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AMERICAN PUBLIC WORKS ASSOCIATION | April 2015 | www.apwa.net

A new method for streamlining tree selection for streets and public properties (see page 44)


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CONTENTS

The APWA Reporter, the official magazine of the American Public Works Association, covers all facets of public works for APWA members including industry news, legislative actions, management issues and emerging technologies.

APRIL 2015

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Vol. 82, No. 4

FACILITIES & GROUNDS INSIDE APWA

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2 6 8 10 14 16 18 20 22 24

President’s Message Technical Committee News Excellence in Snow and Ice Control Award City of Tempe: Phoenix neighbor to the east Preparation: The key to success Gerald Williams: Preparing for public sector service Is your history retiring? Changing perception through communication Recognize Your Leaders Santa Cruz Public Works Department launches “Many Faces” employee blog

COLUMNS 4 29 30 92

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Washington Insight Imagination to Innovation Public Works Institutes Ask Ann...

FEATURES 32 34 38 42 44 50 52 54 59 61 64

Fuel site modernization and automation Protecting public tree health with a “low sodium diet” Building a sustainable maintenance facility Historic building maintenance A new method for streamlining tree selection for streets and public properties Big changes in electrical safety Automated asset management systems Establishing site expectations and developing maintenance programs for athletic fields Things to keep in mind regarding ADA guidelines Bay-Friendly Landscaping & Gardening Coalition Fighting an uphill battle: facility maintenance software eases the public works load

ANNUAL BUYER’S GUIDE 66 Alphabetical listing 80 Categorical listing

MARKETPLACE 95 Products in the News 99 Professional Directory

CALENDARS

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28 Education Calendar 100 World of Public Works Calendar 100

Index of Advertisers www.apwa.net

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PRESIDENT‘S MESSAGE Facilities and grounds management is a holistic approach Larry Stevens, P.E., PWLF APWA President

W

hen one thinks of

its useful life, or prune a mature tree.

infrastructure, not much

These are the components of a facility

attention is given to the

that most people don’t even think

public buildings that our organizations

about. The public has the expectation

are responsible for maintaining. Even

of conducting the business they need

in ASCE’s “Report Card for America’s

to attend to within a well-maintained

Infrastructure,” they speak of public

facility and their perception is based

parks and recreation as well as schools;

solely on appearance. However,

however, there is no mention of the

those of us involved with facilities

public buildings. Take for instance the

management know there is much more

substantial amount of work that is

to maintaining a facility beyond that in

being completed on the U.S. Capitol

which the public observes while in one

Dome in Washington, D.C., and the

of our public buildings.

cost of this renovation/repair project (approximately $60 million). This is

This is why asset management is so

one structure.

vital in our organizations and should play a critical role in keeping our

Every public organization in North

facilities operating at the highest level.

America, regardless of size, has the

Every public organization needs to

responsibility of maintaining the

have a handle on their facilities and

facilities that house the services they

every component of the grounds

are responsible for providing. Not only

that it takes for them to function. In

should attention be paid to the facility

other words, facilities and grounds

but also to the grounds on which it is

management is a holistic approach

located. Such things as the parking lot,

and not simply picking and choosing

the sidewalks and walkways into the

the things to address that the citizens

facility, and the trees and landscaping

see day in and day out. As public works

are things that we see every day

leaders, it is our responsibility to not

but more often than not pay little

only educate the decision makers in

attention to. All of these are assets that

our communities but the public as

have to be appropriately managed.

well. We must take the time to explain the need to spend the necessary funds

Official Magazine of the American Public Works Association PUBLISHER American Public Works Association 2345 Grand Blvd., Suite #700 Kansas City, MO 64108-2625 (800) 848-APWA (Member Services Hotline) (816) 472-6100 (Kansas City metro area) FAX (816) 595-5330 e-mail: kclark@apwa.net Website: www.apwa.net EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Peter B. King EDITOR R. Kevin Clark

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Michiko Shinohara

ADVERTISING SALES: FOX ASSOCIATES Chicago (312) 644-3888 New York (212) 725-2106 Los Angeles (805) 522-0501 Detroit (248) 626-0511 Phoenix (480) 538-5021 APWA WASHINGTON OFFICE 1275 K Street NW, Suite 750 Washington, D.C. 20005-4083 (202) 408-9541 FAX (202) 408-9542 Disclaimer: The American Public Works Association assumes no responsibility for statements and/or opinions advanced by either editorial or advertising contributors to this issue. APWA reserves the right to refuse to publish and to edit manuscripts to conform to the APWA Reporter standards. Publisher’s Notice: The APWA Reporter, April 2015, Vol. 82, No. 4 (ISSN 0092-4873; Publications Agreement No. 41450540). The APWA Reporter is published monthly by the American Public Works Association, 2345 Grand Boulevard, Suite 700, Kansas City, MO 64108-2625. Subscription rate is $207 for nonmembers and $25 for chapter-sponsored students. Periodicals postage paid at Kansas City, MO and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the APWA Reporter, 2345 Grand Boulevard, #700, Kansas City, MO 64108-2625. Canada returns to: P.O. Box 2600, Mississauga, ON L4T 0A8.

Communities and governing boards

on keeping our facilities functioning

Reprints and Permissions: Information is available at www.apwa.net/Publications/Reporter/guidelines.asp.

get excited about building new

while identifying improvements that

© 2015 by American Public Works Association

facilities and infrastructure; however,

are going to be sustainable moving

that excitement is not there when

forward.

Address Change? To alert us of a change to your membership record, contact an APWA Membership Specialist at (800) 848APWA or membership@apwa.net.

you need to spend money to replace a

The APWA Reporter is printed by Royle Printing, Sun Prairie, Wisconsin.

roof that is leaking, replace a 250-ton chiller that has reached the end of 2

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AMERICAN PUBLIC WORKS ASSOCIATION

Your Comprehensive Public Works Resource

Mission Statement: The American Public Works Association serves its members by promoting professional excellence and public awareness through education, advocacy and the exchange of knowledge.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS PRESIDENT Larry Stevens, P.E., PWLF Project Director HR Green, Inc. Johnston, IA PRESIDENT-ELECT Brian R. Usher, PWLF Director of Public Works City of Largo, FL PAST PRESIDENT Edward A. Gottko, PWLF Adjunct Professor New Jersey Institute of Technology Newark, NJ DIRECTOR, REGION I Richard F. (Rick) Stinson, PWLF Director of Public Works Town of Wakefield, MA DIRECTOR, REGION II Harry L. Weed, II, PWLF Superintendent of Public Works Village of Rockville Centre, NY DIRECTOR, REGION III William “Bo” Mills, PWLF Director of Public Services City of Germantown, TN

DIRECTOR, REGION IV Tommy J. Brown, PWLF Superintendent of Fleet Services City of La Grange, GA DIRECTOR, REGION V Richard T. Berning Retired Springfield, IL

ADVISORY COUNCIL DIRECTOR-AT-LARGE, ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY David L. Lawry, P.E. Director of Engineering and Public Works Village of Schaumburg, IL

DIRECTOR, REGION VI Chuck Williams, PWLF Municipal Services Director City of Lenexa, KS

DIRECTOR-AT-LARGE, ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT William E. (Bill) Spearman, III, P.E. Vice President Woolpert, Inc. Columbia, SC

DIRECTOR, REGION VII Maher Hazine, P.E., PWLF Vice President W.C. Scoutten Inc. Goodyear, AZ

DIRECTOR-AT-LARGE, FLEET & FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Mary Joyce Ivers, CPFP, PWLF Fleet and Facilities Manager City of Ventura, CA

DIRECTOR, REGION VIII Ronald J. Calkins, P.E., PWLF Director of Public Works (retired) City of Ventura, CA

DIRECTOR-AT-LARGE, LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT Cora Jackson-Fossett, PWLF Retired City of Los Angeles, CA

DIRECTOR, REGION IX Jill M. Marilley, P.E., MPA, PWLF Senior Project Manager HDR, Inc. Shoreline, WA

DIRECTOR-AT-LARGE, TRANSPORTATION Kathleen B. Davis Director of Local Programs Washington State Department of Transportation Olympia, WA

(Past APWA Presidents) Robert Albee Roger K. Brown Nick W. Diakiw Jerry M. Fay Bob Freudenthal Larry W. Frevert Herbert A. Goetsch Edward A. Gottko Ken Haag Dwayne Kalynchuk Larry T. Koehle Diane Linderman Martin J. Manning James J. McDonough Robert Miller

Judith M. Mueller Ronald L. Norris Richard L. Ridings John J. Roark Harold E. Smith June Rosentreter Spence Noel C. Thompson Elizabeth Treadway Tom Trice William A. Verkest Win Westfall Carl D. Wills

Executive Director Peter B. King Executive Director Emeritus Robert D. Bugher Editorial Advisory Board Gordon R. Garner Neil S. Grigg Susan M. Hann Stephen J. O’Neill Kyle E. Schilling

FPO

FPO FPO

Follow us on Twitter @apwatweets

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WASHINGTON INSIGHT EPA and USACE set to release final version of WOTUS rule Tracy Okoroike Government Affairs Associate American Public Works Association Washington, D.C.

T

his spring, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) are scheduled to release the final version of the “Waters of the US” (WOTUS) rule. To read more about the WOTUS rule, visit http:// www.apwa.net/be_involved/FederalAdvocacy/Federal-Regulation/USFederal-Regulations.

After releasing the proposed rule, the EPA and USACE opened up a comment period, which after several extensions, lasted seven months. In that seven-month period, the agencies received over one million comments. Throughout the entire rulemaking process, the EPA and USACE have resolutely supported the proposed rule as it was initially written.

Nearly a year ago, the EPA and USACE released a proposed rulemaking to define WOTUS and determine which waters are subject to the jurisdiction of the Clean Water Act (CWA). When the two agencies released the proposed rule in April 2014, a broad coalition of local government agencies, agricultural producers, business advocates, and congressional members loudly made known their opposition to the rule. In November 2014, APWA submitted its official comments in response to the proposed rule, citing concerns that the rule would expand jurisdiction to ditches and municipal separate stormwater systems (MS4s), increasing the cost of maintenance and permit requirements for public works departments.

EPA and USACE officials have testified multiple times in recent months and faced great skepticism, and sometimes outright hostility, from congressional members. Agency and Corps officials stood their ground against claims that the rule would greatly expand the jurisdiction of the CWA and unfairly burden state and local governments with the unfunded mandate of complying with additional regulations. In spite of the agencies’ claims, the House of Representatives passed legislation blocking the EPA from implementing the proposed rule. The Senate never voted on the bill. In January 2015, the EPA released the final version of a scientific report supporting the WOTUS rule. The

“Example is not the main thing in influencing others. It is the only thing.” − Dr. Albert Schweitzer (1875-1965), physician, philosopher and humanitarian

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proposed rule extends jurisdiction of the CWA to streams and wetlands in floodplains, which have been historically excluded from jurisdiction. The EPA claims streams and wetlands can affect the water quality of larger bodies of water. The 400-page scientific report synthesizes 1,200 peer-reviewed scientific studies and draws a strong connection between streams and wetlands and larger bodies of downstream water, such as rivers. These findings consequentially support the agency’s attempt to expand CWA jurisdiction beyond larger bodies of water or navigable waters. Because public works professionals in communities of all sizes play an important role in providing clean and safe water, APWA will continue to monitor this matter and make certain APWA membership is informed. Of paramount importance is to support federal and state policies critical to managing and delivering clean water without placing unnecessary regulatory burdens on state and local entities. Tracy Okoroike can be reached at (202) 218-6702 or tokoroike@apwa.net.


www.apwa.net/Resources/Reporter

APWA REPORTER 2015 MEDIA KIT AVAILABLE ONLINE!

2015 APWA Media Kit American Public Works Association The Voice of the Public Works Industry


TECHNICAL COMMITTEE NEWS The heart of many communities Phyllis Muder Professional Development Program Manager American Public Works Association Kansas City, Missouri

P

ublic buildings are the heart of many communities. These historic structures with their pristine landscapes are a source of pride across North America. This is thanks to the dedicated individuals that maintain these facilities and tend to the grounds. The APWA Facilities and Grounds Technical Committee consists of expertise from both sides of the profession. Chair Jennifer Gulick, MA, heads this year’s committee. Jenny is a Senior Consulting Urban Forester for Davey Resource Group in Walton, KY. The rest of the committee represents the broad spectrum on public works individuals that are concerned with facilities and grounds issues.

• Brian Carthan, PWLF, Park Services Manager, City of Oakland, CA • Mark A. Whitfield, PLS, Director of Public Works, Borough of State College, PA • Jeffery Patrick Brown, P.E., Engineering & Infrastructure Director, Cumberland County Engineering & Infrastructure Department, Fayetteville, NC • Joseph A. Sisler, P.E., Chief of Engineering/Facility Maintenance, County of York, Yorktown, VA • Gary L. Rank, Facilities Manager, City of West Des Moines, IA With our previous Board liaison, Brian Usher, busy preparing for his term as the next APWA President, the committee welcomed their new board liaison Ms. Mary Joyce Ivers, CPFP, PWLF. Mary Joyce is the Fleet and Facilities Manager, City of Ventura Public Works, Ventura, CA and brings 6

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over 20 years of facilities experience to the committee. Facility managers constantly face increased demand for services, shrinking budgets, rising operating costs, and aging infrastructure. The committee has highlighted these issues in this issue of the Reporter with articles on the challenges of retrofitting historic buildings in “Historic building maintenance,” accessibility issues in “Things to keep in mind for ADA compliance,” going green in “Building a sustainable maintenance facility,” managing facilities in “Automated asset management systems” and keeping workers safe in “Big changes in electrical safety.” Sustainability and environmental protection is a key focus on the grounds side of the equation. This edition features articles on the effect of road salt on street trees in “Protecting public tree health with a ‘low sodium diet’” and some best practices for a sustainable landscape in “Bay-Friendly Landscaping & Gardening Coalition.” We hope you all caught the committee’s Click, Listen and Learn session, “What to do with Historic Buildings? Tips on Management, Maintenance and Retro-Commissioning” on March 26. With so many communities looking to repurpose properties, the topic is extremely timely. The committee also recommends and advances APWA policies and positions concerning public buildings and grounds issues in the form of position statements. There are three levels of statements that APWA generates: advocacy, guidance and regulatory. An www.apwa.net

advocacy position statement clearly states APWA support for or opposition to a legislative issue; this statement is specific in nature, and directed to local, state, and national legislators and governmental agency administrators. A guidance position statement recommends that public works professionals follow certain practices, methods and activities. The regulatory position states APWA support for action to be taken by an administrative or regulatory body. Every spring, these positions are reviewed for accuracy and relevance to public works. The guidance statements that the committee currently has available on the APWA website are: 1. Mobility and Access For People with Disabilities (Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990) 2. Energy Conservation and Sustainability for Public Facilities 3. Quality Management of Public Facilities and Assets 4. Hazardous Materials and Asbestos Management in Public Facilities 5. Indoor Air Quality 6. Quality Management of the Urban Forest 7. Vulnerability and Security of Public Buildings Updates are currently in the work for all of these. If your agency is looking for guidance on a facilities and grounds issue that is not addressed or if you would like to get more involved, please feel free to contact the staff liaison, committee chair or any committee member. Phyllis Muder can be reached at (816) 595-5211 or pmuder@apwa.net.


2015 APWA North American Snow Conference The Premier Event in Snow & Ice Management

April 12-15, 2015 | DeVos Place, Grand Rapids, MI Hosted by the APWA Michigan Chapter | www.apwa.net/snow

Monday, April 13

8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Winter Maintenance Supervisor Certificate Workshop

8:00 – 9:30 a.m. 3:30 – 5:00 p.m. General Session Talk Show Education Sessions Worker Safety

1:00 – 2:00 p.m. Education Sessions 2:15 – 3:15 p.m. Education Sessions 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. Education Sessions 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. Exhibit Opening and Welcome Reception on the Exhibit Floor

Exhibit Hours: 9:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

9:30 – 11:00 a.m. Coffee Break & Noncompete Time on the Exhibit Floor

3:15 p.m. Prize Drawings on the Exhibit Floor

1:00 – 2:00 p.m. Education Sessions 2:15 – 3:15 p.m. Education Sessions

Tuesday, April 14

3:30 – 5:00 p.m. Closing General Session Keynote Speaker: Jeff Havens Us vs. Them

8:00 – 8:50 a.m. Education Sessions

6:00 – 9:00 p.m. Snow Celebration at The B.O.B.

Exhibit Hours: 8:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

9:40 – 10:25 a.m. Exhibitor Solutions Theater 8:50 – 10:10 a.m. Coffee Break & Non10:30 – 11:15 a.m. Exhibitor Solutions Theater compete Time on the Exhibit Floor 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon 9:00 – 9:45 a.m. Education Sessions Exhibitor Solutions Theater 12:00 noon – 2:00 p.m. Lunch & Non-compete Time 9:45 a.m. Prize Drawings on on the Exhibit Floor the Exhibit Floor 12:45 – 1:45 p.m. 9:50 – 10:35 a.m. Roundtables Exhibitor Solutions Theater 12:50 – 1:35 p.m. Exhibitor Solutions Theater 10:10 – 11:00 a.m. Education Sessions

APWA invites you to join us in the heart of the Snowbelt for the record-breaking 2015 North American Snow Conference in Grand Rapids, MI, April 12-15! We’ve just expanded what was already our largest exhibit floor to accommodate all of the top-notch vendors wanting to share their innovative winter maintenance products with you. Pair that with excellent education sessions led by some of the most knowledgeable experts in the industry, and you have a can’t-miss event! Come experience the most concentrated collection of snow and ice solutions available under one (expanding) roof!

Wednesday, April 15 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon Technical Tours

Gerald R. Ford International Airport Winter Maintenance Winter Operations & Truck Fabrication – A Regional Collaboration

AMERICAN PUBLIC WORKS ASSOC.

11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. 2:30 – 3:15 p.m. Exhibitor Solutions Theater Lunch & Non-compete Time on the Exhibit Floor 2:50 – 3:30 p.m. Refreshment Break & Non- 11:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Exhibitor Solutions compete Time on the Theater Exhibit Floor

Sunday, April 12 Exhibit Hours: 4:30 – 6:30 p.m.

10:40 – 11:25 a.m. Exhibitor Solutions Theater

Winter Maint.

2:00 – 2:50 p.m. Education Sessions


Excellence in Snow and Ice Control Award APWA’s Excellence in Snow and Ice Control Award was established to promote excellence in the management and administration of public works snow and ice operations, and to promote the best practices in snow and ice removal while minimizing environmental impacts. The award will be presented at the 2015 APWA North American Snow Conference, April 12-15, in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Following are this year’s recipients.

C

ity of Columbus, Ohio

The City of Columbus, Ohio, has a snow and ice control plan in place to set forth guidance in providing efficient and timely snow and ice control to the residents and visitors of Columbus. The goals of the plan are to reduce life-threatening and injury-producing conditions, reduce interruption to commerce, and reduce damage to property. The plan is also committed to limiting the environmental impacts associated with removing snow and ice. When there is snow, sleet, ice, or other winter weather events, the City of Columbus’ top priority is public safety. The City of Columbus reviews and revises the snow and ice control plan annually to further improve the levels of service provided to the citizens and visitors of the city.

There are high

expectations to get it done right and perform

to a high standard.

Recognizing the need for efficient and effective snow and ice control along with the demands from the public, the City of Columbus has an available 86 dedicated snowplows. Through interdepartmental cooperation, the City can ramp up to 145 plow trucks, depending upon the severity of a storm. The City has 114 core employees for snow and ice control that can be supplemented 8

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by other City departments, bringing the total number of snow and ice control staff to over 400 employees. The City maintains a stockpile of 27,000 tons of salt for snow and ice control operations. Depending on the nature of a winter season, the City of Columbus uses between 23,000 to 30,000 tons of salt. The six-year average salt use has been 23,320 tons.

City of Lenexa, Kansas Snow removal is a high priority with the citizens of Lenexa, Kansas. There are high expectations to get it done right and perform to a high standard. The Municipal Services Department takes this challenge seriously and attempts to meet or exceed expectations. According to a 2013 DirectionFinder survey, snow removal on major city streets and residential streets ranked #2 and #3 for top City maintenance priorities over the following two years. According to the survey results, the highest levels of satisfaction with maintenance services was snow removal on major streets at 82% of the respondents either very satisfied or satisfied. In order to enhance onsite salt storage, City crews self-performed the construction of two additional hoop-style, fabric-lined salt storage


structures in the past two years that has added 1,500 tons of salt capacity. One structure was built at the west satellite location and the other unit was built to enhance storage at the main service center location. In previous years, the west satellite location was only able to hold 100 tons of salt; this new structure greatly reduces the City’s need to replenish salt during large or multiple winter events.

and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The group discusses all equipment uses, and recommends equipment purchases to improve and maintain service delivery for all divisions of Public Services. The City continues to improve efforts towards chloride

reduction and data acquisition by upgrading one-ton unit application equipment and controls scheduled for 2015, and the proposed 2016 automation of brine and blending production.

City of Waconia, Minnesota Employees of the City of Waconia, Minnesota, actively maintain and improve the City’s environment and infrastructure. In the winter season, workers oversee approximately 48 center-lane miles of roadways, all municipal parking lots, and 27 miles of trails and sidewalks. The State of Minnesota has set forth high expectations for reducing chloride applications in the effort of protecting the wetlands, streams, and lakes for recreational use. In 2010 the City of Waconia made significant changes in winter maintenance practices to meet the State’s expectations. The City of Waconia was the first community in Carver County to utilize liquids in winter maintenance operations. Brine production and anti-icing were implemented into the community’s winter maintenance practices. The City of Waconia continues to equip and research the latest technologies in winter maintenance. In 2014 Public Services created a “Green Fleet Team.” The emphasis of this group is to discuss equipment needs, improve route optimization,

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City of Tempe: Phoenix neighbor to the east Jennifer L. Adams, MSW, LCSW Facilities Maintenance Manager City of Tempe, Arizona Co-Chair, 2015 Congress Publicity Committee

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empe has a variety of unique experiences to offer you while attending Congress in August. I should know. Tempe is my home. I am an ASU graduate and have served the residents of Tempe for 25 years. I have watched this community grow from a college community to a thriving hub of corporate business. As Past President of the APWA Arizona Chapter and past Chair of the National Diversity Committee, I encourage you to visit our exceptional city. Tempe, a vibrant urban oasis in the heart of the Phoenix area, has its own personality. This refreshingly offbeat college town is home to Arizona State Tempe Center for the Arts

University (ASU), one of the largest universities in the country. It’s just minutes from Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (PHX) and accessible via METRO light rail. It is about a 10-minute METRO light rail ride from the Phoenix Convention Center and host hotels for Congress. Tempe’s spirited lifestyle is welcoming and creates a contagious energy. You can feel it on the Arizona State University Tempe Campus where students sporting maroon and gold learn BIG ideas. You can feel this vibe at fun-filled festivals, at theatre productions, comedy shows and art exhibitions at the ASU Art Museum. And, you will never forget when your children see the desert for the first time or feed a giraffe at the Phoenix Zoo. It’s a place where you can earn your personal best at the P.F. Chang’s Arizona Marathon & Half Marathon or Ironman Arizona. You can go kayaking or paddle boarding on Tempe Town Lake, or just relax poolside underneath a colorful umbrella.

Here is a list of things to do in Tempe while you visit our diverse and beautiful city: • See the best shows straight from Broadway at the Frank Lloyd Wrightdesigned ASU Gammage Theater. • Cruise on an electric boat, kayak, or stand-up paddleboard at Tempe Town Lake. • Shop at Arizona Mills, Tempe Marketplace and IKEA.

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• Take a tour of the Desert Botanical Garden, a living museum with more than 50,000 varieties of desert plants from around the world. www.dbg. org • Stroll the shady, brick-lined sidewalks in Downtown Tempe. This popular gathering place is home to more than 100 restaurants, taverns and shops, in addition to public art and historic sites. www. downtowntempe.com

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patio that mimics a City Park. www. handlebaraz.com

Interested in golfing in Tempe? • Play a round at ASU Karsten Golf Course, a par 70, classic Pete Dye links-style course. Afterwards, have a casual lunch at the Trophy Room. You are sure to see a sports personality in the clubhouse. www. asukarsten.com • Play a round at one of the city’s courses. Ken McDonald or Rolling Hills. www.tempe.gov/golftempe

• Escape to another world at SEA LIFE Arizona Aquarium at Arizona Mills, with more than 30 display tanks and 5,000 water-loving creatures. www. visitsealife.com/Arizona

Interested in adult activities?

