how to teach elementary math,” said Burgis. “Everything that we do in the course relates to what they will do in the classroom as teachers.”

Community Ministries: Helping Children Feel God’s Love By Jessica Olson, Senior, Family and Elementary Coordinator -Community Ministries

Ten years ago, a segment of Grand Rapids near the southeast side was identified as “at risk” due to high level of police activity. The concern for the safety and well being of children in the neighborhood prompted five adults and 25 kids to form Community Ministries at Trinity United Methodist Church. Their mission is to “provide a safe place for children to feel God’s love through consistent adults who care about them.” Since its inception, Community Ministries has grown to over 100 volunteers and more than 150 neighborhood children. The majority of the children and teens that we work with are living at or below the poverty level so they are considered to be “at risk.” With God’s guidance and a growing vision, Community Ministries now provides programming for grades 1-12. The programs include: Kids’ Club, Teen Club, Mentoring, Tutoring, Parent Programming, Prayer Partners for each child, Summer programs, Basketball, Scholarships, Family Club and a Partnership with Congress Elementary School.

Jessie Olson (second from left) with (l-r) Stephanie, Keazia and Lamont during a field trip to the John Ball Park Zoo (Photo: Libby Hews)

I have been a part of Community Ministries for almost three years now and it has truly touched my life. I started as an intern with only the expectation of completing my 60 hours and then moving on. But once I began to work with these children, they became part of my life. It has been an incredible experience for me and I have learned so much about diversity and being a part of the community. As a coordinator, I recruit volunteers and mentors to be a part of our programs and I also work

with many of the children. I feel that I have taught these kids a lot about life and have given them new experiences and opportunities. At the same time, they have also taught me so much about life and my own opportunities. These children have taught me to be thankful for what I have and to not take life for granted. When I moved here from Traverse City to attend Aquinas College, I felt very lost and unsure of what I wanted to do with my life. Now that I have been a part of Community Ministries, I trust that I am exactly where I am supposed to be. Working with these children and families has reassured me that I have chosen the right career path for myself. At the end of the day, I feel very blessed to be able to put my time and energy into something so positive and uplifting. We do have our challenging days and encounter some very serious issues with our kids, but we work hard to fill their needs with integrity and compassion. We believe the challenging times are worth it if we touch even one child’s life.

Project Listo Migrant Tutoring By Thomas Eggleston, Senior

Larry Kielich, Ph.D. (1944-2003)

As we were going to print, we learned of the death July 3 of Larry Kielich, Ph.D., 59, professor of sociology at Aquinas since 1974. Kielich fought a long and brave battle against cancer. He was a former chairman of the Sociology Department and authored numerous articles in sociology journals. A memorial service was held July 19 on the Aquinas campus to honor and remember Dr. Kielich.

Seasonal travel is an essential part of the life of migrant workers and their families. The children of a migrant worker transfer to a different school at least twice per year—sometimes more than that, as the families move in search of agricultural work. This constant switching of school districts and curricula causes the school-age children to fall behind in their schooling, year after year. With that knowledge, I founded and coordinated Project Listo—a program to tutor and mentor the children of migrant workers. Teaming up with Sparta Public Schools, which has a program teaching English to adult migrants, Aquinas students cared for the children at the migrant camp while their parents were in class. Aquinas volunteers helped kids with their homework, read books with the children and organized games. Another important part of the program was simply to be present with the children, mentoring them and supplying them with the confidence needed to continue in their education.

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(L-R) Rachel Hackett, Matt Stansfield, Theresa Page and Ken Sokolowski compete in the euchre tournament.

AQ Club Night II – Keeps Getting Better Three Aquinas students were honored by the Michigan Campus Compact (MCC) for their outstanding community service work. Junior Timothy “TJ” Burdick and seniors Mary “Bridie” Kent and Mary “Bridget” Clark were recognized by MCC with its 2003 Outstanding Student Service Awards at a state conference on April 12 in East Lansing. T.J. Burdick received MCC’s Heart & Soul Award, which recognizes students for time, effort and personal commitment to their

Students Recognized for Outstanding Community Service

equity—practices that improve the long-term stability of businesses. Our new degree program includes coursework in business, science and environmental studies and will prepare students to contribute to organizations as they pursue both economic growth and responsible environmental policies. In both our undergraduate programs and the master of management program we will continue to provide outstanding educational opportunities, with a

As we look forward to the new academic year we are excited to greet both the students who will begin academic programs at Aquinas College as well as those who are returning. It’s going to be another busy year. This fall the Business Department will be inaugurating a new undergraduate degree in sustainable business. Sustainable business practices involve strategies that increase profits, protect the environment and build social

fruit that is sweet and fulfilling. A liberal arts education is the focal point of Aquinas College; it is living, learning and adapting to change, personally and professionally. It is taking elements of history, philosophy, humanities, psychology, music, art, natural sciences, English, theology and modern languages and integrating these into the vital individuals we call Aquinas students. All of these disciplines and others shape our students and prepare them for the workplace—

As the seasons take shape, changing the landscape and transitioning to the next season, the students in the School of Arts and Sciences grow and change together with the seasons. Seeds of learning are planted in several areas of a liberal arts education; some grow to fruition, others end after they are introduced. But each brings with it a heritage, color, fragrance and

Plans are being discussed to make a six-week work period at the Peto part of the program. The Michigan Department of Education has been adjusting most endorsement programs’ requirements over the last three years. Its faculty and staff have been working with Aquinas’ faculty to revise, add or drop courses as needed to meet current requirements. A new requirement for CPR training as a teacher certification requirement is still being discussed.

It’s all fun and games in the pool!

community through service projects. Bridie Kent received the MCC Commitment to Service Award for multiple contributions she has made to Aquinas and the community through community service involvement. Bridget Clark is Aquinas’ MCC award recipients (l-r) Mary Bridget Clark, one of five students in Timothy James “TJ” Burdick and Mary “Bridie” Kent the State to receive community resources. Part of the MCC Outstanding ComBridget’s award, a $200 monetary munity Impact Award for making award, will be given to a nonservice an integral part of her profit agency of Bridget’s college experience through sigchoice. nificant investment in enhancing

values-based perspective intended to build management and leadership skills. We will continue to review our curricula in order to be responsive to changes in business, accounting and technology. We appreciate the connections with our alumni. Please keep in touch with faculty and stop by the School of Management office in Jarecki to say hello. a workplace supplemented by beautiful works of art and music, reading, writing and critical thinking. Knowing the value of a liberal arts education is knowing the value of the individual and all that he/she is capable of doing. To grow and change with the seasons is to transition through life. It is with peace and a need to make the world a better place that we align ourselves with the ever flowing seasons and the gifts that come from an Aquinas College education.

News from the Deans

Fall 2003 – Student News

School of Management

By Maryann Matzke, Junior

students arrived at East Hills Athletic Club and participated in a variety of physical activities like swimming, basketball and tennis as well as in low-contact events such as board games and X-Box tournaments. Funding for the event came through a grant from the Prevention Network as well as donations from numerous campus organizations and local businesses.

programs into models of constructivist teaching. The learning disabilities endorsement major has become the single largest choice for a majority of Aquinas College education students. We currently have over 900 enrolled students. Students enrolled in the physically or otherwise health impaired endorsement program (POHI) spent two weeks in May working at the Peto Institute in Budapest, Hungary.

We have been working steadily over the last three years with the Child Development Center (Pre-school Aquinas College program), Child Discovery Center (chartered with Grand Rapids Public Schools) and the East Academy for Young Children (a partner school with Wyoming Public Schools) to facilitate the growth of the teachers and the

Student News – Fall 2003

Enlightenment: Constructing Publics in the Early Modern German Lands (Aldershot, Hampshire: Ashgate Press, 2002). Susan Haworth-Hoeppner, Ph.D. (Sociology Department), Rebecca Coogan, Ph.D. (English Department), and Michelle DeRose, Ph.D. (Insignis Program), attended the National Women’s Studies Association Annual Conference in New Orleans from June 19–22. Each of them is involved in teaching courses contributing to the women’s studies minor. Barbara Witham McCargar, chair of the Music Department, and instructor Carol Grady, attended a national music retreat/ meeting at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon, in June. Staff Recognition. During the April 23rd Faculty/Staff Apprecia-

FACULTY

AQ Club Night II proved to be bigger and better than the original! This drug- and alcoholfree event included more prizes, more food and more fun at no cost to those who attended. On Friday March 28, from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m., more than 200

Shirley Lewis, Ed.D.

School of Arts and Sciences

AQ Club Night II volunteers (l-r) Matt Krevda, Jamie Toth, Sara Koster, MaryAnn Matzke and Megan Alford

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School of Education

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V. James Garofalo, Ph.D.

Cynthia VanGelderen

Fall 2003 – Faculty News

tion Luncheon organized by the Student Senate, three faculty members from the School of Arts and Sciences were recognized: Gary Eberle, Curt Bechler, Ph.D., and Nanette Clatterbuck. Congratulations to the winners of these awards! Pam Waterbury, an assistant professor of English and teacher of education courses “Youth Literature” and “Practicum Writing,” contributed to a new textbook, Children’s Literature: An Invitation to the World, which was published in October 2002. Pam’s contributions to this text were in the areas of idea generation, revisions and editing. • The Grand Rapids-based Nokomis Foundation has awarded a $2,000 grant to Deb Wickering, Ph.D., and Barbara Roos of Grand Valley State

University to support the Tarabiin Bedouin women’s film project. Wickering, a professor in-theCollege at Aquinas, initiated the project several years ago. The trio travelled to Egypt in May to begin preparations for filming. • Many music faculty are in the process or have recently finished a CD recording, including: Roger MacNaughton (Blue Muse, featuring The Roger MacNaughton Trio); Steve Talaga (with Mind’s Eye); Paul Brewer, Ph.D., (with his wife and son, Robin Connell and Matthew Brewer); and Barbara Witham McCargar (with the medieval chant quartet, Vox Angelica, performing Hildegard von Bingen works, and in solo performance of works by women composers, with Mary Hurd and Sr. Catherine Williams, O.P.).

School of Education (SOE)

NOTES Nancy Schmiedicke, Gayle Hulswit, Cindy Blair, Sandy Rademaker and Elizabeth Schmiedicke continued the streak of exceeding the projected fall enrollment goals in School of Education courses for the 14th year in a row. Elizabeth Schmiedicke, certification officer, is teaching Spanish both as adjunct instructor for the Aquinas College Foreign Language Department and the Emeritus Center. Sandy Rademaker, coordinator of Graduate SOE programs, completed a three-year practicum in Spiritual Direction last May. She is currently very busy with this ministry. In addition she is cofacilitating a 33-week JustFaith program.

Melissa King joined the School of Education in November 2002 as its administrative assistant. Sr. Mary Navarre, O.P., and Cathy Tucci, Ph.D., both SOE faculty members, are serving on a Michigan Department of Education (MDOE) committee that oversees the Michigan Test for teachers of reading. Julia Reynolds, director of Introduction to Education program, has been working with the MDOE on its secondary reading work, is serving as president of the National Council of Teachers in English, Michigan Chapter, coordinated their fall state conference and is a reading consultant with the Wyoming Public Schools. Kathy Burgis, with the Math Department and SOE, has been

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working with the MDOE committee that oversees the math curriculum for teachers. Kathy Barker, Director of Special Education Endorsement Programs in SOE, has been working the MDOE Special Education Office, on assessing programs and training special education staffs around the state. Nkechy Ezeh has continued to work with area schools teachers to increase their effectiveness in working with minority students and young children in the community. David Kelly, consultant to our two Reggio Emilia inspired K-5 partner programs, has been working with Steelcase Corporation’s (Grand Rapids) social anthropologists and Susan Lukaart,

Project PRIDE By Elissa Sangalli, Sophomore

Sara Frees joined Aquinas College in June as student assistant activities director in the Campus Life Dept. Frees comes from Eastern Michigan University where she graduated with a master’s degree in counseling. She will serve as a co-advisor to the Student Senate Programming Board and Leadership Training and also manage the Moose Café. Sara Frees

Beyond the Classroom: Oaxaca, Mexico By Kathleen McFadden, Junior

Last December’s Christmas Break signaled the end of classes for the fall semester at Aquinas, but one class was not quite finished. The three-credit class taken by participants in the Oaxaca (pron: WAH-hock-ah) Service-Learning program was over, but the service component was just about to begin. During the Christmas Break, students traveled to Oaxaca, Mexico, to work among the people there for about 10 days. This experience stretches far beyond the classroom. At Aquinas, students learn about Mexico’s history, economics, politics and culture throughout the semester, but in Oaxaca, students learn what cannot be taught from a textbook. A lesson in humility is that of the generosity of poverty stricken families who have next to nothing, yet who are willing to share it all. This brings Philippians 2:3 to life: “Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit, but in humility consider others better than yourselves.”

Sophomore Kathleen McFadden (left) listens as Maria (a Oaxacan girl), reads from a Spanish language book.

Students were able to spend quality time with families of Oaxaca, learning their names and stories and playing with the children. They paired with students from Villanova University (Pennsylvania) to tutor children in English as a Second Language, to strengthen Spanish skills while playing with children, and to visit a nursing home. Students learned about the difference one person can make with faith and trust in God under His direction. The Oaxaca ServiceLearning trip is one of countless opportunities for Aquinas students to begin to make a difference with God’s help.

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Mother Theresa once stated that “We can do no great things, only small things with great love.” On the morning of April 12, nearly 100 Aquinas students and staff and over 50 Heartside residents congregated at Heartside Ministries. Donning kelly green T-shirts emblazed with the white “Project PRIDE” emblem, the group prayed in thanksgiving for all of God’s blessings and then hit the streets of the Heartside District. Working together to conquer litter from Fulton to Logan, and U.S. 131 to Jamison, Aquinas people and Heartside residents swept, raked and sweated away. Originally Project PRIDE’s sole mission was environmental improvement. Now, in Aquinas and Heartside’s fifth collaborative year, PRIDE’s purpose emerged successfully as something new—the integration and peer-education of people from diverse racial, religious and socieconomic backgrounds.

2003 PlanningTeam (l-r) Rick Frederick; Elissa Sangalli, CAVA coordinator; Eric Bridge ’92, Service Learning director; and William Holmes.

Members of the Project Pride team who took on clean-up duties in the Heartside neighborhood.


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Junior Lesley Malkowski (center) is pictured with Nancy and Ray Loeschner, underwriters of the award.

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Lesley Malkowski: Art Competition Winner

- “China: A Nation of Contrasts” November 18, 2003

Junior Lesley Malkowski was selected this past spring as the 2002 winner of the Loeschner TwoDimensional Art Competition in Grand Rapids. The competition is hosted by the Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park. Malkowski’s photograph was selected from among 40 finalists. The Freesoil, Michigan native received a $1,000 cash award, which is funded through the Ray Loeschner Foundation.

- “Sinai Bedouin Women Make Films” February 3, 2004

- “Women and the Holocaust” April 6, 2004 - “Baroque and Classical Era Women and Their Music” March 23, 2004 - “Building the Nest Egg: Issues in Retirement Planning” February 17, 2003 - “The Global Village: An Emerging Humanities Landscape” November 4, 2003

Student News

Measuring the quality of the Aquinas experience has always been a multifaceted task. We use many objective and subjective measures to improve the events and services we offer. Sometimes, it is asking students what they thought of Spring Fling or graduation. Often, it is a systematic survey of students by a department or the Provost’s Office (every course at Aquinas is evaluated by students). Every few years we look at using national instruments to compare our students’ experience with students at other four-year private colleges. This past year, I administered the Student Satisfaction Survey, a national instrument published by the Noel-Levitz Group ,which is the most popular instrument in use nationally to gauge whether students are generally satisfied with their college experience. We used this instrument in 1994, 1995, 1996 and, most recently, in 1998. A random sample from each class was generated and the survey was administered before Christmas 2002. It was encouraging to find that Aquinas College was rated so high by our students. In every scale but two, our students were significantly more satisfied with Aquinas than students attending other four-year private colleges. And, of these two scales (academic advising and safety) we are now at the national average as compared to the last time when we were lower than the national average on these two scales. We have improved significantly in the past five years in how our students evaluate their own satisfaction with the Aquinas experience—the instruction, the people, the services, the atmosphere, the facilities and the campus climate. We will be able to use the results further in this upcoming year to continue to improve the quality of the Aquinas experience. We are truly appreciative of the feedback we receive from our graduates about what went well and what we could improve. Keep the notes and letters coming. By Brad Winkler, Dean of Student Affairs

Student Satisfaction at Aquinas

- “Scenes From Us, A Play in Progress” October 14, 2003 - “Call Me Illya: A Creative Nonfiction Confession of Childhood Espionage” October 27, 2003 - “A Reading from Take On the Seasons, a New Poetry Manuscript” September 16, 2003

The Aquinas Lecture Series Tuesdays in the Wege Student Center Ballroom 12:30–1:20 p.m. principal of Child Discovery Center (Reggio Charter School chartered by Grand Rapids Public Schools) and the Aquinas College Child Development Center to study teaching and learning in these environments. Tim Bennett, director of the master in science education faculty and curriculum, is completing his third year as science education

consultant with the East Grand Rapids Public Schools. Luthene Chappell, Ph.D., has been working on the board of the Northroek Academy, which is a college program for developmentally disabled adults in western Michigan. Carol Winkle, Ph.D., is working with MDOE in developing statewide surveys regarding the percep-

tions of the quality of teacher preparation (to be used with Title II and possibly PR/PE). Sue Liberatore, Director of the Reading Clinic, has added an offsite reading clinic in a Grand Rapids elementary school. Jim Garofalo, Ph.D., dean of the School of Education, continues as a reading/accreditation consultant withWyoming Public Schools.

Faculty Notes - School of Education cont. Faculty New – Fall 2003 MEN’S SOCCER Aug 25 Grace Bible Aug 30 @ Columbia (Mo.) Aug 31 @ Lindenwood (Mo.) Sept 6 @ Alma Sept 9 @ Calvin Sept 13 IndianaTech Sept 20 @ Madonna Sept 21 St. Xavier Sept 23 @ Spring Arbor Sept 27 Concordia Sept 30 Siena Heights Oct 4 @ Cornerstone Oct 5 @ Saginaw Valley State Oct 7 @ Indiana Tech Oct 14 Madonna Oct 18 Spring Arbor Oct 21 @ Concordia Oct 25 @ Siena Heights Oct 28 Cornerstone

Top Senior Student-Athletes Recognized Baker Award. He is a fourKerry Lucas and Lars year letter winner in both Petzke, were selected as the cross country and track 2002-03 Senior Student and field and has taken Athletes—the top female home numerous honors and male senior studentduring that time, including athletes who demonstrated All-American in track academic strength, service (2002), Academic Allto other people and athletic Kerry Lucas American in track (2002), involvement and success. cross country (2000-02). Lucas, a senior from Petzke graduated with Lakeview, received the Sr. a history major and a geoHelen Louise Brogger graphy minor while mainAward. A four-year letter taining a 3.65 GPA and winner in track and field, completing his teaching she earned All-American certification. At Aquinas, honors from 2000-02 and Petzke was active in the Stuwas honored as an AcadeLars Petzke dent Senate, the Studentmic All-American in 2002. Athlete Advisory Board and Phi Lucas graduated with a major Alpha Theta, as its vice president. in chemistry and a minor in “Kerry and Lars are tremendous mathematics. She maintained a ambassadors for Aquinas College, 3.75 GPA and was involved in Casa not only in athletics, but also in the Hogar, several service learning trips classroom,” said Head Track and Field and was a member of the Aquinas Coach Dave Wood.“ They emulate College Ambassadors. the true meaning and spirit of the Petzke, a senior from Saint award.” Joseph,was awarded the Joseph

WOMEN’S SOCCER Aug26 St. Francis Aug 29 @ McKendree (Ill.) Aug 30 @ Newman (Mo.) Sept 5 Taylor Sept 6 @ Alma Sept 9 @ Ferris State Sept 13 Indiana Tech Sept 18 Grand Valley State Sept 20 @ Madonna Sept 24 @ Spring Arbor Sept 27 Concordia (Homecoming) Siena Heights @ Cornerstone @ Indiana Tech Madonna Spring Arbor Hope @ Concordia Siena Heights Cornerstone Oct 1 Oct 4 Oct 8 Oct 15 Oct 18 Oct 20 Oct 22 Oct 25 Oct 29

AQ AND YOU Program Repeating the success of last year, the AQ AND YOU Summer Program 2003 was held the week of June 23. Twenty students came to campus as part of the Rewarding Youth Achievement Program (RYAP), which serves students in the Detroit Public Schools. Brigid Avery, a College admissions representative, developed the program last year to expose students from the Detroit area to Aquinas and the many opportunities throughout West Michigan.

Cassi Gragg, a senior from Grant, was named the WHAC Softball Playerof-the-Year leading Aquinas to a 34-16 record (21-7 WHAC) and the WHAC Championship for the third time in her four years as a Saint. While starting in all 50 of the team’s games, she finished the regular season with a team-high 65 hits in 154 at-bats, for a team-high .426 batting average. While being named WHAC Player-of-the-Week twice, Gragg totaled 21 doubles (new single-season record), three triples, one homerun and a teamhigh 44 RBIs, while only striking out five times. Also excelling on the mound, Gragg led the team with a 2.01 ERA in 21 appearances, going 12-7 with 14 complete games and two shutouts. Opponents hit .221 against her while striking out 65 times

CROSS COUNTRY SCHEDULE Sept 12 Aquinas College Invitational Sept 19 National Catholic Invitational Sept 27 Pre-National Meet Oct 10 Michigan Intercollegiate Oct 26 WHAC Championships Nov 8 NAIA Regionals Nov 22 NAIA Championships

Grand Rapids South Bend, Ind. Louisville , Ky. Hudsonville Grand Rapids Grand Rapids Kenosha,Wis.

Included in this year’s program was an Inquiry and Expression class focusing on The Hip Hop Generation taught by Aquinas Director of Campus Life Jessie Grant. The students went for a ride aboard the Grand Haven Harbor Steamer riverboat for an evening cruise, exposing them to the beautiful West Michigan shoreline. Their challenge for the week ended with a team-building exercise at Higher Ground, an indoor rock climbing facility in Grand Rapids.

CAMPUS CAMPUS EVENTS EVENTS

October 2003 2,Thursday Music Department Sampler Concert 12:30 p.m. • Wege Center Ballroom

5-31, Mon-Fri Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit Bill Hosterman, Printmaking 5, Sunday • Reception, 2-4 p.m.

(Left) Some of the 20 students from the AQ AND YOU Summer Program take a moment to pose for a picture in the gardens at Marywood.

(Below) Raymonda Davis (left rear) and Diane Ngabire, an Aquinas sophomore, pose with Sisters (l-r) Mar y Morang, Lois Schaffer, and Yvonne Richard at Aquinata Hall at Marywood during an ice cream social service project in which the AQ AND YOU students participated.

Gragg Named WHAC Softball Player-of-the-Year

VOLLEYBALL Aug 29, 30 @Cornerstone Tournament Sept 5,6 @ Cedarville Tournament (Ohio) Sept 10 @ Goshen (Indiana) Sept 12, 13 @ St. Xavier Tournament (Ill.) Sept 16 Spring Arbor Sept 19 Siena Heights Sept 20 Aquinas Invitational Sept 23 Concordia Sept 25 Albion Sept 29 Great Lakes Christian Oct 2 @ Spring Arbor Oct 4 @ Siena Heights Oct 7 Madonna Oct 11 @ Kalamazoo College Oct 14 @ Cornerstone Oct 18 @ Huntington Tournament (Ind.) Oct 21 @ Concordia Oct 24, 25 @ Calvin Tournament Oct 28 @ Madonna Nov 4 Cornerstone Nov 11 WHAC Tournament - 1 st Round Nov 14, 15 WHAC Final Four Tournament

6, Monday Jane Hibbard Idema Women’s Studies Center Event 12 noon –1:30 p.m. • Sandra Steingraber, Ph.D. “Environment Threats to Fertility, Pregnancy, Breast Milk and Babies: The Myth of Living Safely in a Toxic World” Open to the Public Wege Center Ballroom

9-11, Thurs-Sat Aquinas Players present “OurTown” Performing Arts Center

30, Thursday AQ Contemporary Writers Series Leslie Ulman Wege Ballroom

Women/Men – 6 p.m./5 p.m. Women/Men – 4:15 p.m./ 5 p.m. Women/Men – 9:30 a.m. /10:30 a.m. 3:30 Women/Men – 12 noon/12:45 p.m. Women/Men - 12 noon/12:45 p.m. Women/Men – 10:30/11:45 a.m. (CST)

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Athletics

Dave Hammer jumped into college basketball coaching more than 25 years ago as an assistant at Delta College. Now, after more than two decades with both boy’s high school and several other notable college programs, Hammer has shifted his sights to West Michigan where he will now lead the Saints basketball program. Hammer, 54, was selected for the head coaching position in early June following a month-long search process that followed the resignation of Rick Albro who left Aquinas in May after 13 years to take an assistant coaching post at Cleveland State University. Hammer, who assumed his duties on July 1, will also be responsible for the College‘s intramural program. “Dave brings a tremendous amount of basketball knowledge and expertise to Aquinas,” said Terry Bocian, director of athletics. “His leadership skills will be an excellent asset to the athletic program; he is an ideal fit for the overall community at Aquinas College.” Hammer comes to Aquinas from Coldwater, Michigan where he had served as athletic director since 1993 and as boy’s basketball coach from 1997-2002. His Coldwater career included a Class B semi-final berth in 1999 and a Class B Coach of the Year award in 1999. During his five years as basketball coach, Hammer led the Cardinals to a 66-45 record, including school records of 24 victories and a winning streak of 18 games in 1999. Before that, Hammer was an assistant coach at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas from 1989-1993. Under the leadership of Mustangs Head Coach John Shumate, Hammer helped to transform the team from the league cellar to the Southwest Conference championship and an NCAA Tournament berth in 1993 (20-8 overall, 12-2 SWC). From 1978 to 1980, Hammer served as an assistant coach at Delta College in University Center. Then, he assumed head coaching duties at Bridgeport High Athletic Director Terry Bocian and new Head School. He left a year later, returning to Delta in 1981 Basketball Coach Dave Hammer as its head coach. His teams earned a 57-24 record during his three years, which included leading the Pioneers to an Eastern Conference Championship in 1982. In 1984, he joined the University of Michigan program as an assistant ideal fit …” under Coach Bill Frieder. As a member of the U-of-M basketball staff, his teams won two consecutive Big Ten titles and earned four NCAA post-Bocian season berths while amassing an overall 100-27 record. Hammer also served as assistant coach at Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene, Texas from 1988 to 1989. “When looking for the right fit to get back into college coaching, Aquinas College met all my criteria, including a strong academic background for the players, a close college community, supportive staff members inside

Former Wolverine Assistant Coach to Lead Saints Men’s Basketball

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Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit All-Media, Juried Student Show Continues

1-26, Mon-Fri (Below) Vendor tables filled the upper level of Wege Student Center.

March 2003 Aquinas Players Present “Pippin” Performing Arts Center

26-28, Thurs-Sat Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit All-Media, Juried Student Show 22, Sunday • Reception, 2-4 p.m.

22-28, Sun-Fri Doreen Ferne (left) from Escape Mind & Body Relax Center explains the newest relaxation products.

Conferencing Services and Aquinas College’s food service (HDS Catering) trumped expectations in its first annual Bridal Show that saw over 300 people in attendance at the March event. Attendees took advantage of the opportunity to talk personally to vendors and gather ideas from the beautiful displays of gowns, cakes, flowers, photos and other related wedding items that filled the upper level of Wege Center. The Catering Department (HDS) showcased some of its most popular food items. Attendees could not get enough of the pork tenderloin and lamb chops. Because of the overwhelmingly positive response from vendors and attendees, the size of next year’s show will be expanded. It is set for Saturday, March 6, 2004. If you are interested in being a vendor next year, contact Conference Coordinator Judi Creamer at (616) 459-8281 or via e-mail at creamjud@aquinas.edu for more information. By Judi Creamer, Conferencing Services

Black History Month Play Performing Arts Center

12-14, Thurs-Sat 1-13, Sun-Fri Bachelor of Fine Arts Student Exhibit Continues

February 2003 Bachelor of Fine Arts Student Exhibit 18, Sunday • Reception, 2-4 p.m.

18-31, Sun-Fri

January 2004

CAMPUS CAMPUS EVENTS EVENTS

Bridal Show Highlights AQ Amenities

Athletics – Fall 2003

CAMPUS CAMPUS EVENTS EVENTS November 2003 1-7, Sat-Fri Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit Bill Hosterman, Printmaking

16-30, Mon-Fri Miriam Pederson and Ron Pederson A Collaborative Exhibition of Poetry and Sculpture 16, Sunday • Opening Reception Art & Music Center Gallery

20-22,Thurs-Sat Aquinas College Thespians present “Flowers for Algernon” Performing Arts Center

23 Sunday • 3 p.m. Choral Concert withValenti Handbell Choir St. Robert of Newminster Church,Ada

December 2003 1-19, Mon-Fri Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit Miriam Pederson and Ron Pederson A Collaborative Exhibition of Poetry and Sculpture

2,Tuesday • 7:30 p.m. Fall Jazz Night Vocal Jazz, Jazz Combo, Big Band Art & Music Center

Aquinas Jazz Festival 2003 Hits High Note By Kate Luce, Contributing Writer (From The AquinasTimes, Apr. 9, 2003. Reprinted with permission.)

Nearly a dozen jazz ensembles and acts from all over Michigan came to Aquinas March 28-30 to perform for the 30th annual Jazz Festival. The mood was upbeat throughout the weekend as various artists took the stage. Acts included performances by ensembles from Aquinas College, Cornerstone University, Grand Valley State University, Newaygo High School, Community High School, Lansing Community College as well as other schools from throughout Michigan. In the evening, jazz concerts brought many professional jazz musicians and highlighted faculty members of the Aquinas Music Department including Director of Instrumental Music Dr. Paul Brewer and Adjunct Faculty Steve Talaga and Dr. Robin Connell. A small combo from Community High School, featuring piano, bass, trumpets, drums and an upright bass were among the highlights. Tunes ranged from a swingy number called “Israel,” to a catchy Bossa Nova tune.

To complement the early afternoon performances, the festival also featured well-known acts such as jazz vocalist Sunny Wilkinson, who appeared Saturday evening. Wilkinson teaches vocal jazz at Michigan State and Western Michigan University, and performs at festivals and venues all over the country. Her latest CD “High Wire,” featuring big-band music, has been a great success. Sunday night performances, held at Wealthy Theater, featured the Grand Rapids Jazz Orchestra’s debut under the direction of Brewer and a performance by renowned trumpeter Randy Brecker. Brecker helped to form the successful band Blood Sweat and Tears, playing with them for a year. Besides sizzling performances, the festival also allowed aspiring musicians to get in on the act. Brewer led a clinic that focused on big band rehearsal techniques. Sunday featured a clinic with Brecker, as well as Tim Froncek on drums, Dave Spring on bass, and Steve Talaga on piano. It was a weekend filled with music to the enjoyment of attendees. The performances were lively and the clinics provided an opportunity for musicians to learn more about jazz techniques.

One of the many participating jazz bands performs at the Art and Music Center.

4-20,Thurs-Fri Aquinas College and Community Circle Theatre “Holiday Extravaganza” Performing Arts Center

7, Sunday • 4 p.m. Holiday Collage Concert Aquinas College Chorus, Chamber Choir, College Band, Student Soloists Art & Music Center

the athletic department and excellent leadership throughout the college,” Hammer noted. “I am looking forward to maintaining the level of quality within our student-athletes and helping the basketball program progress into the future for Aquinas College.” Hammer graduated in 1970 from Central Michigan University with a B.A. in political science and earned a master’s in educational administration at CMU in 1976.

Meanwhile, during his 13 seasons as the Saints men’s head basketball coach, Albro posted seven winning seasons that included two WHAC conference co-championships. His best season was in 1999-2000 when the Saints posted a 23-10 record, the most wins in AQ’s men’s basketball history. Last year’s squad recorded an 18-14 mark, which included victories over Hope, Calvin, Ferris State and Division I Indiana-Purdue-Fort Wayne.

Albro coached more games than any men’s basketball coach in Aquinas history (406) and recorded the most wins (199). His career record at Aquinas was 199207. Bocian praised Albro’s dedication, “Rick gave Aquinas College and its student-athletes 13 years of outstanding effort and commitment. We are appreciative and wish him nothing but the best in his new position at the Division I level.”

Aquinas Wins Sixth Straight All-Sports Award By Damon Bouwkamp ‘00, Contributing Writer

Aquinas College has won the Wolverine Hoosier Athletic Conference (WHAC) AllSports Trophy for an unprecedented 6th consecutive year. Aquinas began its consecutive run of President’s Cup awards in 1997-98. No other WHAC school has won the award more than three times. Aquinas continued its dominance of the WHAC with a conferencehigh 36 league championships over that time. “What an accomplishment! It is the culmination of a great deal of time, energy and commitment on behalf of our staff and our student/athletes,” stated Director of Athletics Terry Bocian. “We are proud to offer the most comprehensive athletic program in the WHAC and to have earned the success we’ve worked hard for is an outstanding reward,” he added. Fourteen sports are recognized as league sanctioned sports. Aquinas won titles this past year in women’s indoor and outdoor track and field, women’s softball, men’s cross country and

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men’s indoor track and field. Combined with one of three second-place finishes in men’s soccer, men’s outdoor track and field or baseball, the Saints earned 47 points to Cornerstone University’s 44 points. “This is a great achievement for our entire department,” said Bocian. “Winning our sixth straight trophy is a tribute to all of our studentathletes.” The WHAC, which originated in 1992, is comprised of Aquinas College, Concordia University, Cornerstone University, Indiana Technical University, Madonna University, Siena Heights University, Spring Arbor University, and Tri-State University. The WHAC All-Sports Champion is determined by each institution’s top finish in any six WHAC sports (three men and three women). Sport champions are awarded eight points (seven for runner-up, six for third, etc.) and the school with the most points is the All-Sports Champion.

