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only noted in the intestinal tissue. It was concluded that 2.5% SP had a potential to enhance some antioxidant parameters mostly in the intestine, followed by the skin and gill. Soybean glycinin decreased growth performance, impaired intestinal health, and amino acid absorption capacity of juvenile grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). Ya-Lin, Zhang; Xu-Dong, Duan; Wei-Dan, Jiang; Lin, Feng; Wu, Pei; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Sheng-Yao Kuang; Tang, Ling; Wu-Neng Tang; Xiao-Qiu, Zhou. (2019). Fish Physiology and Biochemistry; Dordrecht (Jun 2019): 1-14. The present study evaluated the influence of dietary soybean glycinin on growth performance, intestinal morphology, free intestinal amino

acid (AA) content, and intestinal AA transporter (AAT) mRNA levels in juvenile grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). Results were displayed as follows: (1) 8% dietary glycinin decreased growth performance, inhibited intestinal growth, and caused intestinal histology damage of grass carp; (2) dietary glycinin decreased the content of free neutral AAs including Val, Ser, Tyr, Ala, Pro, and Gln in all intestinal segments, and Thr, Ile, Leu, Phe, and Gly in the MI and DI while downregulated the mRNA levels of corresponding transporters including SLC38A2, SLC6A19b, and SLC6A14 in all intestinal segments, and SLC7A5, SLC7A8, and SLC1A5 in the MI and DI. Dietary glycinin decreased the content of free basic AAs

Aquafeed: Advances in Processing & Formulation Vol 11 Issue 3 2019

including Arg in the MI and DI and His in all intestinal segments while downregulated cationic AAT SLC7A1 mRNA levels in the MI and DI. Dietary glycinin decreased the content of free acidic AAs including Glu in all intestinal segments and Asp in the MI and DI while decreased mRNA levels of corresponding transporters including SLC1A2a in all intestinal segments and SLC1A3 in the MI and DI; (3) the digestion trial showed that basic subunits of glycinin was hard to digest in the intestine of grass carp; (4) co-administration of glutamine with glycinin partially alleviated the negative effects. Overall, glycinin decreased intestinal AA absorption capacity partly contributed by decreased AATs’ mRNA levels and the indigestibility of glycinin.

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Aquafeed vol 11 issue 3 2019