• Savor farm to table cuisine and see the city lights from Top of the Rock, a signature dining experience at Phoenix Marriott Tempe at The Buttes. www.marriott.com/phxtm

• Meet a few locals at The Handlebar Tempe on Mill Avenue. This popular spot features a unique mix of beers on tap, beer cocktails, Germaninspired brats and pretzels, and a

• Four Peaks Brewing Co. is legendary in Tempe for both great food and beers like Kilt Lifter and 8th Street Ale. www.fourpeaks.com

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• Order a perfect pint of Guinness, listen to a live band and soak up the Emerald Isle charm at Rula Bula Irish Pub. www.rulabula.com • Laugh along with one of the wellknown comedians who grace the stage at the Tempe Improv each weekend. www.tempeimprov.com • See live music and have rockin’ good food at Copper Blues. www. copperblueslive.com • Have a great meal, play games on the expansive outdoor patio and find your favorite specialty cocktail at the newest addition to Downtown Tempe’s culinary and nightlife scene, Culinary Dropout at the Yard Tempe. www.culinarydropout.com

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Interested in some family activities? • Go to the Phoenix Zoo, voted one of the top five zoos for kids. www. phoenixzoo.org • Take a hike at Papago Park, where you can discover saguaro cactus, lagoons and see the sunset from Hole in the Rock. www. papagosalado.org • See a Childsplay performance, created just for young audiences, at the Tempe Center for the Arts. www. childsplayaz.org • Go play at Main Event Tempe. Here, you’ll find bowling lanes, laser tag, arcade games, gravity ropes course and great food. www.mainevent. com • Explore the underwater world at SEA LIFE Arizona Aquarium, perfectly designed for kids. www.visitsealife. com/Arizona

Here are some fun facts about Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona: • ASU ranks second on a list of schools that are making the most promising and innovative changes in the area of academics, facility and student life, according to U.S. News and World Report. The ranking put ASU in the top 15 percent of all four-year colleges in America.

• The Gallery of Scientific Exploration features interactive exhibits from the voyage of HMS Darwin to NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory. A self-guided tour of Arizona’s largest public arboretum at ASU’s Tempe campus is available online at https://cfo.asu.edu/fdm-arboretumplantcollection. The arboretum has a large date palm collection as well as collections of palms, conifers, cacti, succulents, and desert accent plants.

Getting to and around Tempe by METRO light rail METRO light rail connects Tempe and the ASU Tempe Campus to Downtown Phoenix, the airport and the city of Mesa. METRO runs seven days a week, Monday through Sunday, and on Friday and Saturday, hours are extended. Trains arrive at the stop every 12-20 minutes, depending on the time of day. METRO light rail cars can accommodate wheelchairs and bicycles. Bicycle symbols on the train

• For its commitment to sustainability operations and practice, ASU has achieved a gold rating in the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System, a self-assessment program launched by the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education. • Visit Air Apparent, a Skyspace designed by James Turrell on the ASU Tempe Campus at Rural and Terrace Roads. skyspace.asu.edu Tempe Town Lake Bridge

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windows indicate the doors nearest the bicycle rack. Tempe believes that public transportation is crucial to a community. We are the only city in Arizona offering light rail from border to border and the only one with a light rail bridge. The bridge is illuminated by LCD lights and changes colors every time a train crosses. The rainbow reflects onto the surface of Town Lake, casting shimmering color onto the water. Tickets are $2 one-way, or $4 for an allday pass. Passes for light rail can also be used for buses. www.valleymetro.org/metrolightrail, (602) 253-5000 Whatever your plans may be when you visit our gorgeous state, we hope you consider exploring our exciting and diverse community in Tempe. Jennifer Adams can be reached at (480) 350-8835 or jennifer_adams@tempe.gov.


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Preparation: The key to success Terry Kader, CPFP Fleet Services Superintendent City of Denton, Texas

I

n life, being well prepared has its advantages. Taking APWA’s Certified Public Fleet Professional (CPFP) exam is no different. I began supervising the maintenance of public works vehicles and equipment in 2002, and like many of today’s seasoned fleet professionals, my career in fleet maintenance began long before that. I worked as a technician for more than 15 years before advancing into supervision and, eventually, management. As a technician, I learned of professional certification programs that could enhance the status of my career path, such as the

National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE); in just a few short years, I became an ASE Master, certified in Automotive and Heavy Duty Truck. While these certifications are not required in my present position, they are still maintained as a matter of pride and as an example of their importance and value in the fleet maintenance industry. Technicians continue to be highly encouraged and supported throughout their efforts to obtain ASE certifications. While working as a fleet supervisor for a small municipality, I learned of the CPFP credential offered by APWA.

After comparing other prevalent accreditations, I chose to pursue the CPFP certification, as it seemed the most relevant to the public works industry and to my work. Professional certification would be a big step toward being ready for a future fleet management position if (or when) an opportunity presented itself. Any fleet professional that has attempted CPFP certification will attest to the difficulty of the exam. Preparing to take the test is not an easy task. Although relevant prior experience may contribute to passing the test, a thorough study of suggested

The Fleet Services Department with the City of Denton, Texas. Terry Kader, Fleet Services Superintendent, is third from left on the front row.

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materials is essential. I began with research of the recommended reading list and gathered materials suggested by APWA, especially in those areas of less familiarity, as this would be the best investment of my time. The core competency areas are Operations, General Management and Business, Asset Management, Financial Management, Human Resource Management, Risk Management, Environmental Management, and Information Management & Technology. Each core area requires knowledge based on a wide range of subject matter, which is not as simple as memorizing pages from a particular book. While studying, however, it can be surprising to find what you already know from experience, as well as learning some basic information that you may not have encountered in your career to-date. I attained my certification in 2007, and there have been many associated personal and professional benefits. My promotion to Fleet Superintendent for the City of Denton in 2012 was certainly due, in part, to having the CPFP certification. When seeking advancement opportunities, you find yourself competing against equallyqualified candidates. CPFP is not just four letters added behind your name on a business card; it immediately recognizes your professionalism, knowledge, integrity, and ethics. The credential adds personal credibility and promotes a level of respect among other fleet managers—and that, in and of itself, leads to invaluable networking opportunities. Credibility with your customer base is another benefit, especially when you begin establishing relationships with various operating departments. When hiring a manager into a position of great fiscal responsibility, I believe a city, and its residents, benefit by selecting a candidate who has a thorough

understanding of the core principles of fleet management. Initially, I believed that fleet maintenance was all about vehicles, equipment, machines, parts, and tools. I have come to realize that fleet maintenance is really all about people. Directors, managers, supervisors, technicians, administrative staff, customers, vendors—these are the people who drive fleet maintenance. Learning to develop and maintain good working relationships with all of them is important for today’s fleet manager. Taking care of people, whether customers or staff, is one of the most important functions a fleet manager will do on a day-to-day basis. Becoming certified was a very rewarding experience for me. In the beginning, I did not give much

thought to how my career in fleet maintenance would progress and to what extent. Over time, I simply prepared to the best of my ability and made the most of the opportunities that came my way. I highly recommend this credential to anyone in the fleet maintenance business, whether you are currently in management, working toward a management position, or simply want to enhance your credibility in your current position. The CPFP credential demonstrates possession of industry knowledge, best practices, and a commitment to the profession. A CPFP-accredited fleet manager is well-prepared for the many challenges and opportunities that he or she may face in today’s fleet maintenance environment. Terry Kader can be reached at (940) 3498729 or Terry.kader@cityofdenton.com.

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Gerald Williams: Preparing for public sector service Connie Hartline Editor, APWA Publications American Public Works Association Kansas City, Missouri

W

hen I looked over the list of APWA Donald C. Stone (DCS) Center graduates, I was curious about the one person on the list who was not currently working for a public agency. So, I decided to interview Gerald Williams, who earned the DCS Public Works Manager designation in 2014. At first I wondered why an engineer who ran his own consulting firm would enroll in the program. In looking through his DCS application, I discovered that after 32 years working in the private sector, Gerald is planning to find a position in the public sector. To meet a key requirement of the DCS manager’s track, he enrolled in Iowa State University’s Public Employee Leadership Institute, an online, 100hour program. I became even more curious about Gerald when I noticed that besides the Institute, in the last four years, he also has managed to earn, online, a master’s degree in public administration from the University of Nebraska-Omaha, and he is completing his last class this semester at the University of Idaho to earn a master’s degree in engineering management. Now I was even more curious. With two master’s degrees almost under his belt at such an accelerated pace, when I interviewed him, I asked why he pursued the DCS designation as well. “Formal book learning is important,” he said, “but real world application where ‘the rubber meets the road’ is also invaluable, and that is why I was so interested in the DCS program.” 16

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He said that when he applied to the DCS program, he was encouraged to enter at the Public Works Executive (PWE) level, but he felt compelled to begin with the manager track. “The majority of public works agencies in this country are still small enough that one person must capably wear both the public works manager and executive hats. It was important for me to understand both levels.” The DCS program gives him the additional, relevant public works experience the university programs don’t provide. When I told Gerald about my interest in his paradigm shift, he said this new direction is partly a reflection of the times—an economy that has hit consulting engineering firms squarely in the pocketbook. This is particularly true in small communities like Rexburg, Idaho, where Gerald currently lives and does business, which is approximately 80 miles northeast of Pocatello. He said the switch is also about where he is in life. Gerald wants to be able to devote all of his time at work to using what he knows doing things that benefit society, and he believes that he will be better able to do that in the public sector. “It is not about position and status for me now,” said Gerald. “As a consultant, even in the good times, you can spend about a third of your time marketing and networking, looking for work— lining up that next job. But in public works, the work is just there. There’s seldom any non-productive downtime to deal with.” www.apwa.net

Gerald Williams

Having once worked in the public sector for about a year and a half, Gerald has a little “official” public works experience. However, that was many years ago, and not as an administrator or a manager. But he does have a rich variety of experience in areas that are related to public works, including drainage and hydraulics, floodplain management, water and sewer, transportation engineering, and other forms of municipal engineering. His numerous successful projects attest to Gerald’s knowledge, skills, and abilities in dealing with public works projects and personnel. Since mentorship is a significant part of the DCS process, Gerald chose Bill Sterling as his mentor from the list of DCS Public Works Leadership Fellows (PWLFs). Bill, who retired a few years ago as director of public works in Greeley, Colorado, has— among many other things—written management-oriented books for


APWA, served in key capacities on several APWA committees, and has been instrumental in the APWA Accreditation program. “What a terrific opportunity,” Gerald said. “I could not have picked a better person to be my mentor.” He noted that some programs with mentoring components at other associations pick the mentors for the participants, “but I was able to pick Bill Sterling for myself. That’s a real advantage of the DCS program.” As with other DCS graduates I have interviewed, Gerald can’t say enough about how much he appreciates the time his mentor has taken with him. Bill’s counsel was invaluable to Gerald as they searched through his varied and numerous completed work projects to find one that was public works oriented enough to submit for the project component of the PWM.

in budget the first year! While used to working with contractors on public works projects, this offered Gerald a new and greater view of the challenges and opportunities available in public works. Gerald particularly appreciates the interest Bill showed in him. He felt that Bill was interested in Gerald reaching his own various goals, not just in “going down a checklist” with him. However, because of his simultaneous educational endeavors and not being actively involved in an agency at the time, Gerald observed that he “was probably not the kind of mentee Bill was looking for.” This makes Gerald even more appreciative of Bill’s willingness to mentor him. Gerald has identified a particular area of interest in public works for himself, which he believes is “not adequately

covered in typical engineering, project management, business, or public administration programs and training.” Noting that even small communities like Rexburg have hundreds of millions of dollars tied up in infrastructure assets, he said, “Cities deserve to have people who are trained in infrastructure asset management.” Gerald has been accepted into the DCS PWE program and will begin it officially after he finishes his last master’s class in May. About his experience with DCS, Gerald said, “I think if someone thinks that they don’t need the DCS program, they need to think again! Whatever level you are at, there is something there for all of us. That’s the beauty of the DCS program.” Connie Hartline can be reached at (816) 595 5258 or chartline@apwa.net.

Ultimately, they selected the Portneuf River Levee Recertification Project, which Gerald’s firm undertook in September 2008 to July 2009. The river flows through the City of Pocatello in southeastern Idaho, and a significant older portion of the town (commercial and residential area) is protected by levees on both sides of a 7.2-mile reach of the river. Although the levees were critical to the area, several factors threatened to force their deaccreditation. At the time, levee recertification was new, and the Portneuf project was one of the first to be considered. The project presented some interesting (a euphemism for frustrating!) challenges in coordination of multiple agencies (local and federal). Levee rehabilitation was necessary before certification could be made, which was innovatively provided under the direction of Superintendent Randy Ghezzi using multiple City departments—without any change

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Is your history retiring? Bob Moorhead, P.E. Maintenance Manager, County Road Administration Board Olympia, Washington President, Public Works Historical Society, Board of Trustees

"P

at” is retiring after a long

reasonable job in keeping the fleet and

systems over to the next generation,

career with us. Let’s gather

mechanical systems up-to-date. Many

which will face different challenges

in the Maintenance Center

of us are daring enough to try some

and situations, but might still need to

break room for some coffee, cake,

new materials when they come along.

know where the gizmo that keeps the

and punch this Friday afternoon

We usually hold training sessions to

thing-a-ma-jig running smoothly is

just before quitting time. Maybe the

keep our employees current on the

stored.

Mayor will stop by with a Certificate

issues and options of the day. But how

of Appreciation. Maybe the crew has

many of us are getting the most out of

And, let’s not forget to say “Thanks, Pat

fashioned some sort of memento from

our most experienced employees before

for all you’ve done.” And, invite Pat to

the stuff in the scrap box. Let’s all hope

they retire or move on?

stop by once in a while just to see how

that Pat’s first retirement check arrives

well the next generation is doing in

on time next month!

Former news anchorman Tom

its own season of responsibility. After

Brokaw lauded the perseverance and

all, we’ll all likely be following Pat’s

Besides the certificate and the

accomplishments of “The Greatest

footsteps out the door in a year, or two,

memento and the left-over cake, what

Generation” of the Depression and

or ten, or twenty, or thirty.

else is leaving with Pat this week?

World War II era. Have we done the

Perhaps 25 or 30 years of Memories.

same for the “Baby Boomers” who

Bob Moorhead is a Past President of the

Knowledge. Insights. Everyday

followed? Statistically, the “Boomers”

APWA Washington State Chapter, and

Practical Answers. The confidence that

were born between 1946 and 1964,

a member of the Public Works Historical

everything is running well just from

which puts them in their early 50s

Society Board of Trustees. He may well

the hum or the feel or the sound or the

to late 60s, the common age range

be joining Pat within a year or two, and

smell in the place.

for retirements. They operated

can currently be reached at BobM@crab.

and expanded the public works

wa.gov or (360) 350-6083.

Can you afford to let Pat retire? Have

infrastructure over the past 30 to 40

you asked Pat to review the operations

years as the population of the United

The Public Works Historical

manual lately? Or just jot down a few

States grew from under 200,000,000

Society is an affiliate of APWA, with

“secrets” to keep things on an even

to over 300,000,000. They knew not

membership open to public works

keel? Have a few less-experienced

just how to build or rebuild the water,

practitioners, authors, academia,

employees been given the opportunity

sewer, transportation, and recreation

and anyone interested in public

to spend any quality time shadowing

facilities, but how to operate them

works history. Membership in APWA

Pat to learn the routines? Does

efficiently as well.

is not required. Annual dues are $35,

anybody else know which locker holds

and can be added to APWA members’

that gizmo Pat uses to adjust the thing-

So, let’s not let Pat out the door before

regular annual dues statements.

a-ma-jig?

we glean as much of her/his vocational

Please visit the PWHS website at

memory and institutional knowledge

www.apwa.net/PWHS/ for more

The three components of any well-run

as we can. Let’s utilize the retiring

details on the Society’s mission and

organization are people, equipment,

generation as the valuable resource

activities.

and materials. Most of us do a

it is before turning the public works

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Changing perception through communication Amy McLaren, P.E. County Engineer Peoria County Highway Department, Peoria, Illinois Member, APWA Diversity Committee

P

ublic works professionals (including us engineers) have a knack for being progressive and innovative. When faced with technological advances, we adapt to change. When faced with funding constraints, we find creative solutions. We must be responsive and resourceful to survive in our competitive field. But there’s one field that presents a road block to many of us, myself included. That is social media. Let’s face it: engineers are not historically known for our social acuity. I find this stereotype of myself as a kind of selffulfilling prophecy.

But if we set aside

our fears of repercussion and take the time to tell people how and

Social media sites are great avenues for people to express their opinion, brag on their children, and share personal triumphs or challenges. But they are not great avenues for me. Or so I thought, until it was suggested I use social media as a means to reach more people in a professional capacity, to diversify my department’s public awareness portfolio so to speak. Historically, we’ve gone the traditional route to share information: press releases about road closures, public meetings about proposed projects, construction updates on our website, etc.

why we do the things we do, then they

understand.

Call me, e-mail me, even fax me and I’ll respond to your questions and comments, but tweet me? IM me? What? I hope I am not alone in my “old school” thinking when it comes to public correspondence. I hope there are some of you willing to join me in forging a new path on the information superhighway of web 2.0. It’ll be less scary for all if we band together when putting ourselves, our coworkers, and our department on Facebook and Twitter for all to see, criticize, and crush. No one likes public humiliation. Professionals like us who just “do our job” don’t even like public accolades, so how can we possibly consider sharing the bad news of a road is closed, the bridge is out, or snow is coming directly with the public @ PeoriaCoHwyDept? (That’s a handle for those who don’t know, and it’s probably too long for those who do know.) We’re just asking for trouble. But then I dug a little deeper. People tend towards distrust when they do not fully understand. Maybe they believe we’re repairing Main Street because the mayor lives on Main. Or Mercedes Drive is the first road plowed because it leads to the country club. But if

“It is not about being best in the world, it is about being best for the world.” – Dewitt Jones, National Geographic photographer

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we can explain to them that county 2375 7x4.75 Signpost Puller Ad_F.indd 1 government does not have a mayor— therefore, his residence didn’t factor into our road maintenance schedule— or if we can remind them that no one is driving to the golf course when it’s snowing, then they have a better understanding and a foundation of trust begins to form. And social media is the most direct route to a better understanding. If your department is having issues with reduced revenues due to declining Motor Fuel Tax (MFT), tell people. But be sure to explain what MFT is because they may not know. If you have issues with a subcontractor and your construction project is delayed, tell people. They may not know you use subcontractors. If your employee wins the Civil Engineer of the Year Award, tell people. They may not know what a civil engineer does.

All these things we take for granted— funding challenges, construction delays, award nominations—the general public does not have general knowledge of because they do not live and breathe it like you and I. But if we set aside our fears of repercussion and take the time to tell people how and why we do the things we do, then they understand. My preliminary investigation into this personally uncharted territory of social media as a professional means to communicate with our motoring public has led me to discover that people simply appreciate knowing. And who can fault them for that? Certainly not us public works professionals, who know how roads are made and how we could make them better. I believe we can make the less traveled road of social media the best avenue for reaching our citizens with www.apwa.net

the information they need3/10/15 so we6:51 can PM develop the trust we both desire. To that end, I will be content in taking baby steps toward a more robust pallet of communication methods, keeping in mind that I might have to learn new “languages,” of sorts, to be effective with others who I deal with. Amy McLaren can be reached at (309) 697-6400 or amclaren@peoriacounty.org. Special Reminder: Please make sure you update your personal membership profile, including answering the optional questions 13-16 (see page 10, November 2013 Reporter). Please refer to APWA’s 2013 Diversity Resource Guide 2nd Edition and the Diversity Toolbox for more ideas in celebrating the diversity in your chapter.

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Recognize Your Leaders Nominator’s Name: Josh Wheeler, Benton County Public Works Director Candidate’s Name: Jim Burke Candidate’s Title: Fleet Manager Candidate’s Agency/Organization: Benton County Public Works Candidate’s City/State: Benton County Public Works

H

ow long has the candidate been involved in the public works industry? 28 years

How long has the candidate worked in their current position? Started as a mechanic in 1986. That fall, Jim was promoted to Lead Worker. In August of 1988, Jim was promoted to his current position of Fleet Manager. How was the candidate’s leadership ideas/actions brought to the forefront? In 1990, Jim Blair, the Public Works Director at that time, became aware of economic struggles at a small school district, the Alsea School District. They were having problems with getting their buses repaired in a timely and cost-effective manner. Mr. Blair asked Jim Burke if we could take on that account, and thus begun the future of Benton County Fleet as a regional maintenance facility for the Willamette Valley. As was common, the various governmental entities met on a quarterly basis and learned of this new account at Benton County. Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) asked if the County would be willing to do their work for the local district. Jim Burke realized at that time that the County could be a regional maintenance facility for the central Valley. At the time, agencies in Benton County were looked at, but over the years, the program has expanded to agencies in Polk and Linn County. In

Jim Burke

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1992, Corvallis Fire came on board which accelerated the program as other Fire Departments saw the advantage of allowing Benton County to maintain their fleet. Jim’s background as a volunteer firefighter became the highlight of Benton County Fleet as he understood the needs of fire departments. When ODOT came on board, they asked if they could fuel at the County site. This started what has now become Benton County Public Works as a regional fueling site for all of Benton County and a few other programs outside of the County such as LinnBenton College. Today, Benton County Fleet Department serves 48 customers in the three-county region which includes Oregon State University, Corvallis Fire, Albany Fire, and Lebanon Fire, just to name a few. The partnerships formed by the Benton County Fleet Department jumpstarted a regional effort by all of Benton County. Today, the Road Crew provides Chip Seal services to other agencies as well as Striping Services (all the way to Seaside, OR). Shared mowing has occurred with Lane County as well as internally with our Parks and Natural Resources Department. The Health Department now has facilities in Linn County, the furthest being all the way to Sweet Home, OR.


Who did the candidate work with to help bring this idea/action forward? See above description. Started with Public Works Director Jim Blair and Alsea School District. Tim Smith, foreman at the time, and Dave MacKenzie, Senior Mechanic at the time, really supported Jim in this effort. After Tim left in 1996, Dave MacKenzie, now Foreman, ended up being a staunch supporter of Jim’s commitment to the customers and bringing the mechanic staff along with him, with all staff believing in the concept and making Benton County a regional facility—the place to get done what was needed done with the best service possible. The Board of Commissioners has been instrumental in supporting this endeavor throughout the years. Did the candidate experience any challenges when trying to implement this? In 1992, as the program was quickly expanding, the mechanics were concerned about their compensation. They felt they were being asked to do more without compensation. There were four mechanics at the time, and Jim asked the Public Works Director if they could hire an additional mechanic due to the increasing workload. To be able to justify additional pay, Jim instituted the requirement of ASE (Automotive Service Excellence) Certification which allowed the mechanics to receive additional wages. In 1994-1995, space started to become an issue. The work bays were full. Work had to be done outside. There was just not enough room for all the repairs the County was now responsible for. Sometimes they had to tow a vehicle that was waiting on parts out of the garage just to make room for another repair. To solve this issue, the Board of Commissioners recognized the Fleet

Department as a team and asked what they could do for the employees. The employees asked for a new lathe and more space. At the time, the building housed the Road Department and the Fleet Department. The Commissioners had a new building built that would house Road Department staff and allow the Fleet Department to take over the old area they used. A few years later, an addition was made to the garage which was built specifically to work on large fire engines, two at a time. A big challenge in operating a government regional facility is that we cannot profit from the services. The shop rate must remain low to compete with private business, but with rising wages and overhead costs, the need to raise rates presents a challenge for the future. One challenge we have today, as our staff ages and technology changes annually, is implementing a succession plan where highly educated and experienced people will transfer from college, technical school, or private industry to keep Benton County Fleet as a regional leader in the industry. Our partnerships with Linn-Benton College

and Oregon State University will allow us to make this a reality. Are there steps/processes that, when looking back, the candidate could have done differently to make this idea/ action even more successful (lessons learned)? Ideas have been proposed over the years such as being a full regional shop for places like Corvallis Public Works and Albany Public Works. Those ideas never fully came to fruition, but if we had to do it over again, we would strengthen those relationships early on rather than later which would allow those communities to not be as vested in their own departments and instead save money by using Benton County as a regional facility. The County also looked at partnering with Oregon State University; however, the logistics for partnering with a state agency were too complex. Contributed by Josh Wheeler, Benton County Director of Public Works, Office: 541-766-6010, Fax: 541-766-6891, Cell: 541-740-7704, Joshua.wheeler@ co.benton.or.us

APWA President-Elect Brian Usher and CPWA President Kealy Dedman with Hazel McCallion, retired mayor of Mississauga, Ontario at the Ontario Chapter’s 2015 Annual Conference on January 29 www.apwa.net

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Santa Cruz Public Works Department launches “Many Faces” employee blog Janice Bisgaard Community Relations Specialist City of Santa Cruz, California

T

he City of Santa Cruz Public Works Department has launched a blog that profiles 37 of its employees titled “The Many Faces of Public Works.” Individuals who help to keep the city in working order are depicted through photography and narrative. Santa Cruz residents who visit the blog may enter a weekly contest to win prizes donated by local Green Certified Businesses. Visit http:// themanyfacesofpublicworks.blogspot. com.

free’ Santa Cruz as it wakes up five days a week.”