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“… an

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Dave Hammer jumped into college basketball coaching more than 25 years ago as an assistant at Delta College. Now, after more than two decades with both boy’s high school and several other notable college programs, Hammer has shifted his sights to West Michigan where he will now lead the Saints basketball program. Hammer, 54, was selected for the head coaching position in early June following a month-long search process that followed the resignation of Rick Albro who left Aquinas in May after 13 years to take an assistant coaching post at Cleveland State University. Hammer, who assumed his duties on July 1, will also be responsible for the College‘s intramural program. “Dave brings a tremendous amount of basketball knowledge and expertise to Aquinas,” said Terry Bocian, director of athletics. “His leadership skills will be an excellent asset to the athletic program; he is an ideal fit for the overall community at Aquinas College.” Hammer comes to Aquinas from Coldwater, Michigan where he had served as athletic director since 1993 and as boy’s basketball coach from 1997-2002. His Coldwater career included a Class B semi-final berth in 1999 and a Class B Coach of the Year award in 1999. During his five years as basketball coach, Hammer led the Cardinals to a 66-45 record, including school records of 24 victories and a winning streak of 18 games in 1999. Before that, Hammer was an assistant coach at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas from 1989-1993. Under the leadership of Mustangs Head Coach John Shumate, Hammer helped to transform the team from the league cellar to the Southwest Conference championship and an NCAA Tournament berth in 1993 (20-8 overall, 12-2 SWC). From 1978 to 1980, Hammer served as an assistant coach at Delta College in University Center. Then, he assumed head coaching duties at Bridgeport High Athletic Director Terry Bocian and new Head School. He left a year later, returning to Delta in 1981 Basketball Coach Dave Hammer as its head coach. His teams earned a 57-24 record during his three years, which included leading the Pioneers to an Eastern Conference Championship in 1982. In 1984, he joined the University of Michigan program as an assistant ideal fit …” under Coach Bill Frieder. As a member of the U-of-M basketball staff, his teams won two consecutive Big Ten titles and earned four NCAA post-Bocian season berths while amassing an overall 100-27 record. Hammer also served as assistant coach at Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene, Texas from 1988 to 1989. “When looking for the right fit to get back into college coaching, Aquinas College met all my criteria, including a strong academic background for the players, a close college community, supportive staff members inside

Athletics

Former Wolverine Assistant Coach to Lead Saints Men’s Basketball

Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit All-Media, Juried Student Show Continues

1-26, Mon-Fri (Below) Vendor tables filled the upper level of Wege Student Center.

March 2003 Aquinas Players Present “Pippin” Performing Arts Center

26-28, Thurs-Sat Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit All-Media, Juried Student Show 22, Sunday • Reception, 2-4 p.m.

22-28, Sun-Fri Doreen Ferne (left) from Escape Mind & Body Relax Center explains the newest relaxation products.

Conferencing Services and Aquinas College’s food service (HDS Catering) trumped expectations in its first annual Bridal Show that saw over 300 people in attendance at the March event. Attendees took advantage of the opportunity to talk personally to vendors and gather ideas from the beautiful displays of gowns, cakes, flowers, photos and other related wedding items that filled the upper level of Wege Center. The Catering Department (HDS) showcased some of its most popular food items. Attendees could not get enough of the pork tenderloin and lamb chops. Because of the overwhelmingly positive response from vendors and attendees, the size of next year’s show will be expanded. It is set for Saturday, March 6, 2004. If you are interested in being a vendor next year, contact Conference Coordinator Judi Creamer at (616) 459-8281 or via e-mail at creamjud@aquinas.edu for more information. By Judi Creamer, Conferencing Services

Black History Month Play Performing Arts Center

12-14, Thurs-Sat 1-13, Sun-Fri Bachelor of Fine Arts Student Exhibit Continues

February 2003 Bachelor of Fine Arts Student Exhibit 18, Sunday • Reception, 2-4 p.m.

18-31, Sun-Fri

January 2004

CAMPUS CAMPUS EVENTS EVENTS

Bridal Show Highlights AQ Amenities

Athletics – Fall 2003

CAMPUS CAMPUS EVENTS EVENTS November 2003 1-7, Sat-Fri Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit Bill Hosterman, Printmaking

16-30, Mon-Fri Miriam Pederson and Ron Pederson A Collaborative Exhibition of Poetry and Sculpture 16, Sunday • Opening Reception Art & Music Center Gallery

20-22,Thurs-Sat Aquinas College Thespians present “Flowers for Algernon” Performing Arts Center

23 Sunday • 3 p.m. Choral Concert withValenti Handbell Choir St. Robert of Newminster Church,Ada

December 2003 1-19, Mon-Fri Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit Miriam Pederson and Ron Pederson A Collaborative Exhibition of Poetry and Sculpture

2,Tuesday • 7:30 p.m. Fall Jazz Night Vocal Jazz, Jazz Combo, Big Band Art & Music Center

Aquinas Jazz Festival 2003 Hits High Note By Kate Luce, Contributing Writer (From The AquinasTimes, Apr. 9, 2003. Reprinted with permission.)

Nearly a dozen jazz ensembles and acts from all over Michigan came to Aquinas March 28-30 to perform for the 30th annual Jazz Festival. The mood was upbeat throughout the weekend as various artists took the stage. Acts included performances by ensembles from Aquinas College, Cornerstone University, Grand Valley State University, Newaygo High School, Community High School, Lansing Community College as well as other schools from throughout Michigan. In the evening, jazz concerts brought many professional jazz musicians and highlighted faculty members of the Aquinas Music Department including Director of Instrumental Music Dr. Paul Brewer and Adjunct Faculty Steve Talaga and Dr. Robin Connell. A small combo from Community High School, featuring piano, bass, trumpets, drums and an upright bass were among the highlights. Tunes ranged from a swingy number called “Israel,” to a catchy Bossa Nova tune.

To complement the early afternoon performances, the festival also featured well-known acts such as jazz vocalist Sunny Wilkinson, who appeared Saturday evening. Wilkinson teaches vocal jazz at Michigan State and Western Michigan University, and performs at festivals and venues all over the country. Her latest CD “High Wire,” featuring big-band music, has been a great success. Sunday night performances, held at Wealthy Theater, featured the Grand Rapids Jazz Orchestra’s debut under the direction of Brewer and a performance by renowned trumpeter Randy Brecker. Brecker helped to form the successful band Blood Sweat and Tears, playing with them for a year. Besides sizzling performances, the festival also allowed aspiring musicians to get in on the act. Brewer led a clinic that focused on big band rehearsal techniques. Sunday featured a clinic with Brecker, as well as Tim Froncek on drums, Dave Spring on bass, and Steve Talaga on piano. It was a weekend filled with music to the enjoyment of attendees. The performances were lively and the clinics provided an opportunity for musicians to learn more about jazz techniques.

One of the many participating jazz bands performs at the Art and Music Center.

4-20,Thurs-Fri Aquinas College and Community Circle Theatre “Holiday Extravaganza” Performing Arts Center

7, Sunday • 4 p.m. Holiday Collage Concert Aquinas College Chorus, Chamber Choir, College Band, Student Soloists Art & Music Center

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the athletic department and excellent leadership throughout the college,” Hammer noted. “I am looking forward to maintaining the level of quality within our student-athletes and helping the basketball program progress into the future for Aquinas College.” Hammer graduated in 1970 from Central Michigan University with a B.A. in political science and earned a master’s in educational administration at CMU in 1976.

Meanwhile, during his 13 seasons as the Saints men’s head basketball coach, Albro posted seven winning seasons that included two WHAC conference co-championships. His best season was in 1999-2000 when the Saints posted a 23-10 record, the most wins in AQ’s men’s basketball history. Last year’s squad recorded an 18-14 mark, which included victories over Hope, Calvin, Ferris State and Division I Indiana-Purdue-Fort Wayne.

Albro coached more games than any men’s basketball coach in Aquinas history (406) and recorded the most wins (199). His career record at Aquinas was 199207. Bocian praised Albro’s dedication, “Rick gave Aquinas College and its student-athletes 13 years of outstanding effort and commitment. We are appreciative and wish him nothing but the best in his new position at the Division I level.”

Aquinas Wins Sixth Straight All-Sports Award By Damon Bouwkamp ‘00, Contributing Writer

Aquinas College has won the Wolverine Hoosier Athletic Conference (WHAC) AllSports Trophy for an unprecedented 6th consecutive year. Aquinas began its consecutive run of President’s Cup awards in 1997-98. No other WHAC school has won the award more than three times. Aquinas continued its dominance of the WHAC with a conferencehigh 36 league championships over that time. “What an accomplishment! It is the culmination of a great deal of time, energy and commitment on behalf of our staff and our student/athletes,” stated Director of Athletics Terry Bocian. “We are proud to offer the most comprehensive athletic program in the WHAC and to have earned the success we’ve worked hard for is an outstanding reward,” he added. Fourteen sports are recognized as league sanctioned sports. Aquinas won titles this past year in women’s indoor and outdoor track and field, women’s softball, men’s cross country and

men’s indoor track and field. Combined with one of three second-place finishes in men’s soccer, men’s outdoor track and field or baseball, the Saints earned 47 points to Cornerstone University’s 44 points. “This is a great achievement for our entire department,” said Bocian. “Winning our sixth straight trophy is a tribute to all of our studentathletes.” The WHAC, which originated in 1992, is comprised of Aquinas College, Concordia University, Cornerstone University, Indiana Technical University, Madonna University, Siena Heights University, Spring Arbor University, and Tri-State University. The WHAC All-Sports Champion is determined by each institution’s top finish in any six WHAC sports (three men and three women). Sport champions are awarded eight points (seven for runner-up, six for third, etc.) and the school with the most points is the All-Sports Champion.

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Junior Lesley Malkowski (center) is pictured with Nancy and Ray Loeschner, underwriters of the award.

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Junior Lesley Malkowski was selected this past spring as the 2002 winner of the Loeschner TwoDimensional Art Competition in Grand Rapids. The competition is hosted by the Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park. Malkowski’s photograph was selected from among 40 finalists. The Freesoil, Michigan native received a $1,000 cash award, which is funded through the Ray Loeschner Foundation.

Lesley Malkowski: Art Competition Winner

- “Women and the Holocaust” April 6, 2004 - “Baroque and Classical Era Women and Their Music” March 23, 2004 - “Building the Nest Egg: Issues in Retirement Planning” February 17, 2003 - “Sinai Bedouin Women Make Films” February 3, 2004 - “China: A Nation of Contrasts” November 18, 2003 - “The Global Village: An Emerging Humanities Landscape” November 4, 2003

Student News

Measuring the quality of the Aquinas experience has always been a multifaceted task. We use many objective and subjective measures to improve the events and services we offer. Sometimes, it is asking students what they thought of Spring Fling or graduation. Often, it is a systematic survey of students by a department or the Provost’s Office (every course at Aquinas is evaluated by students). Every few years we look at using national instruments to compare our students’ experience with students at other four-year private colleges. This past year, I administered the Student Satisfaction Survey, a national instrument published by the Noel-Levitz Group ,which is the most popular instrument in use nationally to gauge whether students are generally satisfied with their college experience. We used this instrument in 1994, 1995, 1996 and, most recently, in 1998. A random sample from each class was generated and the survey was administered before Christmas 2002. It was encouraging to find that Aquinas College was rated so high by our students. In every scale but two, our students were significantly more satisfied with Aquinas than students attending other four-year private colleges. And, of these two scales (academic advising and safety) we are now at the national average as compared to the last time when we were lower than the national average on these two scales. We have improved significantly in the past five years in how our students evaluate their own satisfaction with the Aquinas experience—the instruction, the people, the services, the atmosphere, the facilities and the campus climate. We will be able to use the results further in this upcoming year to continue to improve the quality of the Aquinas experience. We are truly appreciative of the feedback we receive from our graduates about what went well and what we could improve. Keep the notes and letters coming. By Brad Winkler, Dean of Student Affairs

Student Satisfaction at Aquinas

- “Scenes From Us, A Play in Progress” October 14, 2003 - “Call Me Illya: A Creative Nonfiction Confession of Childhood Espionage” October 27, 2003 - “A Reading from Take On the Seasons, a New Poetry Manuscript” September 16, 2003

The Aquinas Lecture Series Tuesdays in the Wege Student Center Ballroom 12:30–1:20 p.m. principal of Child Discovery Center (Reggio Charter School chartered by Grand Rapids Public Schools) and the Aquinas College Child Development Center to study teaching and learning in these environments. Tim Bennett, director of the master in science education faculty and curriculum, is completing his third year as science education

consultant with the East Grand Rapids Public Schools. Luthene Chappell, Ph.D., has been working on the board of the Northroek Academy, which is a college program for developmentally disabled adults in western Michigan. Carol Winkle, Ph.D., is working with MDOE in developing statewide surveys regarding the percep-

tions of the quality of teacher preparation (to be used with Title II and possibly PR/PE). Sue Liberatore, Director of the Reading Clinic, has added an offsite reading clinic in a Grand Rapids elementary school. Jim Garofalo, Ph.D., dean of the School of Education, continues as a reading/accreditation consultant withWyoming Public Schools.

Faculty Notes - School of Education cont. Faculty New – Fall 2003 MEN’S SOCCER Aug 25 Grace Bible Aug 30 @ Columbia (Mo.) Aug 31 @ Lindenwood (Mo.) Sept 6 @ Alma Sept 9 @ Calvin Sept 13 IndianaTech Sept 20 @ Madonna Sept 21 St. Xavier Sept 23 @ Spring Arbor Sept 27 Concordia Sept 30 Siena Heights Oct 4 @ Cornerstone Oct 5 @ Saginaw Valley State Oct 7 @ Indiana Tech Oct 14 Madonna Oct 18 Spring Arbor Oct 21 @ Concordia Oct 25 @ Siena Heights Oct 28 Cornerstone WOMEN’S SOCCER Aug26 St. Francis Aug 29 @ McKendree (Ill.) Aug 30 @ Newman (Mo.) Sept 5 Taylor Sept 6 @ Alma Sept 9 @ Ferris State Sept 13 Indiana Tech Sept 18 Grand Valley State Sept 20 @ Madonna Sept 24 @ Spring Arbor Sept 27 Concordia (Homecoming) Oct 1 Siena Heights Oct 4 @ Cornerstone Oct 8 @ Indiana Tech Oct 15 Madonna Oct 18 Spring Arbor Oct 20 Hope Oct 22 @ Concordia Oct 25 Siena Heights Oct 29 Cornerstone

VOLLEYBALL Aug 29, 30 @Cornerstone Tournament Sept 5,6 @ Cedarville Tournament (Ohio) Sept 10 @ Goshen (Indiana) Sept 12, 13 @ St. Xavier Tournament (Ill.) Sept 16 Spring Arbor Sept 19 Siena Heights Sept 20 Aquinas Invitational Sept 23 Concordia Sept 25 Albion Sept 29 Great Lakes Christian Oct 2 @ Spring Arbor Oct 4 @ Siena Heights Oct 7 Madonna Oct 11 @ Kalamazoo College Oct 14 @ Cornerstone Oct 18 @ Huntington Tournament (Ind.) Oct 21 @ Concordia Oct 24, 25 @ Calvin Tournament Oct 28 @ Madonna Nov 4 Cornerstone Nov 11 WHAC Tournament - 1 st Round Nov 14, 15 WHAC Final Four Tournament

Top Senior Student-Athletes Recognized Baker Award. He is a fourKerry Lucas and Lars year letter winner in both Petzke, were selected as the cross country and track 2002-03 Senior Student and field and has taken Athletes—the top female home numerous honors and male senior studentduring that time, including athletes who demonstrated All-American in track academic strength, service (2002), Academic Allto other people and athletic Kerry Lucas American in track (2002), involvement and success. cross country (2000-02). Lucas, a senior from Petzke graduated with Lakeview, received the Sr. a history major and a geoHelen Louise Brogger graphy minor while mainAward. A four-year letter taining a 3.65 GPA and winner in track and field, completing his teaching she earned All-American certification. At Aquinas, honors from 2000-02 and Petzke was active in the Stuwas honored as an AcadeLars Petzke dent Senate, the Studentmic All-American in 2002. Athlete Advisory Board and Phi Lucas graduated with a major Alpha Theta, as its vice president. in chemistry and a minor in “Kerry and Lars are tremendous mathematics. She maintained a ambassadors for Aquinas College, 3.75 GPA and was involved in Casa not only in athletics, but also in the Hogar, several service learning trips classroom,” said Head Track and Field and was a member of the Aquinas Coach Dave Wood.“ They emulate College Ambassadors. the true meaning and spirit of the Petzke, a senior from Saint award.” Joseph,was awarded the Joseph

Gragg Named WHAC Softball Player-of-the-Year Cassi Gragg, a senior from Grant, was named the WHAC Softball Playerof-the-Year leading Aquinas to a 34-16 record (21-7 WHAC) and the WHAC Championship for the third time in her four years as a Saint. While starting in all 50 of the team’s games, she finished the regular season with a team-high 65 hits in 154 at-bats, for a team-high .426 batting average. While being named WHAC Player-of-the-Week twice, Gragg totaled 21 doubles (new single-season record), three triples, one homerun and a teamhigh 44 RBIs, while only striking out five times. Also excelling on the mound, Gragg led the team with a 2.01 ERA in 21 appearances, going 12-7 with 14 complete games and two shutouts. Opponents hit .221 against her while striking out 65 times

CROSS COUNTRY SCHEDULE Sept 12 Aquinas College Invitational Sept 19 National Catholic Invitational Sept 27 Pre-National Meet Oct 10 Michigan Intercollegiate Oct 26 WHAC Championships Nov 8 NAIA Regionals Nov 22 NAIA Championships

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Grand Rapids South Bend, Ind. Louisville , Ky. Hudsonville Grand Rapids Grand Rapids Kenosha,Wis.

AQ AND YOU Program Repeating the success of last year, the AQ AND YOU Summer Program 2003 was held the week of June 23. Twenty students came to campus as part of the Rewarding Youth Achievement Program (RYAP), which serves students in the Detroit Public Schools. Brigid Avery, a College admissions representative, developed the program last year to expose students from the Detroit area to Aquinas and the many opportunities throughout West Michigan.

Included in this year’s program was an Inquiry and Expression class focusing on The Hip Hop Generation taught by Aquinas Director of Campus Life Jessie Grant. The students went for a ride aboard the Grand Haven Harbor Steamer riverboat for an evening cruise, exposing them to the beautiful West Michigan shoreline. Their challenge for the week ended with a team-building exercise at Higher Ground, an indoor rock climbing facility in Grand Rapids.

CAMPUS CAMPUS EVENTS EVENTS

October 2003 2,Thursday Music Department Sampler Concert 12:30 p.m. • Wege Center Ballroom

5-31, Mon-Fri Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit Bill Hosterman, Printmaking 5, Sunday • Reception, 2-4 p.m.

(Left) Some of the 20 students from the AQ AND YOU Summer Program take a moment to pose for a picture in the gardens at Marywood.

(Below) Raymonda Davis (left rear) and Diane Ngabire, an Aquinas sophomore, pose with Sisters (l-r) Mar y Morang, Lois Schaffer, and Yvonne Richard at Aquinata Hall at Marywood during an ice cream social service project in which the AQ AND YOU students participated.

Women/Men – 6 p.m./5 p.m. Women/Men – 4:15 p.m./ 5 p.m. Women/Men – 9:30 a.m. /10:30 a.m. 3:30 Women/Men – 12 noon/12:45 p.m. Women/Men - 12 noon/12:45 p.m. Women/Men – 10:30/11:45 a.m. (CST)

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6, Monday Jane Hibbard Idema Women’s Studies Center Event 12 noon –1:30 p.m. • Sandra Steingraber, Ph.D. “Environment Threats to Fertility, Pregnancy, Breast Milk and Babies: The Myth of Living Safely in a Toxic World” Open to the Public Wege Center Ballroom

9-11, Thurs-Sat Aquinas Players present “OurTown” Performing Arts Center

30, Thursday AQ Contemporary Writers Series Leslie Ulman Wege Ballroom


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Bob Niedzielski, Ph.D., ’58 Alumni Board President

Alumni News

Dear Fellow Alums, The Aquinas College Alumni Association is on the move! Ample evidence of that can be found in this section of the magazine. One year ago, 15 new members were welcomed to the Alumni Association Board of Directors. They made up a good crosssection of Aquinas alums, with degrees ranging from the associate level to the master of management, and they have been engaged in a wide variety of professions. Every decade from the 1950s on was represented on the total Board membership of 22, from a 1950 graduate, to one from the class of 2001. In addition to the Grand Rapids area, Board members reside in the Detroit area and in Frederic, Michigan, as well as in Toledo, Ohio, and Mesa, Arizona. This Board has been very active, particularly at the committee level. Much progress has been made during this year of reorganization and new bylaws. In the works is a benefits package for Aquinas alums. We also hope to broaden the scope of alumni events. Alumni are involved with Development, Admissions, and the Career and Counseling Services Offices. The Alumni Walk has been reinstituted. The Golden Saints alumni group, for those who graduated fifty or more years ago, is now a reality. Additionally, a seat has been purchased in the new Performing Arts Center through the donations of Alumni Board members. There is still work to be done, however. The endowment for the Sister Anne Keating Alumni Scholarship, sponsored by the Alumni Association, needs to be strengthened.

From the Alumni Board of Directors’ President

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Last April, alumni from across the state of Michigan gathered to look back on their times at Aquinas and catch a glimpse of their alma mater’s future. John F. ‘58 and Beth (Geller) Burns ‘58 hosted a reception for Detroit-area alumni and friends on April 8 at the Skyline Club in Southfield, Michigan. Northern Michigan alumni and friends enjoyed connecting with the College and each other at their reception hosted by Edward Carlson ’69 held April 24 at the Waterfront Inn located in Traverse City. Both evenings were filled with memories and excitement for the future initiatives of Aquinas College. Plans are already underway for upcoming events. Mark your calendars for the October 29 Detroit-area reception hosted by Michael P. Smith ‘80. More information will follow. If you would like to host an alumni reception in your area, please contact the Alumni & Parent Relations Office at 616-459-8281 or access us online at… alumni@aquinas.edu.

Alumni Receptions… Keeping in Touch I strongly encourage you to reserve September 26-28 for Homecoming. If you haven’t been on campus in some time, you’ll be pleasantly surprised at the changes at Aquinas since you graduated. You can keep up with the Alumni Association and with the College, in general, at the Aquinas Web site, www.aquinas.edu. As always, your comments and suggestions are welcomed. - Bob Niedzielski

Dress rehearsal for cast of 1967 production of “Bells Are Ringing.” 2003 Opening week of the Performing Arts Center was July 29 through August 2. Community Circle Theatre (formerly Circle theatre) has a full, fall line-up of performances scheduled. 2002 Ground broken for the new Aquinas College Performing Arts Center in May, fulfilling a dream made possible by the collaboration of Circle Theatre, Catholic Secondary Schools, and Aquinas College. 2000 The theatre major restored and Gary Konow resumed direction of full-length plays through the 2003 school year. “Oedipus Rex,” “The Elephant Man,” a repeat of “The Contrast” and “A Doll’s House” were offered.

Performing Arts Center on campus and Circle Theatre would manage it. Actors from both organizations would use the facility thr oughout the year. Catholic Secondary Schools later joined the part-nership, gaining use of the space for its students and allowing collaboration between Aquinas, Circle Theatre and area Catholic high schools. Construction of the $7 million facility began on acreage near Albertus Hall in April 2002. Crews finished their work in July of this year, and a weeklong gala ceremony was planned to welcome the center to campus, starting July 29. The theatre curriculum was resurrected in August 2001 and while it doesn’t have many participants yet, it is growing, Konow says. In the interim between the two programs, Aquinas offered acting

courses and communication Professor Penny Avery had headed the Aquinas College Thespians (ACT). Like their predecessors, these actors staged productions in the renovated Carriage House and other locations around campus. The new Performing Arts Center offers a better venue for them and the thousands of actors, stagehands and audience members who will benefit from—maybe even fall in love among—the bright lights and velvet curtains of their new digs. Jim and Linda Chervenka plan to celebrate with the Aquinas community the renewal of the College’s theatre program, a new Performing Arts Center and the arrival of Circle Theatre on campus. “We’ve been looking forward to it,” Jim says. “The ideal is coming together,” Konow says.

1990s Students in the Insignis program provided medieval drama during the St. Thomas Week celebration. Students sometimes wrote an annual Black History Month play. 1980s After the closing of the Carriage House, theatre was discontinued as a major and drama at the college was limited to student productions by the Drama Club, the Theatre Club, and Aquinas College Thespians (ACT). Kretchmer Recital Hall and the Wege Center Ballroom were the new locations. 1976 The first American drama, Royall Tyler’s “The Contrast,” was the last production in the Carriage House. The fire marshall banned the use for plays soon after the performance. 1972 “Yerma” was presented in the Carriage House and directed by Gary Konow. 1971 “The Hostage” was performed in the Carriage House. Sister Rosemar y O’Donnell, O.P., joined the faculty. She later directed “J.B.” in 1972. 1969 Speech and Drama, which had been a minor, became a theatre and communication major.

Aquinas’ Theatre History

CAMPUS CAMPUS EVENTS EVENTS

September 2003 1-28, Mon-Fri Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit Chris LaPorte ’96, Recent Works

3, Wednesday Reflection Award Dinner

10, Wednesday AQ Contemporary Writers Series Kurtis Lamkin, Poet & Musician 7:30 p.m.• Wege Center Ballroom

23,Tuesday Aquinas College M.A. in Education w/ Initial Certification Info Session Call 616-459-8281

26, Friday Percussion Group Concert Hall of Fame Gala

27-28, Sat-Sun Homecoming Weekend

28, Sunday Homecoming Jazz Brunch

Contemporary Writers Series

Impressive Tennis

In 1997 Dr. Tony Foster ’73 and Linda Nemec Foster ’72 gave a generous grant to establish the Aquinas College Contemporary Writers Series, a series of readings by well-known authors. The desire for an Aquinas writers’ series began while Linda, poet laureate of Grand Rapids, was a student at Aquinas. She thought that she and other students would benefit from having well-known writers visit the campus. Once the Series was underway, the Fosters major goal was to establish an endowment so the Series would be ongoing, free and open to the public. The Fosters have now met their goal and the future of the Series is guaranteed with the endowment in place. Four acclaimed writers visit Aquinas each academic year and

By Damon Bouwkamp ’00, Contributing Writer

AQ Welcomes Alpha Epsilon Delta Three years of preparatory work by Aquinas premedical students culminated in the chartering of the Michigan Zeta chapter of Alpha Epsilon Delta (AED), the National Premedical Honor Society at Aquinas College. On April 11, premedical advisors from universities as far away as Texas and Virginia joined national officers of the

Members of the newly established Alpha Epsilon Delta Honorary Premedical Society with representatives of the national organization at the April Induction Dinner.

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(L-R)Tony Foster ’73, Bob Pastan (awardwinning poet), Linda Pastan, Linda Nemec Foster ’72

the Series has developed a large following. In addition to the readings, the visiting writers along with the readings meet with creative writing students in workshops and offer class readings for students in the College’s first and second year core courses. Contemporary Writers schedules can be found at http://www.aquinas.edu/library/ CW/writers.html.

Society, Aquinas faculty and staff, and families and friends of 13 Aquinas students in establishing the 185th chapter of AED. Students were inducted as members and seven faculty as honorary members. The chartering ceremony was highlighted by a speech on the practice of medicine given by Trustee Dr. Luis Tomatis. AED is the oldest and most respected premedical honor society in the country. Each chapter is completely student organized as it carries out the society’s purpose to encourage and to recognize excellence in premedical studies and to promote service that benefits the entire health care community. Sr. Katrina Hartman, chair of the Chemistry Department, and President Knopke serve as the chapter’s faculty advisors.

After losing two seniors that accounted for 300 victories over four years, the 2003 men’s tennis season could have been a year of rebuilding for Head Coach Jerry Hendricks. But with a 5-3 win over Lindsey Wilson College at the NAIA National Championships in Peachtree City, Georgia, this past May, Hendricks continued the strong run of the Saints’ tennis program. Led by sophomores Jason Walsh (Grandville) and Matt Garner (Grand Rapids), the Saints went 20-7 for the season with a Region VIII Championship. Sealing the regional win was a 5-4 victory over 12th-ranked Indiana Wesleyan University to move onto the National Championships. Also leading the Saints to a top-20 ranking for much of the season were juniors Nate Price (Holland), Jason Winegar (Midland) and Roger Lourido (Grand Rapids), and sophomore Jared Flick (Muskegon). Walsh became the fastest Saints player to reach 100 career victories in just his second season, while junior Brian Ahmedani (Kentwood) was named to the NAIA Academic All-American team after earning at least a 3.5 GPA while contributing to the team. Now five dual match victories away from 200 career victories with an overall record of 195-77, Hendricks has led the Saints to three straight appearances at the NAIA National Championships. The victory over Lindsey Wilson is the first in Aquinas tennis history in National Championship play. After advancing to the Round of 16, the season ended against topranked Azusa Pacific University.

32 Student-Athletes Recognized in 2002-03 All-Americans (12) Laura Beattie – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Michelle Borek – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Sarah Ellis – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Henr y Holmes – Men’s Indoor Track and Field Kerry Lucas – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field John MacLeod – Baseball Jon Mies – Men’s Soccer De-Ale-Jo Roberts – Men’s Indoor Track and Field Chuck Schuba – Men’s Basketball T.J. Shimek – Men’s Indoor Track and Field Andy Steketee – Men’s Basketball Jenny Ziegler – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Academic All-Americans (20) Brian Ahmedani – Men’s Tennis Laura Beattie – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Michelle Borek – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Brett Cagney – Baseball Sanel Fazlic – Men’s Soccer Kara Ferguson – Women’s Tennis Leo Foley – Men’s Cross Country Jeremy Frost – Baseball Tamara Harnden – Volleyball Eric Johnson – Men’s Cross Country, Men’s Outdoor Track and Field Nate Kaiser – Men’s Cross Country Val Kunde – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Kerry Lucas – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Josh May – Men’s Cross Country John Moceri – Baseball Lars Petzke – Men’s Cross Country, Men’s Outdoor Track and Field Nathan Rose – Men’s Soccer Julie Roy – Women’s Soccer T.J. Shimek – Men’s Outdoor Track and Field Jeff White – Men’s Soccer

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WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Nov 7, 8 @ St. Francis Tourney (Indiana) Nov 13 Davenport Nov 15 Rochester Nov 21, 22 Aquinas Classic Nov 25 @ Huntington Nov 29 Kalamazoo College Dec 2 @ Taylor Dec 6 @ Trinity Christian Dec 9 Calvin Dec 13 Goshen Dec 19 Trinity International Jan 2, 3 @ Palm Beach Atlantic Jan 7 @ Michigan - Dearborn Jan 10 @ Madonna Jan 14 Indiana Tech Jan 17 Concordia Jan 21 @ Spring Arbor Jan 24 Cornerstone Jan 28 @ Siena Heights Jan 31 Michigan - Dearborn Feb 4 Madonna Feb 7 @ Indiana Tech Feb 11 @ Concordia Feb 14 Spring Arbor Feb 18 @ Cornerstone Feb 21 Siena Heights Feb 26 WHAC Tournament - 1 st Round Feby 28 WHAC Tournament - Semi-finals March 2 WHAC Tournament - Finals March 11-17 NAIA National Tournament

MEN’S BASKETBALL Nov 11 Davenport Nov 15 Grace Bible Nov 18 Rochester Nov 21, 22 @ Marian Tournament (Indiana) Nov 25 @ Calvin Dec 5, 6 @ Hope Tournament Dec 12, 13 Brann’s Aquinas Classic Dec 19-21 St. Xavier Tournament (Illinois) Jan 2, 3 @ Embry Riddle Tournament (Florida) Jan 7 @ Michigan - Dearborn Jan 10 Madonna Jan 14 @ Indiana Tech Jan 17 @ Concordia Jan 21 Spring Arbor Jan 24 Cornerstone Jan 28 @ Siena Heights Jan 31 Michigan - Dearborn Feb 4 @ Madonna Feb 7 Indiana Tech Feb 11 Concordia Feb 14 @ Spring Arbor Feb 18 @ Cornerstone Feb 21 Siena Heights Feb 25 WHAC Tournament - 1st Round Feb 28 WHAC Tournament Semi-finals March 1 WHAC Tournament Finals

MEN’S GOLF Sept 3 Madonna/Fox Creek GC Sept 5,6 Olivet Invitational Sept 16 Cornerstone/Thousand Oaks CC Sept 20 Siena Heights/Lenawee CC Sept 22 Aquinas/L.E. Kaufman Sept 25 Spring Arbor/Cascades GC Oct 1 Spring Arbor Invitational Oct 3 Aquinas/L.E. Kaufman Oct 11 Tri-State A.C. Eddy Invitational/Zollner GC


Also Special Campus Days • Student-Athletes Saturday, January 24, 2004 • Nursing Students Friday, February 6, 2004 Friday, November 14, 2003 Friday, November 21, 2003 Friday, April 23, 2004

CAMPUS DAYS 2003-04

42

Admissions

Paula Meehan, Tom Mikowski, Angie Schlosser Bacon, Dana Samotis, Brigid Avery, Jeremy Wood, Josh Greenwald and Omar Flores all have many things in common. The most obvious is that they all work in the Admissions Office. But, perhaps not so obvious is that they are all Aquinas graduates! Recruiting students to Aquinas is a natural for all of them because they each spent four great years on this campus and are eager to spread the good word about their alma mater. Each brings to the table different Aquinas experiences, but all share one common feeling and that is their love for Aquinas. Paula Meehan lays claim to being the first female intern hired by the admissions office in 1974. She celebrated 27 years with the college in June. Tom Mikowski hails from Traverse City, Michigan and celebrates 14 years with the College. Angie Schlosser Bacon graduated in 1996 and came to Aquinas to play soccer. Paula, Angie and Tom are also married to AQ alums. (Paula to Ross Meehan ‘80, Angie to Scott

Bacon ‘97 and Tom to Becky Miller Mikowski ‘88). Dana Samotis came to Aquinas to play basketball and graduated in 1999. So great was her experience that she convinced sister Jamie this was the place for her too. Brigid Avery, like Dana, influenced her younger sister Clare to attend Aquinas. Brigid is a 2001 graduate. Jeremy Wood graduated in 1999 and was a long-serving member of the Aquinas student tour guide group before joining the staff as a full-time counselor. Most recent members of the staff are Josh Greenwald ‘01 and Omar Flores ‘02. Both, coincidentally, are engaged to AQ graduates and spent some time as roommates. Josh is engaged to Jessica Buck ‘03 and Omar is engaged to Elizabeth Schmiedicke ‘00. When the staff gets together they like to share stories of their time at AQ, dating back to 1971. Over these 30 years, staff members concur that Aquinas just keeps getting better all the time, and the students they have recruited are carrying on the tradition that makes AQ such a special place.

