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under construction. Docks and kayak launches are also to be built in 2017.

making the trail a little over a mile long, and extended through the heart of downtown. Because of the number of properties involved, the overall plan consisted of 23 phases. Once the bulkheads were constructed, the next major improvement came in the 1990s with relocation of the public library from residential area to a new building in the heart of the downtown. Three dilapidated buildings were razed to make way for the new library and the library was constructed with the “front door” facing the Riverwalk.

Attention to the river also spurred businesses to locate in the downtown. A community theater as well as several art shops are now located in the core of the downtown, along with coffee shops, gift shops, and other mercantile business. In short, the river, once a place no one wanted to be at, had become an attraction. Annual festivals as well as weekly farmer’s markets use the Riverwalk. It has become an attraction for ecotourism, as kayakers can launch in downtown, and traverse the river to the Delaware Bay at Slaughter Beach. Recreational fishing, biking, hiking, and boating are now part of the river and riverbank life. Once an eyesore, the river ended up saving the downtown.

Each of the other phases was constructed over a 40-year time span, with the final phase being the purchase of Goat Island in 2014. Goat Island has been transformed into a nature park with hiking trails with an education pavilion presently

Will it Stick? The temperature of the pavement, not the air temperature, is a key decision factor in determining if and when snow and ice will freeze to the pavement. Your eyes can’t see changes in temperature, and handheld infrared devices are not suited for the task. Only the Vaisala Surface Patrol can reliably and accurately measure road and air temperature as you drive.

To learn more visit us at www.vaisala.com/roads

www.vaisala.com/roads 54

APWA Reporter

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April 2017

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www.apwa.net

While much of the plan for the Riverwalk has been completed, challenges remain. Climate change and sea level rise will need to be addressed. Pressure for development will need to be well thought out and planned for. Rainwater runoff and runoff water quality will need to be addressed. All challenges for future public works and other City officials, in order to continue to maintain a healthy thriving river and downtown. You can learn more about the Riverwalk development by watching the following video: https://vimeo. com/302stories/review/117493338/ d3234e9eda. Mark Whitfield can be reached at (302) 422-1110 or mwhitfield@milford-de.gov.

APWA Reporter, April 2017 issue  

April 2017 issue of the APWA Reporter, the official magazine of the American Public Works Association

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