“The Many Faces of Public Works” includes narrative from Resource Recovery Worker Daniel Ambrose who enjoys operating the street sweeper. “The best part of this work is my shift from 4:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m.,” he said. “I get to experience ‘green and

Street Maintenance Crew Leader Jess Davila’s post says, “I was drawn to public works 34 years ago because I wanted to work for the town I grew up in and enjoyed outdoor construction work. There’s always a full plate maintaining the streets and

In her profile, Tina Larsen, Parking Facilities Maintenance Assistant, states, “Off of the job, I am a seamstress and limit my work to performance costumes. My hobbies include wilderness camping and four-wheeling. I am also an avid target shooter. I am very concerned about our local homeless youth and have served as a licensed foster parent.”

sidewalks and storm drains for the citizens of Santa Cruz. The challenge is completing jobs with minimal traffic delays and maximum safety for pedestrians and cyclists.” The employee profiles also include Fred Stevens, Lead Mechanical Technician at the Wastewater Treatment Facility; Agnes Topp, Environmental Projects Analyst; and Laura Shaw, Wharf Parking Attendant. Photography is by Kevin Johnson, a photojournalist, documentary videographer and multimedia journalist. Prizes for the weekly contest have been donated by six Certified Green Businesses: Kaiser Permanente Arena, home of the Santa Cruz Warriors; Santa Cruz Dream Inn; Olitas Cantina & Grille; Venture Quest Kayaking; The Crow’s Nest; and L’Atelier Salon and Day Spa. The first winner received two NBA D-League Showcase passes providing seats to 16 tournament games at the 11th annual event in Santa Cruz. For more information, please visit the Public Works Department’s website, www.cityofsantacruz. com/publicworks, or Facebook page, www.facebook.com/ cityofsantacruzpublicworks. Janice Bisgaard can be reached at (831) 420-5166 or JBisgaard@cityofsantacruz. com.

City of Santa Cruz Street Maintenance Crew Leader Jess Davila is profiled at The Many Faces of Public Works blog. Photo by Kevin Johnson.

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JOIN US IN CELEBRATION! NATIONAL PUBLIC WORKS WEEK

Community Begins Here may 17-23, 2015

We’re Celebrating Public Works! There would be no community without the quality of life public works provides. There would be no community to police and protect, no public to lead or represent. Public works allows the world as we know it to be - community begins here. Join us in celebrating the tens of thousands of women and men in North America who provide and maintain the infrastructure and services collectively known as public works. Visit our website at apwa.net/npww for great ideas on how to celebrate National Public Works Week in your community this year. Share your experiences on social media using the hashtag #NPWW. If you have any questions about NPWW, contact Jon Dilley at jdilley@apwa.net or call 816-595-5251.


Community Begins Here NATIONAL PUBLIC WORKS WEEK: may 17-23, 2015 this year’s national public works week poster is now available!

get yours today!

Buy online at www.apwa.net/bookstore.

This year’s theme “Community Begins Here” speaks to the essential nature of Public Works services in support of everyday quality of life. There would be no community to police and protect, no public to lead or represent. Public works allows the world as we know it to be.

PSTR15 – Member $13/Non $16

about this year’s artist:

30+ posters: Member $10/Non $13

Christiane Beauregard is an award winning illustrator and designer. Her creative motivation has been to expand her capacity to bring virtual images to life. From delicate emotion to complex technological data, she is always striving to express her passions through her digital art.

quantity discounts:

10-19 posters: Member $12/Non $15 20-29 posters: Member $11/Non $14

Vintage NPWW Posters are still available. Check online for availability.

URE!

P.W. Paws Sampler

• P.W. Paws Plush • P.W. Paws Pencil • P.W. Paws Balloon • P.W. Paws Comic Book • P.W. Paws Coloring Book • P.W. Paws Pencil Pouch • P.W. Paws Stickers (one sheet) PB.A347 – Member $12 /Non $17

P.W. Paws Pencil Pouch

Size: 9 1/4” x 6” PB.A832 – Member $1.25 /Non $2.25

P.W. Paws Pencils PB.A324 (Package of 12) Member – $3 /Non $5 PB.A402 (Package of 100) Member – $20 /Non $25 PB.A403 (Package of 250) Member – $45 /Non $50 Not sold separately.

APWA Earth Squeeze

PUBLIC WORKS COMICS

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ADVENT ALL NEW S IN AN P.W. PAW

E EEL ST riter w

Y

ILE

BA

st

arti

P.W. Paws Rain of Terror

A storm is brewing – and evil is rising. Something dark and twisted is growing beneath the streets. With the coming storm, this unseen menace threatens to flood the city. Everything will be washed away. Luckily one ... tiger stands in its way— P.W. Paws! Join P.W. Paws as he faces an enemy without fear or mercy—a creature so powerful that a hero can’t vanquish it alone. Fortunately for us all, P.W. Paws never works alone. PB.A1213 – Member $1.25 /Non $2.25

P.W. Paws Plush

PB.A313 – Member $10 /Non $15

P.W. Paws Balloons PB.A312 (Package of 12) Members – $3 /Non $5 PB.A405 (Package of 100) Members – $20 /Non $25 PB.A406 (Package of 250) Members – $45 /Non $50 Not sold separately.

P.W. Paws Bobble Head

PB.A1206 Member – $1.25 /Non $2.25 (Logo not actual size)

PB.A400 – Member $12 /Non $17

P.W. Paws Construction Hat

PW.TEE2 (Child size 2-4) PW.TEE6 (Child size 6-8) PW.TEE10 (Youth size 10-12) PW.TEE14 (Youth size 14-16) Member – $12 /Non $17

PB.A903 Member $2.25 /Non $3.25

P.W. Paws Construction T-shirt PB.A900 (Child size 6-8) PB.A901 (Youth size 10-12) PB.A902 (Youth size 14-16) Member – $12 /Non $17

P.W. Paws Stickers PB.STIC1 (30 per sheet) Member – $1.25 /Non $2.25

P.W. Paws Children’s T-shirt

P.W. Paws Coloring Book

PB.PAWS1 Member – $1.25 /Non $2.25

Playtime with P.W. Paws: A Coloring and Activity Book PB.A1101 – Member $1.25 /Non $2.25


APWA Pen

APWA Glacier Bottle

PB.A300 – Member $7 /Non $9

PB.A825 – Member $9 /Non $14

APWA Flash Drive (1G)

APWA Multi-Function

PB.A1325 – Member $10 /Non $15

Pocket Knife PB.A317 – Member $10 /Non $15

APWA Hat PB.AHAT – Member $15 /Non $17

APWA Car Sticker

APWA Navy Cap

Clear cling sticker with white APWA logo. (Shown here on a navy background for purpose of display.)

PB.A623 – Member $10 /Non $15

APWA Visor

PB.A851 – Member $.50 /Non $1 PB.A852 (Package of 12)

PB.A624 – Member $8 /Non $13

Member $5 /Non $10

The Heart of Every City T-shirt (Heather)

“I Public Works” Bumper Sticker

PB.A910 (Adult Small) PB.A911 (Adult Medium) PB.A912 (Adult Large)

PB.A320 – Member $1.50 /Non $2.50

APWA Blinking Traffic Cone

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APWA blinking orange traffic cone with white stripe and silver base.

PB.A914 (Adult XX-Large) PB.A915 (Adult XXX-Large)

PB.A114 – Member $3.50 /Non $5.50

The Heart of Every City T-shirt (White) PB.A856 (Adult Small) PB.A857 (Adult Medium) PB.A858 (Adult Large)

APWA Flashlight Keychain PB.A301 – Member $3 /Non $5

APWA Padfolio PB.A1300 – Member $12/Non $17

PB.A859 (Adult X-Large) PB.A860 (Adult XX-Large)

Acrylic Tumbler (16oz)

PB.A861 (Adult XXX-Large)

Always There T-shirt PB.A600 (Adult Small) PB.A601 (Adult Medium) PB.A602 (Adult Large) PB.A603 (Adult X-Large) PB.A604 (Adult XX-Large) PB.A605 (Adult XXX-Large)

PB.A1112 – Member $9 /Non $14

APWA Friction Travel Mug PB.A1100 – Member $11 /Non $16

Big Barrel Mug (16oz) PB.A1110 – Member $8 /Non $13

APWA Paper Coffee Cup

APWA T-shirt

(Package of 50) PB.A806 – Member $15 /Non $20 With Plastic Lid: PB.A807 – Member $20/Non $30

PB.A811 (Adult Small) PB.A417 (Adult Medium) PB.A304 (Adult Large) PB.A305 (Adult X-Large)

APWA EcoCore Golf Balls

PB.A306 (Adult XX-Large) PB.A307 (Adult XXX-Large)

PB.A314 (One dozen) – Member $18 /Non $23 Not sold separately.

Property of APWA Public Works T-Shirt

APWA Golf Towel

PB.A1307 (Adult Small) PB.A1308 (Adult Medium)

PB.A316 – Member $5 /Non $8

APWA Sports Bag

PB.A1309 (Adult Large)

PB.A303 – Member $25 /Non $35

PB.A1310 (Adult X-Large) PB.A1311 (Adult XX-Large)

APWA Briefpack

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Size: 13” X 15” X 6”

T-SHIRT PRICING BY SIZE S, M, L, XL Member $15 /Non $20 XX-Large Member $17 /Non $22 XXX-Large Member $18 /Non $23

PB.A622 – Member $15 /Non $20

APWA Lunch Sack Size: 9” x 6.5” x 6” PB.A419 – Member $7 /Non $12

Visit us 24/7 at apwa.net/bookstore For bulk quantity prices for some items featured in this advertisment, please call 1-800-848-2792, ext. 5254. Please allow two weeks for delivery on all non-expedited services. All funds in US dollars. All prices are subject to change.


EDUCATION CALENDAR For more information about these programs or to register online, visit www2.apwa.net/Events. Program information will be updated as it becomes available. Questions? Call the Professional Development Department at 1-800-848-APWA.

2015

April 12-15

2015 North American Snow Conference, DeVos Place, Grand Rapids, MI

April 16

Resilient Cities – A Discussion with Chief Resilience Officers

April 23

Built to Last: Getting the Most out of Your Solid Waste Fleet

May 4-8

CSM, CPII and CPFP Certification Exams (computer-based testing)

May 28

Public Works Leaders Talk About Traffic Incident Management

June 18

Best Practices for GPS Fleet Management Solutions

July 13-17

CSM, CPII and CPFP Certification Exams (computer-based testing)

August 30 –September 2

2015 Congress, Phoenix Convention Center, Phoenix, AZ

November 16-20

EDUCATION AT YOUR DESKTOP

EDUCATION AT YOUR DESKTOP

EDUCATION AT YOUR DESKTOP

EDUCATION AT YOUR DESKTOP

September 21-25 CSM, CPII and CPFP Certification Exams (computer-based testing) CSM, CPII and CPFP Certification Exams (computer-based testing)

= Click, Listen & Learn program (Free to Members) EDUCATION AT YOUR DESKTOP

= Live Conference (Paid Registration) = Certification Exam = Web-based training APWA members may access past Click, Listen & Learn programs from the Members’ Library at no cost. Programs can be streamed to your computer via the link found in the library. If you have expertise that you would like to share, please use the online Call for Presentations form to describe your expertise and perspective on the topic. www.apwa.net/callforpresentations/

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IMAGINATION TO INNOVATION Bright prospects from a rare earth Andrew C. Lemer, Ph.D. Senior Program Officer The National Academies of the United States, Washington, D.C. Member, APWA Engineering & Technology Committee Dennis Gabor, awarded the 1971 Nobel Prize in Physics for his discoveries underpinning the development of holography, once wrote, “The future cannot be predicted, but futures can be invented.” Imagination to Innovation is a periodic look at new technology and scientific discovery that we could be using to invent the future of public works.

W

ith snow on the ground and an Alberta Clipper’s sub-freezing temperatures outside my window, my mind wanders to a memory of a colorful chart on the wall of my high school chemistry classroom—the periodic table of elements—and the outlier boxes that introduced me to the “rare earth elements,” oddly named because they are for the most part fairly common in our planet’s rocks and soil. By most accounts there are seventeen of these elements and what is rare is finding enough of them in one place to support economical mining and refining operations. China, by far the low-cost producer, accounts for about 95 percent of the global supply. The supply matters because these rare earth elements have turned out to be really important in many electronics applications and in the very strong magnets used everywhere from tiny electric motors to stereo speakers to medical devices. According to one report, an Apple iPhone has in it eight rare earth elements, in its screen, speakers, and circuitry. One particular rare earth element, samarium (number 62 on that chemistry wall chart), is used primarily in production of strong magnets that can withstand significantly higher temperatures than other kinds without losing their magnetic properties. But what has generated particular

buzz lately is the odd properties of the chemical compound samarium hexaboride, six parts boron (think heat-resistant glass in cooking pots and laundry bleach) and one part samarium. The material is one of several electrical insulators that physicists began to study several decades ago because, contrary to what would normally be expected, they retain some conductivity when cooled to near absolute zero; researchers call them Kondo insulators. At such low temperatures, the insulating ability of most insulating materials effectively becomes infinite— no electricity flows through. Trying to learn why Kondo insulators are different led some scientists to theorize that “topological insulators” might exist, materials that let electricity flow over their surface but not through. Now scientists at a number of universities have shown experimental results that samarium hexaboride may be a true topological insulator.

open a new path to quantum computers and other futuristic electronics. Quantum computers, applying advanced physics principles to perform computation and data processing tasks with single atoms or electrons, could dramatically increase our computing power and greatly improve computer security. Their development is still in its infancy, of course, but the research could one day help control the threat that someone will hack into our increasingly sophisticated water supply or transportation control systems. For now, though, just stay cool. Andrew Lemer, Ph.D., is currently a Senior Program Officer with the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. In addition to technical papers and occasional articles for the Reporter, he writes on civil infrastructure and human settlement at www.andrewlemer.com.

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The “fly in the ointment” for samarium hexaboride’s contribution is the low temperatures needed to have it perform. Having found what they believe is one real topological insulator, however, scientists anticipate they may find others and then develop ways to put them to work. The excitement about the discovery comes from the thought that having topological insulators could www.apwa.net

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PUBLIC WORKS INSTITUTES Module 3: The Importance of Effective Communication in Leadership Janet Ramsay Public Works Operations Manager City of Peoria, Arizona Public Works Institute graduate, 2011

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ublic works is unique in that many who end up here, did not start out with public works in mind much less a leadership role in the field. Whether you started your public works career in construction or environmental services, a common thread is the ongoing need to develop leaders with the specific skill set unique to our profession. I am proud to have completed one of the first Public Works Institute’s four-part programs in the Arizona Chapter. Many of my leaders were called upon to deliver modules of the Institute’s curriculum. The specific relevance of this national program was not only a benefit; it was a boon to my own career. In addition to the invaluable lectures from respected local authorities, the program provided a unique opportunity to spend extended

The Arizona Chapter’s Public Works Institute graduating class of 2011

group time with my peers from around the state. These contacts became one of the most precious takeaways from the program and I have remained in contact exchanging data, collaborating on policies and procedures, and sometimes just benchmarking our service with that of others in the area. As a leader, I have steered several emerging leaders to the Institute for training, utilizing the program as a resource to help me with the growth and development of my organization and succession planning. I recently made an internal promotion of a supervisor in the department. As you might guess, his résumé included the Public Works Institute. I appreciate the experience and insight he gained from the Institute and his participation in the American Public Works Association so when I was called upon to deliver a module to a program group, I could scarcely refuse. My module was on a topic near and dear to my heart: communication. The leader’s role is to inspire and motivate a team toward the mission and vision of the organization through communication. That’s much more complicated than good grammar and eloquence in presentation. While those things are important, a good communicator must find a common ground on which to deliver her message to the selected audience. Even when there is a captive audience, those you pay to listen, communication is a

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complicated beast that takes on life of its own. It can support or destroy your organization through its use. “We have two ears and one mouth so that we can listen twice as much as we speak.” – Epictetus The best communicators are at least equal parts listener and speaker. In a world of communications gone high-tech—text messages, e-mails, twitter and snapchat—it’s tempting to sit at a desk and deliver directives along with colorful illustrations about your organization’s goals and objectives. Depending upon the people in your organization, this may work some or even most of the time. Knowing when and under what circumstances is key because it is a fact that the most effective leaders have always been and will always be good communicators. “To effectively communicate, we must realize that we are all different in the way we perceive the world and use this understanding as a guide to our communication with others.” – Anthony Robbins As a leader, you must not only convey your message through communication, you must be effective in its delivery. This requires some knowledge of your audience and, ideally, a relationship with them. You begin to build this relationship and build upon it by communicating. You must build awareness of the individuals, their interest and role in your message, and then you can be most effective. There are five essential “Be” rules of effective communication: 1. Be honest. Build trust in you and your organization by being a reliable source of information. Tell the truth,

even when it is unpleasant because you can move past an incident of digression, but you cannot move past a general lack of trust. Integrity is key to your team’s security. Security is a requirement for people to take risks and, as we know, risks are required to find innovation. People will feel secure in taking the risks to be innovative where trust exists. When they do not trust you, they will secure themselves in the safest role and that is not where we find motivation and innovation. To be persuasive we must be believable; to be believable we must be credible; to be credible, we must be truthful. – Edward R. Murrow 2. Be personal. John Maxwell said, “People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.” Even as their leader, you are engaged in a relationship with your team. Human beings are emotional and when you communicate to them that you care about them as a person, you touch them on a level that inspires loyalty and motivation. The personal aspect of this relationship may be uncomfortable for some leaders so it will take practice to find what you can do that is both sincere and comfortable. Whether it’s eye contact, a pat on the back, or just a handshake, haptic (nonverbal) communication is personal and cannot be accomplished in an e-mail or twitter blast. 3. Be available. When one of your team members asks, “Do you have a minute?” the answer is ALWAYS yes. If not this minute, soon. The best message you can send is, “Of course I have a minute for you.” In the best case, you do not wait for them to seek you. You will find them and ask what you can do for them. Time spent with your team is time spent developing the relationship that supports your mission as a leader. www.apwa.net

4. Be quiet. Never underestimate the value of listening attentively. Not only will you gain understanding of the question or problem at hand, you will likely gain valuable insight to the person that will help you to reach him/ her when you need to communicate your message. Knowing their values is insight into their motivational keys. 5. Be aware. Take note of the things you do and be ever mindful that your words, your body language, your appearance and even your silence can speak volumes for you. Are you conveying the message you want in all your communications? Self-awareness is vital to avoidance of sending unwanted messages. Communication is the single most important aspect of leading a team. You can be the most skilled technician in your field but if you lack the communication skills to lead, direct and motivate your support team, you will be an ineffective leader. “You can have brilliant ideas, but if you can’t get them across, your ideas won’t get you anywhere." – Lee Iacocca It is critical to be a perpetual student in the art of communication. As a leader, it is critical to engage in the continuous study of yourself, your words, the things you do and do not say in communicating to your team. It is vital that you stay informed, relevant and appropriate as a communicator and it is this insight, this skill, that will set you apart from the rest and earn you the distinction as a great leader. Janet Ramsay can be reached at (623) 773-7830 or janet.ramsay@peoriaaz.gov.

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Fuel site modernization and automation Lloyd Brierley Director, Fleet Services Division City of Toronto, Ontario Member, APWA Fleet Services Committee

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n addition to overseeing vehicles and equipment, the City of Toronto’s Fleet Division is responsible for overseeing the City’s fueling infrastructure. This includes a number of City-owned sites that distribute thousands of litres of fuel per day for use in City vehicles and equipment. The City is currently undergoing a multi-year fuel site improvement and consolidation initiative. This initiative reduces a number of smaller fuel sites that are nearing the end of their life by replacing them with larger capacity super-sites. Super-sites are strategically located and contain multiple pumps and fuel types, enabling them to serve a wider range of vehicles and equipment. The estimated completion date for all upgrades and replacements is 2017, with the City typically upgrading two or three sites per year.

New fuel pumps used at supersites

Site upgrades include installing new above-ground tanks and state-of-theart fuel management systems. Not only do these upgrades ensure compliance with current environmental standards and regulations, but they also provide an increase in management effectiveness through consolidation and modernization. Older fuel sites required daily manual fuel volume measurements and inspections, followed by volumetric charting and calculations which were recorded, inputted and emailed for central record keeping. In contrast, super-sites are equipped with real-time centralized 32

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automated controls that are able to identify tank volumes, including the amount of fuel dispensed or obtained. In addition, the controls provide live readings and thresholds for each tank which are used for ordering fuel, similar to a fuel gauge and low fuel light in a passenger vehicle. Sites are now equipped with an emergency standby generator to ensure the location remains operational in the event of a power outage. These upgrades have considerably reduced the amount of staff time and effort that was previously required for the numerous daily manual tasks necessary to maintain a fuel site. As a result of the automated systems and centralized oversight, data accuracy and response time for fuel management operations have significantly improved. In 2013, Fleet Services introduced a pilot project to further automate the fueling process at each of these sites. Wireless Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology was used to capture vehicle usage and fuel consumption data. Initially, fifty on-road vehicles ranging from small passenger cars to large garbage trucks were equipped with a wireless microprocessor known as a Vehicle Interface Box (VIB). The VIB connects to a secure transponder ring near the vehicle’s fuel port. A corresponding inlet ring was installed on the fuel pump nozzle at the pilot sites for proximity control. Pumps are


activated when the transponder ring on the vehicle’s fuel port is within approximately six inches of the inlet ring on the fuel pump. The pilot was later expanded to include more sites along with a wider range of vehicles and off-road equipment. The fueling process for VIB equipped vehicles is fast and simple. The operator drives to the fuel island, picks up the nozzle, fuels the vehicle and returns the nozzle to the pump when finished. No other steps are required. Behind the scene, the system is fully integrated through a fuel module application on the Fleet Management Information System. This enables real-time authentication and secure fuel management. Statistics including asset identification, fuel type, dispensing limit, time/date and location are collected seamlessly during the fueling process. Vehicle- or equipment-operating data such as the odometer and/or engine hour readings are also captured. As an added option, additional diagnostic data directly from the engine computer is available on many newer vehicles. The simplicity in the fueling process reduces the time operators spend at the fuel pump. Previously, in order to fuel a vehicle the operator had to insert the vehicle’s fuel card into a pump activation module located in an operator shack at each site. They then were required to correctly key in the odometer reading before fuel was dispensed. If the reading was incorrectly keyed or the vehicle’s fuel capacity did not match the system specified range, fueling was stopped or the operator was locked out. A phone call was required to have the reading corrected or the system overridden in order for fuel to be dispensed. In addition, vehicle capacity threshold control was only provided in ranges

Upgraded fuel site, near completion, with multiple pumps and above-ground fuel tanks

as opposed to exact quantities, so some variance existed. Having upto-date reliable data will result in improvements on vehicle preventive maintenance scheduling and vehicle life-cycle management. The VIB pilot project has been successful. It has proven to be a costeffective method to capture asset data while ensuring secure and accurate fuel management when compared with other solutions, such as those that require ongoing monthly charges and/ or human effort to input odometer readings and review and correct entry and reporting errors. Due to the success of the pilot and the seamless data transfer that further reduces staff time and involvement, Fleet Services will now be using the new module on all fuel pumps/islands as upgrades continue. The illustrated 125,000 litre fuel site, which is nearing completion, dispenses gasoline and clear diesel for on-road vehicles as well as dyed-diesel for off-road equipment. www.apwa.net

As a result of the improvement in data accuracy, fleet and fuel management integrity and security, Fleet Services will be adding the VIB modules to all new vehicles as part of the ongoing vehicle and equipment replacement process. Additional efforts will be put forth in 2015 and 2016 to add VIBs to existing vehicles and equipment. The new fuel management system in itself is an improvement, even without the VIB component. Previous systems were unable to provide the same concise data and fleet management capability. The resultant combination of the modernized fuel sites, automated processes and real-time data has produced positive results and financial savings in both fleet and fuel management for the City of Toronto. Lloyd Brierley can be reached at (416) 392-1034 or lbrierl@toronto.ca.