By Paula Meehan ’75, Dean of Admissions

What Do All of These People Have in Common? (L-R) Dana Samotis, Omar Flores,Angie Schlosser Bacon, Josh Greenwald, Paula Meehan, Brigid Aver y,Tom Mikowski and Jeremy Wood pause during a break at a recent In-Service Planning session.

23

Dr. Gary Konow retired after a total of 35 years at Aquinas in the Communication and Theatre Departments

Chuck Frydrych, Physics Dept. Dr. Gary Konow, Theatre Dept. Sr. Amata Fabbro, Theology Dept.

Thirty-Five Years… Terry Bocian, Athletic Dept. Dr. Glenn Barkan, Political Science Gary Robertson, Economics Dept.

Thirty Years… Silvija Visockis, College Relations

Fifteen Years…

Cindy Chapman, Science Dept. Sr. M. Aquinas Weber, Chancellor Dave Zenk, Physical Plant Tom Dooley, College Computing Dr. Woody Hoover, School of Management Joyce LaFleur, ITS

Penny Blickle, Physical Plant Tim Moerland, Physical Plant

Ten Years… Five years…

Twenty Years…

Dr. Anna Bates, History Dept. JoAnne Gorant, Athletics Stacey Jackson, Campus Life Dr. Harry Knopke, President Thad Salter, Physical Plant Bill Shefferly, Finance/Operations Greg Vedders, ITS

Pam Luebke, Library Dr. Burt Ozarow, Psychology Dept. Ron Pederson, Art Dept. Steve Schousen, Art Dept. Len Smith, College Computing

Twenty-Five Years…

Aquinas College took time on May 12 to recognize employees, faculty and staff who have reached milestones in their service to the school. Twenty-seven employees with a cumulative 515 years of service were honored at the Employee Service Awards Celebration at Donnelly Conference Center for their contributions of time and talent to the College. Honorees are listed below.

Employee Service to Aquinas Recognized Campus News – Fall 2003 Fall 2003 – Campus News

Admissions – Fall 2003

Spectrum Scholarship Competition Gathers Top Scholars for Fall 2003 Women of Aquinas Recognized By Gail Gromaski, Senior

Sr. Celeste Miller

Pat Anderson

National Women’s History Month is a time to acknowledge women in our nation’s history that have made significant contributions in our society. Therefore, the faculty and staff of the Jane Hibbard Idema Women’s Studies Center decided to create an annual Outstanding Aquinas Woman Award to give recognition for the efforts of women in the Aquinas community. The Center received 30 nominations.The Women’s

Studies faculty and staff created three Awar d categories: Faculty, Staff/Administrators and Students/Alumni. At a reception on March 28,each nominee was presented with a rose and recognized for her contributions. The Award winners were: Sr. Marie Celeste Miller, O.P., associate professor in-theCollege; Pat Anderson, manager of the Wege Center Corner Café; and Amanda Caldwell, international studies and Spanish major.

Amanda Caldwell

Student Support Services Recognizes MI-MAEOPP Scholarship Recipients By Jill Straub ’00, Writing Specialist, Student Support Services

Each spring the Michigan Chapter of the Mid-America Association of Educational Opportunity Program Personnel (MI-MAEOPP) awards qualified students with $500 scholarships. Student Support Services selects a few students each year as potential candidates for this scholarship. Qualified students must be member of the Student Support Services’ program, and they are required to write an essay describing personal obstacles they overcame to achieve either

academic progress or academic success. This year, Student Support Services honored Tiffany Albro and Julia Wojciechowski with $500 scholarships at the Shanty Creek Ski Resort in Bellaire, Michigan, on March 7, 2003, at a formal dinner banquet. Tiffany Albro, a junior, worked in Student Support Services as a program Peer Mentor, creating quarterly newsletters, planning cultural events, and building closer relationships with the students. She also participates in Project Open Heart, a disabilities awareness group on campus. She further extends her compassion for people in her volunteer work at the Grand Rapids Children’s Museum. Julia Wojciechowski, a sophomore, has been involved in many cultural events, including a trip to

Student Support Services Award winners Julia Wojciechowski (left) and Tiffany Albro.

Chicago. She also participated in Jammin’ Fashion Show, Project Open Heart, Into the Streets, painting a shelter for the homeless, and World Vision’s 30-Hour Famine. Julia works extremely hard, and her grades are well earned. The Student Support Services’ staff is not only inspired by Julia’s dedication, but also by her humorous wit, which allows her to view the lighter side of life.

Eleven years ago, when the Spectrum Scholarship Competition was initiated, the Admissions Office hosted just over 60 students. Since that time the number has more than doubled, making the event one of the largest admissionssponsored events of the year. The scholarship competition was designed by faculty who were looking at ways to reward these academically talented students, while at the same time ascertaining additional attributes which cannot be determined by a high school transcript. On February 15, the top applicants to the freshman class came to compete for the Jerome Byrne full-tuition and room scholarship, the John Veneklasen full-tuition scholarship, three R.Paul Nelson full-tuition scholarships, five $500 St. Catherine scholarships, and five $500 St. Anselm scholarships. Student eligibility is based on a calculation derived from grade point average and and the ACT composite. If the sum equals or is greater than 61 the student automatically receives a $7,500 merit award. Nearly 130 students from more than six states were put through a

variety of assessment tests including a writing sample, a decisionmaking exercise and a critical thinking/problem solving assessment. The competition also involved participation from 30 faculty members who serve as judges during the decision-making exercise. The event is a full day of activity, culminating in a president‘s reception for parents and students. Concurrently parents have a program of events with various panels, campus tours and an introduction to the city of Grand Rapids. One of the unexpected results of the Spectrum Competition is that students who come to campus to compete begin to form friendships with potential future classmates. This has resulted in an over 60 percent enrollment rate of scholarship participants and has also served to raise the cumulative grade point average and test scores of incoming students. Scholarship winners who have confirmed their enrollment are: John Veneklasen Scholarship (full tuition)—Monica Walen, Catholic Central High School (Grand Rapids); R. Paul Nelson Scholar-

ship (full tuition)—Katherine Fannon, Novi High School (Novi, Mich.), Laura Bertram, West Catholic High School (Grand Rapids) and Erika Hoenke, Marquette High School (Marquette, Mich.); St. Catherine Scholarship ($500)—Kathryn Firlik, City High School (Grand Rapids) and Tricia Betts, Holt High School (Holt, Mich.); and, the St. Anselm Scholarship ($500)—Natalie Kent, Lowell High School (Lowell, Mich.). The recipients presented a cumulative 3.9 grade point average and an ACT composite score of 30. In addition they bring an impressive resume of extracurricular involvement, which will surely be continued at the college level. These students join the nearly 50 students who have competed in the past and are now either current Aquinas students or alumni who have joined the work world or are attending graduate school. If your son or daughter meets the qualifications for this competition, please contact the Admissions Office for more information.

Legacy Days By Jeremy Wood ’99, Admissions Representative

Are you a parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle, or friend of a potential Aquinas student? The Admissions Office will be sponsoring the first annual Legacy Day during this year’s Homecoming Weekend (Sept. 26-28). At the time of printing, details are still being hammered out but look for the event to include activities for “Saints-in-Training” of all ages as well as a campus tour designed to highlight some of the newer features of campus. Don’t forget to stop by with your future AQ student! If you’re going to attend Homecoming and would like to participate in Legacy Day, help us plan by calling the Admissions Office at 1-800-678-9593.

22

43


42

Also Special Campus Days • Student-Athletes Saturday, January 24, 2004 • Nursing Students Friday, February 6, 2004 Friday, November 14, 2003 Friday, November 21, 2003 Friday, April 23, 2004

CAMPUS DAYS 2003-04

Admissions

23

Paula Meehan, Tom Mikowski, Angie Schlosser Bacon, Dana Samotis, Brigid Avery, Jeremy Wood, Josh Greenwald and Omar Flores all have many things in common. The most obvious is that they all work in the Admissions Office. But, perhaps not so obvious is that they are all Aquinas graduates! Recruiting students to Aquinas is a natural for all of them because they each spent four great years on this campus and are eager to spread the good word about their alma mater. Each brings to the table different Aquinas experiences, but all share one common feeling and that is their love for Aquinas. Paula Meehan lays claim to being the first female intern hired by the admissions office in 1974. She celebrated 27 years with the college in June. Tom Mikowski hails from Traverse City, Michigan and celebrates 14 years with the College. Angie Schlosser Bacon graduated in 1996 and came to Aquinas to play soccer. Paula, Angie and Tom are also married to AQ alums. (Paula to Ross Meehan ‘80, Angie to Scott

Bacon ‘97 and Tom to Becky Miller Mikowski ‘88). Dana Samotis came to Aquinas to play basketball and graduated in 1999. So great was her experience that she convinced sister Jamie this was the place for her too. Brigid Avery, like Dana, influenced her younger sister Clare to attend Aquinas. Brigid is a 2001 graduate. Jeremy Wood graduated in 1999 and was a long-serving member of the Aquinas student tour guide group before joining the staff as a full-time counselor. Most recent members of the staff are Josh Greenwald ‘01 and Omar Flores ‘02. Both, coincidentally, are engaged to AQ graduates and spent some time as roommates. Josh is engaged to Jessica Buck ‘03 and Omar is engaged to Elizabeth Schmiedicke ‘00. When the staff gets together they like to share stories of their time at AQ, dating back to 1971. Over these 30 years, staff members concur that Aquinas just keeps getting better all the time, and the students they have recruited are carrying on the tradition that makes AQ such a special place.

By Paula Meehan ’75, Dean of Admissions

What Do All of These People Have in Common? (L-R) Dana Samotis, Omar Flores,Angie Schlosser Bacon, Josh Greenwald, Paula Meehan, Brigid Aver y,Tom Mikowski and Jeremy Wood pause during a break at a recent In-Service Planning session.

Dr. Gary Konow retired after a total of 35 years at Aquinas in the Communication and Theatre Departments

Chuck Frydrych, Physics Dept. Dr. Gary Konow, Theatre Dept. Sr. Amata Fabbro, Theology Dept.

Thirty-Five Years… Terry Bocian, Athletic Dept. Dr. Glenn Barkan, Political Science Gary Robertson, Economics Dept.

Thirty Years… Silvija Visockis, College Relations

Fifteen Years…

Cindy Chapman, Science Dept. Sr. M. Aquinas Weber, Chancellor Dave Zenk, Physical Plant Tom Dooley, College Computing Dr. Woody Hoover, School of Management Joyce LaFleur, ITS

Penny Blickle, Physical Plant Tim Moerland, Physical Plant

Ten Years…

Pam Luebke, Library Dr. Burt Ozarow, Psychology Dept. Ron Pederson, Art Dept. Steve Schousen, Art Dept. Len Smith, College Computing

Dr. Anna Bates, History Dept. JoAnne Gorant, Athletics Stacey Jackson, Campus Life Dr. Harry Knopke, President Thad Salter, Physical Plant Bill Shefferly, Finance/Operations Greg Vedders, ITS

Twenty Years…

Five years…

Twenty-Five Years…

Aquinas College took time on May 12 to recognize employees, faculty and staff who have reached milestones in their service to the school. Twenty-seven employees with a cumulative 515 years of service were honored at the Employee Service Awards Celebration at Donnelly Conference Center for their contributions of time and talent to the College. Honorees are listed below.

Employee Service to Aquinas Recognized Campus News – Fall 2003 Fall 2003 – Campus News

Admissions – Fall 2003

Spectrum Scholarship Competition Gathers Top Scholars for Fall 2003 Women of Aquinas Recognized By Gail Gromaski, Senior

Sr. Celeste Miller

Pat Anderson

National Women’s History Month is a time to acknowledge women in our nation’s history that have made significant contributions in our society. Therefore, the faculty and staff of the Jane Hibbard Idema Women’s Studies Center decided to create an annual Outstanding Aquinas Woman Award to give recognition for the efforts of women in the Aquinas community. The Center received 30 nominations.The Women’s

Studies faculty and staff created three Awar d categories: Faculty, Staff/Administrators and Students/Alumni. At a reception on March 28,each nominee was presented with a rose and recognized for her contributions. The Award winners were: Sr. Marie Celeste Miller, O.P., associate professor in-theCollege; Pat Anderson, manager of the Wege Center Corner Café; and Amanda Caldwell, international studies and Spanish major.

Amanda Caldwell

Student Support Services Recognizes MI-MAEOPP Scholarship Recipients By Jill Straub ’00, Writing Specialist, Student Support Services

Each spring the Michigan Chapter of the Mid-America Association of Educational Opportunity Program Personnel (MI-MAEOPP) awards qualified students with $500 scholarships. Student Support Services selects a few students each year as potential candidates for this scholarship. Qualified students must be member of the Student Support Services’ program, and they are required to write an essay describing personal obstacles they overcame to achieve either

academic progress or academic success. This year, Student Support Services honored Tiffany Albro and Julia Wojciechowski with $500 scholarships at the Shanty Creek Ski Resort in Bellaire, Michigan, on March 7, 2003, at a formal dinner banquet. Tiffany Albro, a junior, worked in Student Support Services as a program Peer Mentor, creating quarterly newsletters, planning cultural events, and building closer relationships with the students. She also participates in Project Open Heart, a disabilities awareness group on campus. She further extends her compassion for people in her volunteer work at the Grand Rapids Children’s Museum. Julia Wojciechowski, a sophomore, has been involved in many cultural events, including a trip to

22

Student Support Services Award winners Julia Wojciechowski (left) and Tiffany Albro.

Chicago. She also participated in Jammin’ Fashion Show, Project Open Heart, Into the Streets, painting a shelter for the homeless, and World Vision’s 30-Hour Famine. Julia works extremely hard, and her grades are well earned. The Student Support Services’ staff is not only inspired by Julia’s dedication, but also by her humorous wit, which allows her to view the lighter side of life.

Eleven years ago, when the Spectrum Scholarship Competition was initiated, the Admissions Office hosted just over 60 students. Since that time the number has more than doubled, making the event one of the largest admissionssponsored events of the year. The scholarship competition was designed by faculty who were looking at ways to reward these academically talented students, while at the same time ascertaining additional attributes which cannot be determined by a high school transcript. On February 15, the top applicants to the freshman class came to compete for the Jerome Byrne full-tuition and room scholarship, the John Veneklasen full-tuition scholarship, three R.Paul Nelson full-tuition scholarships, five $500 St. Catherine scholarships, and five $500 St. Anselm scholarships. Student eligibility is based on a calculation derived from grade point average and and the ACT composite. If the sum equals or is greater than 61 the student automatically receives a $7,500 merit award. Nearly 130 students from more than six states were put through a

variety of assessment tests including a writing sample, a decisionmaking exercise and a critical thinking/problem solving assessment. The competition also involved participation from 30 faculty members who serve as judges during the decision-making exercise. The event is a full day of activity, culminating in a president‘s reception for parents and students. Concurrently parents have a program of events with various panels, campus tours and an introduction to the city of Grand Rapids. One of the unexpected results of the Spectrum Competition is that students who come to campus to compete begin to form friendships with potential future classmates. This has resulted in an over 60 percent enrollment rate of scholarship participants and has also served to raise the cumulative grade point average and test scores of incoming students. Scholarship winners who have confirmed their enrollment are: John Veneklasen Scholarship (full tuition)—Monica Walen, Catholic Central High School (Grand Rapids); R. Paul Nelson Scholar-

ship (full tuition)—Katherine Fannon, Novi High School (Novi, Mich.), Laura Bertram, West Catholic High School (Grand Rapids) and Erika Hoenke, Marquette High School (Marquette, Mich.); St. Catherine Scholarship ($500)—Kathryn Firlik, City High School (Grand Rapids) and Tricia Betts, Holt High School (Holt, Mich.); and, the St. Anselm Scholarship ($500)—Natalie Kent, Lowell High School (Lowell, Mich.). The recipients presented a cumulative 3.9 grade point average and an ACT composite score of 30. In addition they bring an impressive resume of extracurricular involvement, which will surely be continued at the college level. These students join the nearly 50 students who have competed in the past and are now either current Aquinas students or alumni who have joined the work world or are attending graduate school. If your son or daughter meets the qualifications for this competition, please contact the Admissions Office for more information.

Legacy Days By Jeremy Wood ’99, Admissions Representative

Are you a parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle, or friend of a potential Aquinas student? The Admissions Office will be sponsoring the first annual Legacy Day during this year’s Homecoming Weekend (Sept. 26-28). At the time of printing, details are still being hammered out but look for the event to include activities for “Saints-in-Training” of all ages as well as a campus tour designed to highlight some of the newer features of campus. Don’t forget to stop by with your future AQ student! If you’re going to attend Homecoming and would like to participate in Legacy Day, help us plan by calling the Admissions Office at 1-800-678-9593.

43


Bob Niedzielski, Ph.D., ’58 Alumni Board President

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Alumni News

Dear Fellow Alums, The Aquinas College Alumni Association is on the move! Ample evidence of that can be found in this section of the magazine. One year ago, 15 new members were welcomed to the Alumni Association Board of Directors. They made up a good crosssection of Aquinas alums, with degrees ranging from the associate level to the master of management, and they have been engaged in a wide variety of professions. Every decade from the 1950s on was represented on the total Board membership of 22, from a 1950 graduate, to one from the class of 2001. In addition to the Grand Rapids area, Board members reside in the Detroit area and in Frederic, Michigan, as well as in Toledo, Ohio, and Mesa, Arizona. This Board has been very active, particularly at the committee level. Much progress has been made during this year of reorganization and new bylaws. In the works is a benefits package for Aquinas alums. We also hope to broaden the scope of alumni events. Alumni are involved with Development, Admissions, and the Career and Counseling Services Offices. The Alumni Walk has been reinstituted. The Golden Saints alumni group, for those who graduated fifty or more years ago, is now a reality. Additionally, a seat has been purchased in the new Performing Arts Center through the donations of Alumni Board members. There is still work to be done, however. The endowment for the Sister Anne Keating Alumni Scholarship, sponsored by the Alumni Association, needs to be strengthened.

From the Alumni Board of Directors’ President

Last April, alumni from across the state of Michigan gathered to look back on their times at Aquinas and catch a glimpse of their alma mater’s future. John F. ‘58 and Beth (Geller) Burns ‘58 hosted a reception for Detroit-area alumni and friends on April 8 at the Skyline Club in Southfield, Michigan. Northern Michigan alumni and friends enjoyed connecting with the College and each other at their reception hosted by Edward Carlson ’69 held April 24 at the Waterfront Inn located in Traverse City. Both evenings were filled with memories and excitement for the future initiatives of Aquinas College. Plans are already underway for upcoming events. Mark your calendars for the October 29 Detroit-area reception hosted by Michael P. Smith ‘80. More information will follow. If you would like to host an alumni reception in your area, please contact the Alumni & Parent Relations Office at 616-459-8281 or access us online at… alumni@aquinas.edu.

Alumni Receptions… Keeping in Touch I strongly encourage you to reserve September 26-28 for Homecoming. If you haven’t been on campus in some time, you’ll be pleasantly surprised at the changes at Aquinas since you graduated. You can keep up with the Alumni Association and with the College, in general, at the Aquinas Web site, www.aquinas.edu. As always, your comments and suggestions are welcomed. - Bob Niedzielski

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Dress rehearsal for cast of 1967 production of “Bells Are Ringing.” 2003 Opening week of the Performing Arts Center was July 29 through August 2. Community Circle Theatre (formerly Circle theatre) has a full, fall line-up of performances scheduled. 2002 Ground broken for the new Aquinas College Performing Arts Center in May, fulfilling a dream made possible by the collaboration of Circle Theatre, Catholic Secondary Schools, and Aquinas College. 2000 The theatre major restored and Gary Konow resumed direction of full-length plays through the 2003 school year. “Oedipus Rex,” “The Elephant Man,” a repeat of “The Contrast” and “A Doll’s House” were offered.

Performing Arts Center on campus and Circle Theatre would manage it. Actors from both organizations would use the facility thr oughout the year. Catholic Secondary Schools later joined the part-nership, gaining use of the space for its students and allowing collaboration between Aquinas, Circle Theatre and area Catholic high schools. Construction of the $7 million facility began on acreage near Albertus Hall in April 2002. Crews finished their work in July of this year, and a weeklong gala ceremony was planned to welcome the center to campus, starting July 29. The theatre curriculum was resurrected in August 2001 and while it doesn’t have many participants yet, it is growing, Konow says. In the interim between the two programs, Aquinas offered acting

courses and communication Professor Penny Avery had headed the Aquinas College Thespians (ACT). Like their predecessors, these actors staged productions in the renovated Carriage House and other locations around campus. The new Performing Arts Center offers a better venue for them and the thousands of actors, stagehands and audience members who will benefit from—maybe even fall in love among—the bright lights and velvet curtains of their new digs. Jim and Linda Chervenka plan to celebrate with the Aquinas community the renewal of the College’s theatre program, a new Performing Arts Center and the arrival of Circle Theatre on campus. “We’ve been looking forward to it,” Jim says. “The ideal is coming together,” Konow says.

1990s Students in the Insignis program provided medieval drama during the St. Thomas Week celebration. Students sometimes wrote an annual Black History Month play. 1980s After the closing of the Carriage House, theatre was discontinued as a major and drama at the college was limited to student productions by the Drama Club, the Theatre Club, and Aquinas College Thespians (ACT). Kretchmer Recital Hall and the Wege Center Ballroom were the new locations. 1976 The first American drama, Royall Tyler’s “The Contrast,” was the last production in the Carriage House. The fire marshall banned the use for plays soon after the performance. 1972 “Yerma” was presented in the Carriage House and directed by Gary Konow. 1971 “The Hostage” was performed in the Carriage House. Sister Rosemar y O’Donnell, O.P., joined the faculty. She later directed “J.B.” in 1972. 1969 Speech and Drama, which had been a minor, became a theatre and communication major.

Aquinas’ Theatre History

CAMPUS CAMPUS EVENTS EVENTS

September 2003 1-28, Mon-Fri Art & Music Center Gallery Exhibit Chris LaPorte ’96, Recent Works

3, Wednesday Reflection Award Dinner

10, Wednesday AQ Contemporary Writers Series Kurtis Lamkin, Poet & Musician 7:30 p.m.• Wege Center Ballroom

23,Tuesday Aquinas College M.A. in Education w/ Initial Certification Info Session Call 616-459-8281

26, Friday Percussion Group Concert Hall of Fame Gala

27-28, Sat-Sun Homecoming Weekend

28, Sunday Homecoming Jazz Brunch

By Damon Bouwkamp ’00, Contributing Writer

In 1997 Dr. Tony Foster ’73 and Linda Nemec Foster ’72 gave a generous grant to establish the Aquinas College Contemporary Writers Series, a series of readings by well-known authors. The desire for an Aquinas writers’ series began while Linda, poet laureate of Grand Rapids, was a student at Aquinas. She thought that she and other students would benefit from having well-known writers visit the campus. Once the Series was underway, the Fosters major goal was to establish an endowment so the Series would be ongoing, free and open to the public. The Fosters have now met their goal and the future of the Series is guaranteed with the endowment in place. Four acclaimed writers visit Aquinas each academic year and

Impressive Tennis

Contemporary Writers Series

AQ Welcomes Alpha Epsilon Delta Three years of preparatory work by Aquinas premedical students culminated in the chartering of the Michigan Zeta chapter of Alpha Epsilon Delta (AED), the National Premedical Honor Society at Aquinas College. On April 11, premedical advisors from universities as far away as Texas and Virginia joined national officers of the

Members of the newly established Alpha Epsilon Delta Honorary Premedical Society with representatives of the national organization at the April Induction Dinner.

(L-R)Tony Foster ’73, Bob Pastan (awardwinning poet), Linda Pastan, Linda Nemec Foster ’72

the Series has developed a large following. In addition to the readings, the visiting writers along with the readings meet with creative writing students in workshops and offer class readings for students in the College’s first and second year core courses. Contemporary Writers schedules can be found at http://www.aquinas.edu/library/ CW/writers.html.

Society, Aquinas faculty and staff, and families and friends of 13 Aquinas students in establishing the 185th chapter of AED. Students were inducted as members and seven faculty as honorary members. The chartering ceremony was highlighted by a speech on the practice of medicine given by Trustee Dr. Luis Tomatis. AED is the oldest and most respected premedical honor society in the country. Each chapter is completely student organized as it carries out the society’s purpose to encourage and to recognize excellence in premedical studies and to promote service that benefits the entire health care community. Sr. Katrina Hartman, chair of the Chemistry Department, and President Knopke serve as the chapter’s faculty advisors.

After losing two seniors that accounted for 300 victories over four years, the 2003 men’s tennis season could have been a year of rebuilding for Head Coach Jerry Hendricks. But with a 5-3 win over Lindsey Wilson College at the NAIA National Championships in Peachtree City, Georgia, this past May, Hendricks continued the strong run of the Saints’ tennis program. Led by sophomores Jason Walsh (Grandville) and Matt Garner (Grand Rapids), the Saints went 20-7 for the season with a Region VIII Championship. Sealing the regional win was a 5-4 victory over 12th-ranked Indiana Wesleyan University to move onto the National Championships. Also leading the Saints to a top-20 ranking for much of the season were juniors Nate Price (Holland), Jason Winegar (Midland) and Roger Lourido (Grand Rapids), and sophomore Jared Flick (Muskegon). Walsh became the fastest Saints player to reach 100 career victories in just his second season, while junior Brian Ahmedani (Kentwood) was named to the NAIA Academic All-American team after earning at least a 3.5 GPA while contributing to the team. Now five dual match victories away from 200 career victories with an overall record of 195-77, Hendricks has led the Saints to three straight appearances at the NAIA National Championships. The victory over Lindsey Wilson is the first in Aquinas tennis history in National Championship play. After advancing to the Round of 16, the season ended against topranked Azusa Pacific University.

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32 Student-Athletes Recognized in 2002-03 All-Americans (12) Laura Beattie – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Michelle Borek – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Sarah Ellis – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Henr y Holmes – Men’s Indoor Track and Field Kerry Lucas – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field John MacLeod – Baseball Jon Mies – Men’s Soccer De-Ale-Jo Roberts – Men’s Indoor Track and Field Chuck Schuba – Men’s Basketball T.J. Shimek – Men’s Indoor Track and Field Andy Steketee – Men’s Basketball Jenny Ziegler – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Academic All-Americans (20) Brian Ahmedani – Men’s Tennis Laura Beattie – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Michelle Borek – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Brett Cagney – Baseball Sanel Fazlic – Men’s Soccer Kara Ferguson – Women’s Tennis Leo Foley – Men’s Cross Country Jeremy Frost – Baseball Tamara Harnden – Volleyball Eric Johnson – Men’s Cross Country, Men’s Outdoor Track and Field Nate Kaiser – Men’s Cross Country Val Kunde – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Kerry Lucas – Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Josh May – Men’s Cross Country John Moceri – Baseball Lars Petzke – Men’s Cross Country, Men’s Outdoor Track and Field Nathan Rose – Men’s Soccer Julie Roy – Women’s Soccer T.J. Shimek – Men’s Outdoor Track and Field Jeff White – Men’s Soccer

41

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Nov 7, 8 @ St. Francis Tourney (Indiana) Nov 13 Davenport Nov 15 Rochester Nov 21, 22 Aquinas Classic Nov 25 @ Huntington Nov 29 Kalamazoo College Dec 2 @ Taylor Dec 6 @ Trinity Christian Dec 9 Calvin Dec 13 Goshen Dec 19 Trinity International Jan 2, 3 @ Palm Beach Atlantic Jan 7 @ Michigan - Dearborn Jan 10 @ Madonna Jan 14 Indiana Tech Jan 17 Concordia Jan 21 @ Spring Arbor Jan 24 Cornerstone Jan 28 @ Siena Heights Jan 31 Michigan - Dearborn Feb 4 Madonna Feb 7 @ Indiana Tech Feb 11 @ Concordia Feb 14 Spring Arbor Feb 18 @ Cornerstone Feb 21 Siena Heights Feb 26 WHAC Tournament - 1 st Round Feby 28 WHAC Tournament - Semi-finals March 2 WHAC Tournament - Finals March 11-17 NAIA National Tournament

MEN’S BASKETBALL Nov 11 Davenport Nov 15 Grace Bible Nov 18 Rochester Nov 21, 22 @ Marian Tournament (Indiana) Nov 25 @ Calvin Dec 5, 6 @ Hope Tournament Dec 12, 13 Brann’s Aquinas Classic Dec 19-21 St. Xavier Tournament (Illinois) Jan 2, 3 @ Embry Riddle Tournament (Florida) Jan 7 @ Michigan - Dearborn Jan 10 Madonna Jan 14 @ Indiana Tech Jan 17 @ Concordia Jan 21 Spring Arbor Jan 24 Cornerstone Jan 28 @ Siena Heights Jan 31 Michigan - Dearborn Feb 4 @ Madonna Feb 7 Indiana Tech Feb 11 Concordia Feb 14 @ Spring Arbor Feb 18 @ Cornerstone Feb 21 Siena Heights Feb 25 WHAC Tournament - 1st Round Feb 28 WHAC Tournament Semi-finals March 1 WHAC Tournament Finals

MEN’S GOLF Sept 3 Madonna/Fox Creek GC Sept 5,6 Olivet Invitational Sept 16 Cornerstone/Thousand Oaks CC Sept 20 Siena Heights/Lenawee CC Sept 22 Aquinas/L.E. Kaufman Sept 25 Spring Arbor/Cascades GC Oct 1 Spring Arbor Invitational Oct 3 Aquinas/L.E. Kaufman Oct 11 Tri-State A.C. Eddy Invitational/Zollner GC


20

45

performed at the Ladies Literary Club.

help, first from a part time professor, then from more full time instructors who taught a series of popular courses. “We didn’t have a huge number of majors, but many students got inolved,” Konow remembers. “We had musicals and straight stage shows. Students perRehearsing a scene from the 1970 production formed and worked of Jean Anouilh’s “Antigone,” performed at the backstage. It was Carriage House. (L-R foreground) Sam Joseph, Sarah Gallagher,Ted Badgerow, and Bill Noble quite effective.” Konow can name name appeared in the credits for a number of alumni—majors and Woody Allen’s movie, Manhattan. non-majors alike—who went on Many alumni keep in touch to make names for themselves in with their former professor. “I was the performance world. only six, seven, eight years older Fred Sebulske ’65 retired as than they were,” Konow says. “We director of the theatre program at have a lot of contact.” Grand Rapids Community College The theatre major ended at and is the managing director of Aquinas in 1976 when the fire Actor’s Theatre. marshal said the Carriage House Andy Way ’79 became techwas not safe for student nical director at a community organizations to use. Yet Konow theatre in Florida. offers other reasons for the Cynthia Donnelly ’70 designs program’s collapse. “There was a costumes on the east coast—her downward trend in the study of theatre in general. People were interested in business, and college theatre programs were hurting,” Konow says. “The only way we could resurrect the major was if the College entered into some sort of collaboration with another program.” Enter Circle Theatre. When Harry Knopke became president of Aquinas College in 1997, he consulted with Joe Dulin, director of Circle Theatre. The company was looking to move out of its cramped quarters at John Ball Park. A partnership was born in 1952 “Down in the Valley” production. It was which Aquinas would build a

R E C E P T I O N S

Be sure to check the AQ Web site for details on these events and others at www.aquinas.edu.

(L-R) Bob Wick ’85, Maureen Carlson and Ed Carlson ’69

For additional information on any listed event, please call the Alumni & Parent Relations Office at 616-459-8281or e-mail to alumni@aquinas.edu. (Seated l-r) Amy Lalewicz ’59, and Mar tha Weaver ’02 Chicago Bus Trip

(Standing l-r) Nathan Plum ’02 and Brian Milliron ’02

Alumni & Friends

Saturday November 22 Detroit Golf Club Detroit-Area Alumni Reception

Traverse City

Wednesday October 29 Arizona Alumni Reception

Date TBA, October Golden Saints Alumni Reunion— all alumni of Classes 1930-53

Sheila Knopke (center) poses with Tannisha Whitehead ’99 (left) and Hattie D. IrvinPookrum ’99 (right).

Class of ’78, ’88 and ’98 Reunions Theatre Program Reunion Willowbrook Reunion Aquinas College Alumni Association Awards

(L-R) James Pelon ’58, Beth (Geller ’58) Burns, Mollie (Brenner ’53) Pelon, and John Burns ’58 share a light moment.

Induction of honorees into Aquinas College’s Hall of Fame and Athletic Hall of Fame

Homecoming & Gala Weekend

Friday-Sunday September 26-28

2003

Alumni Calendar

Detroit Fall 2003 – Alumni News

Campus News – Fall 2003

37th Annual Aquinas College Alumni Association Golf Outing

Top honors of the day with a 12-underpar 60 went to the foursome led by (L to R) Pete Smith, featuring his two sons, Justin Smith ’98 and Ryan Smith ’00, and accompanied by “ringer” Matt Eldred. (The mixed foursome award went to the team of Rick Chapla ’75, Tom Breihof ’75, Tracy Breihof and Dave Breihof.)

What better way to welcome the first day of summer than at the Aquinas College Alumni Association’s 37th Golf Outing. The event at Grand Rapids’ Boulder Creek Golf Club attracted a crowd of golfers—all alumni and friends of the College. Following registration, the group took to the course for the 8 a.m. shotgun start. The picturesque day on the links was made possible with the support of several sponsors: Mika, Myers, Beckett & Jones; Varnum, Riddering, Schmidt & Howlett; Jim ’75 and Linda Payne; and Plante & Moran.

