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Bacterial protein meal: A gut-healthy and sustainable alternative to the scarce resource of protein from fishmeal By Ina K. Julegaard, Commercial Animal Nutritionist, Unibio Group

(kg/capita)

inclusion levels of fishmeal and increased use of plant-based protein sources and fish byproducts. It is a complex task as the demand for high-quality fish remains strong. By way of example, fishmeal produced from fish waste accounted for 29% of global fishmeal production in 2013-2015, while the equivalent number for 2025 is 38%. This will affect the The rapidly growing global aquaculture composition and quality of the fishmeal, industry and the limited supply of leading to a decreased protein content fishmeal have forced fish farmers to and increased amounts of minerals and reduce their dependence on traditional small amino acids (glycine, proline, marine raw materials through reduced hydroxyproline). The difference in composition, with a lower protein content, may affect the nutrition of the carnivorous fish as they require a higher amount of protein to achieve optimal growth. Studies have also been conducted to investigate the possibilities of using soybean meal as an alternative to fishmeal as it is a common source of 1954 1964 1974 1984 1994 2004 2014 protein for many other livestock animals. Capture fisheries However, inclusion of soybean meal has Aquaculture shown to cause soybean meal-induced enteritis in salmonid fish, which is a Fig. 1. Relative contribution of aquaculture and capture fisheries to fish for human consumption. disease causing inflammation in the (Green, K. Seafish Insight. The global picture – fishmeal production and trends. FAO SOFIA Rep. (2016)).

Fish for human consumption

The global demand for fish for human consumption has increased significantly over the past fifty years with a worldwide increase per capita from 10 kg in the 1960s to 20 kg today. Furthermore, aquaculture production continues to grow and has since 2014 accounted for more than half of all fish for human consumption (Figure 1). This has led to a growing demand for fishmeal as it is the primary source of protein in aquaculture feed. However, fishmeal is a scarce resource as it is dependent on wild fish populations, which cannot follow the

increasing demand for fish. With the continuous rise in living standards, aquaculture will become even more intensive, subsequently raising global fishmeal requirements and demands. Since fishmeal is a scarce resource and aquaculture is growing, new alternatives to fishmeal will have to be found.

Aquafeed vol 10 issue 1  

Aquafeed magazine is focused on advances in feed formulation and processing for aquculture.

Aquafeed vol 10 issue 1  

Aquafeed magazine is focused on advances in feed formulation and processing for aquculture.