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Protecting public tree health with a “low sodium diet” Lee Mueller Community Forestry Consultant Davey Resource Group, a division of The Davey Tree Expert Company Grand Rapids, Michigan

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he 2013-14 winter was unquestionably severe. Across the country, the “Polar Vortex” broke records for both total snowfall and low temperatures in many communities. The impacts of the harsh winter on road conditions and budgets have been well documented. In fact, the high demand for salt to keep roads and sidewalks clear caused prices to skyrocket in many local markets (Coyne 2015). As a result of the unanticipated frequency and duration of snow removal and ice treatment, many cities exceeded their winter maintenance budgets which made news headlines across the country (Murray 2015). While much attention has been dedicated to the budgetary overruns and unexpected costs associated with the “Polar Vortex,” the damage of the severe weather and snow management practices on trees and other plants have been less publicized. While some tree and shrub damage has been attributed to cold temperatures alone, communities are now realizing the negative impacts of using large quantities of salt and other snow removal practices on plants.

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“In Columbus, we had a really bad winter. It was not typical. We had a lot of London plane dying, because they don’t take extreme cold that well,” said Joe Sulak, at the time the City Forester for Columbus, Ohio and now with Grand Rapids, Michigan. “I saw a lot of salt damage on elms—mostly on newly planted trees. I’d say approximately two percent of newly planted trees were affected citywide by salt. But in some corridors it was much as sixty-five percent.” Salt can cause significant damage to plants, especially in high concentrations. In many winters, cities use salt sparingly. In more severe winters—like last year—high usage of salt led to considerable and irreversible plant injury. Clayton, Mo., is an example of a city learning the costs of high concentrations of salt on tree health. Clayton has a vibrant business district. To help enhance and protect the character of their community, Clayton established a streetscape program that requires the inclusion of trees as well as other features throughout the business district.

Following the 2013-14 winter, both Clayton, Mo., and Columbus, Ohio, experienced significant tree losses. In Clayton especially, a large portion of these losses have been attributed to uses of large quantities of salt (sodium chloride or NaCl) to melt snow and ice within the business corridor. 34

Considering that many communities across the country are looking at their trees as public assets, practices such as using different deicing chemicals, locating piles of snow appropriately, and employing post-winter damage mitigation strategies may help cities protect their investment in trees.

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Salt can cause significant damage to trees and other plants. In this attractive business district, severe salt injury killed these trees. (Credit: Rex Bastian)

“Typically, we put our street trees on 22-foot spacing. We’ll put two trees followed by a streetlight. We have a very tight tree canopy in our business district,” said Gary Scheipeter, Superintendent of Public Works. Clayton also requires business owners to clear their adjacent sidewalks of all snow and ice. In the business district, where the streetscape consists mostly of pavement, a mixture of snow and salt was repeatedly piled on the small four-foot-square areas where trees are planted. As the long winter dragged on, heavy concentrations of salt accumulated in the soil and only growing space the trees had.


“After the [2013-14] winter, what we saw was extremely typical for salt damage, once trees pushed buds out in spring a lot just instantly turned brown and shriveled up,” said Justin Whipple, Clayton’s City Forester. “In total, we lost 117 trees, 25 more were severely affected.” Scheipeter added that the losses “represent about 45% loss of trees in our downtown core. We lost one whole block of gorgeous ‘Frontier’ elms, about six inches in diameter.” Following winter, Clayton replaced 117 of the trees. Normally, the City plants 125 trees each year. To complete the extra work, the City was forced to contract tree planting for the first time in recent history. Not including removal costs, the replacement of these trees totaled $35,000 or an increase of

15% over Clayton’s standard forestry budget. Citizen safety is a top priority for every community and it is not realistic, nor recommended to stop deicing altogether. Largely, the tree damage in both Clayton and Columbus was limited to those areas where salt is heavily applied—primarily business districts. While the winter of 201314 was extreme, it brings to light the need for public works managers to understand the interactions between trees and salt/deicing chemicals, and how a few simple best practices might limit damage even in normal or average winter seasons. Where realistic, the simplest way to limit salt damage is to avoid using it as much as possible. Prudent snow removal, or pre-wetting prior to

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application, can reduce the amount of salt needed. While more expensive, alternative deicing chemicals such as calcium magnesium acetate or potassium chloride are not as harmful to plants (Beckerman and Lerner 2009). However, this investment is often justified when the expense of removing and replacing trees and other vegetation is included in cost-benefit analyses. In Clayton, mounding of salt-laden snow on trees near the sidewalk led to the loss of the business district trees. In addition to salt, snow from urban sites often includes contaminants produced by vehicles, which can severely damage plants. Simply locating piles of snow on pavement, away from sensitive vegetation, or relocating snow and ice entirely may reduce damage to trees and other plants.

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“One of the options we considered was to double or triple the water when first turning on our irrigation to flush salt out of the soil in the spring.” said Whipple. “We’ll see whether or not it’s going to work, it’s an experiment.” Regardless of how managers choose to mitigate the problems of salt damage, it remains a fact that cities across the country are increasingly investing in trees. Numerous studies have quantified the benefits and values provided by community trees. Initiatives such as Million Trees New York, the Mile High Million (Denver), and Million Trees Los Angeles demonstrate the growing priority that communities have placed on their urban forests.

Piling snow laden with salt and other contaminants from pavements can severely damage trees. In this case, trees can suffer from both mechanical and chemical damage. (Credit: James Zwack)

“We touched base with a number of contract companies [that do snow removal] expressing concerns about stacking snow around the base of the trees” said Scheipeter. “We’re discussing ways that when we plow, [the contractors] could push excess snow into the streets so that it could be removed.”

With such increasing attention and resources dedicated to the urban forest, it makes sense to understand the effects of winter management practices on trees. Though trees are

dormant in winter, they are still fragile, and often face many other significant challenges in the urban environment. For communities that have decided that a vibrant urban forest is a desirable objective, small changes to winter management practices may be one way to protect city’s return on this growing investment. Lee Mueller can be reached at (248) 2210439 or Lee.mueller@davey.com. Acknowledgements Thanks to Gary Scheipeter, Justin Whipple, Joe Sulak, Jenny Gulick, Geoff Kempter, Dotti Clune, Rex Bastian, and James Zwack for their assistance. References • Beckerman, Janna and B. Rosie Lerner. 2009. “Salt damage in landscape plants.” Purdue University Extension, April. Publication ID412-W.

Where other options are infeasible, communities can plant trees that are more tolerant of salt. Community foresters are well versed in selecting trees that tolerate a variety of challenging urban conditions. Species such as horse-chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum), honeylocust (Gleditsia triocanthos), and white oak (Quercus alba) tend to be more tolerant of salt. If a tree is subjected to high concentrations of salt, there are ways to limit damage. Flushing or irrigating the soil may help to wash out excess salt before it is taken up by the tree. In Clayton, the tree wells in the downtown are already irrigated for summer watering. 36

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These street trees are permanently damaged from winter deicing salt application to the surrounding pavement. This neighborhood will be dramatically changed when these trees have to be removed.

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• Coyne, Justine. 2015. “Polar vortex main culprit for large spike in salt prices.” Pittsburgh Business Times, January 2. Accessed February 12, 2015. http://www. bizjournals.com/pittsburgh/printedition/2015/01/02/polar-vortexmain-culprit-for-large-spike-in-salt. html?page=all • Murray, Jon. 2014. “Snow removal breaking budgets in Indianapolis, suburbs.” Indystar, January 21. Accessed February 12, 2015. www.indystar.com/story/news/ politics/2014/01/21/snow-removalbreaking-budgets-in-indianapolissuburbs/4734561/

Too much salt can kill! When rock salt (chemically sodium chloride or NaCl) contacts ice or water it separates into sodium and chloride ions. These ions are taken up by plants much the same way as essential nutrients. Chloride tends to concentrate near shoot tips and causes bud death or leaf scorch (Beckerman and Lerner 2009). These effects are not often noticed until the early spring, when trees begin shoot elongation and growth. Sodium ions are treated by plants similarly to essential nutrients such as potassium and magnesium. As a plant accumulates sodium in its tissue, it lowers the capacity to gather other nutrients. Lacking these essential nutrients, plants can have difficulty producing sufficient chlorophyll, limiting their ability to produce carbohydrates (Beckerman and Lerner 2009). This condition is known as chlorosis and is exhibited in leaf discoloration, disfigurement, or necrosis (tissue death).

High concentrations of salt can have significant effects on the osmosis mechanism used by a plant to capture water through its root system (Beckerman and Lerner 2009). Rather than moving into the tree, water potential can be reversed. Trees can

actually lose water to the surrounding soil—causing desiccation and even death of plant tissue. https://www.extension.purdue.edu/ extmedia/id/id-412-w.pdf

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Building a sustainable maintenance facility Edward C. Holmes Public Services Manager State College Borough, Pennsylvania

“T

his facility will serve the needs of the Borough of State College for the next 50 years.� No one knew just how accurate that statement would be when it was made prior to Borough Council approving construction of a new public works maintenance facility in 1961. In the ensuing years, the Borough grew and the services provided by the Public Works Department grew right along with it. By the turn of the millennium, the truck garages were full and the department was parking about $2 million in rolling stock in driveways and beside buildings every night.

The high water mark at the original maintenance facility, September, 2004. Eighteen to twenty-four inches of water wall-to-wall in both buildings.

Residential developments built upstream from the facility and a sediment-filled neighborhood sinkhole resulted in too frequent flooding events

during or before which staff scrambled to move equipment to high ground. A concrete plant closed on an adjacent property, opening the door to a solution. The Borough acquired the property, which also happened to be in a neighboring township. The purchase set the stage for the construction of a new maintenance facility on the highest ground of the combined parcels. A qualifications-based selection process yielded a local design team to prepare the land development plan. Design charrettes with public works crews and neighborhood meetings were staged to seek input on the project from the people using the facility and those living with it in their backyards. The land development plan team envisioned the campus, scaled the buildings, and conceptualized the stormwater management plan. The team was very intentional about minimizing the impact of the facility on surrounding properties. As environmentally conscious construction came to the forefront, Borough Council adopted a policy to build all new municipal buildings to qualify for LEED Silver certification at a minimum. Council appointed a citizens advisory committee to act as liaison to staff and the design team. Most members were Borough residents, predominantly from the neighborhoods closest to the facility. These citizens brought expertise to the advisory committee in such areas as construction, energy engineering

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and acoustics. Council also recognized the impact the new facility would have on the local elementary school, which is in the Borough and a halfblock from the facility, and residential neighborhoods in Ferguson Township, which borders the site. With one appointment, Council gave voice to both concerns by appointing the elementary school principal who lived a stone’s throw from the project site. The design professional for the construction project was selected following a second qualifications-based evaluation process. Buchart Horn’s architects and engineers set about the business of designing the new facility to meet the environmental and operational needs of the department. This new facility would be built around an existing building with administrative offices, the mechanics garage and crew locker rooms. A

significant phasing challenge awaited the Borough and the contractor, all owing to the fact that street and sewer maintenance, sanitation and tree crews had to operate from the old facility while the new one was being built around it.

electricity consumption. Site lighting includes both photocells and occupancy sensors. Minimal light levels will be maintained when there is no activity, but will increase instantly to maximum lighting when motion is detected.

The design professional and advisory committee began evaluating major design themes. Winter weather response means loaders and trucks with backup alarms at all hours of the day and night. The salt storage and cold truck storage buildings would be built along the property line to allow their mass to block most of the noise from onsite activities. General oneway traffic flow within the facility minimizes backing up, further limiting the noise of backup alarms.

Equipment storage buildings would have large roof surfaces, ideal for rainwater harvesting. Two 20,000-square-foot storage buildings would be built, one heated and one not, with their roof lines sloping toward each other. A 20,000-gallon rainwater collection tank would be buried between the buildings. The Borough will use this water to fill a sewer jetter truck, street sweepers, and large pressure washer tanks. The water is also piped to a holding area where trees, shrubs and flowers are staged in the spring planting season.

All buildings would have LED lights and occupancy sensors to minimize www.apwa.net

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the “LEED Campus” concept had been born. While LEED Silver was the initial goal, the committee and architect determined that LEED Gold was within reach. In the final analysis, with the expectation that tens of thousands of dollars would be added to the cost of the project to meet the LEED requirements, Council accepted the recommendation of the advisory committee to not pursue LEED certification.

20,000-gallon rainwater collection tank buried between truck storage buildings

A new truck wash facility would include a canopy between the truck wash and the existing fuel island. The new canopy was designed with space for a CNG fueling island should the Borough’s fleet of CNG-powered vehicles expand to the point that onsite compression makes sense. The drive-through truck wash design includes undercarriage wash and customized wash cycles for each vehicle type. Wash-water reclamation equipment will minimize the use of freshwater in the washing of vehicles and equipment.

parking is made available in the staff lot for employees of the elementary school when their onsite parking is at full capacity. The design professional worked with the advisory committee and staff to scope the LEED points within reach of the project. The only new occupied structure in the project was too small to qualify for LEED certification, but

Bids were opened in the fall of 2013 followed by groundbreaking in January 2014. The staging was every bit as challenging as expected. The excellent working relationship between the Borough and general contractor Poole Anderson kept things moving forward in a positive vein. As the construction project concluded in February 2015, public works crews used available time to “move in” to the new buildings. Already one wonders how crews managed in the leaky, flood prone, way-too-cramped buildings that just barely outlived that prophetic statement made to Council in 1961. Ed Holmes can be reached at 814-2784713 or eholmes@statecollegepa.us.

The stormwater management plan features a detention sump to contain runoff from most rainfall events, with a detention pond the size of a soccer field for the largest storm runoff events. The field may be used by the elementary school and by the regional parks and recreation department. Employee parking will double as public parking for parks and recreation activities which will generally occur during non-work hours. In addition, 40

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Architect’s site rendering from above the entrance road. The peaked roof in the upper left is the only original structure remaining.

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Historic building maintenance Identifying issues with the upkeep of historic buildings Gary Rank Facilities Manager City of West Des Moines, Iowa Member, APWA Facilities and Grounds Committee

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he dust has settled, the engineers have put away their slide rules, and the architect has filed the paint swatch colors for the newly remodeled/repurposed historic building. Now the real fun and work begins—maintenance of what was created by others in some cases over two hundred years ago and repurposed in your last budget cycle. Let’s take a look at how this may affect you, your staff, and those who inhabit the building as the end user. Small items that were not found when the punch list was completed become your problem, along with a few big ones that were hidden. You then get to play hide and seek to find the root cause of the issues. An example of this would be low water pressure to the second floor restrooms. It seems to have plenty of volume and pressure to fill the ultralow water flush toilet, and seems that the new low-flow faucet has plenty of water, but when the garden hose was hooked up to complete a maintenance task on the second floor it runs a steady stream for all of a minute. From there, the water all but disappears, and there is no pressure. As you initiate your search in all of the dark, confused, compromised, and confined spaces you find no issue with the newly-installed water lines. As you work the problem from end to source you determine that the water line into the building has an issue. This is where the Facility Manager begins to ask some important questions. Was this system evaluated? Was the Water Department involved in flow testing this before the new 42

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concrete floor was placed? All too often these critical items are overlooked. They do, however, become a very major issue as you move forth to replace or repair. This may sound very familiar to some and a “duh” moment to others, but it does happen. As we begin to work out all of the kinks and twists that this old girl has up her sleeve, you find other issues, the ones that come back to haunt and create sleepless nights for a Facility Manager. The paint is beginning to boil in very specific areas of the building. We all know what that means. Moisture has found a way to compromise the very existence of this historic building. But how could this happen? The building with which I have had recent

West Des Moines Historic City Hall

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experience has been around for over a hundred years. It seems to come down to modern intervention. The brick design of this structure, as with a lot of buildings of its era, shares common wall construction with its neighbors. At this point one may think compromised walls. No, once again the building has been around for a long time and upon evaluation to repurpose it, all that was detected was some tuck point areas that needed repair and all would be fine. This is where tools such as thermal cameras, moisture detecting tools, and small probe tools are found to be indispensable. What happened in the short span of time from repurpose to now? Plaster was added to the walls of the building. This caused any trapped moisture within the wall system a very limited area for it to escape. In the case of this building it was found that moisture was wicking up from below grade and through the walls themselves. No issues were found with adjoining walls, just front and rear of the building and a center support footing midway through the structure. I won’t go into the obvious discussion about proper backfill, caulking, or vapor barrier, but I will state these were all factors in the root problem. We all know that with the building being occupied and no other place to relocate the affected staff, you now have a dilemma on your hands. How do we correct this issue without shutting down the building? Will this issue become more problematic if not addressed correctly? What changes need to be made that won’t


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affect the building’s historic value? Will any of this jeopardize meeting all the requirements to remain listed as a historic landmark? These are all questions that will have to be sorted through, with decisions needing to be made based upon the findings with relevance to historic preservation. I can say that in this case, the problem will never be truly corrected. Unfortunately, recurring maintenance will have to be the solution to many of the issues. There are many factors that will impact the complete repair, monetary expense and relocation space for affected staff. Another area that compounded these problems was with the HVAC system. It was determined that the diffusers were improperly sized to allow for adequate air flow and dehumidification of the building. With the system already in place, altering it was a next-to-impossible task with relation to maintaining the aesthetics

of the building’s interior—another “slap in the face.” As we redesign and repurpose these types of structures, maintenance needs to be part of the equation. This viewpoint is from one of those who is typically left “holding the bag” and having to repair these types of buildings to maintain their integrity for now and well into the future. Items that may not be in some folks’ “cross hairs” are very much in the “bull’s-eye” of those of us that have to maintain them. It is imperative for success that key maintenance staff should be included in every aspect of this process including purchasing, planning and punch list completion. These folks are the ones that look at the building from a maintenance perspective and ask the questions that far too often are overlooked in the planning process. Some of the questions that seem to be www.apwa.net

a common theme are “was the water line tested?”, “has the sewer into the building been evaluated?” and “has it had a camera run down the line and a report given as to deficiencies found by a Certified Inspector?” These are very important items to a Facility Manager, as they become the problems inherited once the project is completed. From a logical point of view, if a project isn’t designed with overall maintenance in mind, small items that make a huge difference will eventually come into play. In closing, the issue really boils down to similar problems in many other processes—a lack of communication. Getting the right people involved and engaged in the process will typically lead to enhanced levels of success. Gary Rank can be reached at (515) 2223480 or gary.rank@wdm.iowa.gov.

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A new method for streamlining tree selection for streets and public properties David Moore Forester New York City Parks Department

E

very city plants trees; but how

wrong tree in the wrong place, you are

survey have varying environmental

do you choose the types of trees

again setting your community forest up

constraints.

that your crews plant? Would

for failure and wasting tax dollars. Selection can be a simple task on a tree-

your answer be any of these? 1. We have a “Top 10” species list we choose from every year. 2. I select whatever trees are on sale at

So, how do you make the right tree

by-tree basis, but this is not efficient

species selection when you have so

when it comes to making thousands

many to choose from and yet so many

of selections per season. We needed a

possible site constraints?

decision-making protocol to ensure consistency and accuracy throughout

the nursery. 3. We plant the same kinds of trees because it’s easier to maintain them. 4. We plant the mayor’s favorite trees.

The New York City Parks Department

the urban forestry program, while

developed a simple and effective

considering the reality of our foresters’

system to help them select the right

time constraints. We also wanted

tree for the right place. This system

to optimize the net benefits of our

works well for this city that plants over

tree plantings by systematically

If your answer is any of the above, then

25,000 trees annually. But, it can also

maximizing each planting site’s

you are taking a big risk with your

work for your city whether you plant

potential.

future forest and are likely wasting

2,500 or 250 trees a year.

public funds.

Background

Developing a classification system for street tree planting sites

History has shown us the perils of

The MillionTreesNYC initiative

Our first task was to develop a

planting too many trees of the same

was catalyzed by research that

classification system to distinguish the

species. In the 1920s Dutch elm disease

shows on average, New York City

different street tree planting conditions

all but wiped out the popular American

street trees currently return $5.60

we come across. Each site is its own

elm that graced city streets and parks.

to the community for every $1

habitat or biotope (a subsection of a

Currently the emerald ash borer (EAB)

spent on management. In the

biome) for a tree. We aimed to define

is killing the even more popular ash

course of fulfilling the mission

the various environmental conditions

species that is a favorite go-to tree for

of MillionTreesNYC, NYC Parks

that would set one street tree biotope

streets, parks, cemeteries, commercial

Department foresters are tasked

apart from another.

areas, and residential properties.

with designing planting spaces and

1

selecting tree species for each site,

This was a difficult task given the

Planting too many trees of the same

then overseeing construction and

diverse landscapes of New York

species (a monoculture) is a disaster

community engagement.

City. We had to choose the most

waiting to happen. But another wrong

significant criteria influencing a

practice is not selecting trees that are

Two factors that affect plant selection

forester’s selection decision. If we

best suited for the planting site. Some

in NYC: first, to guarantee biodiversity,

split hairs, we could have hundreds of

trees won’t grow in compacted soils;

we use over 250 different tree species,

different biotopes, but such a specific

some need large rowing areas above

cultivars, and selections grown under

classification system wouldn’t be very

and below ground; some need high

contract by tree nurseries in the region;

helpful to anyone in the field. But

levels of nutrients. If you plant the

second, the planting sites that we

by framing the biotopes a little more

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broadly, they would be more easily

Additional major factors to consider:

been shaped and sized to accommodate

identified in the field.

We recognize that there is a dramatic

both the tree and pedestrian traffic

range of how “urban” a planting

on the sidewalk. These cut-outs vary

How did we determine the most

site can be across the city—parts of

in size due to the fluctuating shape

significant and common criteria

Manhattan resemble a concrete jungle,

and size of the public right-of-way

impacting tree selection? Many

while parts of the outer boroughs

throughout the city, or to underground

conditions are already held constant

consist of single-family homes

utilities, or to other safety and spacing

across the city for various reasons—

with lush lawns and quiet streets.

guidelines that are used throughout

for example, because of contract

Another big factor is whether or not

the city. In some neighborhoods of

specifications. For instance, soil

a planting site has overhead power

the outer boroughs, trees are planted

composition within the tree bed is

lines; if such wires are present, only a

in extended lawn strips instead of in

uniform because each excavation is

small ornamental tree species would

concrete cut-outs. This allows for extra

backfilled with a specified topsoil.

be chosen. (Most neighborhoods

rooting volume as well as other site

There are also some conditions that

throughout the outer boroughs have

condition benefits.

vary, however uncommonly. For

electric power lines over one side of the

instance, the majority of planting sites

street.)

Definition of criteria

will be a full-sun condition because

The following is an overview of how we

streets are typically wide relative to

A third major factor is the total soil

defined these three major criteria used

building height, but some sites will be

volume available to the tree. Typically

to classify our biotopes:

outliers with a partial-sun condition.

trees are headed for cut-outs that have www.apwa.net

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Site Condition. A forester judges a site’s degree of drought condition, soil compaction, and soil Site Condition. A forester judges a site’srating. degree of drought condition, soil compaction, and soil pollution, then provides a site condition pollution, then provides a site condition rating. Landscape Landscape Drought Condition caused by surrounding Drought Condition caused by surrounding reflective surfaces, lack of nearby lawns or reflective surfaces, of nearby lawns or mature trees, lack oflack irrigation mature trees, lack of irrigation Soil Compaction caused by truck and bus Soil Compaction caused passengers by truck andunloading bus traffic, pedestrian traffic, traffic, pedestrian traffic, passengers unloading from vehicles from vehicles Soil Pollution caused by pedestrian waste, pet Soil Pollution by pedestrian waste, vehicularcaused pollution, road salt waste, pet waste, vehicular pollution, road salt

Urban Urban Urban Urban (Residential) (Commercial) (Residential) (Commercial)

Low Low

Medium Medium

High High

Low Low

Medium Medium

High High

Low Low

Medium Medium

High High

A Landscape be representative of a quiet withforatree lawn strip for –– A Landscape ratingrating wouldwould be representative of a quiet street with astreet lawn strip planting.

tree planting. – A Landscape rating would be representative of a quiet street with a lawn strip for tree planting.