Golfers did their best to win a Chevrolet Impala from Kool Chevrolet on Hole No. 13; Bob Mason ’90 missed by only a few inches. Golfers also missed their chance to relax in their own spa, which was put up by Emerald Spa on Hole No. 3. All participants left with something in hand thanks to the many prize sponsors and friends of Aquinas. If you’d like to join us next year, look for information on the 38th Annual Aquinas College Alumni Association Golf Outing in the Spring 2004 Aquinas magazine.

With all of the threats bombarding the network daily, only one actually penetrated the network—the Klez virus—last November. System administrators acted quickly and shut down all access to stop the exponential effects and limit the infection to only 12 PCs on the network. The computer network, and the campus, was brought to its knees, causing a widespread disruption of communications and tasking assignments that lasted for five days.

Japanese Seek Economic Future in Grand Rapids By Woody Hoover, Ph.D. Professor, Business Administration

Scrambles invoke a rarity on the links… team members actually hope their teammates’ putts go in.

(L-R) Fred Hesse ’63, joined by Tom Timlin and Larry Spetoskey, enjoys his 24th consecutive alumni golf outing.

1968 “An Evening with Ionesco” and “An Evening Albee” were performed in the Carriage House. 1967 “Under Milk Wood” was performed in the Carriage House and directed by Sister Mary de Chantal. Gary Konow, chair of the theatre department, joined the faculty. 1966 The Carriage House Theatre makes its debut with Moliere’s “Tartuffe.” 1963 “Arms and the Man” by George Bernard Shaw was performed at the Civic Theatre and directed by Sr. Mary de Chantal and Jack Rang. 1957 Sister Mary de Chantal Luke, O.P., joined the faculty in 1957. Her first production was Moliere’s “The Miser” followed by “Medea,” “The Importance of Being Earnest” and “Cyrano de Bergerac.” 1952 “Down In The Valley” and “Solomon and Balchis” were performed at the Ladies Literary Club in downtown Grand Rapids. 1950 Lacordaires presented “City of Kings” at the St. Cecilia Auditorium. 1949 “Rise and Shine” was performed at the St. Cecelia Auditorium and directed by Tony Brink. 1945 Aquinas moved to the Robinson Road campus and the Lacordaires, a student dramatic club, presented short plays in the upper floor of the one-time stable, now Bukowski chapel. 1940s Name changed to Aquinas College and students continued to present original plays and skits. 1930s Catholic Junior College produced skits and workshop plays. Variety shows such as “Campus Silluettes” were performed at St. Cecelia Auditorium.

Aquinas’ Theatre History Japan has been struggling to restart its stalled economy for more than a decade. In April, Aquinas College hosted representatives of the Japanese Corporate Consortium for Creating New Consumer Industries in a forum designed to share ideas from business scholars from west Michigan colleges and universities and successful American entrepreneurs. During the day-long conference held at Marywood on April 25, representatives of the Japanese Consortium reviewed the state of their economy in standard economic terms to include discussions of monetary and fiscal policies together with economic reform packages. They also shared a paper prepared by Tsuguo Sakiyama, who serves as an advisor to the Japanese Prime Minister. In his report, presented by one of his

Voted “Best Mulligan Salesperson, ” Michelle Bottrall ’97 pitches her most difficult sell of the day to her husband, David, a College Trustee.

L to R: Bing Goel, Rick Huisman and Trustee Pat Miles, Jr. ’88 celebrated along with teammate Pat Miles, Sr. ’95 as he clinched the Closestto-the-Pin contest sponsored by Tom and Joyce Wisner.

48

Information Technology and Services (ITS) contained the problem by shutting down the entire system. The staff worked feverishly in the following hours and days to isolate the virus and begin correcting the problem. Every campus computer was checked. Fortunately, the damage was minimal. Still, the virus had a profound impact on campus operations, impacting fundraising, financial records, admissions applications, internal communications and lost work time.

As the ITS staff scanned the network, it uncovered numerous violations of the College’s AUP relating to software installation and use. Included was the unauthorized installation of a Klez-infected program by an unsuspecting employee, which circumvented the established anti-virus protocol. While ITS discovered its vulnerability the hard way, it became clear early on in this incident that its staff is prepared and experienced enough to successfully respond to threats.

representatives, Sakiyama challenged the group to think beyond standard terms to include the consideration of paradigm changes and “recalibrations” of how an economy is viewed and measured. Emphasis was placed on the Japanese state of mind and the reasons Representatives from a Japanese Consortium meet with West Michigan businesspeople and those with money will not business scholars in a day-long forum hosted by spend. This was followed by Aquinas College.Aquinas Economics Professor a description of specific Masato Yamazaki, Ph.D., (rear left), a native of Japan who organized the forum, addresses consumer initiatives underparticipants. taken by the firm Asahi Elles. The question and answer session revolved around the balance of that followed the presentation gave public sector and private sector the American academicians and activities, with some consensus business people an opportunity to developing around the idea that put the Japanese economy in Japanese “guided capitalism” may context so that it could be better have created a regulatory understood and evaluated. This environment too discouraging to was followed by American entrepreneurs. Discussion of the recommendations for the Japanese vision for future market economies economy, which varied from short included the environmental term pragmatic ideas about credit problem with numerous sugmanagement to ideas concerning gestions made concerning how a new vision for all future market environmental costs might be economies. Some discussion recognized.

17


Think back to your junior and senior years at Aquinas— competing for internships, struggling with your resume, attending endless job fairs… and just trying to get your foot in the door. Wouldn’t it have been great to be able to know a little more before jumping right in? Well, the Alumni Office and the Career and Counseling Services Office are teaming up to start an Alumni Mentor Network, available to students in September and we need you! This is a Web-based program called eRecruiting that you will find on the Aquinas homepage (www.aquinas.edu/) under Career and Counseling Services. Registered users—Aquinas students and Alumni—will be able to locate and network with people and businesses in their field of work and in different regional areas if they are planning to relocate. As a mentor, you are able to control the amount of time you want to make available, and what types of things you would like to help them with. A student will perform a search with specific details and all matching profiles will appear with your preferred method of contact information. If you would only like to be contacted once a month, your name will not appear after a student picks you until the next month. No other contact information is given to the student beyond what you choose to disclose. It is the student’s responsibility to contact you. If this sounds like something you would like to be involved in, please give us a call at 616-459-8281.

Mentor Network

46

A room rate discount of 20 percent applies to Aquinas College students, alumni and their immediate families.

Campus Facility Reservations The Alumni Web Site offers the latest information regarding Aquinas Alumni Association activities and events as well as campus news. Alumni can also easily update their contact information and keep connected to their alma mater. (www.aquinas.edu/alumni)

Aquinas Alumni Web Site Published bi-annually, the Aquinas magazine keeps alumni current with campus news. Each issue also includes in-depth features and profiles of our alumni and friends.

Aquinas Magazine

Alumni Benefits & Services Alumni Office 616-459-8281 • alumni@aquinas.edu

Aquinas’ theatre program has bred actors, directors, costume designers, clowns—even a few romances. Jim Chervenka ‘70 and Linda McLeod-Chervenka ’72 didn’t meet on the floorboards of the Carriage House stage, but they did marry there “because that’s where our love was,” Linda says. They had gone to high school in Dayton, Ohio and gotten involved in theatre at Aquinas. John was the leading man, stoic and silly in a number of roles. Linda was a supporting player. Yet, the college program that started their careers

19

ended a few years after they graduated. Now, 30 years later, John is technical director for Grand Rapids Civic Theatre, while Linda directs high school plays and children’s productions. The rebirth of theatre as an academic program at Aquinas has been decades in the making, says Gary Konow, Ph.D., ’82 who was chair of the theatre program then and who retired at the end of the recently completed fiscal year. “What is a liberal arts college without theatre? Especially a Catholic college?” Konow asks. “Theatre confronts issues that

cover the entire spectrum of a liberal arts education. That’s why a theatre program is critical.” Sister Mary de Chantal, O.P., recognized that 40 years ago when, as a speech/drama professor, she had a vision for more student involvement in the performing arts. de Chantal asked Konow to head a theatre major for the college. Konow put together a curriculum and students performed in the Carriage House, which at that time had a thrust stage. de Chantal left the college a year or so later, but Konow had plenty of

By Tonya Schafer ’02, Contributing Writer

Theatre Program Fosters Talent and Romance Albert Doherty (l) and Neola Wolfe in scene from 1952 production of “Solomon and Balchis” performed at the Ladies Literary Club in downtown Grand Rapids.

Seating: limited to first 55 guests; payment reserves seat. Cost: $50. Includes muffins, juice, snacks and door prizes.

(All times are Eastern Standard Times.)

7:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m. 11:30 p.m.

Bus departs from Aquinas Arrive in Chicago Depart for Grand Rapids Arrive at Aquinas

Saturday, November 22, 2003 Alumni & Friends Chicago Trip

Jim Chervenka ’70 (l) and Jessica Starr ’72 rehearse a scene from the 1967 production of Dylan Thomas’ “Under Milkwood,” directed by Sr. Mary de Chantal, O.P., at the Carriage House.

Don’t Miss the Bus!

Fall 2003 – Alumni News

Campus News – Fall 2003

Alumni News – Fall 2003

Volunteers Make It Happen While the combined efforts to build a state-of-the-art theatre facility at Aquinas College have come to fruition, the real collaboration of art and education is just beginning. Aquinas College, Circle Theatre and the Catholic Secondary Schools are now moving ahead with productions that will bring amateurs and community professionals together under one roof to provide audiences with a truly unique theatre experience. Our many thanks to all who have made the Aquinas College Performing Arts Center a reality for students and community theatre performers. Our deepest gratitude goes out to the hundreds of volunteers from Circle Theatre, Aquinas College and Catholic Secondary Schools who worked on the campaign raising funds, planning the weeklong Grand Opening (July 29 to August 2) events, and collaborating on a vigorous performance schedule. Steering and Grand Opening Committee members (some pictured at right) include Andy Angelo, Brian Annable, Penny Avery, Reed Bretz, Kimberly Bruyn, Lawrence Burns, Rick Cassard, Deb Cleland-Nowakowski, Steven de Polo, Joseph Dulin, Marty Fahey, Duane Feldpausch, Kathryn Fore, Cynthia Goldman, Ellen Harburn, Gary Hensch, Kyle Irwin, Marjorie Kindel, Gary Konow, Harry Knopke, Barb Koning, the Rev. James Kowalski, Connie Kowalsyk, Eric Messing, Lyle Morrison, Dauvan Mulally, Lisa Nawrocki, Deb O’Donnell, Catherine

Alum/Former GR Black Sox Player Honored in Exhibit By Tonya Schafer ’02, Contributing Writer

Aquinas College Performing Arts Center Grand Opening Planning Committee

Aquinas College Performing Arts Center Steering Committee

Pearce, Sally Reeves, Julie Ridenour, Phillip Rios, Bob Rose, James Schipper, Bill Shefferly, Sharon Smith, Tom Sullivan, Tom Summers, David Weinandy, and Jim Wisnewski.

Aquinas College Performing Arts Center Performance Schedule 2003-04 Date

2003

2004

Event/performance

Group

“The Comedy of Errors” “The Comedy of Errors” Black History Month “Pippen” “Guys and Dolls” “Guys and Dolls” Children’s Play “Grease” “Grease” Main Stage Main Stage Main Stage Main Stage Main Stage

Jan. 29–31 Jan. 31 Feb. 12–14 Feb. 26–28 March 18–20 March 20 April 1–3 April 21–23 April 23 May 5–30 June 9–27 July 7–Aug. 1 Aug. 11–22 Sept. 1–26

“BeeHIVE” “Proof ” “Our Town” “Dracula” “Dracula” “Thurber3” “Thurber3” “Flowers for Algernon” Holiday Show

August 6–31 Sept. 10–28 Oct. 9–11 Oct. 23–25 Oct. 25 Nov. 6–8 Nov. 8 Nov. 20–22 Dec. 4–20

Circle Theatre Circle Theatre Aquinas College Players West Catholic High School (7:30 p.m.) West Catholic (2:30 p.m.) Catholic Central High School (7:30 p.m.) Catholic Central (2:30 p.m.) Aquinas College Thespians (A.C.T.) (7:00 p.m.) Circle Theatre / Aquinas College West Catholic / Catholic Central (7:30 p.m.) West Catholic / Catholic Central (2:30 p.m.) Aquinas College Aquinas College West Catholic (7:30p.m.) West Catholic (2:30 p.m.) Circle Theatre / Aquinas College Catholic Central (7:30 p.m.) Catholic Central (2:30 p.m.) Circle Theatre Circle Theatre Ticket Information Circle Theatre Circle Theatre (616) 456-6656 Circle Theatre

It’s ironic, but Henry Saverson ’57 didn’t play baseball at Aquinas —his student job at the Peninsular Club in downtown Grand Rapids kept him too busy for batting practices and double headers on the College ball field. The former Grand Rapids Black Sox player took away something even more important from his undergraduate years—a sociology major and a career helping disadvantaged kids enjoy the same benefits he had throughout his introduction to adulthood. “My childhood experiences showed me a lot of things could be done to help children in the community,” said Saverson, who still lives in Grand Rapids. “I grew up in a poor environment, and that made me able to concentrate on studying and getting a decent job. I wanted to motivate young folks to go on and get further education.” For Saverson, the place to do that was Aquinas. “Some of the staff—especially Sister Gonzaga— went out of their way to make us feel comfortable. Not many African Americans were at the school at that time, and someone always helped us whenever we needed assistance,” Saverson said. “The quality of education was important, too,” he added. “The professors were helpful and the classes were not large. Aquinas was small enough that you could know people intimately.” Saverson kept busy in the summer months playing baseball

Henry Saverson ’57 (left) is pictured with Reuben Smartt during the unveiling last January of a special exhibit at the VanAndel Museum Center honoring the Grand Rapids Black Sox. PHOTO BY © THE GRAND RAPIDS.

and breaking barriers with the Grand Rapids Black Sox, a semiprofessional league for African Americans that the Van Andel Museum Center recently honored with a special exhibit. The second baseman—who had honed his skills in junior baseball leagues as a child and later with teams at City High School and Grand Rapids Community College—spent three years with the Detroit Stars and the Kansas City Monarchs as part of the Negro American League. (Both teams belonged to Black Sox owner Ted Rasberry.) Saverson left his baseball days behind when he joined the service, and later earned a master’s degree in social work from Michigan State University. He got a job with the juvenile courts and then with the State of Michigan’s Child Welfare Licensing Division. After five years he became a supervisor and then a

18

regional manager. Saverson retired from state service in 1992. Since then, he has done volunteer work with the Grand Rapids Community Foundation, continuing his commitment to kids by helping conduct statewide studies of adoption policies and creating policies that ensure children get permanent placements in loving, dedicated homes. Saverson has been accompanied in his journey by his wife, Naomi, daughter, Suzann, and their son, Henry Jr., who is now deceased. Despite his array of accomplishments both professional and athletic, Saverson’s Aquinas days are never far from mind. Recently he met with old chums to reminisce about the days he spent in Grand Rapids as a Saint. “I had been told Aquinas was a good school. I always felt comfortable and accepted there,” he said.

47


46

Think back to your junior and senior years at Aquinas— competing for internships, struggling with your resume, attending endless job fairs… and just trying to get your foot in the door. Wouldn’t it have been great to be able to know a little more before jumping right in? Well, the Alumni Office and the Career and Counseling Services Office are teaming up to start an Alumni Mentor Network, available to students in September and we need you! This is a Web-based program called eRecruiting that you will find on the Aquinas homepage (www.aquinas.edu/) under Career and Counseling Services. Registered users—Aquinas students and Alumni—will be able to locate and network with people and businesses in their field of work and in different regional areas if they are planning to relocate. As a mentor, you are able to control the amount of time you want to make available, and what types of things you would like to help them with. A student will perform a search with specific details and all matching profiles will appear with your preferred method of contact information. If you would only like to be contacted once a month, your name will not appear after a student picks you until the next month. No other contact information is given to the student beyond what you choose to disclose. It is the student’s responsibility to contact you. If this sounds like something you would like to be involved in, please give us a call at 616-459-8281.

Mentor Network

19

A room rate discount of 20 percent applies to Aquinas College students, alumni and their immediate families.

Campus Facility Reservations The Alumni Web Site offers the latest information regarding Aquinas Alumni Association activities and events as well as campus news. Alumni can also easily update their contact information and keep connected to their alma mater. (www.aquinas.edu/alumni)

Aquinas Alumni Web Site Published bi-annually, the Aquinas magazine keeps alumni current with campus news. Each issue also includes in-depth features and profiles of our alumni and friends.

Aquinas Magazine

Aquinas’ theatre program has bred actors, directors, costume designers, clowns—even a few romances. Jim Chervenka ‘70 and Linda McLeod-Chervenka ’72 didn’t meet on the floorboards of the Carriage House stage, but they did marry there “because that’s where our love was,” Linda says. They had gone to high school in Dayton, Ohio and gotten involved in theatre at Aquinas. John was the leading man, stoic and silly in a number of roles. Linda was a supporting player. Yet, the college program that started their careers

ended a few years after they graduated. Now, 30 years later, John is technical director for Grand Rapids Civic Theatre, while Linda directs high school plays and children’s productions. The rebirth of theatre as an academic program at Aquinas has been decades in the making, says Gary Konow, Ph.D., ’82 who was chair of the theatre program then and who retired at the end of the recently completed fiscal year. “What is a liberal arts college without theatre? Especially a Catholic college?” Konow asks. “Theatre confronts issues that

cover the entire spectrum of a liberal arts education. That’s why a theatre program is critical.” Sister Mary de Chantal, O.P., recognized that 40 years ago when, as a speech/drama professor, she had a vision for more student involvement in the performing arts. de Chantal asked Konow to head a theatre major for the college. Konow put together a curriculum and students performed in the Carriage House, which at that time had a thrust stage. de Chantal left the college a year or so later, but Konow had plenty of

By Tonya Schafer ’02, Contributing Writer

Alumni Benefits & Services

Theatre Program Fosters Talent and Romance

Alumni Office 616-459-8281 • alumni@aquinas.edu

Albert Doherty (l) and Neola Wolfe in scene from 1952 production of “Solomon and Balchis” performed at the Ladies Literary Club in downtown Grand Rapids.

Seating: limited to first 55 guests; payment reserves seat. Cost: $50. Includes muffins, juice, snacks and door prizes.

(All times are Eastern Standard Times.)

7:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m. 11:30 p.m.

Bus departs from Aquinas Arrive in Chicago Depart for Grand Rapids Arrive at Aquinas

Saturday, November 22, 2003 Alumni & Friends Chicago Trip

Jim Chervenka ’70 (l) and Jessica Starr ’72 rehearse a scene from the 1967 production of Dylan Thomas’ “Under Milkwood,” directed by Sr. Mary de Chantal, O.P., at the Carriage House.

Don’t Miss the Bus!

Fall 2003 – Alumni News

Campus News – Fall 2003

Alumni News – Fall 2003

Volunteers Make It Happen While the combined efforts to build a state-of-the-art theatre facility at Aquinas College have come to fruition, the real collaboration of art and education is just beginning. Aquinas College, Circle Theatre and the Catholic Secondary Schools are now moving ahead with productions that will bring amateurs and community professionals together under one roof to provide audiences with a truly unique theatre experience. Our many thanks to all who have made the Aquinas College Performing Arts Center a reality for students and community theatre performers. Our deepest gratitude goes out to the hundreds of volunteers from Circle Theatre, Aquinas College and Catholic Secondary Schools who worked on the campaign raising funds, planning the weeklong Grand Opening (July 29 to August 2) events, and collaborating on a vigorous performance schedule. Steering and Grand Opening Committee members (some pictured at right) include Andy Angelo, Brian Annable, Penny Avery, Reed Bretz, Kimberly Bruyn, Lawrence Burns, Rick Cassard, Deb Cleland-Nowakowski, Steven de Polo, Joseph Dulin, Marty Fahey, Duane Feldpausch, Kathryn Fore, Cynthia Goldman, Ellen Harburn, Gary Hensch, Kyle Irwin, Marjorie Kindel, Gary Konow, Harry Knopke, Barb Koning, the Rev. James Kowalski, Connie Kowalsyk, Eric Messing, Lyle Morrison, Dauvan Mulally, Lisa Nawrocki, Deb O’Donnell, Catherine

Alum/Former GR Black Sox Player Honored in Exhibit By Tonya Schafer ’02, Contributing Writer

Aquinas College Performing Arts Center Grand Opening Planning Committee

Aquinas College Performing Arts Center Steering Committee

Pearce, Sally Reeves, Julie Ridenour, Phillip Rios, Bob Rose, James Schipper, Bill Shefferly, Sharon Smith, Tom Sullivan, Tom Summers, David Weinandy, and Jim Wisnewski.

Aquinas College Performing Arts Center Performance Schedule 2003-04 Date

2003

2004

Event/performance

Group

August 6–31 Sept. 10–28 Oct. 9–11 Oct. 23–25 Oct. 25 Nov. 6–8 Nov. 8 Nov. 20–22 Dec. 4–20

“BeeHIVE” “Proof ” “Our Town” “Dracula” “Dracula” “Thurber3” “Thurber3” “Flowers for Algernon” Holiday Show

Circle Theatre Circle Theatre Aquinas College Players West Catholic High School (7:30 p.m.) West Catholic (2:30 p.m.) Catholic Central High School (7:30 p.m.) Catholic Central (2:30 p.m.) Aquinas College Thespians (A.C.T.) (7:00 p.m.) Circle Theatre / Aquinas College

Jan. 29–31 Jan. 31 Feb. 12–14 Feb. 26–28 March 18–20 March 20 April 1–3 April 21–23 April 23 May 5–30 June 9–27 July 7–Aug. 1 Aug. 11–22 Sept. 1–26

“The Comedy of Errors” “The Comedy of Errors” Black History Month “Pippen” “Guys and Dolls” “Guys and Dolls” Children’s Play “Grease” “Grease” Main Stage Main Stage Main Stage Main Stage Main Stage

West Catholic / Catholic Central (7:30 p.m.) West Catholic / Catholic Central (2:30 p.m.) Aquinas College Aquinas College West Catholic (7:30p.m.) West Catholic (2:30 p.m.) Circle Theatre / Aquinas College Catholic Central (7:30 p.m.) Catholic Central (2:30 p.m.) Circle Theatre Circle Theatre Ticket Information Circle Theatre Circle Theatre (616) 456-6656 Circle Theatre

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It’s ironic, but Henry Saverson ’57 didn’t play baseball at Aquinas —his student job at the Peninsular Club in downtown Grand Rapids kept him too busy for batting practices and double headers on the College ball field. The former Grand Rapids Black Sox player took away something even more important from his undergraduate years—a sociology major and a career helping disadvantaged kids enjoy the same benefits he had throughout his introduction to adulthood. “My childhood experiences showed me a lot of things could be done to help children in the community,” said Saverson, who still lives in Grand Rapids. “I grew up in a poor environment, and that made me able to concentrate on studying and getting a decent job. I wanted to motivate young folks to go on and get further education.” For Saverson, the place to do that was Aquinas. “Some of the staff—especially Sister Gonzaga— went out of their way to make us feel comfortable. Not many African Americans were at the school at that time, and someone always helped us whenever we needed assistance,” Saverson said. “The quality of education was important, too,” he added. “The professors were helpful and the classes were not large. Aquinas was small enough that you could know people intimately.” Saverson kept busy in the summer months playing baseball

Henry Saverson ’57 (left) is pictured with Reuben Smartt during the unveiling last January of a special exhibit at the VanAndel Museum Center honoring the Grand Rapids Black Sox. PHOTO BY © THE GRAND RAPIDS.

and breaking barriers with the Grand Rapids Black Sox, a semiprofessional league for African Americans that the Van Andel Museum Center recently honored with a special exhibit. The second baseman—who had honed his skills in junior baseball leagues as a child and later with teams at City High School and Grand Rapids Community College—spent three years with the Detroit Stars and the Kansas City Monarchs as part of the Negro American League. (Both teams belonged to Black Sox owner Ted Rasberry.) Saverson left his baseball days behind when he joined the service, and later earned a master’s degree in social work from Michigan State University. He got a job with the juvenile courts and then with the State of Michigan’s Child Welfare Licensing Division. After five years he became a supervisor and then a

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regional manager. Saverson retired from state service in 1992. Since then, he has done volunteer work with the Grand Rapids Community Foundation, continuing his commitment to kids by helping conduct statewide studies of adoption policies and creating policies that ensure children get permanent placements in loving, dedicated homes. Saverson has been accompanied in his journey by his wife, Naomi, daughter, Suzann, and their son, Henry Jr., who is now deceased. Despite his array of accomplishments both professional and athletic, Saverson’s Aquinas days are never far from mind. Recently he met with old chums to reminisce about the days he spent in Grand Rapids as a Saint. “I had been told Aquinas was a good school. I always felt comfortable and accepted there,” he said.


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1952 “Down in the Valley” production. It was performed at the Ladies Literary Club. 1968 “An Evening with Ionesco” and “An Evening Albee” were performed in the Carriage House. 1967 “Under Milk Wood” was performed in the Carriage House and directed by Sister Mary de Chantal. Gary Konow, chair of the theatre department, joined the faculty. 1966 The Carriage House Theatre makes its debut with Moliere’s “Tartuffe.” 1952 “Down In The Valley” and “Solomon and Balchis” were performed at the Ladies Literary Club in downtown Grand Rapids. 1950 Lacordaires presented “City of Kings” at the St. Cecilia Auditorium. 1949 “Rise and Shine” was performed at the St. Cecelia Auditorium and directed by Tony Brink. 1945 Aquinas moved to the Robinson Road campus and the Lacordaires, a student dramatic club, presented short plays in the upper floor of the one-time stable, now Bukowski chapel. 1940s Name changed to Aquinas College and students continued to present original plays and skits. 1930s Catholic Junior College produced skits and workshop plays. Variety shows such as “Campus Silluettes” were performed at St. Cecelia Auditorium.

help, first from a part time professor, then from more full time instructors who taught a series of popular courses. “We didn’t have a huge number of majors, but many students got inolved,” Konow remembers. “We had musicals and straight stage shows. Students perRehearsing a scene from the 1970 production formed and worked of Jean Anouilh’s “Antigone,” performed at the backstage. It was Carriage House. (L-R foreground) Sam Joseph, Sarah Gallagher,Ted Badgerow, and Bill Noble quite effective.” Konow can name a number of alumni—majors and non-majors alike—who went on to make names for themselves in the performance world. Fred Sebulske ’65 retired as director of the theatre program at Grand Rapids Community College and is the managing director of Actor’s Theatre. Andy Way ’79 became technical director at a community theatre in Florida. Cynthia Donnelly ’70 designs costumes on the east coast—her

Aquinas’ Theatre History

Be sure to check the AQ Web site for details on these events and others at www.aquinas.edu.

(L-R) Bob Wick ’85, Maureen Carlson and Ed Carlson ’69

For additional information on any listed event, please call the Alumni & Parent Relations Office at 616-459-8281or e-mail to alumni@aquinas.edu. (Seated l-r) Amy Lalewicz ’59, and Mar tha Weaver ’02 Chicago Bus Trip

(Standing l-r) Nathan Plum ’02 and Brian Milliron ’02

Alumni & Friends

Saturday November 22 Detroit Golf Club Detroit-Area Alumni Reception

R E C E P T I O N S

Traverse City

Wednesday October 29 Arizona Alumni Reception

Date TBA, October Golden Saints Alumni Reunion— all alumni of Classes 1930-53

Sheila Knopke (center) poses with Tannisha Whitehead ’99 (left) and Hattie D. IrvinPookrum ’99 (right).

Class of ’78, ’88 and ’98 Reunions Theatre Program Reunion Willowbrook Reunion Aquinas College Alumni Association Awards

(L-R) James Pelon ’58, Beth (Geller ’58) Burns, Mollie (Brenner ’53) Pelon, and John Burns ’58 share a light moment.

Induction of honorees into Aquinas College’s Hall of Fame and Athletic Hall of Fame

Homecoming & Gala Weekend

Friday-Sunday September 26-28

2003

Alumni Calendar

Detroit What better way to welcome the first day of summer than at the Aquinas College Alumni Association’s 37th Golf Outing. The event at Grand Rapids’ Boulder Creek Golf Club attracted a crowd of golfers—all alumni and friends of the College. Following registration, the group took to the course for the 8 a.m. shotgun start. The picturesque day on the links was made possible with the support of several sponsors: Mika, Myers, Beckett & Jones; Varnum, Riddering, Schmidt & Howlett; Jim ’75 and Linda Payne; and Plante & Moran.

Scrambles invoke a rarity on the links… team members actually hope their teammates’ putts go in.

(L-R) Fred Hesse ’63, joined by Tom Timlin and Larry Spetoskey, enjoys his 24th consecutive alumni golf outing.

1957 Sister Mary de Chantal Luke, O.P., joined the faculty in 1957. Her first production was Moliere’s “The Miser” followed by “Medea,” “The Importance of Being Earnest” and “Cyrano de Bergerac.”

name appeared in the credits for Woody Allen’s movie, Manhattan. Many alumni keep in touch with their former professor. “I was only six, seven, eight years older than they were,” Konow says. “We have a lot of contact.” The theatre major ended at Aquinas in 1976 when the fire marshal said the Carriage House was not safe for student organizations to use. Yet Konow offers other reasons for the program’s collapse. “There was a downward trend in the study of theatre in general. People were interested in business, and college theatre programs were hurting,” Konow says. “The only way we could resurrect the major was if the College entered into some sort of collaboration with another program.” Enter Circle Theatre. When Harry Knopke became president of Aquinas College in 1997, he consulted with Joe Dulin, director of Circle Theatre. The company was looking to move out of its cramped quarters at John Ball Park. A partnership was born in which Aquinas would build a

Campus News – Fall 2003

37th Annual Aquinas College Alumni Association Golf Outing

Top honors of the day with a 12-underpar 60 went to the foursome led by (L to R) Pete Smith, featuring his two sons, Justin Smith ’98 and Ryan Smith ’00, and accompanied by “ringer” Matt Eldred. (The mixed foursome award went to the team of Rick Chapla ’75, Tom Breihof ’75, Tracy Breihof and Dave Breihof.)

1963 “Arms and the Man” by George Bernard Shaw was performed at the Civic Theatre and directed by Sr. Mary de Chantal and Jack Rang.

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Fall 2003 – Alumni News

Voted “Best Mulligan Salesperson, ” Michelle Bottrall ’97 pitches her most difficult sell of the day to her husband, David, a College Trustee.

L to R: Bing Goel, Rick Huisman and Trustee Pat Miles, Jr. ’88 celebrated along with teammate Pat Miles, Sr. ’95 as he clinched the Closestto-the-Pin contest sponsored by Tom and Joyce Wisner.

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Golfers did their best to win a Chevrolet Impala from Kool Chevrolet on Hole No. 13; Bob Mason ’90 missed by only a few inches. Golfers also missed their chance to relax in their own spa, which was put up by Emerald Spa on Hole No. 3. All participants left with something in hand thanks to the many prize sponsors and friends of Aquinas. If you’d like to join us next year, look for information on the 38th Annual Aquinas College Alumni Association Golf Outing in the Spring 2004 Aquinas magazine.

As the ITS staff scanned the network, it uncovered numerous violations of the College’s AUP relating to software installation and use. Included was the unauthorized installation of a Klez-infected program by an unsuspecting employee, which circumvented the established anti-virus protocol. While ITS discovered its vulnerability the hard way, it became clear early on in this incident that its staff is prepared and experienced enough to successfully respond to threats.

With all of the threats bombarding the network daily, only one actually penetrated the network—the Klez virus—last November. System administrators acted quickly and shut down all access to stop the exponential effects and limit the infection to only 12 PCs on the network. The computer network, and the campus, was brought to its knees, causing a widespread disruption of communications and tasking assignments that lasted for five days.

Information Technology and Services (ITS) contained the problem by shutting down the entire system. The staff worked feverishly in the following hours and days to isolate the virus and begin correcting the problem. Every campus computer was checked. Fortunately, the damage was minimal. Still, the virus had a profound impact on campus operations, impacting fundraising, financial records, admissions applications, internal communications and lost work time.

Japanese Seek Economic Future in Grand Rapids

representatives, Sakiyama challenged the group to think beyond standard terms to include the consideration of paradigm changes and “recalibrations” of how an economy is viewed and measured. Emphasis was placed on the Japanese state of mind and the reasons Representatives from a Japanese Consortium meet with West Michigan businesspeople and those with money will not business scholars in a day-long forum hosted by spend. This was followed by Aquinas College.Aquinas Economics Professor a description of specific Masato Yamazaki, Ph.D., (rear left), a native of Japan who organized the forum, addresses consumer initiatives underparticipants. taken by the firm Asahi Elles. The question and answer session revolved around the balance of that followed the presentation gave public sector and private sector the American academicians and activities, with some consensus business people an opportunity to developing around the idea that put the Japanese economy in Japanese “guided capitalism” may context so that it could be better have created a regulatory understood and evaluated. This environment too discouraging to was followed by American entrepreneurs. Discussion of the recommendations for the Japanese vision for future market economies economy, which varied from short included the environmental term pragmatic ideas about credit problem with numerous sugmanagement to ideas concerning gestions made concerning how a new vision for all future market environmental costs might be economies. Some discussion recognized.

