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Bioactive Peptides from hydrolyzed proteins: a new opportunity for aquaculture By Oriol RoigÊ, Bioiberica, Barcelona, Spain. The farming of fish and shrimp can still be considered a young and developing industry, since it only started in the 50s and did not explode till the 90s (FAO). Since then, it has become the alternative to wild capture, and has already achieved a production level of around 50 per cent of total marine organisms’ harvest. Given the potential and relevance of aquaculture (which is important to meet the global animal protein demand), and the fact that it is a young industry (there is room for improvement and growth), companies and administrations are putting efforts and resources in to it.

Without a doubt, aquaculture nutrition and feeds is one of the most studied fields, with many researchers investigating how to obtain maximum profit for the best price. Protein plays an important role in fish feed, and it makes the difference in terms of feed efficiency, quality, production and profit (Hou et al., 2017). Traditionally, one of the main sources of protein in fish feed is fish meal, for different reasons (reasonable price, broad offering, availability, good quality‌). However, in recent years the trend has been to reduce the amount of this raw material, because of the environmental impact, the fluctuation of price and all the uncertainties of the

geopolitical scene. Soybean meal is being used to replace fishmeal protein in feed. It is well known that soy is a good source of protein and it is also attractive in terms of price. However, its efficiency in terms of fish growth and production is not as good as using fish meal, because these animals demand an animal-like protein profile rather than a vegetablelike protein profile. For this reason the addition of animal origin protein hydrolysates in feeds with reduced or without fish meal and with high levels of soybean meal is increasingly common. Animal protein hydrolysates are a highquality source of free amino acids, small peptides (di and tripeptides) and other oligopeptides (length from 2 to 20 amino

acids) obtained from different animal byproducts using chemical, enzymatic or microbial hydrolysis (Pasupuleki & Braun, 2010) (Dieterich et al., 2014). Animal protein hydrolysates are very interesting products in the field of animal nutrition. One of the best known hydrolyzed proteins is hydrolyzed porcine intestinal mucosa, also known as porcine solubles or porcine digestible peptides. This is a product that is commonly associated with the manufacturing process of heparin, the pharmaceutical anticoagulant drug, which is in fact isolated from porcine intestinal mucosa. Bioiberica (Barcelona, Spain) is the leading heparin manufacturing company in the world, and has for many

Aquafeed vol 10 issue 1  

Aquafeed magazine is focused on advances in feed formulation and processing for aquculture.

Aquafeed vol 10 issue 1  

Aquafeed magazine is focused on advances in feed formulation and processing for aquculture.