–– AnAn Urban (Residential) rating would representative of a moderate-usage urban street with a sidewalk Urban (Residential) ratingbewould be representative of a moderate-usage urban streetcut-out with for a – An Urban (Residential) rating would be representative of a moderate-usage urban street with a tree planting.cut-out for tree planting. sidewalk

sidewalk cut-out for tree planting.

–– AnAn Urban (Commercial) rating would representative of a heavy-usage street with a sidewalk Urban (Commercial) ratingbewould be representative of a urban heavy-usage urban streetcut-out with afor – An Urban (Commercial) rating would be representative of a heavy-usage urban street with a tree planting. sidewalk cut-out for tree planting.

sidewalk cut-out for tree planting.

Vertical Clearance: Vertical Clearance: Wires Wires Pole to Pole electric wires less than 30’ Pole to Pole electric wires less than 30’ overhead overhead

Wireless Wireless No wires at all, communication wires only, or No wires at all, communication wires or wires connecting building to main linesonly, across wires connecting building to main lines across the street the street

– The vertical clearance criterion determines whether an “underwire” (dwarf or ornamental) tree is needed.

– The vertical clearance criterion determines whether an “underwire” (dwarf or ornamental) tree – The vertical clearance criterion determines whether an “underwire” (dwarf or ornamental) tree is needed. and each column represents various tree bed width); thus, these are our 18 Tree is Bed Width (distance needed. perpendicular to curb):

different street tree biotopes for New

< 42” vs. 42” to 54” vs. > 54”

photos on pages 48-49.)

Tree Bed Width (distance perpendicular curb): York City. (Seeto flow chart and example Tree Bed Width (distance perpendicular to curb): < 42” vs. 42” to 54” vs. > 54” < 42” vs. 42” to 54” vs. > 54”

categories of a tree’s biological qualities (drought tolerance, flood tolerance, shade tolerance, form, leaf color, etc.).

These data were drawn from USDA – This last criterion is an indicator of Developing tools – This last Because criterion is an of total soilthis volume. most tree bedsand areother rectangular to Fact Sheets relevant sources total soil volume. most treeindicator In order to make systemBecause field– This last criterion is an flow, indicator of total soil(distance volume. Because most tree bedsisare rectangular to accommodate pedestrian tree bed width perpendicular to curb) the limiting written in an urban forestry context. beds are rectangular to accommodate ready, it was necessary to develop a accommodate pedestrian flow, tree bed width (distance perpendicular to curb) is the limiting factorflow, fortree howbed big a tree trunk can get spreadsheet without causing sidewalk Each column is filterable, so a forester pedestrian width master that identified the heaving. factor for how big a tree trunk can get without causing sidewalk heaving. can find a tree species fitting various (distance perpendicular to curb) is distinguishable features and tolerances specific criteria in a matter of seconds. the limiting factor for how big a tree of all the 250+ tree species on our Results Results You will(site notice that our department trunkIn can get without causing sidewalk possible plantingcombinations list. (You can download total, there are 18 different of these three criteria condition, In total, there are 18 different possible combinations of these three criteria (site condition, added some columns customized to heaving. this spreadsheet here: http://www. vertical clearance, and tree bed width); thus, these are our 18 different street tree biotopes for vertical clearance, and tree bed width); thus, these are our 18 different street tree biotopes for our own needs; you may want to tailor nycgovparks.org/trees/street-treeNew York City. (See flow chart and examples photos on pages __-__.) New York City. (See flow chartplanting/steps. and examplesUnder photos pages __-__.) this spreadsheet to your own program’s Stepon 5: Species Results needs. Selection and Tree Planting, see the In total, there are 18 different possible Developing tools Developing tools hyperlink for “data sheet”). Each row combinations of these three criteria represents a different tree species (site condition, vertical clearance, and 46

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Combining the science-based research collected in this spreadsheet with additional first-hand field knowledge, it was possible to assign these tree species to their most appropriate biotopes (see columns in far right). We used an “x” to signify the first choice, and an “m” for the “maybes” or secondary choices. The process of choosing which tree species corresponded to each biotope was quite challenging and underwent many revisions. The trees needed to be distributed based on their biological tolerances to match the given site conditions. The lists also had to be generous enough so that foresters had realistic options given nursery availability. Plus, some biotopes are more commonly found in the field than others, so tree species choices had to reflect that distribution. Lastly, we wanted to assign trees to biotopes where they would be put to best use relative to all their other biotope options (considering factors of tree growth potential, longevity, and site potential).

• Step 1: Approach your potential tree planting site. • Step 2: Measure distances from surrounding buildings, trees, and other infrastructure to find the most suitable location for the new tree. • Step 3: Assess the site condition by taking a 360º view of the streetscape and how it is used. • Step 4: Score the site on drought condition, soil compaction, and soil pollution and determine its site condition rating as either UrbanCommercial, Urban-Residential, or Landscape. • Step 5: Determine whether or not the site has overhead pole-to-pole electric wires. • Step 6: Determine and measure the

• Step 7: Use information regarding site condition, overhead clearance, and tree bed width to classify the site as a specific biotope (1–18). • Step 8: Make note of any additional environmental factors that could influence tree species selection. • Step 9: Using data collected during the field visit, filter the master spreadsheet and match tree species to corresponding biotopes and site conditions. Using this process, foresters will be collecting information on the distribution of biotopes across the city. These data can be analyzed and used to inform tree procurement decisions for future years.

Pub Name: PARKS N REC 4.75 x 4.75

Application Using this methodology, we are able to approach a planting site and classify it as a certain biotope fairly efficiently. When the forester comes across one of the less-common environmental constraints (e.g., being in a coastal flood zone), the spreadsheet can be filtered by this criterion, which further refines the tree species list for that biotope. Since it is common for surveying to take place months before a forester knows nursery availability, this classification system can come in handy. During the site visit, the forester can assess the three criteria for determining the biotope, make note of that biotope number, and document any additional environmental constraints. Then, species can easily be retrofitted to the site listing at a later date.

most appropriate tree bed width and length.

Guidelines for field use:

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Conclusion By developing a methodical system based on scientific research, New York City hopes to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of our street tree planting program, as well as demonstrate accountability and transparency to the public we serve. While many citizens are primarily focused on the aesthetic results of our tree planting operations, we hope this set of documented protocols will portray street trees as growing, living, green infrastructure that provide quantifiable environmental benefits to our city. We believe our system can provide useful insights that can be adapted and customized to the needs of other cities undertaking street tree planting, and we are pleased to share this with the public works community.

Flow Chart

Acknowledgements: • Matthew Stephens, NYC Parks Department, consultation and editing Example photo: Biotope 3, Urban-Commercial, Wires, Tree Bed >54”

• Navé Strauss, NYC Parks Department, consultation • Leylâ Moore, flow chart design

Citations: Peper et al. New York City, New York Municipal Forest Resource Analysis. Center for Urban Forest Research, USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, 2007. 1

Reprinted courtesy of City Trees, the magazine of the Society of Municipal Arborists (www.urban-forestry.com). David Moore can be reached at David. Moore@parks.nyc.gov.

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Right: Example photo: Biotope 11, Urban-Residential, Wireless, Tree Bed 42-54”

Bottom: Example photo: Biotope 18, Landscape, Wireless, Tree Bed >54”

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Big changes in electrical safety Doug Tellin Project Manager and Consultant Electrical Safety Specialists LLC Louisburg, Kansas

T

here has been a major shift in the enforcement of electrical safety. This is in part due to the latest regulations concerning Arc Flash Risk Assessments. Arc Flash in a sense has become the driving force for bringing the existing known hazards of shock and electrocution to the forefront, as well as emphasizing the importance of qualified persons and proper equipment maintenance. Explosions, burn injuries, and physical trauma caused by electrical equipment failure and accidental contact are easily visualized at a primordial level. This has made OSHA compliance officers and safety professionals take a second look at what factors contribute to electrical injuries and what can be done to prevent future injuries from occurring. It is becoming more and more evident that working as an electrician or electrical maintenance person requires training and an understanding that even the slightest modification or error can have catastrophic results. Arc Flash Risk Assessments are just one piece of the overall picture in becoming OSHA compliant and preventing future injuries or deaths.

3. Lack of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) 4. Poorly maintained electrical equipment The best defense is a good offense. Employees who have been properly trained have the skills to avoid and prevent the accident before they occur. If an event does occur, they have the proper PPE to maintain a survivable level. The question “Who is a Qualified Person?” seems to be a common debate. There is frustration that OSHA does not clearly define what a qualified person is except for the fact that a person must be deemed qualified to work on or near energized parts. OSHA and the NFPA 70E also have strict guidelines on when you can and can’t work near energized parts. Every qualified person should know these regulations or standards as well as several others. OSHA’s definition of a qualified person (1910.399 8/07)

It may be best to identify some of the root causes of electrical accidents and injuries, and then address them individually. 1. Inadequately trained personnel 2. Electrical hazards have not been evaluated properly 50

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Electrical Safety Specialists classroom training

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includes the phrase “has demonstrated skills.” This has a big impact on the type of training required for electrical workers. In order to meet this requirement a person actually has to demonstrate the ability to perform the task in a safe and timely manner. The level of training should match the level of the hazard. This type of training is seen in the community and is accepted because there is a proper perception on the hazards and consequences of these hazards. Take firemen, for example; if they make a mistake “on the job” the worst-case scenario would be death to themselves or others nearby. The public in general would not feel safe if they knew the only training firemen received was watching a short video on how to drive a fire truck and put out fires. So one could ask what the worst-case scenario is if an electrician makes a mistake on the job. It could also be death to themselves or others


nearby. If the training an electrician receives does not include individual hands-on demonstrations and auditing procedures, training would be incomplete. If the worker cannot perform the task with proper PPE in a safe manner, a reasonable person can assume the training has failed. When it comes to training OSHA tells employers what to do and the NFPA 70E tells them how to do it. Justification to work, Hazard Risk Assessments, PPE, Shock Boundaries, CPR/AED, Release of Victims, and LOTO are but a few of the items a person needs to clearly know and demonstrate their ability to perform before an employer can deem them qualified.

production. Worst case would mean death, serious injuries, and building damage. Outdated and improperly maintained or tested equipment will not operate as expected. If the Arc Flash Risk Assessment is based on particular clearing times of breakers and the breaker does not clear per manufacturer’s specs, the hazards can increase exponentially. This renders PPE virtually ineffective. It takes highly

trained personnel to evaluate and test electrical equipment. Electricity is not only the most powerful and dangerous item in your facility but also arguably the one item you cannot do without. Electricity deserves the upmost respect as a driving force for industry and as a hazard. Doug Tellin can be reached at (816) 9250443 or dtellin@qualifiedtrainings.com.

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How can an employer protect their employees from a hazard if they don’t know what the hazard is? This is why Arc Flash Risk Assessments are so very important in an overall electrical safety program. Is the panel a stick of dynamite or is it a firecracker? Choosing the proper PPE for personnel is incredibly important but almost impossible without conducting an Arc Flash Risk Assessment. Even in what would be considered a small Arc Flash, the choice of clothing can literally mean life or death. Arc Flash Risk Assessments are the only way to reduce a hazard to a manageable level. This is a vital step in OSHA’s requirements to Assess-Eliminate-Reduce hazards in a facility. So how does properly maintained electrical equipment fall into the picture? If equipment is improperly maintained or at the end of its life cycle, there can be devastating consequences. Equipment near the end of its life cycle, as with any mechanical part, can fail at any given time. At best it would mean disruption in power or loss of

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Automated asset management systems Joe Sisler, P.E. Chief of Engineering and Facility Maintenance County of York Yorktown, Virginia

I

f your public works department is managing work orders via a homegrown database or worse, by some type of “pen and paper” system, you could save significant time and money while obtaining better outcomes by utilizing an automated asset management system. Automated asset management systems have many advantages such as higher efficiency, improved communications, better record keeping, and easy-to-use reporting capabilities. Here are some of the reasons that your department may wish to consider using such a system.

These systems help

to ensure that budget dollars and valuable staff time are spent on actual

Public works managers must be good stewards of the buildings and infrastructure they are responsible for. “If you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it” is an old maxim that has application to the resources that public works managers maintain. Staff’s perception of how often they are working on or how much they are spending to maintain a building’s roof or a certain piece of equipment is often distorted. It is frequently surprising to pull up a report of actual dollars spent and hours expended working on something such as a heat pump and learn that it isn’t nearly as bad, or possibly as good, as the maintenance supervisor thought. Without the ability to easily retrieve and view such vital reports, important decisions about equipment and infrastructure repair and replacement can be misguided. Automated asset management systems provide such

priorities rather than just responding to ‘squeaky

wheels.’

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reports with just a few clicks of the mouse. These systems help to ensure that budget dollars and valuable staff time are spent on actual priorities rather than just responding to “squeaky wheels.” Public works departments that still use some form of pen and paper system for initiating and carrying out their work orders invariably have an indispensable staff person that is essential to the system’s operation. This individual has all of the history, knows each of the technicians and their capabilities, has a relationship with all the building managers and knows just whom to give each job as it is reported. Having such a knowledgeable and valuable employee performing a task that the asset management system can perform automatically is a waste of crucial resources. In these trying times of budget constraints there are certain to be other critical needs to which such a valuable employee could be better utilized. With most systems, nearly anyone having knowledge of problems or a needed repair can in a minute or two initiate a work order. The system can then automatically route the work order to the supervisor or technician that normally handles the work of the needed craft or the type of problem detailed in the work order request. There is no sticky note to lose, and the system rapidly resolves multiple reports of the same problem; and once the work is complete, the technician can quickly and easily input


important information such as the cost of materials, hours of labor, and a description of what was found and how it was corrected. Communications between the service providers and end users can be greatly improved through the use of these systems. Often, an office manager will only learn the outcome of the work order requests they initiate, either when the problem is corrected or they pick up the phone and track down who is working their issue. Many automated asset management systems have multilayered work order feedback built in. Such systems can automatically generate an e-mail message that lets requesters know that their work order request was received, when it was assigned, who is working on it and when it has been resolved. Such communication helps to improve relations between maintenance departments and the other public works employees that depend upon their services without adding any additional effort on the part of the maintenance workers. Another advantage of these systems is that they provide easy access and permanent storage of vital information about your assets. With most systems, the public works department can decide how much detail they wish to input and maintain in the system. It can be high-level information such as when installed, value, make, model, etc. or more detailed information such as filter types and sizes, operating voltage, replacement value, etc. Having one location where everyone can access this data can be a huge time saver. It is also essential during accidents and disasters. As APWA President Larry Stevens recently wrote, “Every year the extraordinary events that happen seem to evolve significantly, from

the types of disasters to the shifting pattern of geographical locations.” When facilities are damaged or destroyed, public works departments are strained beyond their limits trying to simultaneously clean up, provide temporary facilities, repair or replace the damage all while continuing with regular operations. Agencies like FEMA will step in to help, but they pretty quickly want to know what facilities you are dealing with, what assets are in them, what their condition was, and what the replacement value was. That information can be very hard to pull together quickly if you don’t already have it. Outside of disasters, having up-to-date information on assets is crucial to justify spending requests, maintaining proper inventories and aiding with long-term planning. There are dozens upon dozens of automated asset management systems available. The different software systems have highly varied capabilities and costs. The advantages and disadvantages depend upon items such as: what types of assets you will be tracking and maintaining; what level of automation you want; and how much time and effort you want to put into developing and operating the system. Some systems reside on your computer network and others are cloud based. As with so many things, you can utilize APWA resources to aid you in determining which system is best for your organization. Speak with neighboring jurisdictions, your colleagues in APWA, or use infoNOW to learn what system they are using and which ones may work best for your organization. Joe Sisler can be reached at (757) 8903788 or sislerj@yorkcounty.gov.

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Establishing site expectations and developing maintenance programs for athletic fields Arthur Goodhind Supervisor of Land Facilities and Natural Resources Town of Natick, Massachusetts

I

ntroduction

The foundation of a collaborative

The challenges facing grounds

relationship begins with identifying

managers today are arguably

your own and other individuals’

the most complex seen in decades.

goals, both personal and within an

Challenges such as the rising costs

organization. This identification

of supplies, increasing expectations,

is critical to understand not what

environmental concerns, and limited

an individual does within an

resources are issues that a grounds

organization or department, but

manager must confront on a frequent

to better understand why they do

basis and still maintain safe playable

what they do. For example, a youth

conditions. This article attempts to

group leader may speak with you

provide some key elements in your

regarding a game schedule, but the

tool kit as a grounds manager. Tools

core of their participation is rooted

and strategies such as interpersonal

in a child’s joy while playing a sport.

skills, effective communication, and

Understanding this core element

collecting metrics are essential for

of an individual’s purpose will help

a grounds manager to obtain great

build a collaborative relationship by

results in any municipal organization.

aligning goals and building trust. Both you as a grounds manager and

Building collaborative relationships

the youth group leader have a shared

Perhaps the most important and most

athletic field that a child can enjoy.

difficult skill set to master is the ability

This shared interest begins to build a

to build collaborative relationships.

win-win situation and relationship

Jeffery Shuman and Janice Trombly

that can be very valuable when you

of The Rhythm of Business, Inc., state

may be challenged as manager, or need

that “Collaboration is a purposeful,

support to make capital improvements

strategic way of working that leverages

to a site. Learning how to leverage

the resources of each party for the

resources through a collaborative

benefit of all by coordinating activities

relationship is an essential skill for a

and communicating information

grounds manager. To begin building

within an environment of trust

collaborative relationships consider

and transparency”(Shuman 2009).

the following:

interest in providing a safe and fun

Collaborative relationships extend beyond the department of the grounds

the most important)

manager and include stakeholders such as youth groups, town or city

• Identify ways to build trust

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• Identify shared interests (not always

• Consider how all parties benefit from the relationship • Remember this relationship requires leadership • Find ways to obtain group buy-in

Set site expectations and level of service Regardless of your community’s size or economic stability, resources are limited. Limited resources can negatively affect a grounds manager’s ability to adequately meet the needs of the community and meet level of service expectations. Attempting to meet the same level of service at all locations throughout your community can be frustrating and for most of us impossible due to staffing, funding, and most importantly time. One effective strategy is to set different levels of service for your properties and set site expectations. To accomplish this consider the following: • Key user groups • Site amenities • Versatility of site • Irrigation • Level of use • Overall site conditions After gathering this data a level of service model can be built. In the areas of the greatest use and most desirable site amenities set a high level of service. In areas that are used less or offer more passive recreation, set a lower level of

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service (see Exhibit 1 on page 56). Most importantly document the level of service goals and outline the frequency and quality related to: • Mowing height and frequency • Irrigation, if any • Fertilizer and pest control, if any • Cultural practices such as aeration and seeding • Infield grooming frequencies This may seem to be a simple strategy; however, when documented this information offers a desirable level of transparency for your department and helps you to build a maintenance program and schedule for each site. This information can be used to address issues regarding product applications and concerns, maintenance frequencies, and to build trust with your key stakeholders. This trust and transparency will enable you to build collaborative relationships and help others understand the maintenance of the turf and why strategies such as goal mouth wear, proper infield grooming, and frost damage prevention are so important to you.

Know your costs and collect data for performance increase justifications Now that your site expectations and level of service are set, a monetary value can be set for the work that you perform (see Exhibit 2 on page 57). Setting monetary values and collecting other metrics such as the number of events on your field, or hours required to repair damage, will greatly help you and others understand the financial impact of maintenance and events.


As management educator and author

• Product costs Peter Drucker once said, “What gets • Contractor costs measured gets improved.” Costs that • Maintenance frequencies are more transparent will not only help

• Product costs

under-promise and over-deliver.

• Contractor costs

Although these tools may seem simple

• Maintenance frequencies

on the surface, they are essential to build relationships, align goals, and to

with fiscal budgeting, but will also be

For maintenance performed by in-

demonstrate your value as a grounds

funding for new or improved sites.

can be difficult to capture such as labor,

Works Cited

Fordata maintenance performed by in-house a commercial be substituted to measure house staffstaff a commercial rate canrate be can manager valuable to help support your professional. other costs that can be difficult to capture such as labor, fuel, and equipment depreciation. substituted to measure other costs that requests for extra funding, or obtain

Finally, produce results and maintain trust Jeffery Shuman and Janice Trombly, fuel, and equipment depreciation. Of course, the most important factor to maintain your relationships and keep the trust earned is to “The Real Power of Collaboration,” with your key stakeholders to help follow through. Now that site expectations and level of service are set, ensure that you stick to Finally, produce results and Volume 9 in the White Paper Series demonstrate the value of your service your commitments. When issues arise that endanger your commitments, communicate those Collaborative Business, October 2009, and demonstrate the value of return for maintain trust issues with your stakeholders. Set expectations that are obtainable and when appropriate underOf course, the most important factor to The Rhythm of Business, Inc. investing in the community. Because promise and over-deliver. Although these tools may seem simple on the surface, they are maintain your relationships and keep most of what municipal organizations essential to build relationships, align goals, and to demonstrate your Arthur valueGoodhind as a grounds manager the trust earned is to follow through. can be reached at provide are social, public or political professional. Now that site expectations and level of agoodhind@natickma.org. goods, metrics and monetary values This information can also be shared

are an essential tool to realize our

service are set, ensure that you stick to

of service, a monetary value per acre

communicate those issues with your

can be determined by considering the

stakeholders. Set expectations that

following:

are obtainable and when appropriate

Works Cited your commitments. When issues arise value in a tangible manner. Based Jeffery Shuman and Janice Trombly, “The Real Power of Collaboration,” Volume 9 in the White that endanger your commitments, on your set expectations and level Paper Series Collaborative Business, October 2009, The Rhythm of Business, Inc. Arthur Goodhind can be reached at agoodhind@natickma.org.

Exhibit 1. Site Expectation Example Class One Class one represents the most intense use, care, and site expectations. These sites are mowed two or three times per week at a height of two and one-quarter inches and are irrigated with well water. Irrigation is monitored on a frequent basis and irrigation programs are adjusted on a weekly basis based on anticipated rainfall and environmental conditions. Cultural practices include core aeration and vertical drainage at a frequency not to be less than twice per year. Goal mouths and other high wear areas are monitored frequently with soil amendments and turfgrass seed applied as needed. Class Two Class two represents a moderate use model and site expectations. Site two locations may or may not be irrigated. These areas are mowed once, sometimes twice per week at a height of two and one-quarter inches. Cultural practices such as core aeration and vertical drainage have a goal of once or twice per year. Fertilization and turfgrass seed applications in a given year depend on funds available. Class Three Class three represents the lowest use model and site expectations. These areas are not irrigated and are mowed once per week at a height of two and one-quarter inches. Cultural practices such as core aeration and vertical drainage are performed when possible based on time and funds. Fertilizer and seed are rarely applied to these sites.