By Woody Hoover, Ph.D. Professor, Business Administration

Japan has been struggling to restart its stalled economy for more than a decade. In April, Aquinas College hosted representatives of the Japanese Corporate Consortium for Creating New Consumer Industries in a forum designed to share ideas from business scholars from west Michigan colleges and universities and successful American entrepreneurs. During the day-long conference held at Marywood on April 25, representatives of the Japanese Consortium reviewed the state of their economy in standard economic terms to include discussions of monetary and fiscal policies together with economic reform packages. They also shared a paper prepared by Tsuguo Sakiyama, who serves as an advisor to the Japanese Prime Minister. In his report, presented by one of his

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When I first came to Aquinas College three-plus years ago, the most frequent remark I heard from our alumni was, “I never hear from Aquinas College.” My, how things have changed in a few years! With the advent of Aquinas magazine, concentrated work on our alumni database, and regular contact with our alums through various efforts, including the electronic media, I’m happy to report I haven’t heard that comment in more than a year. And now the comment most frequently heard is one that brings smiles rather than cringes: “It’s time for Aquinas!” That’s what you are saying, and that’s what all departments of the College are working to make happen. Within the next five years major changes will take place at Aquinas, changes that will enhance the Aquinas experience, and help the College even better prepare our students for their lives. Among the changes will be upgrades to the library, Field House, expanded endowment to support faculty and scholarship, and growth in annual operational support for Aquinas College. Within the Development Department, in collaboration with the academic departments and facilities, and under the direction of President Knopke, we are preparing the groundwork that will provide the direction for these needed expansions. But the most important ingredient in all the preparation is you. If you’re reading this, you’ve heard from Aquinas College, and now Aquinas College wants to hear from By Julie Ridenour Vice President of Development

you. We want to know that your experience at Aquinas altered your life by providing the education and direction that sets you apart in your job. We want to know that you share our vision for an institution that embraces the Dominican way, and that you want to see your alma mater have the resources and facilities that will ensure the College’s position among the nation’s premiere Catholic colleges. How can you help? There are so many ways: • Visit the Aquinas College Web site, and keep apprised of activities at Aquinas; • Know a great high school senior? Encourage him or her to attend Aquinas College, and contact our Admissions Office to let them know about your admissions prospect; • Participate in the Aquinas College Alumni Association; • Join the Aquinas College Career Network. Help other alums achieve their career objectives through your support; • And please, above all, give back to the College when asked. Aquinas College enjoys an exceptionally high level of graduate satisfaction for their educational experience. And more than 90 percent of our students received financial assistance to attend Aquinas. Let that satisfaction translate to giving back to Aquinas— you can make a difference! For information about how to give to Aquinas College, please call the Office of the Vice President for Development (616-459-8281), or visit the development Web site at www.aquinas.edu/development. You’ve heard from us—we want to hear from you. Make it “Time for Aquinas.”

C ommencement, It’s Time…

In a testament to the powers of determination, continuing education (CE) student LaTanga (pronounced “LaTanya”) Joseph, age 45, graduated in May after years of challenges. “LaTanga has persevered in her quest to finish her bachelor’s By Laura Bennett-Kimble ‘95, Contributing Writer

How to Reach Graduation in Just 28 Years

degree with a major in communication while facing daunting obstacles, health concerns and, in general, the passage of 28 years,” said Pat Kozal, Joseph’s college advisor. The road to graduation hasn’t been smooth. For the past four years Joseph drove back and forth from Chicago every weekend to a part-time job. She suffered a mild heart attack in the fall of 2001, and her mother died of cancer after a short illness in August 2002. “Sometimes you have to do whatever it takes to reach your goals,” said Joseph, who graduated from Benton Harbor High School in 1975 and took classes at various schools over the years. She received her Associate in Arts diploma from Grand Rapids Community College in 2000.

“I believe that my family has always been pro-education, especially as African-Americans. It’s always been important to be the best you can be,” said Joseph, who was inducted into Alpha Sigma Lambda, the national honor society for CE students. “LaTanga’s story is one of many,” Kozal said. “But what makes her stand out from the crowd are her personal qualities of courage, cheerfulness, persistence, and personal responsibility.” “I love learning and I could not have chosen a better school,” Joseph said. Then she laughed. “I sound like an advertisement for Aquinas, but it’s true.”

Right: Joseph is hooded by Dean Shirley Lewis, Ed.D., during May’s graduation ceremonies. Pictured left: President Knopke poses with LaTanga Joseph during induction ceremonies of the national honor society for CE students.

it and passing it on to the next generation one of the best possible ways to live.” And he posted a challenge to the graduates embarking on life’s 2003 graduates carry out the traditional turning of the tassel.

journey, saying that they “could do no better than to emulate the people who brought us our democracy.” During the cere- Sr. Aquinas Weber ’58 is recognized for her 25 years of service mony, President Knopke to the College; she retired June 30. also took time to recognize, and Gary Konow, Ph.D., for 35 years thank, two long-standing as a College faculty member. members of the Aquinas com(Full texts of the Wilkins and munity scheduled to retire at the Canepa remarks are available at: end of the year—Sr. Mary www.aquinas.edu/president/ Aquinas Weber, Chancellor, commencement.) after 25 years of service, and

M ay 2003 Technology at Aquinas By Joyce LaFleur, B.S.B.A. ’82, M.M. ’95, Director Information Technology and Services

Technology resources and services at Aquinas College are continually being upgraded and expanded to meet the needs of students, faculty and staff. Educause, the professional information technology association for colleges and universities, publishes a guide for prospective students to evaluate information technology at colleges and universities they are considering. Aquinas stacks up very well in the various aspects of the guide, including Academic Experience, Administrative Experience, Social Experience, Requirements and Services & Costs. Most notable are our course support Web pages, library resources available online, computer and information literacy courses, online access to college catalog and policies, computer labs throughout campus, residential hall network, student news, information and organizational Web portal and refresh plans for keeping systems current. The Hardware Refresh Leasing Plan allows College equipment to

Julie Ridenour Vice President of Development

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Members of the ITS team (from left) Brad Vedders, Greg Vedders, Director Joyce LaFleur and Tom Ferratt huddle to develop options for dealing with a potentially damaging virus.

Development

Fall 2003 – Campus News

Alumni News – Fall 2003

to aid faculty-led classroom instruction as well as student presentations. Videoconferencing facilities located in the Jarecki Center for Advanced Learning can be utilized by individuals, small groups or class activities. A 24-hour online knowledge center and help desk system augment training and help desk services. A College technology council, created in 1997, consisting of faculty, staff and student representatives, meets monthly to identify and prioritize technology needs. The Aquinas network faces a constant threat from virus laced electronic information and intrusion attempts by malicious hackers. Several layers of protective technology and internal policy thwarted over 10,000 potential incidents last year alone. Every incoming e-mail message is scanned for viruses before it is delivered. Updates to the virus protection software, both for e-mail and for data files, are checked several times each day for updated definitions of new threats. Intrusion detection software runs continuously at the server level and reports on each attempt at unauthorized access—a daily occurrence. While technologiThe ITS team discuss the processes of containing the cal methods of provirus and restoring the College computer network to tecting the Aquinas a secure state, which was achieved within five days. network are essential, so too are policies governing use In addition, computer labs are and user awareness of individual available in the residence halls, responsibilities. Good electronic student center, library and community citizenship is not academic center for student use. All intuitive and has been clarified in classrooms are wired for network the College’s Acceptable Use access and deluxe multimedia Policy (AUP). mobile instructor carts are available be replaced every three years. Web-based courses and applications, including academic research, library holdings, and e-mail via the Web, allow for access to many information resources from an off-campus Internet connection. Campus portals ACORN, Alumni, and The Moose connect students, faculty, staff and alumni to campus news, events, resources and each other from on or off campus. Resident students may connect their personally owned PC to the Resident Hall Network (RESNET) for access to these and many other Web-based resources from the convenience of their room. There are also ports in various locations around campus, including a net-work in the Cook Carriage House with wireless laptops for check-out, which allows students, faculty and staff to connect to the RESNET system for research and communication.

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Adler Has the Look for Burt’s Bees New Line Tracy Lint Soltis Adler ’89, is the new face for Burt’s Bees Healthy Treatment skin-care products. And it all happened by chance when Burt’s Bees owner, Roxanne Quimby walked into the North Carolina restaurant Adler owns with her husband, Mitchell. Adler caught Quimby’s eye as a woman aging with grace and confidence— just the look Quimby wanted to

promote her company’s new skincare line. “If you look closely at the boxes,” Adler said in a Grand Rapids Press article (March 4, 2003), “you’ll see they didn’t airbrush the crow’s feet off my face. They wanted me to look achievable. Fresh and natural, but not perfect. Because perfect is not attainable.”

Alum Designs Poster for Festival of Arts Virginia Rose Kane ’84, and her husband Manuel Gentile, both artists, created the winning poster for Festival of the Arts 2003, a celebration of arts held in downtown Grand Rapids annually in June. Their poster is a threedimensional collage of downtown

landmarks with Alexander “Sandy” Calder in the center. Calder is the creator of “La Grande Vitesse” which stands tall next to city hall in the downtown area. The original poster was on display at the Festival and at the Grand Rapids Art Museum.

Southard’s Work Spans Many Genres “Everyone in Heaven writes an autobiography sooner or later,” says Scott D. Southard ‘88, explaining why he chose that theme for his first novel, 3 Days In Rome. In 2001, the Heeken Novel Writing Fellowship for Work in Progress honored his book about a young man who relates his earthly and heavenly travails while perched behind the Pearly Gates. Southard also received awards for The Dante Experience, a 10episode radio series that receives play on National Public Radio. He is currently scouting publishers for

his next novel, Cassandra on the Island. Since graduating from Aquinas, Southard has studied at Michigan State University and the University of Southern California, where he earned a master’s degree in writing. His stage play will premiere off-Broadway this year. One of Southard’s proudest moments was his marriage in December 2002 to Heather Vaughan. “Convincing her to marry me was a great accomplishment on my part!” he says. The Los Angeles resident learned much at Aquinas. “Dr.

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Chesley, Dr. Raikes, Mr. Eberle and Dr. Brooks…all have been major influences. I cannot say enough for how important they have each been in my life,” Southard relates.


Dr. Albert M. Lewis Emeritus College Director

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Emeritus College

I am delighted to share with you the enthusiasm of the Aquinas Emeritus College Board of Governors and staff. Charged with enhancing and further developing a program that has served the Grand Rapids community for 28 years, we have combined our efforts to create new programs and partnerships. We have successfully negotiated contracts for lifelong learning courses with Porter Hills, the Clark Retirement Community and Breton Woods. Our class offerings at the Browne Center have increased. We now offer evening classes in June and early fall. Working with FifthThird Bank we have offered a class titled—“Pre-retirement Planning: It’s more than just the money.” In a course evaluation a participant wrote: “Great program …sparkling personalities… three cheers to 5/3 Bank and Aquinas Emeritus College.” We plan to offer this program again in the fall. Charley Honey, a writer for The Grand Rapids Press, has actively reported on our programs, especially the course on the Prodigal Son, taught by Monsignor Gaspar Ancona. And, John Loeks of Celebration Cinema has made it possible for Dr. Andrew Jefchak to teach a course on modern film at Celebration Cinema in the fall. We expect all of our fall classes to fill quickly and encourage early registrations! The Aquinas Emeritus Board is now challenged to reach out to the

many people who do not know about us, and to people in the 40to-50-year-old range. We hope to achieve this through evening course offerings in the fall—“The Civil War,” “So, You’ve Always Wanted to be an Entrepreneur,” and “Lewis and Clark”—and to advertise more effectively. Toward that end, our new promotional brochure will be distributed to all our constituents very soon. With the Aquinas College Department of Languages, we are considering an intergenerational trip to France in May 2004. We are also reviewing new opportunities for our program in Naples, Florida, and considering a new program in Traverse City. Our Emeritus Evening Award honoring Larry and Nancy Erhardt was a very successful event in all respects; the largest turnout ever enjoyed being present to see Larry and Nancy accept the Aquinas Emeritus Award. The Emeritus Evening Award is always the highlight of our year; our Board could not have chosen individuals who better exemplify the values of Aquinas College and the Dominican traditions. Finally, the Development Committee of our Board of Governors is busy organizing the initial phases of its campaign to raise a $1 million endowment to secure the future of the Aquinas Emeritus College. We look forward to seeing you in our classes! For course and registration information, please call 616-459-8281.

Where can a collector go to locate information on Kenner dolls? On Oct. 1, 2003, collectors and dealers alike will be waiting for the opportunity to get their hands on a hardcover copy of the Collectible Kenner Dolls Identification and Value Guide. Aquinas College Applications Specialist Amy Sprouse, herself an avid doll collector, authored the handy guidebook as a tool for dealers and collectors to identify Kenner dolls along with the original packaging and accessories. The 176-page book contains more than 600 full-color photographs of Kenner dolls, produced from 1971 to 1981, in their original outfits. “I started collecting in 1998 and found dolls I had played with as a girl that were brand new and still in the original packaging,” said Sprouse. “The quality of Kenner figures is higher than other toys of that time and they still hold up 20 years later, which is a testament to the durability of Kenner products.” As a pioneer for Kenner-related collectibles, Sprouse has shared her knowledge with other enthusiasts by writing articles for several doll collector magazines. As she prepared for writing her guidebook, she had the opportunity to contact some of the original designers to learn more about the development of the Kenner doll products. According to the publisher, Collector Books, this guidebook will be the first to focus entirely on Kenner dolls. Chapters of the

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Amy Sprouse poses with just a few of the hundreds of Kenner Dolls she collects and for which she authored a resource book on identification and value for collectors and dealers.

book are devoted to separate doll lines including Darci, Bionic Woman, Hardy Boys, Star Wars, Indiana Jones, Mad Cap Molly, Strawberry Shortcake and many others. Other chapters cover the care of Kenner dolls, online tips and trade show transactions related to dolls. “I found that there was no complete resource on Kenner, so I figured that if no one else will write it, I’m going to do it,” said Sprouse. “I have a rare opportunity to fill an untapped market. “This book appeals to collectors and buyers because of the descriptions and prices, but it caters to everyone.” Collectible Kenner Dolls Identification and Value Guide will be available via www.collectorbooksonline.com, starting this October. Retail price will be $24.95 ($14.95 for dealers.)

Promotional photo of the cover of Sprouse’s book.

Emeritus College–Committed to Lifelong Learning

AQ Staffer Pens Ultimate Guide to Collecting Kenner Dolls

By Dr. Albert M. Lewis, Director

By Curtis R. Burdette, Contributing Writer

Campus News – Fall 2003 Fall 2003 – Campus News

Emeritus College – Fall 2003

Aquinas College Graduates First Class of POHI Majors By Kathy Barker, Assistant Professor of Education, and David Dvorak, Executive Director CLC

The Conductive Learning Center is the sort of program that never fails to give visitors a lumpin-the-throat feeling that good things happen there, much of it through the efforts of Aquinas students. In May 2005, Aquinas College will graduate its first physically and/or otherwise health impaired (POHI) majors. The POHI major is offered within the School of Education and is an endorsement in an additional area of expertise that is earned along with the elementary teacher certification. Aquinas College is one of two colleges/universities in the state of Michigan that offers this teaching endorsement. The curriculum utilized for this teacher preparation is unique. Dr. Andras Peto developed this method in Budapest, Hungary, over fifty years ago and teachers have been trained at the International Peto Institute/Teachers College since that time. Aquinas College is now the sole provider of this training on the American continents. The program’s focus is on working with those with motoricrelated disabilities, such as cerebral palsy and spina bifida. What makes this training unique from others? One distinct difference is the quantity of handson application experience that is required of the college student. POHI majors spend a minimum of 120 hours per semester within the classrooms of the Conductive Learning Center, a non-profit school affiliated with Aquinas

Aquinas College students Clare Avery, Andrea Gainok, Melissa Kelly and Jamieson McCormick visited the International Peto Institute in Budapest, Hungary, in May.

College. Here, students work under the direction of Aquinas College and Peto Teachers College instructors. Experience includes the leading of activities within the day, working as a member of the instructional team, planning curriculum and working with assessments. Classroom instruction includes biomedical and educational content stressing active participation in each portion of the day. The emphasis is on development of the whole person versus focus on only the motor issue of disability. The future for these students is promising, with multiple options for employment. They may work as special education teachers within the public schools, or be employed as conductor-teachers within the international conductive education field, or as general education teachers. It is anticipated that the demand for teachers prepared with these skills will only increase. This is due, in part, to the success the medical field is having in saving premature

babies and the potential related disabilities that may result. Also there is a limited number of conductor-teachers being prepared to maintain the demand of existing service programs in Canada, U.S.A., Europe and Asia. Requests for qualified candidates teaching conductive education are already coming in. Anxious to know when Aquinas will graduate its first class of teachers of conductive education. Aquinas has been recognized for its efforts to bring new thinking and skills to the field of teaching the physically impaired. Educational leadership within the state of Michigan is keeping the program’s progress on its radar screen and is eager to see positive results for students. The Superintendent of Education for the state of Michigan has observed the process in action and supports the innovation this brings. It is one more example of how vision, hard work and patience can bring positive change to the lives of many.

Ronald Urbanski, Emeritus College Board member, offers a toast in honor of Larry and Nancy Erhardt (left) who were presented with the 2003 Emeritus Award. Also on stage are Al Lewis (second from right) and President Knopke (right).

Erhardts Honored by Emeritus College By Laura Bennett-Kimble ‘95, Contributing Writer

On May 21, Nancy and Larry Erhardt received the Emeritus Award. The proclamation which President Harry Knopke read at the annual Aquinas Emeritus Evening stated, in part, that “Larry and Nancy embrace and represent the values of Aquinas College and its mission as an inclusive educational community rooted in the Catholic Dominican tradition.” Formal as that proclamation may sound, the message came through loud and clear: These two people have worked hard to better their world. The event itself bubbled over with warmth and goodwill as some 300 friends, relatives and well-wishers celebrated with the couple. Bernard (Bernie) Malewitz, owner of River City Mechan-ical and longtime friend of Larry’s,

teased his old friend a bit before stating, “I have never in all my life in construction known a more ethical person than Larry Erhardt.” As CEO of Erhardt Construction, Larry has been involved with a number of significant area construction projects, including the Aquinas College Performing Arts Center, the Aquinas College Field House, Van Andel Arena, St. Robert of Newminster Church, Van Andel Research Institute and the new $20 million Devos Place Convention Center. Larry attended Aquinas as a preengineering student for two years before transferring to the University of Detroit, where he earned his degree in engineering. Nancy became involved at Aquinas after she received her bachelor of science degree from Siena Heights College in Adrian.

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She has always been a “gracious, kind, and caring” woman with “a servant’s heart,” said Cynthia VanGelderen, dean of the School of Management, who pointed out Nancy’s involvement with the Circle Theatre project, her membership on the Aquinas College Board of Trustees Development Committee, and her volunteer work with Villa Elizabeth Nursing Home. Ronald Urbanski, Emeritus College Board of Governors member, gave the toast. He described the Erhardts as the “kindest, gentlest, most loving, unselfish, charitable, and trustworthy people you could know. These many years I have never heard a negative word said about them. And these many years, I have never heard them say a negative word about others. What goes around comes around,” he said, raising his glass.

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Dr. Albert M. Lewis Emeritus College Director

Emeritus College

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I am delighted to share with you the enthusiasm of the Aquinas Emeritus College Board of Governors and staff. Charged with enhancing and further developing a program that has served the Grand Rapids community for 28 years, we have combined our efforts to create new programs and partnerships. We have successfully negotiated contracts for lifelong learning courses with Porter Hills, the Clark Retirement Community and Breton Woods. Our class offerings at the Browne Center have increased. We now offer evening classes in June and early fall. Working with FifthThird Bank we have offered a class titled—“Pre-retirement Planning: It’s more than just the money.” In a course evaluation a participant wrote: “Great program …sparkling personalities… three cheers to 5/3 Bank and Aquinas Emeritus College.” We plan to offer this program again in the fall. Charley Honey, a writer for The Grand Rapids Press, has actively reported on our programs, especially the course on the Prodigal Son, taught by Monsignor Gaspar Ancona. And, John Loeks of Celebration Cinema has made it possible for Dr. Andrew Jefchak to teach a course on modern film at Celebration Cinema in the fall. We expect all of our fall classes to fill quickly and encourage early registrations! The Aquinas Emeritus Board is now challenged to reach out to the

many people who do not know about us, and to people in the 40to-50-year-old range. We hope to achieve this through evening course offerings in the fall—“The Civil War,” “So, You’ve Always Wanted to be an Entrepreneur,” and “Lewis and Clark”—and to advertise more effectively. Toward that end, our new promotional brochure will be distributed to all our constituents very soon. With the Aquinas College Department of Languages, we are considering an intergenerational trip to France in May 2004. We are also reviewing new opportunities for our program in Naples, Florida, and considering a new program in Traverse City. Our Emeritus Evening Award honoring Larry and Nancy Erhardt was a very successful event in all respects; the largest turnout ever enjoyed being present to see Larry and Nancy accept the Aquinas Emeritus Award. The Emeritus Evening Award is always the highlight of our year; our Board could not have chosen individuals who better exemplify the values of Aquinas College and the Dominican traditions. Finally, the Development Committee of our Board of Governors is busy organizing the initial phases of its campaign to raise a $1 million endowment to secure the future of the Aquinas Emeritus College. We look forward to seeing you in our classes! For course and registration information, please call 616-459-8281.

Where can a collector go to locate information on Kenner dolls? On Oct. 1, 2003, collectors and dealers alike will be waiting for the opportunity to get their hands on a hardcover copy of the Collectible Kenner Dolls Identification and Value Guide. Aquinas College Applications Specialist Amy Sprouse, herself an avid doll collector, authored the handy guidebook as a tool for dealers and collectors to identify Kenner dolls along with the original packaging and accessories. The 176-page book contains more than 600 full-color photographs of Kenner dolls, produced from 1971 to 1981, in their original outfits. “I started collecting in 1998 and found dolls I had played with as a girl that were brand new and still in the original packaging,” said Sprouse. “The quality of Kenner figures is higher than other toys of that time and they still hold up 20 years later, which is a testament to the durability of Kenner products.” As a pioneer for Kenner-related collectibles, Sprouse has shared her knowledge with other enthusiasts by writing articles for several doll collector magazines. As she prepared for writing her guidebook, she had the opportunity to contact some of the original designers to learn more about the development of the Kenner doll products. According to the publisher, Collector Books, this guidebook will be the first to focus entirely on Kenner dolls. Chapters of the

Amy Sprouse poses with just a few of the hundreds of Kenner Dolls she collects and for which she authored a resource book on identification and value for collectors and dealers.

book are devoted to separate doll lines including Darci, Bionic Woman, Hardy Boys, Star Wars, Indiana Jones, Mad Cap Molly, Strawberry Shortcake and many others. Other chapters cover the care of Kenner dolls, online tips and trade show transactions related to dolls. “I found that there was no complete resource on Kenner, so I figured that if no one else will write it, I’m going to do it,” said Sprouse. “I have a rare opportunity to fill an untapped market. “This book appeals to collectors and buyers because of the descriptions and prices, but it caters to everyone.” Collectible Kenner Dolls Identification and Value Guide will be available via www.collectorbooksonline.com, starting this October. Retail price will be $24.95 ($14.95 for dealers.)

Promotional photo of the cover of Sprouse’s book.

By Curtis R. Burdette, Contributing Writer

By Dr. Albert M. Lewis, Director

AQ Staffer Pens Ultimate Guide to Collecting Kenner Dolls

Emeritus College–Committed to Lifelong Learning

Campus News – Fall 2003 Fall 2003 – Campus News

Emeritus College – Fall 2003

Aquinas College Graduates First Class of POHI Majors By Kathy Barker, Assistant Professor of Education, and David Dvorak, Executive Director CLC

The Conductive Learning Center is the sort of program that never fails to give visitors a lumpin-the-throat feeling that good things happen there, much of it through the efforts of Aquinas students. In May 2005, Aquinas College will graduate its first physically and/or otherwise health impaired (POHI) majors. The POHI major is offered within the School of Education and is an endorsement in an additional area of expertise that is earned along with the elementary teacher certification. Aquinas College is one of two colleges/universities in the state of Michigan that offers this teaching endorsement. The curriculum utilized for this teacher preparation is unique. Dr. Andras Peto developed this method in Budapest, Hungary, over fifty years ago and teachers have been trained at the International Peto Institute/Teachers College since that time. Aquinas College is now the sole provider of this training on the American continents. The program’s focus is on working with those with motoricrelated disabilities, such as cerebral palsy and spina bifida. What makes this training unique from others? One distinct difference is the quantity of handson application experience that is required of the college student. POHI majors spend a minimum of 120 hours per semester within the classrooms of the Conductive Learning Center, a non-profit school affiliated with Aquinas

Aquinas College students Clare Avery, Andrea Gainok, Melissa Kelly and Jamieson McCormick visited the International Peto Institute in Budapest, Hungary, in May.

College. Here, students work under the direction of Aquinas College and Peto Teachers College instructors. Experience includes the leading of activities within the day, working as a member of the instructional team, planning curriculum and working with assessments. Classroom instruction includes biomedical and educational content stressing active participation in each portion of the day. The emphasis is on development of the whole person versus focus on only the motor issue of disability. The future for these students is promising, with multiple options for employment. They may work as special education teachers within the public schools, or be employed as conductor-teachers within the international conductive education field, or as general education teachers. It is anticipated that the demand for teachers prepared with these skills will only increase. This is due, in part, to the success the medical field is having in saving premature

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babies and the potential related disabilities that may result. Also there is a limited number of conductor-teachers being prepared to maintain the demand of existing service programs in Canada, U.S.A., Europe and Asia. Requests for qualified candidates teaching conductive education are already coming in. Anxious to know when Aquinas will graduate its first class of teachers of conductive education. Aquinas has been recognized for its efforts to bring new thinking and skills to the field of teaching the physically impaired. Educational leadership within the state of Michigan is keeping the program’s progress on its radar screen and is eager to see positive results for students. The Superintendent of Education for the state of Michigan has observed the process in action and supports the innovation this brings. It is one more example of how vision, hard work and patience can bring positive change to the lives of many.

Ronald Urbanski, Emeritus College Board member, offers a toast in honor of Larry and Nancy Erhardt (left) who were presented with the 2003 Emeritus Award. Also on stage are Al Lewis (second from right) and President Knopke (right).

Erhardts Honored by Emeritus College By Laura Bennett-Kimble ‘95, Contributing Writer

On May 21, Nancy and Larry Erhardt received the Emeritus Award. The proclamation which President Harry Knopke read at the annual Aquinas Emeritus Evening stated, in part, that “Larry and Nancy embrace and represent the values of Aquinas College and its mission as an inclusive educational community rooted in the Catholic Dominican tradition.” Formal as that proclamation may sound, the message came through loud and clear: These two people have worked hard to better their world. The event itself bubbled over with warmth and goodwill as some 300 friends, relatives and well-wishers celebrated with the couple. Bernard (Bernie) Malewitz, owner of River City Mechan-ical and longtime friend of Larry’s,

teased his old friend a bit before stating, “I have never in all my life in construction known a more ethical person than Larry Erhardt.” As CEO of Erhardt Construction, Larry has been involved with a number of significant area construction projects, including the Aquinas College Performing Arts Center, the Aquinas College Field House, Van Andel Arena, St. Robert of Newminster Church, Van Andel Research Institute and the new $20 million Devos Place Convention Center. Larry attended Aquinas as a preengineering student for two years before transferring to the University of Detroit, where he earned his degree in engineering. Nancy became involved at Aquinas after she received her bachelor of science degree from Siena Heights College in Adrian.

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She has always been a “gracious, kind, and caring” woman with “a servant’s heart,” said Cynthia VanGelderen, dean of the School of Management, who pointed out Nancy’s involvement with the Circle Theatre project, her membership on the Aquinas College Board of Trustees Development Committee, and her volunteer work with Villa Elizabeth Nursing Home. Ronald Urbanski, Emeritus College Board of Governors member, gave the toast. He described the Erhardts as the “kindest, gentlest, most loving, unselfish, charitable, and trustworthy people you could know. These many years I have never heard a negative word said about them. And these many years, I have never heard them say a negative word about others. What goes around comes around,” he said, raising his glass.


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In a testament to the powers of determination, continuing education (CE) student LaTanga (pronounced “LaTanya”) Joseph, age 45, graduated in May after years of challenges. “LaTanga has persevered in her quest to finish her bachelor’s By Laura Bennett-Kimble ‘95, Contributing Writer

How to Reach Graduation in Just 28 Years

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degree with a major in communication while facing daunting obstacles, health concerns and, in general, the passage of 28 years,” said Pat Kozal, Joseph’s college advisor. The road to graduation hasn’t been smooth. For the past four years Joseph drove back and forth from Chicago every weekend to a part-time job. She suffered a mild heart attack in the fall of 2001, and her mother died of cancer after a short illness in August 2002. “Sometimes you have to do whatever it takes to reach your goals,” said Joseph, who graduated from Benton Harbor High School in 1975 and took classes at various schools over the years. She received her Associate in Arts diploma from Grand Rapids Community College in 2000.

“I believe that my family has always been pro-education, especially as African-Americans. It’s always been important to be the best you can be,” said Joseph, who was inducted into Alpha Sigma Lambda, the national honor society for CE students. “LaTanga’s story is one of many,” Kozal said. “But what makes her stand out from the crowd are her personal qualities of courage, cheerfulness, persistence, and personal responsibility.” “I love learning and I could not have chosen a better school,” Joseph said. Then she laughed. “I sound like an advertisement for Aquinas, but it’s true.”

Right: Joseph is hooded by Dean Shirley Lewis, Ed.D., during May’s graduation ceremonies. Pictured left: President Knopke poses with LaTanga Joseph during induction ceremonies of the national honor society for CE students.

it and passing it on to the next generation one of the best possible ways to live.” And he posted a challenge to the graduates embarking on life’s 2003 graduates carry out the traditional turning of the tassel.

journey, saying that they “could do no better than to emulate the people who brought us our democracy.” During the cere- Sr. Aquinas Weber ’58 is recognized for her 25 years of service mony, President Knopke to the College; she retired June 30. also took time to recognize, and Gary Konow, Ph.D., for 35 years thank, two long-standing as a College faculty member. members of the Aquinas com(Full texts of the Wilkins and munity scheduled to retire at the Canepa remarks are available at: end of the year—Sr. Mary www.aquinas.edu/president/ Aquinas Weber, Chancellor, commencement.) after 25 years of service, and

M ay 2003 Fall 2003 – Campus News

Members of the ITS team (from left) Brad Vedders, Greg Vedders, Director Joyce LaFleur and Tom Ferratt huddle to develop options for dealing with a potentially damaging virus.

Technology at Aquinas By Joyce LaFleur, B.S.B.A. ’82, M.M. ’95, Director Information Technology and Services

Development

It’s Time…

Technology resources and services at Aquinas College are continually being upgraded and expanded to meet the needs of students, faculty and staff. Educause, the professional information technology association for colleges and universities, publishes a guide for prospective students to evaluate information technology at colleges and universities they are considering. Aquinas stacks up very well in the various aspects of the guide, including Academic Experience, Administrative Experience, Social Experience, Requirements and Services & Costs. Most notable are our course support Web pages, library resources available online, computer and information literacy courses, online access to college catalog and policies, computer labs throughout campus, residential hall network, student news, information and organizational Web portal and refresh plans for keeping systems current. The Hardware Refresh Leasing Plan allows College equipment to

Julie Ridenour Vice President of Development

When I first came to Aquinas College three-plus years ago, the most frequent remark I heard from our alumni was, “I never hear from Aquinas College.” My, how things have changed in a few years! With the advent of Aquinas magazine, concentrated work on our alumni database, and regular contact with our alums through various efforts, including the electronic media, I’m happy to report I haven’t heard that comment in more than a year. And now the comment most frequently heard is one that brings smiles rather than cringes: “It’s time for Aquinas!” That’s what you are saying, and that’s what all departments of the College are working to make happen. Within the next five years major changes will take place at Aquinas, changes that will enhance the Aquinas experience, and help the College even better prepare our students for their lives. Among the changes will be upgrades to the library, Field House, expanded endowment to support faculty and scholarship, and growth in annual operational support for Aquinas College. Within the Development Department, in collaboration with the academic departments and facilities, and under the direction of President Knopke, we are preparing the groundwork that will provide the direction for these needed expansions. But the most important ingredient in all the preparation is you. If you’re reading this, you’ve heard from Aquinas College, and now Aquinas College wants to hear from By Julie Ridenour Vice President of Development

you. We want to know that your experience at Aquinas altered your life by providing the education and direction that sets you apart in your job. We want to know that you share our vision for an institution that embraces the Dominican way, and that you want to see your alma mater have the resources and facilities that will ensure the College’s position among the nation’s premiere Catholic colleges. How can you help? There are so many ways: • Visit the Aquinas College Web site, and keep apprised of activities at Aquinas; • Know a great high school senior? Encourage him or her to attend Aquinas College, and contact our Admissions Office to let them know about your admissions prospect; • Participate in the Aquinas College Alumni Association; • Join the Aquinas College Career Network. Help other alums achieve their career objectives through your support; • And please, above all, give back to the College when asked. Aquinas College enjoys an exceptionally high level of graduate satisfaction for their educational experience. And more than 90 percent of our students received financial assistance to attend Aquinas. Let that satisfaction translate to giving back to Aquinas— you can make a difference! For information about how to give to Aquinas College, please call the Office of the Vice President for Development (616-459-8281), or visit the development Web site at www.aquinas.edu/development. You’ve heard from us—we want to hear from you. Make it “Time for Aquinas.”

C ommencement,

Alumni News – Fall 2003

to aid faculty-led classroom be replaced every three years. instruction as well as student Web-based courses and applicapresentations. Videoconferencing tions, including academic research, facilities located in the Jarecki library holdings, and e-mail via the Center for Advanced Learning can Web, allow for access to many be utilized by individuals, small information resources from an groups or class activities. off-campus Internet connection. A 24-hour online knowledge Campus portals ACORN, Alumni, center and help desk system augment and The Moose connect students, training and help desk services. A faculty, staff and alumni to campus College technology council, crenews, events, resources and each ated in 1997, consisting of faculty, other from on or off campus. staff and student representatives, Resident students may connect meets monthly to identify and their personally owned PC to the prioritize technology needs. Resident Hall Network (RESNET) The Aquinas network faces a for access to these and many other constant threat from virus laced Web-based resources from the electronic information and convenience of their room. intrusion attempts by malicious There are also ports in various hackers. Several layers of proteclocations around campus, tive technology and internal policy including a net-work in the Cook thwarted over 10,000 potential Carriage House with wireless incidents last year alone. laptops for check-out, which Every incoming e-mail message allows students, faculty and staff to is scanned for viruses before it is connect to the RESNET system for delivered. Updates to the virus research and communication. protection software, both for e-mail and for data files, are checked several times each day for updated definitions of new threats. Intrusion detection software runs continuously at the server level and reports on each attempt at unauthorized access—a daily occurrence. While technologiThe ITS team discuss the processes of containing the cal methods of provirus and restoring the College computer network to tecting the Aquinas a secure state, which was achieved within five days. network are essential, so too are policies governing use and user awareness of individual responsibilities. Good electronic community citizenship is not intuitive and has been clarified in the College’s Acceptable Use Policy (AUP).