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Exhibit 2. Maintenance Program Example Class One Maintenance Program Fertilization

lb/M

lb/A

Fertilizer 16-1-5 @1lbN

6.25

275

20

880

Fertilizer 17-0-20 @1lbN

5.88

258.72

Fertilizer 16-1-5 @1lbN

6.25

275

20

880

lb/M

lb/A

Seed 50/50 Mix

2

88

Seed 50/50 Mix

2

Amendment @20lb/M

Amendment @20lb/M

$$/lb $ 1.02 $ 0.54 $ 1.18 $ 1.02 $ 0.54

$$/A $ 280.17 $ 475.20 $ 304.77 $ 280.17 $ 475.20 $ 1,815.51

88

$$/lb $ 2.79 $ 2.79

$$/A $ 245.52 $ 245.52 $ 491.04

$$/A $ 28.88

#/Week

Weeks Per Year

2

30

$$/A $ 700.00 $ 325.00 $ 375.00 $ 150.00

Times/Year

$$/A/Year $ 1,400.00 $ 650.00 $ 375.00 $ 300.00

Total Cost per Acre Fertilization Seeding

Total Cost per Acre Seed

Mowing Mowing* Total Cost per Acre Mowing Cultural Practices-Labor Deep Tine Aerification* Core Aerification* Topdressing Seeding

2 2 1 2

$$/A/Year $ 1,732.80 $ 1,732.80

Continued on page 58

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Total Cost per Acre Cultural Practices-Labor Cultural Practices-Tines

$$/Tine $ 7.35 $ 7.35

# of Tines

Acres/Set

12

8

32

8

Cultural Practices-Materials

Tons/A

$$/Ton

Top Dressing Sand 2mm Total Cost per Acre Cultural Practices-Materials

20

Deep Tine-Solid Tines Core Aerification Tines Total Cost per Acre Cultural Practices-Tines

Plant Protectant ApplicationsMaterials

$

oz/A

Monocot herbicide

1.5

66

Surfactant

0.16

7.04

Broadleaf Herbicide

1.5

66

0.147

6.468

Plant Protectant Applications-Labor Spray Rate Per Acre Total Cost Per Acre Plant ProtectantLabor *= Performed In House

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$$/A $ 11.03 $ 29.40 $ 40.43

Times/Year $$/A/Year $ 25.25 1 505.00 $ 505.00

oz/M

Insecticide Total Cost Per Acre Plant ProtectantMaterials

58

$ 2,725.00

$$/oz $ 1.55 $ 0.56 $ 0.84 $ 19.19

$$/A $ 102.30 $ 3.94 $ 55.44 $ 124.12 $ 285.80 $$/A $ 125.00 $ 125.00

$ Total Cost Per Acre Class One 7,229.54

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Things to keep in mind regarding ADA guidelines Jeffery Brown, P.E. Engineering & Infrastructure Director Cumberland County, North Carolina Member, APWA Facilities and Grounds Committee

P

icture this: Your department

plans, the building code official begins

has been appropriated some

to ask questions about door widths

funding to make some

and counter heights. You immediately

improvements to one of the many

begin to panic. This is the first time

buildings that you are responsible

that you think ADA: Another

for maintaining. Departmental staff

Disapproved Action. Have you ever

works diligently with the building

found yourself in the middle of this

occupant in developing a detailed

scenario? If so, you are not alone.

plan for the proposed improvements. You have reached the pinnacle. The

The American with Disabilities Act

plan is complete and the last step

(ADA) of 1990 was put in place to

before construction begins is to get the

prohibit discrimination against

necessary permits. While reviewing the

persons with a disability as well as to

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59


ensure that they are provided an equal

Understanding of ADA requirements

end of the day you commend your

opportunity for employment and

is not only essential for the design

staff for addressing the work orders

public accommodations. The 1991

of facilities, it is equally important

in such a timely manner. However,

ADA Standards for Accessible Design

when it comes to maintaining

what you don’t realize is that the staff

could be used for new construction

an organization’s facilities and

just created two ADA violations that

and alterations up until March 14,

grounds. It is easy to see why design

did not previously exist. The soap

2012. However, as of March 15, 2012,

professionals would need to have a firm

dispenser was installed at a height of

all new construction and alterations

understanding of ADA requirements

42” and ADA guidelines require soap

shall meet the 2010 ADA Standards

when designing a new facility or

and towel dispensers not to exceed 40”

for Accessible Design as published

renovating an existing facility.

from the floor. ADA also requires that

by the Department of Justice. The

However, it may not be as obvious

all obstacles protrude no more than 4”

2010 ADA Standards addresses new

why your facilities maintenance staff

from the wall and the newly installed

construction and alterations to state

needs to understand ADA guidelines as

suggestion box protrudes 5.5” from

and local government facilities as well

well. If you are responsible for facilities

the wall.

as program accessibility and barrier

management for your organization,

removal.

then I am sure that you have received

As you can see, it is critical for

work order requests to reinstall a

maintenance personnel to have a

We have to begin to analyze our

paper towel dispenser or a hand soap

good understanding of the ADA

facilities with ADA guidelines as

dispenser within a restroom that

guidelines to avoid the creation of

forethought and not an afterthought

has become unattached from the

compliance issues as they relate to the

as many of us find ourselves doing

wall. This work order is then given to

ADA guidelines. This is why training

at times. It is not a goal of any

maintenance staff to be completed.

and education are so vital for any

organization to overlook the needs

Staff arrives at the facility and

organization. Both of these compliance

of anyone as most agencies pride

determines that the drywall anchors

issues could have been easily avoided

themselves on providing equal

used to attach the dispenser to the

if the maintenance staff had been

opportunities to all citizens. In the

restroom wall have been stripped out

educated on the requirements of

scenario described above, the basis of

of the wall. The decision is made to

ADA. Two basic examples were

the renovation was to improve security

simply raise the height of the dispenser

provided within this article. Take the

for the employees working within the

and the dispenser is reattached to the

time to evaluate your organization’s

facility as well as improve customer

wall. The work order is complete and

maintenance practices to make certain

service to the citizens conducting

closed out and they move onto the

that you are not creating compliance

business within the facility. One of the

next work order in a different facility.

issues.

sole reasons behind the renovation was

One of the largest departments within

for customer service enhancement,

your organization has requested a

Please reference the link below to find

but no thought was given to the fact

suggestion box be placed within the

detailed information concerning the

that the service counter would have

hallway to receive feedback from the

current requirements regarding ADA

to be lowered and the door width

customers in which they are providing

accessibility and design. Information

widened to be able to guarantee that

services to. The skilled craftsmen

and Technical Assistance on the

someone utilizing a wheelchair could

with the Carpentry Section have

American with Disabilities Act (www.

be provided the same level of service.

constructed a small box and given to

ada.gov).

Would we see things differently if

the maintenance staff to install. The

we could see things from a different

maintenance staff arrives at the facility

Jeffery Brown can be reached at (910) 678-

perspective? People tend to pay greater

and consults with the department

7633 or jbrown@co.cumberland.nc.us.

attention to details when they have

head as to where they would like

firsthand experience with assisting

to see the suggestion box installed.

a friend or loved one who utilizes a

The suggestion box is installed and

wheelchair for mobility.

the work order is closed out. At the

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Bay-Friendly Landscaping & Gardening Coalition Robert Kennedy Park Supervisor II Parks & Tree Services Division City of Oakland, California

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ark Services: Bay-Friendly Practice

The City of Oakland has partnered with the Bay-Friendly Coalition to train and develop its Parks & Tree Services staff to improve City standards and to create sustainable landscapes within its parks network. In October 2014, 90% of Parks and Tree Services staff received their Maintenance Qualification (MTQ). Oakland’s Bay-Friendly Qualified Staff applies this sustainable and holistic approach to improve its maintenance practices and manage the City’s park assets. They work with nature to conserve water and soil, reduce waste, and prevent pollution—creating a landscape that is safe, healthy and provides an aesthetic that the community values and supports.

Background The Bay-Friendly Landscaping & Gardening Coalition is a nonprofit organization that the City of Oakland works in partnership with to make informed decisions about sustainable landscaping in their communities, reduce waste and pollution, conserve natural resources, and create vibrant landscape amenities. Bay-Friendly landscaping is the systematic approach that Oakland Public Works (OPW) uses when it comes to design, construction, and the maintenance of landscapes. This allows for a balanced maintenance practice that supports the San Francisco Bay Area’s fragile watershed and ecosystem. There are seven Bay-Friendly Landscape principles that integrate

over 50 environmentally-sound landscape practices that the Parks and Tree Services Division implements. The seven principles are: (1) Landscape Locally; (2) Landscape for Less to the Landfill; (3) Nurture the Soil; (4) Conserve Water; (5) Conserve Energy; (6) Protect Water & Air Quality; and (7) Create & Protect Wildlife Habitat. Some practices are repeated under multiple principles because they protect the environment in more than one way. Using mulch, for example, reduces waste, nurtures the soil, conserves water, and creates wildlife habitat.

Bay-Friendly Guidelines The Bay-Friendly guidelines are organized around seven principles for protecting the environment. By viewing our landscapes through the lens of these seven principles, our agency can see how the choices we make for specific landscape projects can have a ripple effect on the surrounding community and the natural environment. Plant selection, for example, has a direct impact on how much waste ends up in landfills. Selecting the appropriate plant palette for a given area can determine how

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much water is consumed for irrigation due to plant needs, and how much food and habitat is available for pollinators and wildlife. In applying these principles OPW can establish a beneficial planting pallet, improve our maintenance standards with sustainable practices, and conserve our resources.

The Seven Principles 1. Landscape Locally. This principle encourages our staff to learn about the native plant communities and helps our gardening staff recognize what these local plant communities are and how to evaluate the condition that allows these plants to thrive. By choosing plants that match the microclimate and soil conditions, we can reduce their susceptibility to disease, other pests, while decreasing their need for fertilizers and pesticides. These thriving local plant communities can act as a model for our planting standards and enable our staff to develop procedures for selecting the appropriate plant palette for their environment. 2. Landscape Less to the Landfill. In order to reduce our waste stream, we have to not create it in the first place. This goes back to landscaping locally and proper plant selection. The reuse of plant trimmings such as mulch, grass clippings, and compost have helped to improve our park soils which in turn reduces the tons of debris going to the landfill. The use of compost has a direct benefit to our park patrons as the soil stores approximately twice as much carbon as that in the atmosphere, reducing the city’s carbon footprint. Landscaping less to the landfill has helped create beautiful, low-maintenance landscapes that yield year-round benefits for the community and the San Francisco Bay. 3. Nurture the Soil. The cornerstone to Bay-Friendly landscaping is creating and protecting soil conditions that help to promote the diversity of 62

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beneficial soil organisms. The soil beneath our feet is a complex and dynamic combination of minerals, air, water, and organic matter that play a vital part in the health of our environment. Healthy soils contain plant and animal debris in various stages of decomposition along with billions of living organisms such as beneficial bacteria and fungi. This matters because the soil and the organisms that live within it create soil structure that stores and cycles nutrients which protect plants from pests and filter out urban pollutants. Oakland’s network of creeks and streams tie into the Bay Area’s watershed, so keeping these waterways clean and clear of pollutants is the main focus. 4. Conserve Water. The climate in California consists of long, dry summers and in recent years drought conditions due to the lack of significant rainfall. Water is a precious and often scarce resource where onethird of all urban water is applied to landscapes. Sustainable water practices for landscaping are more than efficient irrigation and xeriscaping. It’s a combination of practices that augments the water-holding capacity of the soil to create drought resistant soils. By utilizing non-potable water sources like reclaimed water, gray water, or rain catchment water, we can conserve the potable water we rely on to live and promote a sustainable maintenance practice. 5. Conserve Energy. As the City of Oakland embraces sustainability, the conservation of energy is one of our top priorities as the use of power equipment contributes to major use of energy. Conventional landscapes consume large amounts of fossil fuels. Statistics show that nationally forty million lawnmowers consume 200+ million gallons of gasoline per year, representing a huge investment of energy for this one maintenance task alone. By adjusting our maintenance www.apwa.net

practices and creating native habitats we reduce the need for power equipment, thus allowing Mother Nature to sustain itself. 6. Protect Water and Air Quality. The Bay-Friendly practices protect our waterways from pollution by reducing the amount of contaminants entering the waterways and by increasing the soil’s ability to remove pollutants from urban runoff before it enters the watershed. Only 15% of rainwater leaves the system through surface water runoff and more than one-third moves into the soil where the living organisms break down and naturally filter out pollutants. For example, an acre of parking lot will produce four gallons of oil, gasoline and diesel fuel runoff each year. At the same time, gas-powered equipment accounts for 5% of the nation’s air pollution. The plant debris that is removed from the site is hauled off in CO2 emitting trucks. Once there, the disposed plant materials begin to decompose and release greenhouse gases. By embracing the deployment of composting in our parks we can sequester large amounts of these gases before they reach the atmosphere, promoting a healthier way of maintaining our park network. 7. Create and Protect Wildlife Habitat. The San Francisco Bay Area, rich in its plant and animal diversity, makes for a unique and beautiful watershed. With more than 1,500 local plant species that support hundreds of native pollinators, beneficial insects and other organisms, we can reduce the need for herbicides. By installing native habitats, we attract birds and butterflies that bring song and beauty to our urban park spaces throughout the city. The developed landscape that we maintain provides food, shelter, water and nesting sites for birds, butterflies, beneficial insects and other creatures. Maintaining our park networks with Bay-Friendly techniques


creates natural corridors that preserve valuable wildlife resources and restores damaged ecosystem, which promotes the benefits of having a healthy and diverse wildlife population.

Robert Kennedy graduated from the College of Environmental Design at the University of California, Berkeley where he was able to merge landscape architecture with city planning. UC Berkeley’s Environmental Design program and philosophies have provided him with the foundation to not only obtain his CA Landscape Contractor’s license, but enabled him to become CAD certified

and a Bay-Friendly designer. As Park Supervisor II for the City of Oakland, it is Kennedy’s vision to continue applying the Bay-Friendly concepts in a way that integrates the natural environment to improve the residents’ lives and increase their standard of living. He can be reached at (510) 615-5987 or RKennedy@ oaklandnet.com.

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The City of Oakland has inspired many people to be environmental stewards and to take part in the “Pollinator Posse” which activates the collaboration between Oakland Park Maintenance, the West Oakland Green Initiative, the Insect Sciences Museum of California and Children’s Fairyland. This group works closely together to keep Oakland beautiful and safe for pollinator populations by creating healthy and sustainable landscapes. OPW’s vision is to be the industry leader by creating the Lake Merritt Butterfly House garden and applying maintenance practices that can be used as a model for greener living throughout the San Francisco Bay Area. Oakland Parks and Tree Services is working to increase wildlife diversity and reestablish sustainable and balanced ecosystems throughout our city by creating Bay-Friendly, Pollinator-Friendly landscapes. It is OPW’s mission and challenge to the community and local businesses to go Bay-Friendly and Pollinator-Friendly in their landscapes and gardens. OPW is working to create a system and practice within Oakland’s park network that can be used as a national model for activating local communities to take ownership of their neighborhood parks. By creating a stewardship and volunteer based model, OPW is reversing pollinator decline through gardening opportunities and other educational outreach that brings life, habitat and nature back into the urban built environment.

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Fighting an uphill battle: facility maintenance software eases the public works load Brian Bell Vice President of Strategy Dude Solutions and FacilityDude Cary, North Carolina

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onsistently fighting against budget constraints and cuts coupled with renewed questions on the efficacy and efficiency of the department as a whole, public works professionals are facing mounting pressures to maintain vast infrastructures in the areas they serve. As state governments and municipalities continue to grow, so do the facility maintenance requirements, particularly with older buildings and crumbling infrastructure systems as well as linear.

BUILDING & CONSTRUCTION

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Technology in support of select local and state government operations and particularly facility maintenance is outdated or relies on e-mail and fax to handle communication across departments to track and update progress to supervisors managing work requests. Often, “phoning it in” is still an accepted method to convey status updates or location status while out in the field. With the use of web-based facility management technology applications,

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facility maintenance professionals can benefit from an affordable and efficient vehicle to streamline operations requests, improve awareness, readiness and response times during an event, reduce liability exposure and drive down insurance claims, and empower supervisors with information and answers when needed. Let’s take a deeper look:

Administrative efficiency affords project transparency Whether it’s a scheduled repair to a courthouse out-of-work bathroom or a pop-up water main break, it can be a complex and daunting task for facility maintenance professionals to manage administrative work orders and reporting, particularly when much of it is still accomplished in a paper-based fashion or through Excel spreadsheets. Web-based facility maintenance solutions can help improve communication and give continuous insight into progress on current work orders, personnel assigned to managing and completing the project, and time and budget allocated. Supervisors can easily reallocate personnel utilizing web-based software to handle emergency situations or call in a nearby field worker when additional support is needed. Armed with the right information, facility maintenance professionals can do more with the assets and resources available and, at the same time, justify resource needs and requests to administration. And, according to recent research, technology can extend the life of building and equipment assets by nearly 35 percent.

Inter- and cross-departmental communications vehicle While cloud technology enables improved facilities data accessibility

and storage capacity, adoption rates are still relatively low across most governmental departments. The benefits of the cloud, however, are undeniable—particularly when looking at increased communication across a department or multiple departments. Take, for instance, if several employees are sick or can’t make it on time during a snow emergency when they are tasked to be first on the scene in order to keep roads and government building entrances clear. Public works is on the front lines and is responsible for managing the cleanup regardless of a reduced workforce. During routine or emergency issues, facility maintenance webbased software affords the ability to effortlessly assess scheduling needs and reassign personnel located in one part of the municipality to help out in the understaffed region. Instantly creating automatic reports, supervisors can easily send status updates to other departments apprising them of the progress on an hourly, daily or other pre-determined timing basis. In addition, incident calls coming in from local residents can be easily tracked and managed through the software.

Minimizing liability exposure Civil lawsuits against municipalities are on the rise. Building maintenance issues ranging from routine repairs to old and outdated facilities mean hundreds of thousands to millions of dollars that eat into government budgets and resources. Recently, one municipality was able to successfully fight a lawsuit using their facility maintenance software reporting records where a local resident claimed they slipped and injured themselves in a courthouse bathroom due to an out-of-order overflowed toilet. Through a quick review of records in www.apwa.net

the implemented facility maintenance solution, it was determined that the toilet was successfully replaced several weeks prior to the incident thus stopping the lawsuit before thousands of dollars in legal fees and settlement claims could be assessed. During a major natural disaster where FEMA steps in, such as Hurricane Sandy, response, cleanup and recovery efforts by a municipality or state government need to be well-documented in order to receive reimbursement funds from the federal agency. Using paper-based or even Excel spreadsheets can mean hundreds of hours of time and money wasted, whereas a facility maintenance management solution yields incredible efficiency and reporting capabilities as the work happens so that facilities maintenance professionals can focus on the cleanup rather than the administrative tasks. Whether managing public works buildings, maintaining grounds, or mitigating a minor or major disaster in concert with other departments, critical resources are vital to ensuring that the overall assets are wellmaintained, kept safe, and the public works department works smoothly and efficiently. As in-house resources become stretched and strained, the advantage of a web-based facility maintenance solution can easily manage daily work requests, schedule routine maintenance and inspections, and create a more cooperative work environment to better connect employees and other governmental agencies and most importantly the citizens they serve. Brian Bell can be reached at (866) 4553833 or brian@facilitydude.com.

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Annual Buyer’s Guide (alphabetical listing) The Annual Buyer’s Guide is provided as a service by the American Public Works Association to its members to assist in identifying the corporate members that represent the consulting, service and manufacturing firms serving the public works industry today. It is by no means an attempt to list all of the firms serving the industry, only those that are APWA members as of February 18, 2015. The Annual Buyer’s Guide is not intended to provide endorsement of any particular products or services listed herein. The alphabetical listing appears first, followed by the categorical listing on page 80. APWA makes every effort to achieve accuracy, but cannot be held responsible for inadvertent omissions or incorrect entries. If any errors are detected, please notify the Finance/Membership Department at (800) 848-APWA.

3rd Eye MobileVision (972) 765-3767 9940 W Sam Houston Pkwy, Ste 330 Houston, TX 77099 www.awti.net

AgileAssets Inc (512) 327-4200 FAX: (512) 328-7246 3001 Bee Caves Rd Ste 200 Austin, TX 78746-5590 www.agileassets.com

Alpha Geotechnical & Materials (602) 453-3265 FAX: (602) 453-3267 2504 W Southern Ave Tempe, AZ 85282-401 www.alphageotech.com

4Leaf, Inc (925) 462-5959 FAX: (925) 462-5958 2110 Rheem Dr Ste A Pleasanton, CA 94588-2767

AHBL Inc (253) 383-2422 FAX: (253) 383-2572 2215 N 30th St Ste 300 Tacoma, WA 98403-3350 www.ahbl.com

Altec Industries (205) 790-6253 FAX: (205) 981-2522 33 Inverness Ctr Pkwy Dr Birmingham, AL 35242 www.altec.com

Air-Flo Manufacturing Inc (607) 522-3574 365 Upper Oakwood Ave Elmira, NY 14903-1127 www.air-flo.com

American Engineering Testing Inc Toll Free: (800) 972-6364 550 Cleveland Ave N St. Paul, MN 55114

Achen-Gardner Construction LLC (480) 940-1300 FAX: (480) 940-4576 550 S 79th St Chandler, AZ 85226-4706 www.achen.com ADA Engineering Inc (305) 551-4608 FAX: (305) 551-8977 8550 NW 33rd St Ste 202 Doral, FL 33122-1941 www.adaengineering.com Adhara Systems Inc (408) 441-0341 FAX: (408) 441-0343 1735 N First St Ste 200 San Jose, CA 95112-4530 AECOM Technology Corporation (763) 551-2409 FAX: (763) 473-0400 161 Cheshire Ln N Ste 500 Plymouth, MN 55441 www.aecom.com Aerostar SES LLC (904) 565-2820 FAX: (904) 565-2830 11181 Saint Johns Industrial Pkwy N Jacksonville, FL 32246-7643 www.aerostar.net Affinis Corp (913) 239-1100 FAX: (913) 239-1111 7401 W 129th St Ste 110 Overland Park, KS 66213-2694 www.affinis.us Aggregate Industries SWR Inc (734) 529-2411 FAX: (734) 529-4110 Toll Free: (888) 646-5246 201 Jones Road Waltham, MA 02451 www.aggregate-us.com

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Airworks Compressors Corp (780) 454-2263 FAX: (780) 452-9969 14503 115 Ave Edmonton, AB T5M 3B8 www.airworkscompressors.com AirX Utility Surveyors (760) 480-2347 FAX: (760) 739-8037 2534 East El Norte Parkway, Ste C Escondido, CA 92027 www.airxus.com AKS Engineering & Forestry LLC (503) 563-6151 FAX: (503) 925-8969 12965 SW Herman Rd Ste 100 Tualatin, OR 97062-7194 Alamo Industrial (830) 372-9646 Toll Free: (800) 882-5762 1502 E Walnut Street Sequin, TX 78155 Alberta Highway Services Ltd (780) 701-8668 FAX: (780) 443-2918 200 11010 178th St N W Edmonton, AB T5S 1R7 www.ahsl.ca Alfred Benesch & Co (630) 577-9100 FAX: (630) 577-9199 1560 Wall St Ste 222 Naperville, IL 60601

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American Pavement Systems (209) 303-5921 1012 11th St Ste 1000 Modesto, CA 95354-0846 American Paving Fabrics Inc (410) 379-2209 FAX: (410) 796-0272 6910 O Conner Rd Hanover, MD 21076-1038 American Samoa Power Authority 68-46-9901-05 FAX: 68-46-9941-29 PO Box PPB Pago Pago, AS 96799 www.aspower.com American Traffic Safety Materials Inc (904) 284-1708 FAX: (904) 284-8165 Toll Free: (877) 872-2876 PO Box 1449 Orange Park, FL 32067-1449 www.atsminc.com Ames Construction Inc (602) 431-2111 FAX: (602) 731-5952 8333 E Hartford Dr Scottsdale, AZ 85255-5478 www.amesconstruction.com Amick Equipment Company Inc (803) 359-6656 FAX: (803) 359-0925 PO Box 1965 Lexington, SC 29071-1965 www.amickequipment.com

A-N West Inc (510) 222-9800 FAX: (510) 222-6714 3095 Richmond Pkwy Ste 212 Richmond, CA 94806-5875 Anderson & Associates Inc (540) 552-5592 FAX: (540) 552-5729 100 Ardmore St Blacksburg, VA 24060-5802 www.andassoc.com AndersonPenna (949) 428-1500 20280 Acacia St Unit 100 Newport Beach, CA 92660 www.andpen.com Andregg Geomatics (530) 885-7072 FAX: (530) 885-5798 11661 Blocker Dr Ste 200 Auburn, CA 95603-4649 www.andregg.com Angus-Young Associates Inc (608) 756-2326 FAX: (608) 756-0464 555 S River St Janesville, WI 53548-4783 www.angusyoung.com Applied GeoLogics (519) 821-3262 FAX: (519) 821-7302 111 Farquhar St Guelph, ON N1H 3N4 www.appliedgeologics.com Applied Professional Services Inc (425) 888-2590 FAX: (425) 888-2554 43530 SE North Bend Way North Bend, WA 98045-9289 www.apslocates.com ARCADIS (602) 438-0883 410 N 44th St Ste 1000 Phoenix, AZ 85008-6503 www.arcadis-us.com Arizona Public Service Co (602) 371-7837 FAX: (602) 371-6653 PO Box 53933 Station 3177 Phoenix, AZ 85072-3933 www.aps.com


ARS Engineers Inc (214) 739-3152 FAX: (214) 739-3169 12801 N Central Expy Ste 1250 Dallas, TX 75243-1861 www.arsengineers.com

Ayres Associates (715) 834-3161 FAX: (715) 831-7500 3433 Oakwood Hills Parkway Eau Claire, WI 54701-7698 www.ayresassociates.com

AshBritt Environmental (954) 545-3535 FAX: (954) 545-3585 565 E Hillsboro Blvd Deerfield Beach, FL 33441-3543 www.ashbritt.com

Aztec Engineering (602) 454-0402 FAX: (602) 4540403 4561 E McDowell Rd Phoenix, AZ 85008-4505 www.aztec.us

Aspect Consulting LLC (206) 838-6589 401 2nd Ave S Ste 201 Seattle, WA 98104-3870 Asphalt Pavement Alliance (301) 918-8391 FAX: (301) 731-4621 Toll Free: (877) 272-0077 5100 Forbes Blvd Ste. 101B Lanham, MD 20706-4416 www.asphaltalliance.com Associated Pump & Supply (228) 818-6400 FAX: (228) 818-6408 6501 Sunplex Drive Ocean Springs, MS 39564-8704 Associated Transportation Engineers (805) 687-4418 FAX: (805) 682-8509 100 N Hope Ave Ste 4 Santa Barbara, CA 93110-2621 www.atesb.com ATKINS NA Inc (928) 855-4505 FAX: (928) 855-4535 60 S Acoma Blvd Ste C-106 Lake Havasu City, AZ 86403 www.atkinsglobal.com Atlantic Detroit Diesel-Allison LLC (732) 424-2717 FAX: (732) 424-2727 PO Box 950 180 Rte 17 South Lodi, NJ 07644-0950 www.atlanticdda.com Atmax Equipment Co (813) 634-1111 FAX: (813) 634-1115 PO Box 329 Wimauma, FL 33598-0329 www.atmax.us

Azteca Systems/Cityworks (801) 523-2751 FAX: (801) 523-3734 Toll Free: (888) 523-2751 11075 South State Street Ste 24 Sandy, UT 84070 www.cityworks.com

Biggs Cardosa Associates Inc (408) 296-5515 FAX: (408) 296-8114 865 The Alameda San Jose, CA 95126-3133 www.biggscardosa.com BioSeal (708) 479-0110 FAX: (714) 528-8434 19148 104th Ave Mokena, IL 60448-8202 www.biosealusa.com

B & E Engineers (626) 446-4449 FAX: (626) 446-6566 20 E Foothill Blvd Ste 230 Arcadia, CA 91006-2375 www.beeng.com

BL Companies Inc (203) 630-1406 FAX: (203) 630-2615 Toll Free: (800) 301-3077 355 Research Pkwy Ste 1 Meriden, CT 06450-7100 www.blcompanies.com

Barrett Engineered Pumps (619) 232-7867 FAX: (619) 232-3029 1695 National Ave San Diego, CA 92113-1008

Blacklidge Emulsions Inc (228) 863-3878 12251 Bernard Pkwy Gulfport, MS 39503-5086

Bartlett Consolidated Inc (508) 746-4246 FAX: (508) 747-6587 PO Box 810 Plymouth, MA 02362-0810 www.bartlettconsolidated.com

Blair, Church & Flynn Consulting Engineers (559) 326-1400 FAX: (559) 326-1500 451 Clovis Ave Ste 200 Clovis, CA 93612-1376

Baxter & Woodman Consulting Engineers (847) 223-5088 FAX: (847) 543-1661 8678 Ridgefield Rd Crystal Lake, IL 60012-2714 www.baxterwoodman.com

Blois Construction Inc (805) 656-1432 FAX: (805) 485-0338 3201 Sturgis Rd Oxnard, CA 93030-8931 www.bloisconstruction.com

Becher-Hoppe Associates Inc (715) 845-8000 FAX: (715) 845-8008 330 Fourth Street PO Box 8000 Wausau, WI 54402-8000 Behnke Materials Engineering (608) 449-8427 FAX: (608) 713-4823 3621 E Hart Rd Beloit, WI 53511-9538

Auto Truck Group (630) 860-5600 FAX: (630) 860-5631 1420 Brewster Creek Blvd Bartlett, IL 60103-1695 www.autotruck.com

Bell Equipment Company (248) 370-0000 FAX: (248) 370-0011 78 Northpointe Dr Orion, MI 48359-1846 www.bellequip.com

Avalon Engineering Inc (239) 573-2077 FAX: (239) 573-2076 2503 del Prado Blvd S Ste 200 Cape Coral, FL 33904-5709 www.avalonengineering.net

Berg & Associates Inc (310) 548-9292 FAX: (310) 548-9195 302 W 5th St Ste 210 San Pedro, CA 90731-2749

Aviles Engineering Corporation (713) 895-7645 FAX: (713) 895-7943 5790 Windfern Rd Houston, TX 77041-6210

Brandon Industries Inc (972) 542-3000 FAX: (972) 542-1015 PO Box 2230 McKinney, TX 75070-8167 www.brandonindustries.com

BHC RHODES Civil Engineers & Surveyors (913) 663-1900 7101 College Blvd Ste 400 Overland Park, KS 66210-2081 www.ibhc.com

Bergkamp Inc (785) 825-1375 FAX: (785) 825-6869 3040 Emulsion Dr Salina, KS 67401-8415 www.bergkampinc.com

Brown & Gay Engineers Inc (713) 488-8271 FAX: (713) 488-8250 10777 Westheimer Rd Ste 400 Houston, TX 77042-3475 www.browngay.com Burgess and Niple FAX: (614) 451-1385 Toll Free: (800) 321-5313 668 Seabury Drive Worthington, OH 43085 www.burgessniple.com Burns & McDonnell (816) 333-9400 FAX: (816) 333-3690 9400 Ward Pkwy Kansas City, MO 64114-3319 www.burnsmcd.com BURY (512) 328-0011 FAX: (512) 328-0325 221 West Sixth Street Ste 600 Austin, TX 78701

BMC Corporation (781) 273-0398 FAX: (781) 273-0724 PO Box 60 Pinehurst, MA 01866-0060 www.tsoil.com Bollinger Lach & Associates Inc (630) 438-6400 FAX: (630) 438-6444 333 W Pierce Rd Ste 300 Itasca, IL 60143-3165

Cal Engineering & Geology Inc (925) 935-9771 FAX: (925) 935-9773 1870 Olympic Blvd Ste 100 Walnut Creek, CA 94596-5067 www.caleng.com California Pavement Maintenance (916) 381-8033 FAX: (916) 381-3703 Toll Free: (800) 473-9390 9390 Elder Creek Rd Sacramento, CA 95829-9326 Caltrop Corporation (619) 787-7393 FAX: (619) 235-9229 1775 Hancock St Ste 190 San Diego, CA Calvin Giordano & Associates (954) 921-7781 FAX: (954) 921-8807 1800 Eller Dr Ste 600 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33316-4211 www.calvin-giordano.com Camosy Construction (847) 395-6800 FAX: (847) 395-6891 43451 N US Highway 41 Ste 100 Zion, IL 60099-9455 www.camosy.com

Bolton & Menk Inc (507) 625-4171 1960 Premier Dr Mankato, MN 56001-5900 www.bolton-menk.com Bowen Island Municipality (604) 947-4255 981 Artisan Ln Bowen Island, BC V0N 1G2 Bowman Bowman Novick (816) 753-2550 411 Nichols Rd Ste 246 Kansas City, MO 64112-2023

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Cargill Deicing Technology (440) 716-4700 FAX: (888) 739-8705 Toll Free: (866) 900-7258 24950 Country Club Blvd Ste 450 North Olmsted, OH 44070-5333 www.cargilldeicing.com

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Carolina Industrial Equipment Inc (704) 588-4522 FAX: (704) 588-2592 Toll Free: (800) 476-2434 PO Box 667907 Charlotte, NC 28266-7907

CESARE Inc (702) 564-3331 FAX: (702) 564-8542 106 Cassia Way Henderson, NV 89014-6415 www.jacesare.com

Carollo Engineers (925) 932-1710 FAX: (925) 930-0208 Toll Free: (800) 523-5826 2700 Ygnacio Valley Rd Ste 300 Walnut Creek, CA 94598-3466 www.carollo.com

CESNW Inc (503) 968-6655 FAX: (503) 968-2595 13190 SW 68th Pkwy Ste 150 Portland, OR 97223-8294 www.cesnw.com

Carroll Engineering Inc (408) 261-9800 FAX: (408) 261-0595 1101 S Winchester Blvd Ste H184 San Jose, CA 95128-3903 www.carroll-engineering.com CarteGraph (563) 556-8120 FAX: (563) 556-8149 Toll Free: (800) 688-2656 3600 Digital Drive Dubuque, IA 52003 www.cartegraph.com

CFA Software Inc (630) 543-1410 FAX: (630) 543-1904 Toll Free: (800) 437-6001 1020 W Fullerton Ave Ste A Addison, IL 60101 www.cfasoftware.com Chastain & Associates LLC (815) 489-0050 FAX: (815) 489-0055 345 Executive Pkwy Ste L4 Rockford, IL 61107-5291 www.hlclip.com Cherry Valley Tractor Sales (856) 983-0111 FAX: (856) 988-6290 35 W Route 70 Marlton, NJ 08053-3009 www.cherryvalleytractor.net

Case Construction Equipment (262) 636-7498 Toll Free: (866) 542-2736 621 State St Racine, WI 53402-5133 www.casece.com Casperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Truck Equipment (920) 687-1111 FAX: (920) 687-1122 700 Randolph Dr Appleton, WI 54913-9291 www.casperstruck.com CDG Engineers & Associates Inc (334) 222-9431 FAX: (334) 222-4018 1840 E Three Notch St PO Box 278 Andalusia, AL 36421-2404 www.cdge.com CDO Technologies Inc (937) 476-2278 FAX: (937) 258-1614 5200 Springfield St Ste 320 Dayton, OH 45431-1265

Cimline Pavement Maintenance Group FAX: (763) 557-1971 Toll Free: (800) 328-3874 2601 Niagara Ln N Plymouth, MN 55447-4721 www.cimline.com Ciorba Group Inc (773) 775-4009 FAX: (773) 775-4014 5507 N Cumberland Ave Ste 402 Chicago, IL 60656-4754 www.ciorba.com Civic Engineering & Information Technology Inc (615) 425-2000 FAX: (615) 385-4834 25 Lindsley Ave Nashville, TN 37210-2038 www.civicinc.com

Clark Patterson Lee (585) 454-7600 FAX: (585) 232-5836 Toll Free: (800) 274-9000 205 Saint Paul St Ste 500 Rochester, NY 14604-1187 www.clarkpatterson.com

Colorado Barricade (303) 922-7815 2295 S. Lipan Denver, CO 80223 www.coloradobarricade.com Company Wrench (803) 508-5144 FAX: (740) 687-9130 1252 Old Kimbill Trl Aiken, SC 29805-9010

ClearSpan Fabric Structures (860) 528-1119 FAX: (860) 289-4711 1395 John Fitch Blvd South Windsor, CT 06074-1029 www.clearspan.com CMT Engineering Laboratories (801) 908-5859 FAX: (801) 972-9074 2800 S Redwood Rd West Valley City, UT 84119-2375

Compass Minerals America Inc (913) 344-9222 FAX: (913) 345-0309 9900 W 109th St Ste 100 Overland Park, KS 66210-1436 www.nasalt.com CompassCom Software (303) 680-3311 FAX: (303) 766-2488 12353 E Easter Ave Ste 200 Centennial, CO 80112-6797 www.compasscom.com

CMTS, LLC (503) 242-1388 FAX: (503) 242-0094 Toll Free: (888) 661-7259 3220 SW 1st Ave Ste 150 Portland, OR 97239-4600 www.cmtsinc.com Cobb Fendley & Associates Inc (713) 462-3242 FAX: (713) 462-3262 13430 Northwest Fwy Ste 1100 Houston, TX 77040-6153 www.cobfen.com Colas Solutions Inc (313) 410-1090 FAX: (734) 213-2735 Toll Free: (888) 369-3163 2309 Peters Rd Ann Arbor, MI 48103-9431 www.barrettpaving.com

Construction Accessories (937) 429-9089 FAX: (937) 427-4653 3880 Haines Rd Waynesville, OH 45068 Construction Testing Services Inc (925) 462-5151 FAX: (925) 462-5183 2118 Rheem Dr Pleasanton, CA 94588-2775 www.cts-1.com

Cold Mix Manufacturing (718) 463-1444 FAX: (718) 463-0292 12030 28th Ave Flushing, NY 11354-1049 www.greenpatch.com

Contractor Compliance & Monitoring Inc (618) 254-3855 FAX: (618) 254-2200 635 Mariners Island Blvd Ste 200 San Mateo, CA 94404-1060 www.ccmi-tpa.com

Cole & Associates Inc (314) 984-9887 FAX: (314) 984-0587 1520 S 5th St Ste 307 Saint Charles, MO 63303-4153 www.colestl.com

Corrective Asphalt Materials (801) 359-5565 FAX: (801) 359-4272 2060 East 2100 South Salt Lake City, UT 84109 www.cammidwest.com

CE Niehoff & Co (847) 866-1536 2021 Lee St Evanston, IL 60202-1557 www.ceniehoff.com

Civil Consulting Group (972) 569-9193 FAX: (972) 569-9197 201 1/2 E Virginia St Ste 2 McKinney, TX 75069-4323

CEI (479) 273-9472 PO Box 1408 Bentonville, AR 72712-1408 www.ceieng.com

Civiltech Engineering Inc (630) 773-3900 FAX: (630) 773-3975 450 E Devon Ave Ste 300 Itasca, IL 60143-1263 www.civiltechinc.com

CollectiveData Inc (319) 362-1993 FAX: (319) 364-4306 Toll Free: (800) 750-7638 230 2nd St SE Ste 414 Cedar Rapids, IA 52401 www.collectivedata.com

Crafco Inc (602) 276-0406 FAX: (480) 961-0513 Toll Free: (800) 227-4059 420 N Roosevelt Ave Chandler, AZ 85226 www.crafco.com

CenterPoint Energy Minnegasco (612) 321-5426 FAX: (612) 321-5480 PO Box 1165 Minneapolis, MN 55440-1165 www.centerpointenergy.com

CivTech Inc (480) 659-4250 10605 N Hayden Rd Ste 140 Scottsdale, AZ 85260-5595 www.civtech.com

Collier Engineering Company Inc (615) 331-1441 FAX: (615) 331-1050 5560 Franklin Pike Cir Ste 101 Brentwood, TN 37027-4982 www.collierengineering.com

Crafton Tull (479) 878-2412 901 N 47th St Ste 200 Rogers, AR 72756-9634 www.craftontull.com

Certified Power Inc (314) 422-3128 FAX: (314) 978-6471 970 Campus Dr Mundelein, IL 60060-3803 www.certifiedpower.com

Clark Dietz Engineers (262) 657-1550 FAX: (262) 657-1594 5017 Green Bay Rd Ste 126 Kenosha, WI 53144-1782 www.clark-dietz.com

Collins Engineers Inc (312) 704-9300 FAX: (312) 704-9320 Toll Free: (800) 835-3483 123 North Wacker Drive Ste 900 Chicago, IL 60606

Creighton Manning Engineering LLP (518) 446-0396 FAX: (518) 446-0397 2 Winners Cir Albany, NY 12205-1121 www.cmellp.com

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Cretex Specialty Products (262) 542-8153 FAX: (262) 542-0301 Toll Free: (800) 345-3764 N16 W23390 Stoneridge Dr –A Waukesha, WI 53188 www.cretexseals.com CrowderGulf (251) 459-7430 FAX: (251) 459-7433 Toll Free: (800) 992-6207 5435 Business Park Way Theodore, AL 36582-1615 www.crowdergulf.com CRS Consulting Engineers (407) 896-0594 FAX: (407) 896-4836 2060 E 2100 S Salt Lake City, UT 84109-1151 www.crsengineers.com

David Evans and Associates Inc (503) 223-6663 FAX: (503) 223-2701 2100 SW River Pkwy Portland, OR 97201-8070 www.deainc.com Davis & Floyd Inc (843) 554-8602 FAX: (864) 229-7119 3229 W Montague Ave North Charleston, SC 29418-7915 DBA Construction Inc (602) 442-6767 FAX: (602) 442-0408 1833 S 59th Ave Phoenix, AZ 85043-7921 DeAngelo Brothers Inc (570) 459-1112 FAX: (570) 459-0321 100 N Conahan Dr Hazleton, PA 18201-7355 www.dbiservices.com D’Escoto Inc (312) 787-0707 FAX: (312) 787-7322 420 N Wabash Ave Ste 200 Chicago, IL 60611-3539

CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation/Rapid Set Products (714) 379-8260 FAX: (714) 379-8270 Toll Free: (800) 929-3030 11065 Knott Ave Ste A Cypress, CA 90630-5149 www.ctscement.com CTS Group (636) 230-0843 FAX: (636) 230-5886 15933 Clayton Rd Ste 110 Ballwin, MO 63011-2172 Curbco (810) 232-2121 FAX: (810) 232-2460 PO Box 70 Swartz Creek, MI 48473-0070 www.curbco2121.com

Design Precast & Pipe Inc (228) 831-5833 FAX: (228) 831-2791 PO Box 2401 Gulfport, MS 39505-2401 Dewberry (703) 849-0192 FAX: (703) 849-0118 8401 Arlington Blvd Fairfax, VA 22031 www.dewberry.com Diaz Yourman & Associates (714) 245-2920 FAX: (714) 245-2950 1616 E 17th St Santa Ana, CA 92705-8509 www.diazyourman.com

Custom Hydraulics & Design Inc (704) 347-0023 3822 Statesville Ave Charlotte, NC 28206-1013

Dibble Engineering (602) 957-1155 FAX: (602) 957-2838 7500 N Dreamy Draw Dr Ste 200 Phoenix, AZ 85020-4669 www.dibblecorp.com

Custom Underground Inc (309) 683-3677 FAX: (309) 683-3076 9907 W US Highway Edwards, IL 61528

Dickson Equipment (214) 741-6337 FAX: (214) 741-5515 4525 Irving Blvd Dallas, TX 75247-5703

Cutler Repaving Inc (785) 843-1524 921 E 27th St Lawrence, KS 66046 www.cutlerrepaving.com

Diesel Equipment Company Toll Free: (800) 222-7159 220 Atwell Ave Ste 212 Greensboro, NC 27406-4501

D&D Instruments (612) 378-1445 FAX: (612) 378-1445 2525 Winter St NE Minneapolis, MN 55413-2933 Data Transfer Solutions (407) 382-5222 FAX: (407) 382-5420 3680 Avalon Park Blvd East Ste 200 Orlando, FL 32828-9373 www.dtsgis.com

Dokken Engineering (858) 514-8377 FAX: (858) 514-8608 5675 Ruffin Rd Ste 250 San Diego, CA 92123-1372 www.dokkenengineering.com Doland Engineering LLC (847) 991-5088 FAX: (847) 934-3427 334 E Colfax St Ste C Palatine, IL 60067-5343 www.dolandengineering.com

Dome Corporation of North America (973) 744-0440 FAX: (973) 744-8759 15 S Park St Montclair, NJ www.dome-corp-na.com Donelson Construction Company LLC (417) 743-2694 FAX: (417) 743-2945 1075 Wise Hill Rd Clever, MO 65631-6552 www.donelsonconstruction.com Donovan Equipment Co Inc (603) 669-2250 FAX: (603) 669-0501 Toll Free: (800) 458-3867 6 Enterprise Dr Londonderry, NH 03053-2158 Drake Haglan & Associates Inc (916) 363-4210 FAX: (916) 363-4230 11060 White Rock Rd Ste 200 Rancho Cordova, CA 95670-6061 www.drakehaglan.com DRMP Inc (614) 791-3600 FAX: (614) 791-4800 941 Lake Baldwin Ln Ste 100 Orlando, FL 32814-6438 www.drmp.com DRS Marine Inc (707) 648-3483 525 Chestnut St Vallejo, CA 94590-7200 DuBois Chemicals Inc (513) 475-3279 FAX: (513) 731-0678 3630 E Kemper Rd Cincinnati, OH 45241-2011 www.galaxy-associates.com Dynamic Surface Applications Toll Free: (800) 491-5663 373 Village Rd Pennsdale, PA 17756 E Meier Contracting Inc (636) 300-0908 FAX: (636) 300-0907 860 Westwood Industrial Park Ct Weldon Spring, MO 63304-4580 EAC Consulting Inc (305) 264-2557 FAX: (305) 264-8363 815 NW 57th Ave Ste 402 Miami, FL 33126-2054 www.eacconsult.com Earth Systems Inc (805) 781-0112 FAX: (805) 781-0180 895 Aerovista Pl Ste 102 San Luis Obispo, CA 93401-8725 www.earthsystems.com EBA-A Tetra Tech Company (604) 685-0275 FAX: (604) 684-6241 885 Dunsmuir St Ste 1000 10FL Vancouver, BC V6C 1N5 www.eba.ca

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ECS Engineers (307) 675-1919 371 Coffeen Ave Sheridan, WY 82801-4808 EFK Moen LLC (314) 729-4100 FAX: (314) 729-4199 13523 Barrett Parkway Dr Ste 250 St. Louis, MO 63021-3802 www.efkmoen.com EJ Group Inc (210) 824-7383 FAX: (210) 824-2031 8801 Tradeway San Antonio, TX 78217 www.ejiw.com ElectraTherm (775) 398-4690 FAX: (775) 398-4672 4750 Turbo Cir Reno, NV 89502-5965 Emterra Environmental (905) 336-9084 FAX: (905) 336-8865 1122 Pioneer Rd Regina, SK S4M 0A1 Encore Group (702) 354-8740 FAX: (702) 463-3844 Toll Free: (800) 991-7029 2380 W Horizon Ridge Pkwy Ste 100 Henderson, NV 89052-5078 Engineering Associates (307) 587-4911 FAX: (307) 587-2596 PO Box 1900 Cody, WY 82414-1900 www.eaengineers.com Engineering Resources (951) 765-6622 FAX: (951) 765-6621 3550 E Florida Ave Ste B Hemet, CA 92544-4937 www.erscinc.com Engineering Service Inc (601) 939-8737 FAX: (601) 939-8799 PO Box 180429 198 Cleary Road Richland, MS 39218 www.engservice.com England-Thims & Miller Inc (904) 642-8990 FAX: (904) 646-9485 14775 Old Saint Augustine Rd Jacksonville, FL 32258-2463 www.etminc.com EnviroIssues (206) 269-5041 FAX: (206) 269-5046 101 Stewart St Ste 1200 Seattle, WA 98101-2449 www.enviroissues.com Envirolink Inc (252) 235-4900 FAX: (252) 235-2132 PO Box 670 Bailey, NC 27807-0670

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Environmental Partners Group Inc (617) 657-0200 FAX: (617) 657-0201 1900 Crown Colony Dr Ste 402 Quincy, MA 02169-0980 www.envpartners.com ENZ USA INC (630) 692-7880 FAX: (630) 692-7885 1585 Beverly Ct Ste 115 Aurora, IL 60502-8731 www.enz.com EPCOR Water Services Inc (780) 412-7755 FAX: (780) 969-7057 2000-10423 101 Street NW Edmonton, AB T5H 0E8 www.epcor.ca EPS Group Inc (480) 503-2250 FAX: (480) 503-2258 2045 S Vineyard Ave Ste 101 Mesa, AZ 85210-6890 www.epsgroupinc.com Equipment World (205) 248-1266 FAX: (205) 248-1058 Toll Free: (800) 633-5953 3200 Rice Mine Road NE Tuscaloosa, AL 35406 www.betterroads.com Ergon Asphalt & Emulsions Inc (903) 258-6186 3303 Cripple Creek Tyler, TX 75707 www.ergonasphalt.com