In addition, computer labs are available in the residence halls, student center, library and academic center for student use. All classrooms are wired for network access and deluxe multimedia mobile instructor carts are available

Adler Has the Look for Burt’s Bees New Line

Chesley, Dr. Raikes, Mr. Eberle and Dr. Brooks…all have been major influences. I cannot say enough for how important they have each been in my life,” Southard relates.

his next novel, Cassandra on the Island. Since graduating from Aquinas, Southard has studied at Michigan State University and the University of Southern California, where he earned a master’s degree in writing. His stage play will premiere off-Broadway this year. One of Southard’s proudest moments was his marriage in December 2002 to Heather Vaughan. “Convincing her to marry me was a great accomplishment on my part!” he says. The Los Angeles resident learned much at Aquinas. “Dr.

promote her company’s new skincare line. “If you look closely at the boxes,” Adler said in a Grand Rapids Press article (March 4, 2003), “you’ll see they didn’t airbrush the crow’s feet off my face. They wanted me to look achievable. Fresh and natural, but not perfect. Because perfect is not attainable.”

Tracy Lint Soltis Adler ’89, is the new face for Burt’s Bees Healthy Treatment skin-care products. And it all happened by chance when Burt’s Bees owner, Roxanne Quimby walked into the North Carolina restaurant Adler owns with her husband, Mitchell. Adler caught Quimby’s eye as a woman aging with grace and confidence— just the look Quimby wanted to

Alum Designs Poster for Festival of Arts Virginia Rose Kane ’84, and her husband Manuel Gentile, both artists, created the winning poster for Festival of the Arts 2003, a celebration of arts held in downtown Grand Rapids annually in June. Their poster is a threedimensional collage of downtown

landmarks with Alexander “Sandy” Calder in the center. Calder is the creator of “La Grande Vitesse” which stands tall next to city hall in the downtown area. The original poster was on display at the Festival and at the Grand Rapids Art Museum.

Southard’s Work Spans Many Genres “Everyone in Heaven writes an autobiography sooner or later,” says Scott D. Southard ‘88, explaining why he chose that theme for his first novel, 3 Days In Rome. In 2001, the Heeken Novel Writing Fellowship for Work in Progress honored his book about a young man who relates his earthly and heavenly travails while perched behind the Pearly Gates. Southard also received awards for The Dante Experience, a 10episode radio series that receives play on National Public Radio. He is currently scouting publishers for

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Saturday, May 10, was not unlike any other spring day unless you were one of the 559 students receiving diplomas from Aquinas College. The 63rd annual Commencement drew a large audience to the College’s Field House. Honorary degrees were conferred on three individuals. Trustee Emeritus John Canepa received an honorary doctor of business administration. He was recognized for his years of service in Grand Rapids and, especially, for his long, distinguished record of leadership in both business and service to the community. In his remarks, he told graduates that he believes “a strong social conscience, a sense of individual responsibility, of renewed integrity, a commitment to community and a respect for others will be the rule for your generation of leaders.” “Success,” he told them, “will be defined not only by monetary success, but equally important by a deep social commitment, by making the world a better place to live in for you and your community.” Trustee Emerita Katherine S. Donnelly was also recognized during the ceremony, receiving an honorary doctor of humane letters degree for her generous contributions of time and resources to many worthy community organizations. The Board of Trustees selected Roger Wilkins, a son of Grand Rapids to give the commencement address and receive an honorary degree to recognize his life’s work as a Pulitzer-Prize-winning journalist, educator and civil rights

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Tom and Nancy Church (left) share a lighter moment with Mary Ellen Rogers of Deloitte and Touche (second from right) and John Kennedy of Autocam.

activist. His scheduled attendance had drawn criticism from the conservative Washington-based Cardinal Newman Society, which cited his pro-choice stance. However, Wilkins canceled his appearance two days before the ceremony due to the death of his mother-in-law in Virginia. Instead, his sister, Judith Claytor, attended to accept his honorary doctor of laws degree. Wilkins’ mother, Helen Claytor, received an honorary degree from Aquinas in 1985, thus becoming the first mother-son dyad to receive the degrees from the College. Wilkins’ prepared remarks for the graduates were shared by President Knopke. In them, he noted that September 11, 2001, and this year’s Iraq war have “elicited remarkable displays of patriotism all over the country.” He stated that “it’s been an ‘us against them’ brand of patriotism, which is to be expected in times of war or national peril.” His message encouraged the graduates to consider another kind of patriotism, “the long term kind that is necessary to sustain a democracy over the centuries...” noting that it is the kind that our country’s founding fathers recommended. Following some perspective on America’s founding history, Wilkins noted in his remarks that “flag waving and chest thumping during times of high national stress are fine, but doing that and little more does amount to hitching a free ride on the planet.” Our founders, he continued, “found the daily work of keeping the republic, improving

(L-R) Trustee Pat Quinn ’58, Bishop Kevin Britt and Rita Quinn

Judith Claytor, sister of Roger Wilkins, expresses her appreciation on his behalf after accepting his honorary doctor of laws degree. Trustee Dave Bottrall and his wife, Michelle ’97, welcome friends of Aquinas College to their CascadeTownship home. President Harry Knopke introduces Trustee Emerita Kay Donnelly before presenting her with her honorary doctor of humane letters degree. Aquinas Trustee Emeritus John Canepa delivers remarks after receiving his honorary doctor of business administration degree.

C ommencement,

Students got financial support in the amount of $60,000 thanks to April’s Evening of Elegance. A sold-out crowd gathered to raise scholarship money for Catholic education at the home of hosts David Bottrall, an Aquinas Trustee, and his wife, Michelle Bottrall ‘97. President Harry Knopke and Greg Alksnis ‘71, a trustee and Evening of Elegance chair, spoke to visitors who roamed through the Bottrall’s leafy veranda, richly hued living room and collection of Star Trek memorabilia. The luxury was a warm welcome, but Michelle Bottrall summarized the event’s true importance when she remembered the pride she felt upon receiving her degree. “I’ll never forget that day. I was the first grandchild in my family to earn a bachelors degree,” Bottrall told guests, who included Bishops Kevin Britt and Robert Rose from the Diocese of Grand Rapids. “One quarter of Aquinas students are the first in their families to attend college and to receive degrees. You’re putting an awful lot of kids through school.”

(L-R) Bishop Robert Rose, President Harry Knopke and Bishop Kevin Britt Trustee Emerita/Former Board Chair Kate Pew Wolters ’78 and Jeanne Kapenga, M.D. (L-R) Nancy Church; Sr. Maribeth Holst, O.P, Dominican Prioress/Aquinas Trustee; Sr. Aquinas Weber ’58; and Trustee/Board Chairman Tom Church

By Tonya Schafer ’02, Contributing Writer

M ay 2003 Evening of Elegance

Development Development

President’s Reception

(L-R) President Harry Knopke, Sheila Knopke,Trustee Karen Palmore ’89 and Bill Palmore

Sanel Fazlic, senior, shares his family’s struggle to flee Bosnia with attendees at an Aquinas Fund reception in June.

Appreciation Events a Huge Success! The President’s Reception hosted by new trustee Karen Palmore’89 and her husband, Bill, and the President’s Dinner hosted by Kate Pew Wolters ’78, outgoing Chair of the Board of Trustees, were a success in conveying the deep appreciation to benefactors of the College. This year has been a triumph in finalizing the new Performing Arts Center and a record setting Aquinas Fund campaign. In addition, new endowed scholarships and special gifts have significantly increased, as well. Special thanks to all Society, Circle and Gift Club members who have made this achievement possible. Also, our sincerest appreciation to Sr. M. Aquinas Weber, Chancellor of the College, whose unwavering dedication to development efforts have helped to make our success a reality.

President’s Recognition Dinner

Hostess/former Board Chairperson Kate Wolters shares a moment with Fred Meijer.

“Primary care is a distinctive, special focus of this program,” President Knopke said, and it has secured significant financial aid for the students. “This is also one of only three nursing undergraduate degree programs in the country that offer co-op placements—in other words, students work for pay in clinical settings while earning course credit after their junior year.” Mulligan said the program has its complications. “Financial aid is frustrating,” she said, because the two schools had had conflicting information regarding her status as a full-time student. “I did talk to Harry Knopke about it, and he has been extremely helpful,” she said, noting that such complications aren’t surprising in a new program. Knopke agreed, stating, “There are start-up refinements one would expect with a new program, especially one that is conducted by three different partners.” The partners have a lot in common, though. Like Aquinas, UDM has an “emphasis on the cultural and spiritual aspects of life,” Thomas said. “And so we attract students who are interested in the cultural and spiritual aspects of care, along with the physiologic and psychologic [ones].” Also, “St. Mary’s has a very good reputation as far as their extensive program with the inpatient, the clinics, the ambulatory centers, and their focus on spirituality and cultural diversity. “It’s sort of the best of both worlds,” Thomas said, “particularly since Aquinas has such a great reputation for its liberal arts.”

Actor Bruce Weitz Resident at Aquinas By Laura Bennett-Kimble ‘95, Contributing Writer

Emmy Award-winning actor Bruce Weitz spent a few weeks living on campus in late spring, Sr. Aquinas Weber (left) and Emmy Award winning actor thanks to the collaboration Bruce Weitz (right) pose with Stella and Chuck Royce between the College and during a picnic in Weitz’s honor held at the president’s Community Circle Theatre. He residence, Willowbrook. performed in the Neil Simon production, The Prisoner of Second Avenue, which was directed by Rodney Vaccaro, his long-time friend and a former Grand Rapids resident. Although he works onstage at least once a year, Weitz, known more for his portrayal of Detective Mick Belker on NBC’s “Hill Street Blues” (1981-87), said that the production was his first community theater work. At a picnic held in his honor in June at Willowbrook, President Knopke’s home, Weitz explained how he ended up here. “[Rodney and I] worked together as writer, producer on a couple of projects that never got made,” Weitz said, “but that’s where our friendship started. Now our families are very friendly; we share a beach house in the summer. And he’s been talking about Grand Rapids and the theater here for years, and telling me that there was a fairly extensive talent pool of good people.” Vaccaro said when he talked to Weitz about Circle Theatre at the beach house last year, Weitz asked, “Would they be interested in me coming there?” Having Weitz headline one of the theater’s productions was “quite a coup for us,” said Community Circle Theatre Executive Director Joe Dulin. “This has been wonderful working on the play,” Weitz said. “It’s fun. What I saw was a level of commitment that I don’t think you see in most communities… I found that quite astonishing, actually.” The new theater on campus, a collaboration with the College, Circle Theatre and Catholic Secondary Schools, drew raves from both Weitz and Vaccaro, who said he’d never thought of the association. He said when Dulin called him to talk about the idea, “I thought, God, that’s just perfect. My experience with Aquinas is that it’s sort of a bastion of liberalism. It’s an absolutely perfect collaboration. The new theater is the single most perfect theater I’ve ever seen. I’m aching Bruce Weitz and President Knopke to [direct] in the new space.” (right) exchange thoughts on the College’s new Performing Arts Center. Weitz, who keeps busy with recurring roles on both ER and Judging Amy, received his undergraduate degree from Carnegie Institute of Technology, and later earned an M.F.A. at Yale. He has more than 100 movie and film credits, including Half Past Dead and Deep Impact.

(L-R) Fred Meijer, Ulrika Wege,Trustee Emeritus Peter Wege and Sheila Knopke

The dinner honored the College’s special friends. 56

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Sr. Rosemary O’Donnell leads a class discussion.

Aquinas College is known for many things, but did you know that we have been serving the educational needs of the adult student since 1969? Today, one quarter of the student body at Aquinas College comprises adult students attending classes in the undergraduate or master’s programs. These dedicated individuals can often be found hustling into the Academic Building or Jarecki Center around six o’clock each evening, Monday thru Thursday. Some log onto Michigan Virtual University to discuss topics with their Web course classmates. No matter the class format or time, you will find our adult students have a special place in their hearts for Aquinas. As Thora Wease, a current continuing education (CE) student graduating in May 2004 so generously stated, “My time at Aquinas has been the most rewarding and exquisitely delightful of any educational experience I have ever had. The classes are challenging and the learning opportunities incredible. I have been encouraged to dream my dream and have been given the tools necessary to make it come true. For that I will be forever grateful.” Nationwide, 73 percent of all undergraduates are considered

non-traditional in some way— they work, have children, are independent of parents or didn’t enroll into college right after high school. Further, 40 percent of those are working adults over the age of 25 and 56 percent of all adult college students are female. That number is expected to rise to 58 percent by 2011, according to the Non-Traditional Student Report issued in May 2003. It is important that we at Aquinas continue to meet the needs and provide the services necessary for our current and prospective students—services like the Academic Achievement Center, that assist our adult students with building and refreshing math and writing skills. The Career and Counseling Center provides guidance and skills needed for our students‘ future jobs, and helps with anxious feelings about returning to school. The biggest concern our adult students face is how to fund their education. Primary sources of assistance come from employer tuition-reimbursement programs or federal aid. Aquinas also offers two privately funded scholarships for adult students—the John F. Donnelly Scholarship and the Norbert J. Hruby Scholarship. You can find out more informa-

55

tion on these opportunities by visiting the Aquinas Web site at www.aquinas.edu. With flexible scheduling, a variety of class formats and assistance with financial aid, adult students can fulfill those dreams of returning to school for a degree or taking classes purely for exploration and interest. Interested in attending Aquinas College as a continuing education or master’s student? Please call (616) 459-8281 for an individual appointment or visit the College’s Web site at www.aquinas.edu.

The Rev. Bernard Hall

A scholarship to help minority students who have an interest in theological studies and human service programs was funded through a bequest left to Aquinas by Fr. Bernard Hall. Fr. Hall was ordained a Catholic priest in 1977. He was active in diocesan Catholic schools in the area of curriculum development. He

helped establish the African American Apostolate for Grand Rapids. Fr. Hall served as pastor of St. Joseph’s Parish, Muskegon, St. Mary’s Parish, and our Lady of Sorrow’s Church, Grand Rapids. In 1996, Fr. Hall retired for medical reasons and moved to St. Ann’s Home. He joined his Heavenly Father on March 23, 2002.

Scholarship Established for Fr. Bernard Hall

Robert Fiori (L-R) Erika Vann and Amanda Saenz Janice Noel

What or who is at the heart and soul of Aquinas College? If you ask alumni, parents, faculty or friends of the College the same answer is reiterated each time— students! And at the cornerstone of student financial assistance is the Aquinas Fund, which helps to fund nearly $1.7 million dollars in scholarships. The Fund has seen dramatic increases in support recently. It is a testimony to the fact that, together, we can make a difference in the lives of students. Donors small and large have sacrificed and, in turn, the students are blessed. Leo Kunkel, parent of alumnus John T. Kunkel ’90 and father-inlaw to Theresa Schulte Kunkel ’91, has been a regular Thomist Club member ($500-$999 contributor) for years. He echoes the sentiments of many Aquinas Fund contributors. When asked why he continues his strong support of the College, Kunkel said, “You attract high caliber students here [at Aquinas].

Being a Notre Dame graduate, I always thought Notre Dame was it! My late wife, Betty, wanted to be a donor to Aquinas even after John graduated. Catholic colleges were so important to her. We got to know Aquinas, visited the campus, got to know John’s friends and I realized what a difference our gift makes for students coming to Cecilia Cunningham

Aquinas. I am extremely happy with the education [John] re-ceived at Aquinas! It is a good Catholic college, John fit here where the professors and students have a close relationship,” he added. Kunkel believes in higher education, “I am sort of a nut when it comes to education. Not only does it open doors for a better job. It gives you insight into life itself. It’s the key to one’s very existence. Education is not inexpensive today. It is very difficult for a lot of families. To me that’s a sacrifice worth every penny.” When asked about consistently giving Kunkel said, “I’ve contributed to Notre Dame for 55 years, Betty gave to St. Mary’s as well. It is paramount for each (alumni) to do it, to carry on the legacy. It is an absolute. Aquinas alumni owe it to themselves to make sure the first class education is passed on to another…it is a pleasure to support students through the Aquinas Fund!”

By Cecilia Cunningham, Director of the Aquinas Fund

By Lisa Piatek ‘97, Director of Adult Student Recruitment

Aquinas Fund: Heart and Soul

Continuing Education…Still Thriving

Development – Fall 2003

Fall 2003 – Campus News

Fall 2003 – Development

Campus News – Fall 2003

Aquinas Selects Trustee Emeritus Marty Allen for Reflection Award Trustee Emeritus Martin J. Allen, Jr. will be the recipient of the 11th Annual Reflection Award to be presented on Wednesday, September 3. The award is one of the highest honors given by Aquinas College and is bestowed upon those who, like Allen, reflect the Aquinas values of commitment, vision, service, loyalty and integrity. The honorary co-chairs of the Reflection Dinner are President and Mrs. Gerald R. Ford and the event co-chairs are Trustee Emeritus John C. Canepa and his wife, Marie. Allen, a 1958 Notre Dame University alumnus, as those who have seen his car’s license plate know, is Chairman of the Gerald R. Ford Foundation Board of Trustees and co-chair of the National Archives on Presidential Libraries. He spent his 30-year career at Old Kent Bank, heading the bank’s marketing department, and was a driving force behind the Old Kent River Bank Run and Old Kent Park, both of which have taken on

the name of the bank’s successor, Fifth Third Bank. He has been part of the community’s major fund-raising initiatives, helping to build the Van Andel Arena and the city’s latest addition, DeVos Place, the new convention center set to open later this fall. Allen is a lifelong Grand Rapids resident, who attended St. Stephen’s Elementary School, Grand Rapids Catholic Central High School, Notre Dame and Michigan State University. He also served in the United States Navy. He has been recognized for his leadership by the West Michigan Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals, which presented him with its “Executive Leader Award,” and by Notr e Dame University, which presented him with the Harvey G. Foster Award for distinguished athletic endeavors and community service. Allen is a past president of the Notre Dame Club of Grand Rapids. He and his wife, Susan, have two sons and a daughter: Steven

Developer/Preservationist John Knott Jr. speaks to a full house in the Wege Student Center Ballroom .

Sue and Marty Allen

(Aquinas ’90), Michael (Notre Dame), and Kathleen (Duke University and University of Michigan Law School). Previous Reflection honorees are: Peter and Pat Cook, Dr. Luis A. Tomatis, John S. Jackoboice, Sally Gleason, Peter M. Wege, Clare Jarecki, John Canepa, Raymond E. Knape, John Cummiskey, and Sr. M. Aquinas Weber. Aquinas alumni, friends of the College and friends of the honoree are encouraged to attend this exciting night. Individual tickets for the Reflection Dinner may be purchased for $150/each by calling Ellen Harburn at (616) 459-8281 or e-mailing her at hurbuell@aquinas.edu.

U.S. Rep. Ehlers Shares Views on Religion, Politics By Joe Boomgaard ‘03, Assistant Editor (From The Aquinas Times, May 5, 2003 - Reprinted with permission.)

“I try to make it a policy never to discuss religion and politics, but that’s what I’m here to do,” said Third District Congressional Representative Vern Ehlers, RGrand Rapids,to a gathering of students and faculty on April 28. “I’m often asked, ‘Is our government Christian?’ It is Christian in its foundation and in terms of philosophy and ideals of government, but we are not a theocracy,” Ehlers said.

“People,” he noted, “often misconstrue that [first] amendment as guaranteeing separation of church and state,” but said, “the first amendment says nothing about the separation of church and state. It says that Congress shall make no law establishing a state religion— something that leaders have long tried to prevent.” Ehlers revealed that religious beliefs do play a role in his political

54

U.S. Representative Vern Ehlers, RGrand Rapids, speaks in Lacks Center.

decisions. “…I look at issues through a Christian perspective— my core beliefs come from my religion. I think people realize that when they elect politicians.”

Urban Preservationist Urges Sustainability By Nicole Selzer, Staff Writer

“Put the face of your children and grandchildren on each decision you make.” John Knott Jr., CEO and director of the South Carolinabased Noisette Company, offered that advice at the Seventh Annual Wege Speaker Series in April. Knott comes from a long line of builder/developers whose family has been involved in urban and historical restoration since 1908. He employs the seven principles of sustainability—the Sanborn Principles—throughout his works, including the Noisette Project, which is the largest urban renewal development of its kind in the nation, and the Dewees Island project, which restored a storm battered island to a thriving natural habitat and residential community. The Sanborn Principles were created by a group called together by the National Renewable Resources Laboratory (NREL). According to these principles each design project must provide a healthy living environment for occupants and be ecologically

thinking. ”People understand durability, health, efficiency and comfort,“ he said. ”What we need to understand is that sustainability equals those qualities in the end.“ According to Knott, the biggest issue we face is making short term decisions for the benefit of a few at the detriment of many. This is true in business, he pointed out, and in our personal and public lives. We have forgotten what our purpose is in this life. “As a result, the social structures of community, the value systems in our lives, and the health of our children and environJohn Knott Jr. (left) and Peter M. Wege, trustee ment are threatened. emeritus and creator of the Wege Speaker Series. What we don’t seem to realize is that the healthy, socially just, culturally problem isn’t out there,” says creative, beautiful, physically and Knott. economically accessible, and evo“It’s in here (pointing to his lutionary. Using these principles, chest), in each of us, stemming the NREL is confident that it is from the decisions we make possible to renew and restore areas everyday. We are not making the once thought to be beyond help. connection between action and Following his speech, Knott consequence.” responded to questions, telling a Knott’s speech was inspiring. packed Wege Center ballroom Changing the world is a daunting audience that “although most of task, he noted, one that can be you don’t know this, Grand Rapids disheartening, reminding them, is one of the major sustainable too, that one person can make a centers in the country.” He difference. “If every one of you encouraged Grand Rapidians to leaves today and changes three keep doing what they’re doing. things that you are doing in your “It’s intimidating, but how many every day lives, that’s a lot of of us go through our days thinking change for the better.” green, so to speak? Sustainability For more information on John can be a slippery concept to grasp,” Knott Jr’s projects visit… he stated. www.noisettesc.com Aquinas’ new sustainable busiand ness major fits in with Knott’s www.deweesisland.com. 11


10

Sr. Rosemary O’Donnell leads a class discussion.

Aquinas College is known for many things, but did you know that we have been serving the educational needs of the adult student since 1969? Today, one quarter of the student body at Aquinas College comprises adult students attending classes in the undergraduate or master’s programs. These dedicated individuals can often be found hustling into the Academic Building or Jarecki Center around six o’clock each evening, Monday thru Thursday. Some log onto Michigan Virtual University to discuss topics with their Web course classmates. No matter the class format or time, you will find our adult students have a special place in their hearts for Aquinas. As Thora Wease, a current continuing education (CE) student graduating in May 2004 so generously stated, “My time at Aquinas has been the most rewarding and exquisitely delightful of any educational experience I have ever had. The classes are challenging and the learning opportunities incredible. I have been encouraged to dream my dream and have been given the tools necessary to make it come true. For that I will be forever grateful.” Nationwide, 73 percent of all undergraduates are considered

non-traditional in some way— they work, have children, are independent of parents or didn’t enroll into college right after high school. Further, 40 percent of those are working adults over the age of 25 and 56 percent of all adult college students are female. That number is expected to rise to 58 percent by 2011, according to the Non-Traditional Student Report issued in May 2003. It is important that we at Aquinas continue to meet the needs and provide the services necessary for our current and prospective students—services like the Academic Achievement Center, that assist our adult students with building and refreshing math and writing skills. The Career and Counseling Center provides guidance and skills needed for our students‘ future jobs, and helps with anxious feelings about returning to school. The biggest concern our adult students face is how to fund their education. Primary sources of assistance come from employer tuition-reimbursement programs or federal aid. Aquinas also offers two privately funded scholarships for adult students—the John F. Donnelly Scholarship and the Norbert J. Hruby Scholarship. You can find out more informa-

tion on these opportunities by visiting the Aquinas Web site at www.aquinas.edu. With flexible scheduling, a variety of class formats and assistance with financial aid, adult students can fulfill those dreams of returning to school for a degree or taking classes purely for exploration and interest. Interested in attending Aquinas College as a continuing education or master’s student? Please call (616) 459-8281 for an individual appointment or visit the College’s Web site at www.aquinas.edu.

A scholarship to help minority students who have an interest in theological studies and human service programs was funded through a bequest left to Aquinas by Fr. Bernard Hall. Fr. Hall was ordained a Catholic priest in 1977. He was active in diocesan Catholic schools in the area of curriculum development. He

55

The Rev. Bernard Hall

helped establish the African American Apostolate for Grand Rapids. Fr. Hall served as pastor of St. Joseph’s Parish, Muskegon, St. Mary’s Parish, and our Lady of Sorrow’s Church, Grand Rapids. In 1996, Fr. Hall retired for medical reasons and moved to St. Ann’s Home. He joined his Heavenly Father on March 23, 2002.

Scholarship Established for Fr. Bernard Hall

Robert Fiori (L-R) Erika Vann and Amanda Saenz Janice Noel

What or who is at the heart and soul of Aquinas College? If you ask alumni, parents, faculty or friends of the College the same answer is reiterated each time— students! And at the cornerstone of student financial assistance is the Aquinas Fund, which helps to fund nearly $1.7 million dollars in scholarships. The Fund has seen dramatic increases in support recently. It is a testimony to the fact that, together, we can make a difference in the lives of students. Donors small and large have sacrificed and, in turn, the students are blessed. Leo Kunkel, parent of alumnus John T. Kunkel ’90 and father-inlaw to Theresa Schulte Kunkel ’91, has been a regular Thomist Club member ($500-$999 contributor) for years. He echoes the sentiments of many Aquinas Fund contributors. When asked why he continues his strong support of the College, Kunkel said, “You attract high caliber students here [at Aquinas].

Being a Notre Dame graduate, I always thought Notre Dame was it! My late wife, Betty, wanted to be a donor to Aquinas even after John graduated. Catholic colleges were so important to her. We got to know Aquinas, visited the campus, got to know John’s friends and I realized what a difference our gift makes for students coming to Cecilia Cunningham

Aquinas. I am extremely happy with the education [John] re-ceived at Aquinas! It is a good Catholic college, John fit here where the professors and students have a close relationship,” he added. Kunkel believes in higher education, “I am sort of a nut when it comes to education. Not only does it open doors for a better job. It gives you insight into life itself. It’s the key to one’s very existence. Education is not inexpensive today. It is very difficult for a lot of families. To me that’s a sacrifice worth every penny.” When asked about consistently giving Kunkel said, “I’ve contributed to Notre Dame for 55 years, Betty gave to St. Mary’s as well. It is paramount for each (alumni) to do it, to carry on the legacy. It is an absolute. Aquinas alumni owe it to themselves to make sure the first class education is passed on to another…it is a pleasure to support students through the Aquinas Fund!”

By Cecilia Cunningham, Director of the Aquinas Fund

By Lisa Piatek ‘97, Director of Adult Student Recruitment

Aquinas Fund: Heart and Soul

Continuing Education…Still Thriving Campus News – Fall 2003

Fall 2003 – Development

Fall 2003 – Campus News

Development – Fall 2003

Aquinas Selects Trustee Emeritus Marty Allen for Reflection Award Trustee Emeritus Martin J. Allen, Jr. will be the recipient of the 11th Annual Reflection Award to be presented on Wednesday, September 3. The award is one of the highest honors given by Aquinas College and is bestowed upon those who, like Allen, reflect the Aquinas values of commitment, vision, service, loyalty and integrity. The honorary co-chairs of the Reflection Dinner are President and Mrs. Gerald R. Ford and the event co-chairs are Trustee Emeritus John C. Canepa and his wife, Marie. Allen, a 1958 Notre Dame University alumnus, as those who have seen his car’s license plate know, is Chairman of the Gerald R. Ford Foundation Board of Trustees and co-chair of the National Archives on Presidential Libraries. He spent his 30-year career at Old Kent Bank, heading the bank’s marketing department, and was a driving force behind the Old Kent River Bank Run and Old Kent Park, both of which have taken on

Developer/Preservationist John Knott Jr. speaks to a full house in the Wege Student Center Ballroom .

the name of the bank’s successor, Fifth Third Bank. He has been part of the community’s major fund-raising initiatives, helping to build the Van Andel Arena and the city’s latest addition, DeVos Place, the new convention center set to open later this fall. Allen is a lifelong Grand Rapids resident, who attended St. Stephen’s Elementary School, Grand Rapids Catholic Central High School, Notre Dame and Michigan State University. He also served in the United States Navy. He has been recognized for his leadership by the West Michigan Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals, which presented him with its “Executive Leader Award,” and by Notr e Dame University, which presented him with the Harvey G. Foster Award for distinguished athletic endeavors and community service. Allen is a past president of the Notre Dame Club of Grand Rapids. He and his wife, Susan, have two sons and a daughter: Steven

Sue and Marty Allen

(Aquinas ’90), Michael (Notre Dame), and Kathleen (Duke University and University of Michigan Law School). Previous Reflection honorees are: Peter and Pat Cook, Dr. Luis A. Tomatis, John S. Jackoboice, Sally Gleason, Peter M. Wege, Clare Jarecki, John Canepa, Raymond E. Knape, John Cummiskey, and Sr. M. Aquinas Weber. Aquinas alumni, friends of the College and friends of the honoree are encouraged to attend this exciting night. Individual tickets for the Reflection Dinner may be purchased for $150/each by calling Ellen Harburn at (616) 459-8281 or e-mailing her at hurbuell@aquinas.edu.

U.S. Rep. Ehlers Shares Views on Religion, Politics By Joe Boomgaard ‘03, Assistant Editor (From The Aquinas Times, May 5, 2003 - Reprinted with permission.)

“I try to make it a policy never to discuss religion and politics, but that’s what I’m here to do,” said Third District Congressional Representative Vern Ehlers, RGrand Rapids,to a gathering of students and faculty on April 28. “I’m often asked, ‘Is our government Christian?’ It is Christian in its foundation and in terms of philosophy and ideals of government, but we are not a theocracy,” Ehlers said.

“People,” he noted, “often misconstrue that [first] amendment as guaranteeing separation of church and state,” but said, “the first amendment says nothing about the separation of church and state. It says that Congress shall make no law establishing a state religion— something that leaders have long tried to prevent.” Ehlers revealed that religious beliefs do play a role in his political

U.S. Representative Vern Ehlers, RGrand Rapids, speaks in Lacks Center.

decisions. “…I look at issues through a Christian perspective— my core beliefs come from my religion. I think people realize that when they elect politicians.”

Urban Preservationist Urges Sustainability By Nicole Selzer, Staff Writer

“Put the face of your children and grandchildren on each decision you make.” John Knott Jr., CEO and director of the South Carolinabased Noisette Company, offered that advice at the Seventh Annual Wege Speaker Series in April. Knott comes from a long line of builder/developers whose family has been involved in urban and historical restoration since 1908. He employs the seven principles of sustainability—the Sanborn Principles—throughout his works, including the Noisette Project, which is the largest urban renewal development of its kind in the nation, and the Dewees Island project, which restored a storm battered island to a thriving natural habitat and residential community. The Sanborn Principles were created by a group called together by the National Renewable Resources Laboratory (NREL). According to these principles each design project must provide a healthy living environment for occupants and be ecologically

54

thinking. ”People understand durability, health, efficiency and comfort,“ he said. ”What we need to understand is that sustainability equals those qualities in the end.“ According to Knott, the biggest issue we face is making short term decisions for the benefit of a few at the detriment of many. This is true in business, he pointed out, and in our personal and public lives. We have forgotten what our purpose is in this life. “As a result, the social structures of community, the value systems in our lives, and the health of our children and environJohn Knott Jr. (left) and Peter M. Wege, trustee ment are threatened. emeritus and creator of the Wege Speaker Series. What we don’t seem to realize is that the problem isn’t out there,” says Knott. “It’s in here (pointing to his chest), in each of us, stemming from the decisions we make everyday. We are not making the connection between action and consequence.” Knott’s speech was inspiring. Changing the world is a daunting task, he noted, one that can be disheartening, reminding them, too, that one person can make a difference. “If every one of you leaves today and changes three things that you are doing in your every day lives, that’s a lot of change for the better.” For more information on John Knott Jr’s projects visit… www.noisettesc.com and www.deweesisland.com.

healthy, socially just, culturally creative, beautiful, physically and economically accessible, and evolutionary. Using these principles, the NREL is confident that it is possible to renew and restore areas once thought to be beyond help. Following his speech, Knott responded to questions, telling a packed Wege Center ballroom audience that “although most of you don’t know this, Grand Rapids is one of the major sustainable centers in the country.” He encouraged Grand Rapidians to keep doing what they’re doing. “It’s intimidating, but how many of us go through our days thinking green, so to speak? Sustainability can be a slippery concept to grasp,” he stated. Aquinas’ new sustainable business major fits in with Knott’s

11


12

53

Tom and Nancy Church (left) share a lighter moment with Mary Ellen Rogers of Deloitte and Touche (second from right) and John Kennedy of Autocam.

Saturday, May 10, was not unlike any other spring day unless you were one of the 559 students receiving diplomas from Aquinas College. The 63rd annual Commencement drew a large audience to the College’s Field House. Honorary degrees were conferred on three individuals. Trustee Emeritus John Canepa received an honorary doctor of business administration. He was recognized for his years of service in Grand Rapids and, especially, for his long, distinguished record of leadership in both business and service to the community. In his remarks, he told graduates that he believes “a strong social conscience, a sense of individual responsibility, of renewed integrity, a commitment to community and a respect for others will be the rule for your generation of leaders.” “Success,” he told them, “will be defined not only by monetary success, but equally important by a deep social commitment, by making the world a better place to live in for you and your community.” Trustee Emerita Katherine S. Donnelly was also recognized during the ceremony, receiving an honorary doctor of humane letters degree for her generous contributions of time and resources to many worthy community organizations. The Board of Trustees selected Roger Wilkins, a son of Grand Rapids to give the commencement address and receive an honorary degree to recognize his life’s work as a Pulitzer-Prize-winning journalist, educator and civil rights

activist. His scheduled attendance had drawn criticism from the conservative Washington-based Cardinal Newman Society, which cited his pro-choice stance. However, Wilkins canceled his appearance two days before the ceremony due to the death of his mother-in-law in Virginia. Instead, his sister, Judith Claytor, attended to accept his honorary doctor of laws degree. Wilkins’ mother, Helen Claytor, received an honorary degree from Aquinas in 1985, thus becoming the first mother-son dyad to receive the degrees from the College. Wilkins’ prepared remarks for the graduates were shared by President Knopke. In them, he noted that September 11, 2001, and this year’s Iraq war have “elicited remarkable displays of patriotism all over the country.” He stated that “it’s been an ‘us against them’ brand of patriotism, which is to be expected in times of war or national peril.” His message encouraged the graduates to consider another kind of patriotism, “the long term kind that is necessary to sustain a democracy over the centuries...” noting that it is the kind that our country’s founding fathers recommended. Following some perspective on America’s founding history, Wilkins noted in his remarks that “flag waving and chest thumping during times of high national stress are fine, but doing that and little more does amount to hitching a free ride on the planet.” Our founders, he continued, “found the daily work of keeping the republic, improving

(L-R) Trustee Pat Quinn ’58, Bishop Kevin Britt and Rita Quinn

Judith Claytor, sister of Roger Wilkins, expresses her appreciation on his behalf after accepting his honorary doctor of laws degree. Trustee Dave Bottrall and his wife, Michelle ’97, welcome friends of Aquinas College to their CascadeTownship home. President Harry Knopke introduces Trustee Emerita Kay Donnelly before presenting her with her honorary doctor of humane letters degree. Aquinas Trustee Emeritus John Canepa delivers remarks after receiving his honorary doctor of business administration degree.

C ommencement,

Students got financial support in the amount of $60,000 thanks to April’s Evening of Elegance. A sold-out crowd gathered to raise scholarship money for Catholic education at the home of hosts David Bottrall, an Aquinas Trustee, and his wife, Michelle Bottrall ‘97. President Harry Knopke and Greg Alksnis ‘71, a trustee and Evening of Elegance chair, spoke to visitors who roamed through the Bottrall’s leafy veranda, richly hued living room and collection of Star Trek memorabilia. The luxury was a warm welcome, but Michelle Bottrall summarized the event’s true importance when she remembered the pride she felt upon receiving her degree. “I’ll never forget that day. I was the first grandchild in my family to earn a bachelors degree,” Bottrall told guests, who included Bishops Kevin Britt and Robert Rose from the Diocese of Grand Rapids. “One quarter of Aquinas students are the first in their families to attend college and to receive degrees. You’re putting an awful lot of kids through school.”

(L-R) Bishop Robert Rose, President Harry Knopke and Bishop Kevin Britt Trustee Emerita/Former Board Chair Kate Pew Wolters ’78 and Jeanne Kapenga, M.D. (L-R) Nancy Church; Sr. Maribeth Holst, O.P, Dominican Prioress/Aquinas Trustee; Sr. Aquinas Weber ’58; and Trustee/Board Chairman Tom Church

By Tonya Schafer ’02, Contributing Writer

M ay 2003 Evening of Elegance

Development Development

President’s Reception

(L-R) President Harry Knopke, Sheila Knopke,Trustee Karen Palmore ’89 and Bill Palmore

Sanel Fazlic, senior, shares his family’s struggle to flee Bosnia with attendees at an Aquinas Fund reception in June.

Appreciation Events a Huge Success! The President’s Reception hosted by new trustee Karen Palmore’89 and her husband, Bill, and the President’s Dinner hosted by Kate Pew Wolters ’78, outgoing Chair of the Board of Trustees, were a success in conveying the deep appreciation to benefactors of the College. This year has been a triumph in finalizing the new Performing Arts Center and a record setting Aquinas Fund campaign. In addition, new endowed scholarships and special gifts have significantly increased, as well. Special thanks to all Society, Circle and Gift Club members who have made this achievement possible. Also, our sincerest appreciation to Sr. M. Aquinas Weber, Chancellor of the College, whose unwavering dedication to development efforts have helped to make our success a reality.

President’s Recognition Dinner

Hostess/former Board Chairperson Kate Wolters shares a moment with Fred Meijer.

“Primary care is a distinctive, special focus of this program,” President Knopke said, and it has secured significant financial aid for the students. “This is also one of only three nursing undergraduate degree programs in the country that offer co-op placements—in other words, students work for pay in clinical settings while earning course credit after their junior year.” Mulligan said the program has its complications. “Financial aid is frustrating,” she said, because the two schools had had conflicting information regarding her status as a full-time student. “I did talk to Harry Knopke about it, and he has been extremely helpful,” she said, noting that such complications aren’t surprising in a new program. Knopke agreed, stating, “There are start-up refinements one would expect with a new program, especially one that is conducted by three different partners.” The partners have a lot in common, though. Like Aquinas, UDM has an “emphasis on the cultural and spiritual aspects of life,” Thomas said. “And so we attract students who are interested in the cultural and spiritual aspects of care, along with the physiologic and psychologic [ones].” Also, “St. Mary’s has a very good reputation as far as their extensive program with the inpatient, the clinics, the ambulatory centers, and their focus on spirituality and cultural diversity. “It’s sort of the best of both worlds,” Thomas said, “particularly since Aquinas has such a great reputation for its liberal arts.”

Actor Bruce Weitz Resident at Aquinas By Laura Bennett-Kimble ‘95, Contributing Writer

Emmy Award-winning actor Bruce Weitz spent a few weeks living on campus in late spring, Sr. Aquinas Weber (left) and Emmy Award winning actor thanks to the collaboration Bruce Weitz (right) pose with Stella and Chuck Royce between the College and during a picnic in Weitz’s honor held at the president’s Community Circle Theatre. He residence, Willowbrook. performed in the Neil Simon production, The Prisoner of Second Avenue, which was directed by Rodney Vaccaro, his long-time friend and a former Grand Rapids resident. Although he works onstage at least once a year, Weitz, known more for his portrayal of Detective Mick Belker on NBC’s “Hill Street Blues” (1981-87), said that the production was his first community theater work. At a picnic held in his honor in June at Willowbrook, President Knopke’s home, Weitz explained how he ended up here. “[Rodney and I] worked together as writer, producer on a couple of projects that never got made,” Weitz said, “but that’s where our friendship started. Now our families are very friendly; we share a beach house in the summer. And he’s been talking about Grand Rapids and the theater here for years, and telling me that there was a fairly extensive talent pool of good people.” Vaccaro said when he talked to Weitz about Circle Theatre at the beach house last year, Weitz asked, “Would they be interested in me coming there?” Having Weitz headline one of the theater’s productions was “quite a coup for us,” said Community Circle Theatre Executive Director Joe Dulin. “This has been wonderful working on the play,” Weitz said. “It’s fun. What I saw was a level of commitment that I don’t think you see in most communities… I found that quite astonishing, actually.” The new theater on campus, a collaboration with the College, Circle Theatre and Catholic Secondary Schools, drew raves from both Weitz and Vaccaro, who said he’d never thought of the association. He said when Dulin called him to talk about the idea, “I thought, God, that’s just perfect. My experience with Aquinas is that it’s sort of a bastion of liberalism. It’s an absolutely perfect collaboration. The new theater is the single most perfect theater I’ve ever seen. I’m aching Bruce Weitz and President Knopke to [direct] in the new space.” (right) exchange thoughts on the College’s new Performing Arts Center. Weitz, who keeps busy with recurring roles on both ER and Judging Amy, received his undergraduate degree from Carnegie Institute of Technology, and later earned an M.F.A. at Yale. He has more than 100 movie and film credits, including Half Past Dead and Deep Impact.

(L-R) Fred Meijer, Ulrika Wege,Trustee Emeritus Peter Wege and Sheila Knopke

The dinner honored the College’s special friends. 56

9


8

to give indithey are in it and wouldn’t trade vidualized the experience for any other.” attention to “To me, the best part of it is the the students,” students—watching them grow she said. The and develop and realize that they inaugural are wanting to give back to the class, which community,” Thomas said. “The had an averstudents who are attracted to this Nursing students (l-r) Melissa Bauer, Jennifer Gable, Jennifer Kragt age GPA of program are really special students. and Kristi Koetje 3.5 at the end They are wonderful scholars but of last semester, has increased to they’re also very giving people. Does it get complicated when 12. They will graduate in May They do a lot of volunteer work three highly reputable, time2004 with a bachelor of science on their own.” honored institutions join forces to in nursing from UDM, which has And they also get more time create a joint educational program? conducted its School of Nursing with patients, which is something “Oh, yeah!” said Robi Thomas, for 63 years. junior Erin Mulligan appreciates. struggling to control her laughter. While this program may be Unlike most four-year nursing Thomas, assistant professor of relatively new, the College’s programs which begin clinical nursing and chair of the Grand involvement in nursing Rapids campuses of the UDM sciences isn’t. In fact, McAuley School of Nursing, is at beginning in 1932, Saint the hub of a partnership between Mary’s Hospital School of Aquinas College, the University of Nursing students atDetroit Mercy (UDM), and Saint tended Catholic Junior Mary’s Mercy Medical Center. College (now Aquinas) to The partnership was created to earn college credit as part bring a bachelor’s degree nursing of their nursing eduprogram with a primary health cation, said Aquinas care focus to West Michigan. The College Archivist Sr. Jean curriculum is divided evenly Milhaupt, O.P., who between Aquinas and UDM, with taught them English in Aquinas handling the liberal arts the early 1950s and said and sciences and UDM the the program ran until 20 advanced nursing science and Student Jennifer Gable checks on patient at Saint or 30 years ago. clinical courses. Complex though “Our faculty who teach Mary’s Mercy Medical Center. it may be, the program “is going nursing students all say great,” Thomas said. “I’m expecting the students are very good, very work in the third year of training, approximately 90 students by this dedicated and work awfully hard,” “we begin patient-related work in August.” said Arts and Sciences Dean the first year and start clinicals in The program began in fall 2000 Shirley Lewis, Ed.D., “The stuthe second year,” she said, “so I will with eight students and “was dents consistently report they get a lot more clinical time.” This designed to have no more than 32 didn’t know how demanding the experience takes place at Saint students per year, because one of nursing curriculum would be when Mary’s, both in the hospital and in the things UDM and Aquinas they enrolled in it, but all are glad primary care settings. pride them-selves on is their ability

57

Aquinas College Endowment Society members and guests were treated to a presentation on “Shakespeare’s GlobeTheater: A Living Model” by English Department Chairman Gary Eberle. Other miniclasses included “Poetry 111: No Experience Necessary” by Assistant Professor Vicki McMillan and “Cinema: Tips for Budding Film Reviewers” by Professor Emeritus Andrew Jefchak. The dinner recognized the English Department and the Patrick Gill Memorial Scholarship that is awarded to an outstanding English major.

English Department Featured at ACES Dinner English Department Chair Gary Eberle shows a model of the Globe Theatre to attendees at the May Endowment Society Dinner. (L-R) Dave Kamm ’64; Kathy Fore, director of Special Gifts; Sr. Aquinas Weber ’58; Michael O’Connor ’77; Joseph Boomgard ’03; and, Claire Waltman ’03

Aquinas College was remembered by our honored alumnus, Jerome C. Byrne ’48, through a gift from his Beverly Hills, California estate. A portion from the sale of the beautiful villa brought a gift of $1.6 million to provide funding for projects that were special to Jerry. The Byrne Professorship in Early Childhood Education and the Byrne Distinguished Faculty Fund will help Aquinas recruit and support outstanding faculty in the School of Education. The Jerome C. Byrne Scholarship will also provide awards to outstanding students who maintain a 3.7 GPA. After Aquinas College, Byrne attended Harvard University where he was the editor of the Law Review. He later served as special counsel to the Governor of California, where he investigated student unrest and made recommendations for the restructuring of the University of California educational system during the 1960s. Mr. Byrne died of cancer on October 24, 2001.

Former Trustee Honors Aquinas with Bequest Barbara McCargar, chair of the Music Department, and Mark Rehl, an adjunct instructor, look over the equipment in the College’s new recording studio.

By Laura Bennett-Kimble ‘95, Contributing Writer

Collaborative Nursing Program Enters Its Fourth Year

The renovated music recording studio was unveiled by Department Chairperson, Barbara Witham McCargar, at the luncheon held for the Friends of the Music at Aquinas College. The college raised $20,000 to equip the studio. The old equipment was often breaking down and was not suitable for students. Recording studio classes are important since

future performers and teachers will need to know the fundamentals and principles of recording sound. Our graduates will be going into schools that have sound systems for both performing and practicing. Mark Rehl is the adjunct faculty who teaches both introductory and intermediate classes. Mark is a recording professional who has taught at Aquinas since 1999.

New Recording Studio Attracts Students

Campus News

Development – Fall 2003 1967 Sr. Joellen Barkwell, O.P., is the vocational director/associate director for the Grand Rapids Dominican Sisters at Marywood.

1968 John Cybulskis a physics teacher at Niles High School in southern Michigan is pioneering a curriculum known as The Infinity Project—a hands-on computerbased class that gives students exposure to engineering for the first time anywhere at the high school level.

1970

The deadline for submitting

Kathleen Plato, Ph.D., recently received the 2003 “Champion for Kids” award from the TOGETHER organization of Olympia, Washington, for her decade of volunteer service and leadership on the board of directors of Community Youth Services. Her career work for education programs at the Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction was also recognized.

1971

class notes for the spring

James Woroniecki left his position as vice-president of Subaru in Indiana to become a senior vice-president with Denso in Tennessee. James and his wife, Nancy, live on a lake at the foot of the Smokey Mountains. Planning to retire in about six years, they have no plans to move from their lakefront home.

Aquinas magazine

Matthew also volunteers as a track coach at Union High School in Grand Rapids.

1979 Edward Mann announces the publication of his second work of fiction Long River, which came out in April. Look for Long River and his first book, Shadow Wind, on amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com. Michael Waters completed his urological surgery residency at Michigan State in 2000 and is currently a practicing urologist with Maine Coast Urology in the Ellsworth/ Bar Harbor region and plans to start Frenchman Bay Urology in the summer of 2003. He was named vicepresident of Maine Lithotripsy Services, LLC in April of 2003. Michael and his wife, Michelle, were married in August 2000 and reside in Ellsworth, Maine. Lawrence Wilson is a Lieutenant Colonel in the Judge Advocate General Corps and is currently serving on active military duty in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin.

1982 Mary McCaffery is a speech-language pathologist for the Flint Community Schools. She has two sons, Harley and Jack. Harley just returned from a year as an exchange student in Japan; Jack is in his second year at MTU in Houghton.

1983 1972

is December 1, 2003. ______ alumni@aquinas.edu (616) 459-8281

Shirley (Smith) Kupiecki was among five people honored in May 2003 by the Galesburg-Augusta Community Forum for years of dedication and service in helping to build a healthy community.

1974 Gregory Knowles, Ph.D., record producer, is based in New York and Los Angeles. He is past president and trustee of the Recording Academy (Grammy Awards) and on the music faculty of the Julliard School in New York. Greg and his wife, Katie, commute between Coasts.

1976 Matthew Meyer has been employed with Spectrum Health for the past 15 years. He and wife Maryhave two boys, both freshmen at North Park University in Chicago.

William F. Roth and his wife Colleen (Leonard) Roth ’84 became the proud parents of quads, Braden, William IV, Aishlin, and Colin, in June of 2002. Beyond the challenge of raising four small children, Bill and Colleen were also faced with Bill’s bone marrow transplant last fall. “If there has been anything evident from the past 18 months in the lives of both Colleen and I, it has been the power of faith and prayers,” he says. The hardest part for him was spending four months away from Colleen and the quads while recovering in an isolation type environment. Bill works for BDO Siedman, and the company connected his apartment in Chicago and the family home in Grand Rapids with Web cams so Bill could see Colleen and the quads, and they could see him as well.

This edition of AQ magazine comes to you as the 2003-04 academic year is nearly underway. The articles you’ll be perusing reflect the past year’s experiences that students and other members of the College community gained in our myriad academic, service and student activity programs. From conductive education to nursing to migrant tutoring, the programs and people featured in this issue also reflect the vibrancy of the campus our visitors readily notice and the energy that is moving this new academic year forward. One of our summer visitors was President Harry J. Knopke Bruce Weitz, an Emmy Awardwinning actor who resided in our Ravine apartments while he starred in Circle Theatre’s production of “Prisoner of Second Avenue.” His visit here is recalled on page 9. While he was pleased to have the lead in the next-to-last Circle production in John Ball Park before its move to our new Performing Art Center here in July, he stated several times during his stay that he hopes to return to perform in the new theatre. In an exchange with Grand Rapids Rotary members, he described our newest building as arguably the finest community theatre in the country, an actor’s theatre that any good actor would do anything to perform in. Our student actors, directors and production specialists now have this outstanding facility at their disposal; we’re all looking forward to the countless artistic and creative additions they will be making to the life of the College in the months and years ahead. While the theatre and other new programs evolve to become integral parts of the campus this year, they will be doing so without the daily guidance and support of Sr. Aquinas Weber who retired this summer after 25 years of devotion and exceptional service to Aquinas College. An all-too-brief summary of her background and accomplishments is found on page 6. Now Emeritus Chancellor, Sr. Aquinas continues to embody the spirit and the purpose of the College as she did in her daily work on behalf of the students and all other members of the College community. Fortunately, her retirement does not mean a complete cessation of her relationship with the College; she’s agreed to continue her active participation on selected committees of our Board of Trustees as well as to share her insights and perspective with some special ad hoc College committees. Over many years, Sr. Aquinas has been instrumental in fostering the Catholic identity of Aquinas College and in helping it maintain its Dominican emphases on academic rigor, inclusiveness and involvement with the community. I’m particularly grateful that we will continue to benefit from her presence here as we all work to pursue truth with an open mind and an open heart.

60

President’s Message

Class Notes

Fall 2003 –

5


Tom Church,Chairperson, Aquinas College Board ofTrustees

58

Trustee Profiles

The Aquinas College Board of Trustees has a new chairman, and considering that he’s been a partner with the accounting firm of Deloitte & Touche for 12 of the last 22 years, it’s not surprising that one of Thomas D. Church’s goals is “ensuring the financial well-being of the College.” The CPA first became involved with the College a few years back when President Knopke and Sr. Aquinas Weber “got me involved with the Development Committee,” he said. From there, Church became chair of the Business and Finance Committee. “I saw it as an opportunity to bring my interest in education, Catholic faith and financial acumen to the school.” He joined the Board of Trustees in 1998, and also is currently chair of the Student and Religious Affairs Committee. Church said he enjoys working with Aquinas College because “it is truly a collective effort with tremendous donors—they give from the heart.” He said that he’s seen the school’s contributions, facilities, and enrollment grow, and he wants to see that continue during his chairmanship. Referring to Aquinas as a hidden gem, Church said he’d like to see it get more national recognition as a premier liberal arts college in the Midwest. One of the things Church has enjoyed at Aquinas is seeing how it works with other organizations. By joining forces with Circle Theatre and Catholic Secondary Schools, the College helped to create the new Performing Arts Center. And by working with the University of Detroit and St. Mary’s Mercy Medical Center, Aquinas has helped to create a bachelor’s degree program for nursing students. These programs are unique, he said, because of their nature and their numbers. Although Church did not attend Aquinas, he said, “I’m a product of Catholic education and a believer in faith-based education,” and when the opportunity to become involved with Aquinas appeared, he took it. He had moved to the area about ten years ago, he said, from the southeast side of the state. He and his wife Nancy have three children, Joe, Katie, and Michael. When asked about his life outside of work, he said, “My activities really center around my family.” Church freely admitted to being a busy man, and rued that he was sitting with his cell phone in LaGuardia Airport during the interview for this story rather than comfortably chatting in a Grand Rapids coffeehouse. But this is his life, and he makes no apologies for it. In fact, he said that taking on the new responsibilities as chair of the board is not a concern. “When it’s a priority, when it’s important—you make the time,” he said. Plus, he doesn’t view himself as “out there on my own” with this Board, because the group works so well as a team. The bottom line? The goals of the Board of Trustees and the people who make up Aquinas College are shared by Church, who said, “I’ve enjoyed the people I’ve met, and I enjoy their mission. It’s a very inclusive community.” By Laura Bennett-Kimble ‘95, Contributing Writer

Tom Church: Taking the Reins

things, because I think everybody had such strong feelings about her. She was in a sense a quiet leader of the school.” He paused. “She just has a draw about her because she’s so reliable.” That draw has enabled her to help the College in many ways, including financially. Through her efforts in the Development office and as a special assistant to the president, she has helped grow the College into the thriving institution it is today. To the relief of many, Sr. Aquinas will stay involved with the College. “The president has asked me to do a couple of things,” she said. “I will serve on a couple of committees and still work a bit at Emeritus College, and I can pick and choose what I want to do– that’s the beauty of retirement.” Sr. Aquinas has received numerous awards, including the 1999 Edward J. Frey Sr. Distinguished Achievement Award, the 1997 National Kidney Foundation Galaxy Award, the 1993 Aquinas College Reflection Award, and the 1990 Jewish National Fund Tr ee of Life Award. Former Aquinas College President Norbert Hruby once said, “This is a lady who can do it all.” And as she enjoys her retirement, she will surely do even more, whether it’s helping out at the College, traveling to visit her relatives or seeing the country (“I do want to go to Alaska,” she said), volunteering, or just relaxing with a good book. She said retirement will allow more time for prayer, reflection and renewal of her spirit. Whatever she does, though, one can assume she will do it well.

7

Bottom right: Sr. Aquinas with her 1990 University of Notre Dame Award of the Year Bottom left: Sr. Aquinas at her retirement luncheon held in the Holmdene Board Room in May. Middle: Sr. Aquinas receives the 1990 Tree of Life Award from the National Jewish Foundation. Included in the picture (from left) are Aquinas Trustee Pat Quinn ’58, the late Hy Berkowitz, Trustee Emeritus John Canepa,Sr. Aquinas, Trustee Emeritus Raymond Knape, Jerry Subar and Larry Meyer. Right: Sr. Mary Aquinas Weber, O.P., ’58 (1974)

Campus News

Campus News Trustee Profiles – Fall 2003

Sister Aquinas Weber Retires By Laura Bennett-Kimble ’95, Contributing Writer

Aquinas College Chancellor Sr. Mary Aquinas Weber, O.P., turned 80 in May, and decided after 25 years at the College, it was time to retire. Her retirement took effect at the end of June. “I thought about it through the [previous] year and knew my answer by December,” she said. “ I never questioned it, that it was the right thing to do. It’s best to go when you’re on top of things, and that’s the way I feel.” One might argue that the quiet and steady Sr. Aquinas has been on top of things most of her life. One of 11 children, she became a Dominican Sister in 1944. Why? “I felt a calling,” she said, “and followed through.” After teaching and serving as a principal in Detroit and Bay City, Sr. Aquinas was Prioress of the Marywood Dominican Sisters from 1966 to 1972, and then she served as the director of the newly formed Eastown Neighborhood Project from 1973 until 1976, when she was elected treasurer of the Dominican Sisters. Sr. Aquinas became a chairperson of the Aquinas College Board of Trustees in 1966, and has been a presence on campus ever since. She served as vice president President Knopke and Sr. Aquinas Weber of Development with Aquinas from 1983 to 1988, and was appointed as the College’s first chancellor in 1987. When asked what she had found most satisfying in her career, Sr. Aquinas said, “the Eastown Neighborhood Project.” In addition, she said, “my work at

Aquinas in the Emeritus program,” which she led as director from 1980-1983 and again from 19881991. Also, “Teaching was very satisfying for me; I think I did well at it and I think I was a good principal.” Marty Allen, chairman of the Board of Trustees for the Gerald R. Ford Museum and a retired executive from Old Kent Bank, first knew Sr. Aquinas as a teacher: “She was my sixth grade teacher at St. Stephen’s. Little did we know that what we were getting instilled in us was a part of our values system that would last all our lives. At the time, she was, in our minds, a very stern taskmaster.” Very active in her community, this taskmaster has been on a number of boards, including St. John’s Home, Por ter Hills Presbyterian Village, and Salvation Army. As the first woman on the Board of Directors of Old Kent Bank, Sr. Aquinas initially rattled Allen during his presentations to the board, the Aquinas College Trustee Emeritus said, as he “was a bit nervous because I had my sixth grade teacher back observing me.” At Aquinas, Allen said, “What I saw as a sixth grader still exists. She won’t back down from anything. She will stand up for what is right in that stern way. But it’s not a negative trait, it’s a trait people recognize for who said it and what was said, because she has a history of being right. “Whenever there was a special need that was critical to the survival of Aquinas or when there was an issue, she was always placed in that position to rectify those

The Aquinas College Board of Trustees said farewell to three of its longest-term members, outgoing Chair Kate Pew Wolters ’78, Bob Vander Weide ’81, and Awards Committee Chair Martin J. Allen Jr., but welcomed each in their new capacity as Trustee Emeriti. Wolters also will continue on the Board for the coming year as Immediate Past President. During their service to the College, the three trustees have been involved in significant growth at Aquinas: the addition of Jarecki Center, the addition of the campus apartments, construction of the new Aquinas College Performing Arts Center, and the inclusion of several new academic programs and community initiatives. Wolters is a member of the Steelcase Board of Directors and President of the Kate and Richard Wolters Foundation and has just completed her presidential appointment to the National Council on Disability.

College Salutes Outgoing Trustees

Marty Allen

Bob Vander Weide

Kate Wolters

Allen has served the Board as chair of both the Awards and Development Committees. He is chairman of the Gerald R. Ford Foundation Board of Trustees, and continues to serve on numerous national and regional boards. VanderWeide is President/ CEO of RDV Sports/Orlando Magic and resided with his family for many years in Orlando, Florida, where he was also active in numerous community organizations there. He continues his involvement with RDV Sports, but with his move back to Grand Rapids this past year is now also able to spend more time with his several businesses in the Grand Rapids area. At the May Board meeting, Trustees formally recognized Wolters, Allen and VanderWeide for their service. Aquinas is grateful to each of them for their continued service and support of the College.

Trustee Goes the Distance! In last spring’s (2003) issue, we introduced you to Trustee Lori Bush of Holland, a runner who finished the New York Marathon last November. with a time of 3:54, putting her in the top quarter of all 31,835 runners and 1,297 out of 10,210 females competing. In Boston, last April, she continued to improve her time, setting a personal best time of 3:40:02. “I really did not plan on going out for a personal best, but knew at about mile 15 that I was feeling very good and it was worth a shot,” she recalled. Bush said it was a warm day and a number of people suffered from heat exhaustion. Typically, she said, people run the Boston 10 to15 minutes slower because of the difficult course conditions. Her finishing time automatically qualifies her to run next year’s 26.2 mile marathon in Bean Town. And she says, “I will.” Meanwhile, eighteen days later, Bush ran the Fifth Third River Bank run, here in Grand Rapids, where she notched another personal best of 2:03:53 in the 25K run. Immediately after that race, she came to Aquinas where she

6

Trustee Lori Bush in Boston

took part in Commencement ceremonies, giving no hint that she had just finished a marathon run that morning.

59


58

Tom Church,Chairperson, Aquinas College Board ofTrustees

Trustee Profiles

7

The Aquinas College Board of Trustees has a new chairman, and considering that he’s been a partner with the accounting firm of Deloitte & Touche for 12 of the last 22 years, it’s not surprising that one of Thomas D. Church’s goals is “ensuring the financial well-being of the College.” The CPA first became involved with the College a few years back when President Knopke and Sr. Aquinas Weber “got me involved with the Development Committee,” he said. From there, Church became chair of the Business and Finance Committee. “I saw it as an opportunity to bring my interest in education, Catholic faith and financial acumen to the school.” He joined the Board of Trustees in 1998, and also is currently chair of the Student and Religious Affairs Committee. Church said he enjoys working with Aquinas College because “it is truly a collective effort with tremendous donors—they give from the heart.” He said that he’s seen the school’s contributions, facilities, and enrollment grow, and he wants to see that continue during his chairmanship. Referring to Aquinas as a hidden gem, Church said he’d like to see it get more national recognition as a premier liberal arts college in the Midwest. One of the things Church has enjoyed at Aquinas is seeing how it works with other organizations. By joining forces with Circle Theatre and Catholic Secondary Schools, the College helped to create the new Performing Arts Center. And by working with the University of Detroit and St. Mary’s Mercy Medical Center, Aquinas has helped to create a bachelor’s degree program for nursing students. These programs are unique, he said, because of their nature and their numbers. Although Church did not attend Aquinas, he said, “I’m a product of Catholic education and a believer in faith-based education,” and when the opportunity to become involved with Aquinas appeared, he took it. He had moved to the area about ten years ago, he said, from the southeast side of the state. He and his wife Nancy have three children, Joe, Katie, and Michael. When asked about his life outside of work, he said, “My activities really center around my family.” Church freely admitted to being a busy man, and rued that he was sitting with his cell phone in LaGuardia Airport during the interview for this story rather than comfortably chatting in a Grand Rapids coffeehouse. But this is his life, and he makes no apologies for it. In fact, he said that taking on the new responsibilities as chair of the board is not a concern. “When it’s a priority, when it’s important—you make the time,” he said. Plus, he doesn’t view himself as “out there on my own” with this Board, because the group works so well as a team. The bottom line? The goals of the Board of Trustees and the people who make up Aquinas College are shared by Church, who said, “I’ve enjoyed the people I’ve met, and I enjoy their mission. It’s a very inclusive community.” By Laura Bennett-Kimble ‘95, Contributing Writer

Tom Church: Taking the Reins

things, because I think everybody had such strong feelings about her. She was in a sense a quiet leader of the school.” He paused. “She just has a draw about her because she’s so reliable.” That draw has enabled her to help the College in many ways, including financially. Through her efforts in the Development office and as a special assistant to the president, she has helped grow the College into the thriving institution it is today. To the relief of many, Sr. Aquinas will stay involved with the College. “The president has asked me to do a couple of things,” she said. “I will serve on a couple of committees and still work a bit at Emeritus College, and I can pick and choose what I want to do– that’s the beauty of retirement.” Sr. Aquinas has received numerous awards, including the 1999 Edward J. Frey Sr. Distinguished Achievement Award, the 1997 National Kidney Foundation Galaxy Award, the 1993 Aquinas College Reflection Award, and the 1990 Jewish National Fund Tr ee of Life Award. Former Aquinas College President Norbert Hruby once said, “This is a lady who can do it all.” And as she enjoys her retirement, she will surely do even more, whether it’s helping out at the College, traveling to visit her relatives or seeing the country (“I do want to go to Alaska,” she said), volunteering, or just relaxing with a good book. She said retirement will allow more time for prayer, reflection and renewal of her spirit. Whatever she does, though, one can assume she will do it well.

Bottom right: Sr. Aquinas with her 1990 University of Notre Dame Award of the Year Bottom left: Sr. Aquinas at her retirement luncheon held in the Holmdene Board Room in May. Middle: Sr. Aquinas receives the 1990 Tree of Life Award from the National Jewish Foundation. Included in the picture (from left) are Aquinas Trustee Pat Quinn ’58, the late Hy Berkowitz, Trustee Emeritus John Canepa,Sr. Aquinas, Trustee Emeritus Raymond Knape, Jerry Subar and Larry Meyer. Right: Sr. Mary Aquinas Weber, O.P., ’58 (1974)

Campus News

Campus News Trustee Profiles – Fall 2003

Sister Aquinas Weber Retires By Laura Bennett-Kimble ’95, Contributing Writer

Aquinas College Chancellor Sr. Mary Aquinas Weber, O.P., turned 80 in May, and decided after 25 years at the College, it was time to retire. Her retirement took effect at the end of June. “I thought about it through the [previous] year and knew my answer by December,” she said. “ I never questioned it, that it was the right thing to do. It’s best to go when you’re on top of things, and that’s the way I feel.” One might argue that the quiet and steady Sr. Aquinas has been on top of things most of her life. One of 11 children, she became a Dominican Sister in 1944. Why? “I felt a calling,” she said, “and followed through.” After teaching and serving as a principal in Detroit and Bay City, Sr. Aquinas was Prioress of the Marywood Dominican Sisters from 1966 to 1972, and then she served as the director of the newly formed Eastown Neighborhood Project from 1973 until 1976, when she was elected treasurer of the Dominican Sisters. Sr. Aquinas became a chairperson of the Aquinas College Board of Trustees in 1966, and has been a presence on campus ever since. She served as vice president President Knopke and Sr. Aquinas Weber of Development with Aquinas from 1983 to 1988, and was appointed as the College’s first chancellor in 1987. When asked what she had found most satisfying in her career, Sr. Aquinas said, “the Eastown Neighborhood Project.” In addition, she said, “my work at

6

Aquinas in the Emeritus program,” which she led as director from 1980-1983 and again from 19881991. Also, “Teaching was very satisfying for me; I think I did well at it and I think I was a good principal.” Marty Allen, chairman of the Board of Trustees for the Gerald R. Ford Museum and a retired executive from Old Kent Bank, first knew Sr. Aquinas as a teacher: “She was my sixth grade teacher at St. Stephen’s. Little did we know that what we were getting instilled in us was a part of our values system that would last all our lives. At the time, she was, in our minds, a very stern taskmaster.” Very active in her community, this taskmaster has been on a number of boards, including St. John’s Home, Por ter Hills Presbyterian Village, and Salvation Army. As the first woman on the Board of Directors of Old Kent Bank, Sr. Aquinas initially rattled Allen during his presentations to the board, the Aquinas College Trustee Emeritus said, as he “was a bit nervous because I had my sixth grade teacher back observing me.” At Aquinas, Allen said, “What I saw as a sixth grader still exists. She won’t back down from anything. She will stand up for what is right in that stern way. But it’s not a negative trait, it’s a trait people recognize for who said it and what was said, because she has a history of being right. “Whenever there was a special need that was critical to the survival of Aquinas or when there was an issue, she was always placed in that position to rectify those

The Aquinas College Board of Trustees said farewell to three of its longest-term members, outgoing Chair Kate Pew Wolters ’78, Bob Vander Weide ’81, and Awards Committee Chair Martin J. Allen Jr., but welcomed each in their new capacity as Trustee Emeriti. Wolters also will continue on the Board for the coming year as Immediate Past President. During their service to the College, the three trustees have been involved in significant growth at Aquinas: the addition of Jarecki Center, the addition of the campus apartments, construction of the new Aquinas College Performing Arts Center, and the inclusion of several new academic programs and community initiatives. Wolters is a member of the Steelcase Board of Directors and President of the Kate and Richard Wolters Foundation and has just completed her presidential appointment to the National Council on Disability.

College Salutes Outgoing Trustees

Marty Allen

Bob Vander Weide

Kate Wolters

Allen has served the Board as chair of both the Awards and Development Committees. He is chairman of the Gerald R. Ford Foundation Board of Trustees, and continues to serve on numerous national and regional boards. VanderWeide is President/ CEO of RDV Sports/Orlando Magic and resided with his family for many years in Orlando, Florida, where he was also active in numerous community organizations there. He continues his involvement with RDV Sports, but with his move back to Grand Rapids this past year is now also able to spend more time with his several businesses in the Grand Rapids area. At the May Board meeting, Trustees formally recognized Wolters, Allen and VanderWeide for their service. Aquinas is grateful to each of them for their continued service and support of the College.

Trustee Goes the Distance! In last spring’s (2003) issue, we introduced you to Trustee Lori Bush of Holland, a runner who finished the New York Marathon last November. with a time of 3:54, putting her in the top quarter of all 31,835 runners and 1,297 out of 10,210 females competing. In Boston, last April, she continued to improve her time, setting a personal best time of 3:40:02. “I really did not plan on going out for a personal best, but knew at about mile 15 that I was feeling very good and it was worth a shot,” she recalled. Bush said it was a warm day and a number of people suffered from heat exhaustion. Typically, she said, people run the Boston 10 to15 minutes slower because of the difficult course conditions. Her finishing time automatically qualifies her to run next year’s 26.2 mile marathon in Bean Town. And she says, “I will.” Meanwhile, eighteen days later, Bush ran the Fifth Third River Bank run, here in Grand Rapids, where she notched another personal best of 2:03:53 in the 25K run. Immediately after that race, she came to Aquinas where she

59

Trustee Lori Bush in Boston

took part in Commencement ceremonies, giving no hint that she had just finished a marathon run that morning.


8

57

Does it get complicated when three highly reputable, timehonored institutions join forces to create a joint educational program? “Oh, yeah!” said Robi Thomas, struggling to control her laughter. Thomas, assistant professor of nursing and chair of the Grand Rapids campuses of the UDM McAuley School of Nursing, is at the hub of a partnership between Aquinas College, the University of Detroit Mercy (UDM), and Saint Mary’s Mercy Medical Center. The partnership was created to bring a bachelor’s degree nursing program with a primary health care focus to West Michigan. The curriculum is divided evenly between Aquinas and UDM, with Aquinas handling the liberal arts and sciences and UDM the advanced nursing science and clinical courses. Complex though it may be, the program “is going great,” Thomas said. “I’m expecting approximately 90 students by this August.” The program began in fall 2000 with eight students and “was designed to have no more than 32 students per year, because one of the things UDM and Aquinas pride them-selves on is their ability

to give indithey are in it and wouldn’t trade vidualized the experience for any other.” attention to “To me, the best part of it is the the students,” students—watching them grow she said. The and develop and realize that they inaugural are wanting to give back to the class, which community,” Thomas said. “The had an averstudents who are attracted to this Nursing students (l-r) Melissa Bauer, Jennifer Gable, Jennifer Kragt age GPA of program are really special students. and Kristi Koetje 3.5 at the end They are wonderful scholars but of last semester, has increased to they’re also very giving people. 12. They will graduate in May They do a lot of volunteer work 2004 with a bachelor of science on their own.” in nursing from UDM, which has And they also get more time conducted its School of Nursing with patients, which is something for 63 years. junior Erin Mulligan appreciates. While this program may be Unlike most four-year nursing relatively new, the College’s programs which begin clinical involvement in nursing sciences isn’t. In fact, beginning in 1932, Saint Mary’s Hospital School of Nursing students attended Catholic Junior College (now Aquinas) to earn college credit as part of their nursing education, said Aquinas College Archivist Sr. Jean Milhaupt, O.P., who taught them English in the early 1950s and said the program ran until 20 Student Jennifer Gable checks on patient at Saint or 30 years ago. “Our faculty who teach Mary’s Mercy Medical Center. nursing students all say the students are very good, very work in the third year of training, dedicated and work awfully hard,” “we begin patient-related work in said Arts and Sciences Dean the first year and start clinicals in Shirley Lewis, Ed.D., “The stuthe second year,” she said, “so I will dents consistently report they get a lot more clinical time.” This didn’t know how demanding the experience takes place at Saint nursing curriculum would be when Mary’s, both in the hospital and in they enrolled in it, but all are glad primary care settings.

Aquinas College Endowment Society members and guests were treated to a presentation on “Shakespeare’s GlobeTheater: A Living Model” by English Department Chairman Gary Eberle. Other miniclasses included “Poetry 111: No Experience Necessary” by Assistant Professor Vicki McMillan and “Cinema: Tips for Budding Film Reviewers” by Professor Emeritus Andrew Jefchak. The dinner recognized the English Department and the Patrick Gill Memorial Scholarship that is awarded to an outstanding English major.

English Department Featured at ACES Dinner English Department Chair Gary Eberle shows a model of the Globe Theatre to attendees at the May Endowment Society Dinner. (L-R) Dave Kamm ’64; Kathy Fore, director of Special Gifts; Sr. Aquinas Weber ’58; Michael O’Connor ’77; Joseph Boomgard ’03; and, Claire Waltman ’03 Barbara McCargar, chair of the Music Department, and Mark Rehl, an adjunct instructor, look over the equipment in the College’s new recording studio.

By Laura Bennett-Kimble ‘95, Contributing Writer

Collaborative Nursing Program Enters Its Fourth Year

The renovated music recording studio was unveiled by Department Chairperson, Barbara Witham McCargar, at the luncheon held for the Friends of the Music at Aquinas College. The college raised $20,000 to equip the studio. The old equipment was often breaking down and was not suitable for students. Recording studio classes are important since

future performers and teachers will need to know the fundamentals and principles of recording sound. Our graduates will be going into schools that have sound systems for both performing and practicing. Mark Rehl is the adjunct faculty who teaches both introductory and intermediate classes. Mark is a recording professional who has taught at Aquinas since 1999.

New Recording Studio Attracts Students

Campus News

Class Notes

Development – Fall 2003 1968 John Cybulskis a physics teacher at Niles High School in southern Michigan is pioneering a curriculum known as The Infinity Project—a hands-on computerbased class that gives students exposure to engineering for the first time anywhere at the high school level.

1970

The deadline for submitting

Kathleen Plato, Ph.D., recently received the 2003 “Champion for Kids” award from the TOGETHER organization of Olympia, Washington, for her decade of volunteer service and leadership on the board of directors of Community Youth Services. Her career work for education programs at the Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction was also recognized.

1971

class notes for the spring

James Woroniecki left his position as vice-president of Subaru in Indiana to become a senior vice-president with Denso in Tennessee. James and his wife, Nancy, live on a lake at the foot of the Smokey Mountains. Planning to retire in about six years, they have no plans to move from their lakefront home.

Aquinas magazine

______ alumni@aquinas.edu (616) 459-8281

1979 Edward Mann announces the publication of his second work of fiction Long River, which came out in April. Look for Long River and his first book, Shadow Wind, on amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com. Michael Waters completed his urological surgery residency at Michigan State in 2000 and is currently a practicing urologist with Maine Coast Urology in the Ellsworth/ Bar Harbor region and plans to start Frenchman Bay Urology in the summer of 2003. He was named vicepresident of Maine Lithotripsy Services, LLC in April of 2003. Michael and his wife, Michelle, were married in August 2000 and reside in Ellsworth, Maine. Lawrence Wilson is a Lieutenant Colonel in the Judge Advocate General Corps and is currently serving on active military duty in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin.

1982 Mary McCaffery is a speech-language pathologist for the Flint Community Schools. She has two sons, Harley and Jack. Harley just returned from a year as an exchange student in Japan; Jack is in his second year at MTU in Houghton.

1983 1972

is December 1, 2003.

Matthew also volunteers as a track coach at Union High School in Grand Rapids.

Shirley (Smith) Kupiecki was among five people honored in May 2003 by the Galesburg-Augusta Community Forum for years of dedication and service in helping to build a healthy community.

1974 Gregory Knowles, Ph.D., record producer, is based in New York and Los Angeles. He is past president and trustee of the Recording Academy (Grammy Awards) and on the music faculty of the Julliard School in New York. Greg and his wife, Katie, commute between Coasts.

1976 Matthew Meyer has been employed with Spectrum Health for the past 15 years. He and wife Maryhave two boys, both freshmen at North Park University in Chicago.

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William F. Roth and his wife Colleen (Leonard) Roth ’84 became the proud parents of quads, Braden, William IV, Aishlin, and Colin, in June of 2002. Beyond the challenge of raising four small children, Bill and Colleen were also faced with Bill’s bone marrow transplant last fall. “If there has been anything evident from the past 18 months in the lives of both Colleen and I, it has been the power of faith and prayers,” he says. The hardest part for him was spending four months away from Colleen and the quads while recovering in an isolation type environment. Bill works for BDO Siedman, and the company connected his apartment in Chicago and the family home in Grand Rapids with Web cams so Bill could see Colleen and the quads, and they could see him as well.

This edition of AQ magazine comes to you as the 2003-04 academic year is nearly underway. The articles you’ll be perusing reflect the past year’s experiences that students and other members of the College community gained in our myriad academic, service and student activity programs. From conductive education to nursing to migrant tutoring, the programs and people featured in this issue also reflect the vibrancy of the campus our visitors readily notice and the energy that is moving this new academic year forward. One of our summer visitors was President Harry J. Knopke Bruce Weitz, an Emmy Awardwinning actor who resided in our Ravine apartments while he starred in Circle Theatre’s production of “Prisoner of Second Avenue.” His visit here is recalled on page 9. While he was pleased to have the lead in the next-to-last Circle production in John Ball Park before its move to our new Performing Art Center here in July, he stated several times during his stay that he hopes to return to perform in the new theatre. In an exchange with Grand Rapids Rotary members, he described our newest building as arguably the finest community theatre in the country, an actor’s theatre that any good actor would do anything to perform in. Our student actors, directors and production specialists now have this outstanding facility at their disposal; we’re all looking forward to the countless artistic and creative additions they will be making to the life of the College in the months and years ahead. While the theatre and other new programs evolve to become integral parts of the campus this year, they will be doing so without the daily guidance and support of Sr. Aquinas Weber who retired this summer after 25 years of devotion and exceptional service to Aquinas College. An all-too-brief summary of her background and accomplishments is found on page 6. Now Emeritus Chancellor, Sr. Aquinas continues to embody the spirit and the purpose of the College as she did in her daily work on behalf of the students and all other members of the College community. Fortunately, her retirement does not mean a complete cessation of her relationship with the College; she’s agreed to continue her active participation on selected committees of our Board of Trustees as well as to share her insights and perspective with some special ad hoc College committees. Over many years, Sr. Aquinas has been instrumental in fostering the Catholic identity of Aquinas College and in helping it maintain its Dominican emphases on academic rigor, inclusiveness and involvement with the community. I’m particularly grateful that we will continue to benefit from her presence here as we all work to pursue truth with an open mind and an open heart.

5

Fall 2003 –

Aquinas College was remembered by our honored alumnus, Jerome C. Byrne ’48, through a gift from his Beverly Hills, California estate. A portion from the sale of the beautiful villa brought a gift of $1.6 million to provide funding for projects that were special to Jerry. The Byrne Professorship in Early Childhood Education and the Byrne Distinguished Faculty Fund will help Aquinas recruit and support outstanding faculty in the School of Education. The Jerome C. Byrne Scholarship will also provide awards to outstanding students who maintain a 3.7 GPA. After Aquinas College, Byrne attended Harvard University where he was the editor of the Law Review. He later served as special counsel to the Governor of California, where he investigated student unrest and made recommendations for the restructuring of the University of California educational system during the 1960s. Mr. Byrne died of cancer on October 24, 2001.

Former Trustee Honors Aquinas with Bequest Sr. Joellen Barkwell, O.P., is the vocational director/associate director for the Grand Rapids Dominican Sisters at Marywood.

President’s Message

1967


Fall 2003 –

Class Notes – Fall 2003

1985

Editor’s Note As we get ready for the 2003-04 school year, I can’t help but think back proudly on the recently completed year, reviewing the strides we’ve made here at Aquinas. Last September, we launched the First Annual Hall of Fame Gala to recognize those whose contributions have helped make the College what it is today—whether we talk about academics, athletics or community service. We take great pride in recognizing those achievements. Our Alumni receptions continue to attract more new faces from among our graduates. We are encouraged by growing attendance and by the renewed interest alumni are taking in their alma mater. New programs are taking our curricula to new levels. Programs like the collaborative Nursing Program established in conjunction with University of Detroit Mercy and the Saint Mary’s Mercy Medical Center;

the new sustainable business major, which launches this fall; and, the Deaconate program for those seeking a greater involvement in the work of the Catholic Church are creating new opportunities for students, expanding their career choices. The opening of the new Performing Arts Center on July 28 will be the highlight of the year. After years of fundraising and developing another unique collaboration, this time with Community Circle Theatre and the Catholic Secondary Schools, we will soon see our theatre program move to new heights. The state-of-the-art facility will provide our students, faculty and staff with new and exciting experiences. I am especially looking forward to the start of this school year with enthusiasm as we welcome the freshman class of students, among them my daughter, Courtney. But our responsibility here is not only to every

freshman, but ever y new and returning student, as well, along with parents, donors, faculty, staff and administration and the community at large. Aquinas College has a tremendous responsibility to maintain its reputation in the Catholic Dominican tradition of teaching, service, leadership and inclusiveness. These charisms establish the foundation for everything we do here. We take our responsibilities seriously. Our graduates—your sons, daughters, neighbors, friends and colleagues—form our measuring stick. It is by that yardstick that we ask you to judge us and the work we do here. It is my hope that when you look carefully, you will see that there coninues to be a full measure of care given to every student at Aquinas College. – Marty Fahey, Senior Editor

Corrections In the spring 2003 Aquinas magazine article on Clement Chiwaya two photographs were misidentified.

(page 19) Monsignor Terrance Stewart is pictured with Chiwaya, not Bishop Robert Rose as identified. (page19) The naming order of the Sisters pictured was reversed.

The Dominican Sisters provided funds to Chiwaya for his Malawi Project. They include: (back row, l-r) Sisters Janet Mish, Diane Dehn, Ottilia Schaub, and Jean Kramer; (front row, l-r) Sr. Mary Lucille, Chiwaya and Sr. M. Aquinas Weber.

4

Recognition should also be given to Victoria Hargenrader who was instrumental in writing a grant proposal that eventually was approved for funding of the College’s AQ Club Night featured in the spring 2003 edition (page 23) of Aquinas. Also involved in the grant opportunity were Steven de Polo, associate director/grant writer in Development for Aquinas, Kristi Pavlak, and Randy MacGeorge, director of Residence Life.

William Van Wyngaarden earned his doctorate in applied ministry through the Graduate Theological Foundation. He has helped raise more than $50 million while encouraging thousands of people to volunteer. Currently, he is responsible for raising about 30 percent of Inspiration Ministries budget—a total $3 million campaign. Steven C. Wichmann joined the Bloomfield Hills, Michigan office of Rader, Fishman & Grauer PLLC as an associate in January of 2003. Linda Zarzecki was promoted to director of human resources at the Van Andel Institute in Grand Rapids.

1988 Matt Eichhorn, helped co-found the nonprofit Epilepsy Council of West Michigan in October of 2002. “The Council wants people to be aware of what epilepsy is and understand it so they are not afraid,” Eichhorn says. A main reason for starting the Council was the allocating of funding. In Michigan, the east side of the state was seeing plenty of funding while Grand Rapids was overlooked, according to Eichhorn. Since the Council was formed the money raised in West Michigan will stay in West Michigan. The Council provides education opportunities, support groups and financial help for epilepsy sufferers. It will be sponsoring several upcoming events throughout the summer and fall. Please see the Aquinas alumni Web site more details at www.aquinas.edu/alumni.

Robert Winter is a commercial real estate broker specializing in office property sales and leasing and investment property sales with Taatjes, Termaat & Tol in Grandville, Michigan.

1991 Janet Wyllie is the program manager for business services at the Grand Rapids Area Chamber of Commerce. Janet was named to the Leadership Grand Rapids Class of 2003 in January.

1992 Joseph Petersen is currently employed as a senior manufacturing cost analyst at Elmer’s Products, Inc. in Columbus, Ohio. Joe is also working on his MBA from Otterbein College in Westerville, Ohio. Joe and his wife, Julie (Trybus ’93), just celebrated their 10th wedding anniversary in October.

1993 Tania E. (Dee Dee) Fuller is an associate attorney at Miller, Johnson, Snell & Cummiskey, PLC. She was named to the Leadership Grand Rapids Class of 2003 in January. Tracey Gaughran-Perez received her master’s in English from Michigan State in 1997, and has been working on her doctorate ever since. Her writing has recently appeared in the San Francisco Bay Guardian, Bridge Magazine, and N.com. She teaches English at Northern Virginia Community College, in Woodbridge, Virginia. Julie (Trybus) Petersen graduated with her master of library/information science & archival administration from Wayne State in 1999. She was promoted to audiovisual curator for the Ohio State University Photo Archives in Columbus, Ohio, in August 2001. Julie and her husband, Joe Petersen ’92, recently celebrated their 10th wedding anniversary.

1994 Johann Vaz joined the South Florida Sun-Sentinel in February of 2003 as the vice president/chief technology officer. Johann recently relocated to Coral Springs, Florida with his wife, Audra, and children, Brenna and Derrick.

Judy (Arndt) Agarwal lives in the San Francisco Bay area with husband Jay. She is a manager at a biotechnology firm and Jay is an investment banker. She is also enrolled at the University of California at Berkeley, studying public health.

61

Marisa Fernando, a former CAVA coordinator has worked for her native country since returning to Sri Lanka in 1995. She helped rural weavers in the southern region form cooperatives. “Only the poorest families are involved in that trade. (Now) they have better bargaining power with traders and middlemen,” Fernando said. She also works with German Technical Cooperation, which gives vocational training to women and children from poor and middleincome families in masonry, welding, baking and food processing. Membership has grown from 500 women to 1,000 families. She credits a lot of that success to Aquinas. “I grew up, gained self-confidence, gained new skills, improved old skills, took part in some inspiring service-learning trips and made very special friends,” she says. “Working as the coordinator for CAVA and within Campus Ministry continues to guide me in my daily work.”

1995 RaeAnn (Johnson) Collins and her husband Patrick have two sons, Andrew, 18 months, and Samuel, five months. Samuel was born 13 weeks early and has Down’s Syndrome. He will have a second bowel surgery in June and heart surgery this fall. Sam is a little fighter but he can still use all of our prayers.

1997 Debra Langlois received her doctor of medicine degree from Wayne State School of Medicine in June 2002 and is completing her residency in pediatrics at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.

1998 Jessica (Fegan) Ciranni earned her master’s in the art of teaching from Oakland University in May of 2003. She is currently teaching middle school language arts classes. She and husband, Pietro, live in Warren.


Fall 2003 – Class Notes

Piper Peteet-Kilgore was accepted into the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s master’s in mass communication and journalism program.

1999 Cynthia Singleton is vice president of organizational development at Grand Rapids Community College. Cynthia was named to the Leadership Grand Rapids Class of 2003 in January.

2000 Luis Beteta is the director of hispanic ministry for the Diocese of Grand Rapids. In January he was named to the Leadership Grand Rapids Class of 2003.

2001 Lanae Gill received her master’s in college student affairs leadership from Grand Valley in May 2003.

2002 Josie Inbody is attending Western Michigan University pursuing her master’s in school counseling. Molly Jo Rose is using her creative side to earn some cash while in grad school at Iowa State. Molly Jo and several of her classmates double as poets for rent. They handle birthdays, anniversaries, and special occasions. For a minimal fee, tonguetied romantics send a gift from the heart. Ronda (Bolitho) Varnesdeel was named WHAC Coach of the Year for the varsity softball spring 2003 season at Aquinas. This was Ronda’s first year as head coach after being a four-year player and oneyear assistant coach. Michelle Vera is living in Boston on a one-year service trip through Americorp VISTA, in a program called MA Campus Compact. VISTA is similar to the Peace Corp, but within the U.S.A. She works with students to promote volunteerism and giving back to the community.

Marriages ’92 Becky Sprague to Jon Metelonis, June 21, 2003 ’93 Laura Wanbaugh to Jeffery Abraham, Sept. 7, 2002 ’95 Jennifer Evans to John P. Eardley, June 21, 2003

’96 Kaleen Feenie to Keith Early, June 21, 2003 ’96 Amber Pell to John Langan, March 1, 2003 ’98 Daphne Crozier to John Oly ’01, June 8, 2002 ’99 Diana Peffer to Allen Johnson, March 28, 2003 ’00 Melanie Charbonneau to David Prominski, June 21, 2003 ’00 Christine Garthe to Shawn Veenstra, June 6, 2003 ’00 Heather Scollon to Stephen Lentine, May 31, 2003 ’01 Crystal Miller to Kevin Frens, April 26, 2003 ’01 Jamie Opperman to Jeffrey Johnson ’03, May 31, 2003 ’02 Brandy Lovelady to Mark Mitchell, March 29, 2003 ’02 Krisy Debski to Jason P. Vogel, June 14, 2003 ’02 Katie Enders to Curt Weaver, May 31, 2003 ’02 Josie Inbody to Jon Joseph DeJong, March 8, 2003 ’02 Sue San Gregory to Andrew Edler, May 10, 2003 ’02 Joan Riordan to Ryan Bergman, June 7, 2003 ’03 Amber Holcomb to Kevin Wiersum, May 24, 2003 ’03 Tammy Scott to Ken Hartings, June 21, 2003

Births ’55 Frank Schmidt, a granddaughter, Celeste Claire Schmidt, April 2003 ’92 Julie (Trybus ’93) and Joseph Petersen, a boy, Scott Matthew, August 21, 2002 ’93 Nora (Viene) and Michael Berninger, a girl, Evelyn Rose, February 11, 2003 ’97 Melissa McDowell and Vern Johnson, a boy, Amery Walter, August 3, 2002 ’98 Audrey (Czerew) and Casey Negreiff, a girl, Maud Irene, December 15, 2002 ’99 Sara (Berger) and Michael LaForest, a boy, Gavin Michael, Sept. 8, 2002

Deaths ’35 Bernadette R. Schmitt September 11, 2002 ’40 John E. Herrmann, December 24, 2002

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’42 Leslie N. Prangley, September 20, 2002 ’44 Martha E. Kupinski, March 30, 2003 ’60 Sr. Joan Lehman, May 5, 2003 ’67 Lucia Fritsch Barkwell, mother of Sr. Joellen Barkwell, O.P., February 21, 2003 ’71 Anne Painter, November 27, 2002 ’74 Donald W. Miller, November 18, 2002 ’76 Marjorie Hendricks, March 24, 2003 ’76 Mary Hier, December 28, 2003 ’79 William J. Gaugier, June 26, 2002 ’80 Arneta J. Van Oeveren March 8, 2003 ’81 Cassie Gruner, August 29, 2002 ’82 Kenneth Tolman, February 10, 2003 ’83 Barbara J. Graves, February 27, 2003 ’89 Diane I. Casey, February 17, 2003 ’93 Lauren Borgeld, sister of Matt Russo, June of 2002 ’95 Daniel Caswell, father of Bethany (Caswell) Vargas, February 4, 2003 ’01 Daniel Caswell, father of Timothy Caswell and current student Krystal Caswell, February 4, 2003

In Memoriam (2003) Margery “Mudge” Joppe of Grand Rapids, passed away February 14. She worked at Aquinas for 16 years, from 1971 to1988, in the registration and academic advising area of Community Education (now called Continuing Ed). John McCaffery of Grand Rapids, a former professor who taught theatre and speech at Aquinas in the 1960s and 70s, died May 9 following a three-year battle with cancer. Hugh D. Allen of Kalamazoo, died May 1. Allen served as Vice President of Development in the 1970s before retiring from Aquinas in 1977. He was instrumental in the development of Emeritus College, Aquinas’ lifelong learning center established in 1975.

AQUINAS FALL 2003

– Fall 2003

VOLUME 2, NUMBER 2

CONTENTS HOMECOMING 2003

INSERT

President’s Message

page 5

Campus News Sister Aquinas Retires Nursing Program Commencement 2003 Performing Arts Center

page 6 page 8 page 12 page 18

Student News Student Satisfaction at Aquinas Service Learning Projects AQ Club Night

page 28 page 22 page 32

News from the Deans

page 33

Faculty News U.S. Math Educators Watching Aquinas

page 28

Athletics Hammer, New Head Basketball Coach Sixth Straight President’s Cup Senior Athletes of the Year

page 30 page 31 page 32

Admissions Recruitment Staff—What’s in Common?

page 34

Alumni News Alumni Mentor Program Henry Saverson ’57 Annual Golf Outing

page 46 page 47 page 48

Emeritus College Emeritus Evening

page 50

Development Evening of Elegance Reflection Award Recipient Selected Aquinas Fund

page 53 page 54 page 55

Trustee Profiles Tom Church, New Board Chairperson

page 58

Class Notes

page 60

3

Sr Aquinas retires Pg. 6

Community Ministries Pg. 31

Basketball Coach Hammer, Pg. 38

Saverson in museum exhibit, Pg. 47

Erhardts honored Pg. 51

Cover: Nursing program student Erin Mulligan discusses assignments with instructor Maggie Carriker, R.N., M.S.N. (Photo by Andris Visockis)


AQUINAS COLLEGE MISSION STATEMENT

Aquinas College, an inclusive educational community rooted in the Catholic Dominican tradition, provides a liberal arts education with a global perspective, emphasizes career preparation focused on leadership and ser vice to others, and fosters a commitment to lifelong learning dedicated to the pursuit of truth and the common good.

VISION STATEMENT

A

B

C

Aquinas College conducts an array of educational programs whose quality and effectiveness cause it to be considered consistently as a premier Catholic liberal arts college in the Midwest. In doing so, it is the college of choice for increasing numbers of students who seek a diverse, but inclusive, learning community that will enable them to increase their knowledge, hone their competencies, develop their character, and answer God’s calling to use their gifts and talents to make a positive difference in our world through their lives, work, and service. Aquinas strives to graduate students of competence, conscience, compassion, and commitment.

DIVERSITY STATEMENT

D

E

Aquinas College is committed to equality. This statement of the College speaks to this commitment, as do our history and heritage.We believe that diversity is a blessing, which

F

brings a richness of perspective to our intellectual, cultural, social, and spiritual life. All members of our community—faculty, staff, students—will demonstrate respect for each other regardless of our differences. All of us will be sensitive in our actions, words, and deeds. We will demonstrate these sensitivities in our classrooms, curricula, offices, meeting places, and living environments.

G

We will maintain the diversity of our Board of Trustees, faculty, student body, and staff and appreciate the different gifts each brings to this community regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, or disability. SHIPPING: $5.50 1st item; $.50 each additional item. Aquinas magazine is a publication of the College Relations Department, Aquinas College, Grand Rapids, Michigan. It is published semi-annually, spring and fall. Comments/suggestions are encouraged: Online: collegerelations@aquinas.edu

Mail:

College Web site: www.aquinas.edu Alumni news: www. aquinas.edu/alumni

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G Stainless Steel Travel Mug

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$14.95 Plus Shipping $____________ Mich. 6% sales tax $___________ TOTAL $_____________

Order Form (prices good through Februar y 2004)

Name _____________________________________ Phone (______)_____________________________________ Address_________________________________________________________________________________________ City_________________________________________________

State________ ZIP __________________________

Credit Card: VISA M/C AMEX DISCOVER Card No._________________________ Exp. Date __________

AQUINAS COLLEGE MISSION STATEMENT

Aquinas College, an inclusive educational community rooted in the Catholic Dominican tradition, provides a liberal arts education with a global perspective, emphasizes career preparation focused on leadership and ser vice to others, and fosters a commitment to lifelong learning dedicated to the pursuit of truth and the common good.

VISION STATEMENT

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Aquinas College conducts an array of educational programs whose quality and effectiveness cause it to be considered consistently as a premier Catholic liberal arts college in the Midwest. In doing so, it is the college of choice for increasing numbers of students who seek a diverse, but inclusive, learning community that will enable them to increase their knowledge, hone their competencies, develop their character, and answer God’s calling to use their gifts and talents to make a positive difference in our world through their lives, work, and service. Aquinas strives to graduate students of competence, conscience, compassion, and commitment.

DIVERSITY STATEMENT

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Aquinas College is committed to equality. This statement of the College speaks to this commitment, as do our history and heritage.We believe that diversity is a blessing, which

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brings a richness of perspective to our intellectual, cultural, social, and spiritual life. All members of our community—faculty, staff, students—will demonstrate respect for each other regardless of our differences. All of us will be sensitive in our actions, words, and deeds. We will demonstrate these sensitivities in our classrooms, curricula, offices, meeting places, and living environments.

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We will maintain the diversity of our Board of Trustees, faculty, student body, and staff and appreciate the different gifts each brings to this community regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, or disability. SHIPPING: $5.50 1st item; $.50 each additional item. Aquinas magazine is a publication of the College Relations Department, Aquinas College, Grand Rapids, Michigan. It is published semi-annually, spring and fall. Comments/suggestions are encouraged: Online: collegerelations@aquinas.edu College Web site: www.aquinas.edu Alumni news: www. aquinas.edu/alumni

Mail:

(Michigan residents please add 6% sales tax.)

Aquinas Magazine, College Relations Department DESCRIPTION

Aquinas College, 1607 Robinson Road, S.E. Grand Rapids, MI 49506-1799

QTY

SIZE/COLOR

PRICE

A Blanket B 12" Saints Bear

Fax: 616-459-2563 • Phone: 616-459-8281

C 51/4 " Rosewood/Brass Howard Miller Clock Editorial Team Marty Fahey Joelle Kwiatkowski ’02 Sally Reeves Julie Ridenour Contributing Writers Brigid Avery ’01 Kathy Barker Joe Boomgaard ’03 Damon Bouwkamp ’00 Curtis R. Burdette Judi Creamer Cecilia Cunningham Dave Dvorak Thomas Eggleston ’03 Marty Fahey

Kathy Fore V. James Garofalo, Ph.D. Gail Gromaski ’03 Woody Hoover, Ph.D. Laura Bennett-Kimble ’95 Harry J. Knopke, Ph.D. Joelle Kwiatkowski ’02 Crystal (Lubbers ’02) Laska Joyce LaFleur ’82, MM’95 Albert Lewis, D.H.L. Shirley K. Lewis, Ed.D. Kate Luce Robin Mankel ’03 Maryann Matzke, junior Kathleen McFadden, junior Paula Meehan ’75 Bob Niedzielski, Ph.D, ’58

Jessica Olson ’03 Lisa Piatek ’97 Sally Reeves Julie Ridenour Tonya Schafer ’02 Nicole Selzer Jill Straub ’00 Cynthia Van Gelderen Brad Winkler, J.D. Bill Weitzel Jeremy Wood ’99 Design Greg Becker Layout Silvija Visockis

Photography Aquinas Times Brigid Avery ’01 Kathy Barker Eric Bridge ’92 Judi Creamer Marty Fahey Libby Hews Brian Kelly John Niedzielski ’97 Mark Schmidbauer Amy Sprouse The Grand Rapids Press Sarah Van Hall Andris Visockis Bill Weitzel

RED

$29.95

WHITE

$11.95

N/A

$49.95

D Alumni Tee ( OXFORD • S-XXL ) E Marbled Seal Mug

TOTAL

$15.99 N/A

$5.95

F Hand-Painted Ceramic Snowman Ornament

N/A

$9.95

G Stainless Steel Travel Mug

N/A

$14.95 Plus Shipping $____________ Mich. 6% sales tax $___________

Order Form (prices good through Februar y 2004)

TOTAL $_____________

Name _____________________________________ Phone (______)_____________________________________ Address_________________________________________________________________________________________ City_________________________________________________

State________ ZIP __________________________

Credit Card: VISA M/C AMEX DISCOVER Card No._________________________ Exp. Date __________


NONPROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE PAID Grand Rapids, MI PERMIT NO. 101 1607 Robinson Road, S.E. Grand Rapids, MI 49506-1799

Photo by Silvija Visockis

Address Service Requested

Photo by John Niedzielski

The new Performing Arts Center

Photo by John Niedzielski and Silvija Visockis

Albertus Magnus Hall of Science

Photo by Brian Kelly

off of Robinson Road S.E., next to

NONPROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE PAID Grand Rapids, MI PERMIT NO. 101 1607 Robinson Road, S.E. Grand Rapids, MI 49506-1799

Photo by John Niedzielski and Silvija Visockis

The new Performing Arts Center off of Robinson Road S.E., next to Albertus Magnus Hall of Science

Photo by Brian Kelly

Photo by John Niedzielski

Photo by Silvija Visockis

Address Service Requested


Aquinas Magazine :: Fall 2003