Erler & Kalinowski Inc (650) 292-9100 FAX: (650) 552-9012 1870 Ogden Dr Burlingame, CA 94010-5306 Ersco Construction Supply (616) 531-7050 2739 Burlingame Ave SW Wyoming, MI 49509-2333

Evans Mechwart Hambleton & Tilton Inc (614) 775-4510 FAX: (614) 775-4871 5500 New Albany Rd New Albany, OH 43054-8703 www.emht.com Everglades Farm Equipment (561) 996-6531 FAX: (561) 996-8367 PO Box 910 Belle Glade, FL 33430-0910 Exeltech Consulting Inc (360) 357-8289 FAX: (360) 357-8225 8729 Commerce Place Dr NE Ste A Lacey, WA 98516-1363 www.xltech.com

EZ-Liner Industries (712) 737-4016 FAX: (712) 737-4148 1920 Albany Pl SE Orange City, IA 51041 www.ezliner.com Fahrner Asphalt Sealers LLC (920) 759-1008 FAX: (920) 759-1019 Toll Free: (800) 497-4907 860 Eastline Rd Kaukauna, WI 54130-1106 www.fahrnerasphalt.com Falcon Equipment Ltd (604) 888-5066 FAX: (604) 888-3587 Toll Free: (800) 914-7819 18412 - 96 Ave Surrey, BC V4N 3P8

ESG Operations (334) 705-5400 700 Fox Trl Opelika, AL 36801-4532 www.esginc.net ESI Consultants Ltd (630) 420-1700 FAX: (630) 420-1733 1979 N Mill Street, Ste 100 Naperville, IL 60563 www.esiltd.com ESRI (998) 793-2853 FAX: (998) 307-3039 Toll Free: (800) 447-9778 380 New York St Redlands, CA 92373-8118 www.esri.com

APWA Reporter

Etna Supply (616) 514-5154 FAX: (616) 514-6154 Toll Free: (800) 632-4576 529 32nd St SE Grand Rapids, MI 49548-2392 www.etnasupply.com

Exp Services Inc (613) 688-1899 FAX: (613) 225-7337 100-2650 Queensview Dr Ottawa, ON K2B 8H6 www.exp.com

Erlandsen & Associates Inc (509) 884-2562 FAX: (509) 884-2814 250 Simon St SE East Wenatchee, WA 98802-7710 www.erlandsen.com

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Ess Brothers & Sons Inc (763) 478-2027 FAX: (763) 478-8868 Toll Free: (800) 478-2027 9350 County Road 19 Unit 1 Loretto, MN 55357-4613 www.essbrothers.com

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FallLine Corporation FAX: (775) 827-6749 Toll Free: (800) 325-5463 4625 Aircenter Circle Reno, NV 89502 www.fallline.com FASTER Asset Solutions (757) 623-1700 2730 Ellsmere Ave Norfolk, VA 23513 www.fasterasset.com

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Fay Spofford & Thorndike Inc (781) 221-1000 FAX: (781) 229-1115 5 Burlington Woods Burlington, MA 01803 www.fstinc.com

Forsgren Associates Inc (801) 364-4785 FAX: (801) 364-4802 370 E 500 S Ste 200 Salt Lake City, UT 84111-3318 www.forsgren.com

Federal Signal Corporation Environmental Solutions Group (847) 741-5370 FAX: (847) 742-3035 1300 W Bartlett Rd Elgin, IL 60120 www.elginsweeper.com

Foth (414) 336-7900 FAX: (920) 497-8516 8550 Hudson Blvd N Ste 100 Lake Elmo, MN 55042-8706 www.foth.com

FGM Architects (630) 574-8300 FAX: (630) 574-9292 1211 W 22nd St Ste 705 Oak Brook, IL 60523-3200 www.fgmarchitects.com First Group Engineering (317) 290-9549 FAX: (317) 290-4984 5925 Lakeside Blvd Indianapolis, IN 46278-1996 www.firstgroupengineering.com

Foundation Engineering Inc (503) 643-1541 FAX: (503) 626-2419 8380 SW Nimbus Avenue Beaverton, OR 97008-6445 Franklin Paint Company Inc FAX: (508) 528-8152 Toll Free: (800) 486-0304 259 Cottage St Franklin, MA 02038-3006 www.franklinpaint.com

Fisher & Arnold Inc (901) 748-1811 FAX: (901) 748-3115 9180 Crestwyn Hills Dr Ste 100 Memphis, TN 38125-8502 www.fisherarnold.com

Fred Weber Inc (314) 473-3519 FAX: (314) 739-9235 Toll Free: (800) 505-9591 PO Box 2501 2320 Creve Coeur Mill Rd Maryland Heights, MO 63043-8501

Flexible Pavements of Ohio (314) 966-9987 FAX: (314) 966-0329 6205 Emerald Pkwy Ste B Dublin, OH 43016-3300 www.flexiblepavements.org

Freese and Nichols (817) 735-7470 4055 International Plz Ste 200 Fort Worth, TX 76109-4814 www.freese.com

Flink Co (815) 673-4321 FAX: (815) 672-2678 502 N Vermillion Streator, IL 61364 www.flinkco.com

FUELMASTER/Syn-Tech Systems (850) 878-2558 FAX: (850) 877-9327 Toll Free: (800) 888-9136 100 Four Points Way Tallahassee, FL 32305 www.syntech-fuelmaster.com

Flynn Brothers Contracting (502) 364-9100 FAX: (502) 363-1646 1213 Outer Loop Louisville, KY 40219-3417 www.flynnbrothers.com Foit-Albert Associates (716) 856-3933 FAX: (518) 452-3639 763 Main St Buffalo, NY 14203-1321 Foley Inc (732) 885-5555 FAX: (732) 885-6612 833 Centennial Ave Piscataway, NJ 08855 www.foleyinc.com Foothills Paving & Maintenance Inc (303) 462-5600 FAX: (303) 462-5601 15485 W 44th Ave Ste C Golden, CO 80403-2801 FORCE America Inc (952) 707-1355 FAX: (952) 707-1350 Toll Free: (888) 993-6723 501 Cliff Rd E Ste 100 Burnsville, MN 55337-1635 www.forceamerica.com

Fugro Consultants Inc (905) 567-2874 FAX: (905) 567-2871 2505 Meadowvale Boulevard Mississauga, ON www.fugrowest.com

Fugro Roadware Inc (905) 567-2870 Toll Free: (800) 828-2726 8613 Cross Park Dr Austin, TX 78754-4565 www.fugro-roadware.com Gabrielli Truck Sales (516) 931-7915 FAX: (516) 822-2969 880 S Oyster Bay Rd Hicksville, NY 11801-3519 www.gabriellitruck.com Gallagher Asphalt Corporation (708) 877-7160 FAX: (708) 877-5222 18100 South Indiana Ave Thornton, IL 60476-1276 www.gallagherasphalt.com


Gannett Fleming (717) 763-7211 FAX: (717) 763-1808 207 Senate Ave Camp Hill, PA 17011 www.gannettfleming.com

Gkkworks (949) 375-6872 FAX: (949) 955-1662 2355 Main St Ste 220 Irvine, CA 92614-4251 www.gkkworks.com

Great West Engineering (406) 449-8627 FAX: (406) 449-8631 PO Box 4817 Helena, MT 59604-4817 www.greatwesteng.com

Hansen Thorp Pellinen Olson Inc (317) 347-3663 FAX: (317) 347-3664 7510 Market Place Dr Eden Prairie, MN 55344-3687 www.htpo.com

GapVax Inc (814) 535-6766 FAX: (814) 539-3617 575 Central Avenue Johnstown, PA 15902 www.gapvax.com

Global Sensor Systems Inc (905) 507-0007 FAX: (905) 507-4177 400 Brunel Rd Mississauga, ON L4Z 2C2 www.globalsensorsystems.com

Greeley and Hansen (312) 578-2350 FAX: (312) 558-1006 100 S Wacker Dr Ste 1400 Chicago, IL 60606-4000 www.greeley-hansen.com

Hanson Professional Services Inc (816) 941-2178 FAX: (816) 943-4029 1001 E 101st Ter Ste 250 Kansas City, MO www.hanson-inc.com

Gateway Industrial Products Inc FAX: 800-525-3427 Toll Free: (800) 701-4782 160 Freedom Ct Elyria, OH 44035-2245 www.gatewayindustrial.com

Gonzales Companies LLC (314) 961-1888 FAX: (314) 961-1814 1750 S Brentwood Blvd Ste 700 Saint Louis, MO 63144-1314 www.gonzalezcos.com

Gremmer & Associates Inc (920) 924-5720 FAX: (920) 924-5725 93 S Pioneer Rd Ste 300 Fond Du Lac, WI 54935-3802

Harris & Associates (925) 827-4900 FAX: (925) 827-4982 1401 Willow Pass Rd Ste 500 Concord, CA 94520-7964 www.harris-assoc.com

GBA Architects and Engineers (913) 492-0400 FAX: (913) 577-8380 9801 Renner Blvd Lenexa, KS 66219-9718 www.gbateam.com

GovDeals (334) 387-0532 FAX: (334) 387-0579 Toll Free: (800) 613-0156 5907 Carmichael Pl Montgomery, AL 36117 www.govdeals.com

GEC (504) 207-6918 FAX: (225) 612-3015 3445 N Causeway Blvd Ste 401 Metairie, LA 70002-3779 www.gecinc.com

GovHR USA (713) 462-3178 FAX: (713) 462-1631 13333 Northwest Fwy Ste 300 Houston, TX www.govhrusa.com

Geneva Rock Products Inc (801) 281-7969 FAX: (801) 495-0686 PO Box 538 Orem, UT 84059-0538

GPD Group (614) 859-1631 FAX: (330) 572-3721 Toll Free: (800) 955-4731 520 S Main St Ste 2531 Akron, OH 44311-1073 www.gpdgroup.com

GeoDesign Inc (503) 968-8787 FAX: (503) 968-3068 15575 SW Sequoia Pkwy Ste 100 Portland, OR 97224-7195 www.geodesigninc.com GeoEngineers (253) 383-4940 1101 Fawcett Ave Ste 200 Tacoma, WA 98402-2012 www.geoengineers.com Gewalt Hamilton Associates Inc (847) 855-1100 FAX: (847) 855-1115 850 Forest Edge Dr Vernon Hills, IL 60061-3105 www.gha-engineers.com GHD (905) 686-6402 FAX: (905) 432-7877 110 Scotia Court Unit 41 Whitby, ON L1N 8Y7 Ghirardelli Associates (415) 864-4180 FAX: (415) 864-4182 1970 Broadway Ste 920 Oakland, CA 94612-2221 www.ghirardelliassoc.com Gilbarco Veeder-Root (336) 547-5000 FAX: (336) 547-5957 7300 W Friendly Ave Greensboro, NC 27410-6232 www.gilbarco.com

GRAEF (773) 399-0112 FAX: (773) 399-0170 125 S 84th St Ste 401 Milwaukee, WI 53214-1469 www.gasai.com

Gresham Smith and Partners (615) 770-8180 FAX: (615) 770-8189 511 Union St Ste 1400 Nashville, TN 37219-1710 www.gspnet.com GS Equipment Co Inc (813) 248-4971 FAX: (775) 383-4813 1023 S 50th St Tampa, FL 33619-3629 www.gsequipment.net Guida Surveying Inc (949) 777-2000 FAX: (949) 777-2050 9241 Irvine Blvd Ste 100 Irvine, CA 92618-1695 www.guidasurveying.com Gulf Industries Inc (850) 562-1937 FAX: (850) 562-1934 2000 Padlock Pl Tallahassee, FL 32303-7419 www.gulfindustriesinc.com

Granite Technologies (425) 551-3171 FAX: (425) 551-3118 1525 East Marine View Drive Everett, CA 98201 www.granitexp-technologies.com Great Lakes Chloride Inc (574) 267-2286 FAX: (574) 267-2235 Toll Free: (877) 750-3878 895 E 200 N Warsaw, IN 46582-7854 www.glchloride.com Great Valley Consultants (610) 375-8822 FAX: (610) 375-8977 Toll Free: (800) 733-4821 75 Commerce Dr Wyomissing, PA 19610-3323

Hart Crowser Inc (206) 324-9530 FAX: (206) 328-5581 1700 Westlake Ave N Ste 200 Seattle, WA 98109-6212 www.hartcrowser.com HBK Engineering LLC (312) 432-0076 FAX: (312) 432-0231 921 W Van Buren St Ste 100 Chicago, IL 60607-3571 HD Supply FAX: (952) 937-8065 Toll Free: (888) 658-3623 10641 Scripps Summit Court San Diego, MN 92131 www.hdsupply.com HDR Inc (402) 399-1000 8404 Indian Hills Drive Omaha, NE 68114-4098 www.hdrinc.com

Grand Traverse Diesel Services Inc (231) 943-4488 FAX: (231) 943-3731 Toll Free: (866) 943-4488 194 Memorial S Commons Traverse City, MI 49685-8332 Granite Construction Company (425) 551-3171 FAX: (425) 551-3118 1525 East Marine View Drive Everett, CA 98201 www.gcinc.com

Harrison Hydraulic Solutions (281) 807-4420 FAX: (281) 807-4815 Toll Free: (800) 723-3334 14233 West Road Houston, TX 77041 www.harrisonhydragen.com

GVM Snow Equipment (717) 677-6197 FAX: (717) 677-4291 Toll Free: (800) 458-5123 224 E King St East Berlin, PA 17316-9512 www.gvmsnow.com H G Meigs LLC (920) 723-9624 FAX: (680) 742-1805 1220 Superior St Portage, WI 53901-9702 H&H Engineering & Surveying Inc (801) 756-2488 PO Box 1649 American Fork, UT 84003-6649 Hannum Wagle & Cline Engineering (317) 347-3663 FAX: (317) 347-3664 151 N Delaware St Ste 800 Indianapolis, IN 46204-2528

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Heil of Texas (713) 923-7600 FAX: (713) 923-5522 5900 Wheeler St Houston, TX 77023-5409 www.heiloftexas.com Helac Corporation (360) 825-1601 FAX: (360) 825-1603 Toll Free: (800) 797-8458 225 Battersby Avenue Enumclaw, WA 98022 www.helac.com Henry, Meisenheimer & Gende Inc (618) 594-3711 FAX: (618) 594-8217 1075 Lake Rd PO Box 70 Carlyle, IL 62231-1245 www.hmgengineers.com

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Herzog Contracting Corp (816) 233-9001 FAX: (816) 233-9881 PO Box 1089 600 S Riverside Rd Saint Joseph, MO 64502-1089 www.herzogcompanies.com Hey and Associates Inc (847) 740-0888 FAX: (847) 740-2888 26575 W Commerce Dr Unit 601 Volo, IL 60073-9662 www.heyassoc.com

HP Fairfield (800) 356-2813 FAX: (207) 474-6526 9 Green Street Skowhegan, ME 04976 www.hpfairfield.com

Industrial Systems Ltd (815) 344-5566 112 W Route 120 Lakemoor, IL 60051 www.ice-melt-products.com

James J. Benes & Associates Inc (630) 719-7570 FAX: (630) 719-7589 950 Warrenville Rd Ste 101 Lisle, IL 60532-1844 www.jjbenes.com

HR Green Inc (319) 841-4000 Toll Free: (800) 728-7805 8710 Earhart Lane SW Cedar Rapids, IA 52404 www.hrgreen.com

Insituform Technologies Inc (636) 530-8000 FAX: (636) 519-8010 17988 Edison Ave Chesterfield, MO 63005-3700 www.insituform.com

Jarrett Builders Inc (615) 371-6626 FAX: (615) 371-6636 104 Eastpark Dr Ste 300 Brentwood, TN 37027-7535

Huitt-Zollars Inc (281) 496-0066 FAX: (281) 496-0220 1500 S Dairy Ashford Rd Ste 200 Houston, TX 77077-3858 www.huitt-zollars.com

Highway Equipment Company (319) 286-3158 FAX: (319) 286-3352 1330 76th Ave SW Cedar Rapids, IA 52404-7038 www.highwayequipment.com HNTB Corporation (816) 527-2433 FAX: (816) 472-5004 715 Kirk Dr Kansas City, MO 64105 www.hntb.com Holbrook Asphalt (435) 652-4427 FAX: (435) 656-3943 Toll Free: (866) 500-7326 3828 S 1700 E St George, UT 84790 Holdrege & Kull Consulting Engineers and Geologists (530) 478-1305 FAX: (530) 478-1019 792 Searls Ave Nevada City, CA 95959-3056 www.holdregeandkull.com HOLT CA1T (972) 721-2988 2000 E Airport Fwy Irving, TX 75062-4831

Howard/Stein-Hudson Associates Inc (617) 482-7080 FAX: (617) 482-7417 11 Beacon St Ste 1010 Boston, MA 02108-3020 www.hshassoc.com

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HW Lochner (405) 418-5880 FAX: (816) 363-0027 Toll Free: (800) 748-8276 510 E Memorial Rd Ste A-1 Oklahoma City, MO 73114 www.hwlochner.com HWA GeoSciences Inc (425) 774-0106 FAX: (425) 774-2714 21312 30th Dr SE Ste 110 Bothell, WA 98021-7010 www.hwageo.com Hyatt Survey Services Inc (941) 748-4693 FAX: (941) 744-1643 11007 8th Ave E Bradenton, FL 34212-9146

IDS Engineering Group (630) 649-6086 13333 Northwest Fwy Ste 300 Houston, TX 77040-6016 www.idsengineeringgroup.com

Horner & Shifrin Inc (314) 335-8619 FAX: (314) 5316966 401 S 18th St Ste 400 Saint Louis, MO 63103-2296 www.hornershifrin.com

APWA Reporter

HVJ Associates Inc (281) 933-7388 FAX: (281) 933-7293 6120 S Dairy Ashford Rd Houston, TX 77072-1010 www.hvj.com

Hydro Designs Inc (248) 250-5000 FAX: (248) 786-1789 Toll Free: (800) 690.6651 5700 Crooks Road Ste 100 Troy, MI 48098-2826 www.hydrodesignsinc.com

Hoosier Company Inc (717) 876-6675 FAX: 317-872-7183 PO Box 681064 Indianapolis, IN 46268-7064 www.hoosierco.com

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Hutchison Engineering Inc (815) 773-2233 605 Rollingwood Dr Shorewood, IL 60404-0665

IEA Inc (214) 884-4253 18333 Preston Rd Ste 205 Dallas, TX 75252-5426 IMS Infrastructure Management Services (480) 839-4347 FAX: (480) 839-4348 1820 W Drake Dr Ste 108 Tempe, AZ 85283 www.ims-rst.com

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Inspection Services Inc (415) 243-3265 FAX: (415) 243-3266 1798 University Ave Berkeley, CA 94703-1514 Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute (703) 657-6900 FAX: (703) 657-6901 14801 Murdock St Ste 230 Chantilly, VA 20151-1037 www.icpi.org International Municipal Signal Association (315) 331-2182 FAX: (315) 331-8205 Toll Free: (800) 723-4672 597 Haverty Court, Ste 100 Rockledge, FL 32955 www.imsasafety.org International Road Dynamics (306) 653-6600 FAX: (504) 955-9052 Toll Free: (888) 473-8669 702 - 43rd Street East Saskatoon, SK S7K 3T9 www.irdinc.com Interprovincial Traffic Services Ltd (604) 542-8500 Unit 1, 2153 - 192nd St Surrey, BC V3S 3X2

Jesco Inc (908) 753-8080 FAX: (908) 753-7853 118 Saint Nicholas Ave South Plainfield, NJ 07080-1892 Johnston North America (704) 658-1333 FAX: (704) 658-1377 606 Performance Rd Mooresville, NC 28115-9595 Jones & Carter, Inc. (979) 731-8000 FAX: (979) 846-2893 1716 Briarcrest Dr Ste 160 Bryan, TX 77802-2776 Jp2g Consultants (613) 828-7800 1150 Morrison Drive Ste 410 Ottawa, ON K2H 8S9 JSD Professional Services Inc (608) 848-5060 FAX: (608) 848-2255 161 Horizon Dr Ste 101 Verona, WI 53593-1249 www.jsdinc.com J-U-B Engineers Inc (509) 783-2144 FAX: (509) 736-0790 2810 W Clearwater Ave Ste 201 Kennewick, WA 99336-2982 www.jub.com

Interwest Consulting Group (714) 899-9039 15061 Springdale Ste 205 Huntington Beach, CA 92649

K & A Engineering Inc (998) 279-1800 FAX: (951) 279-4380 357 N Sheridan St Ste 117 Corona, CA 92880-2029 www.kaengineering.com

IPRF (610) 759-8213 3333 Warrenville Rd Ste 550 Lisle, IL 60532-4552

Kaskaskia Engineering Group LLC (618) 233-5877 FAX: (618) 233-5977 208 E Main St Ste 100 Belleville, IL 62220

J&J Truck Bodies & Trailers (814) 444-3400 FAX: (814) 443-2621 10558 Somerset Pike Somerset, PA 15501-7352 www.jjbodies.com

KCI Associates of NC (919) 783-9214 FAX: (919) 783-9266 4601 Six Forks Rd Ste 220 Raleigh, NC 27609-5210 www.kci.com

J2 Engineering & Environmental Design (602) 438-2221 FAX: (602) 438-2225 4649 E Cotton Gin Loop Ste B2 Phoenix, AZ 85040-8885 www.payne-brockway.com

KE&G Construction (520) 748-0188 FAX: (520) 748-8975 5100 S Alvernon Way Tucson, AZ 85706-1976 www.kegtus.com

Jacobs (425) 452-8000 FAX: (425) 452-1212 600 108th Ave NE Ste 700 Bellevue, WA 98004-5110 www.jacobs.com

Keshavarz and Associates Inc (561) 689-8600 711 N Dixie Hwy Ste 201 West Palm Beach, FL 33401-3902


Killeen Engineering & Surveying (254) 526-3981 FAX: (254) 526-4351 2901 E Stan Schlueter Loop Killeen, TX 76542-4593 www.kesltd.com

LandMark Consultants Inc (760) 370-3000 FAX: (760) 337-8900 780 N 4th St El Centro, CA 92243-1511 www.landmark-ca.com

LNV Inc (210) 822-2232 FAX: (210) 822-4032 8918 Tesoro Dr Ste 401 San Antonio, TX 78217-6220 www.lnvinc.com

Mailhot Industries USA Inc (603) 880-9380 FAX: (603) 886-8254 7 Tracy Ln Hudson, NH 03051-3031 www.mailhotindustries.com

Kimley-Horn and Associates Inc (714) 939-1030 FAX: (714) 938-9488 765 The City Dr S Ste 400 Orange, CA 92868-6914 www.kimley-horn.com

Larkin Lamp Rynearson (816) 361-0440 FAX: (816) 361-0045 9200 Ward Parkway Ste 200 Kansas City, MO 64114 www.lra-inc.com

Lochmueller Group (812) 454-5581 FAX: (812) 479-6262 6200 Vogel Rd Evansville, IN 47715-4006 www.blainc.com

Maintenance Design Group (303) 302-0266 FAX: (303) 302-0270 1600 Stout St Ste 940 Denver, CO 80202-3100 www.maintenancedesigngroup.com

Kirkham Michael Inc (515) 270-0848 FAX: (515) 270-1067 11021 Aurora Ave Des Moines, IA 50322-7902 www.kirkham.com

Lawson-Fisher Associates PC (574) 234-3167 FAX: (574) 234-3167 525 W Washington St Ste 200 South Bend, IN 46601-1555 www.lawson-fisher.com

Locklear & Associates Inc (352) 672-6867 FAX: (652) 692-5390 4140 NW 37th Place Ste A Gainesville, FL 32606-8153

Maintenance Facility Consultants, Div of Whitman Requardt & Assoc (936) 372-1800 FAX: (936) 372-1803 PO Box 919 Waller, TX 77484-0919 www.mfc-houston.com

Kissick Construction Company Inc (816) 363-5530 FAX: (816) 523-1557 8131 Indiana Ave Kansas City, MO 64132-2507 www.kissickco.com

LCC Inc (925) 228-4218 FAX: (925) 228-4638 930 Estudillo St Martinez, CA 94553-1620 www.lcc-inc.com

Kleinfelder FAX: (617) 498-4630 Toll Free: (800) 489-6689 1801 California St Ste 1100 Denver, CO 80202-2623 www.seacon.com

LDA Engineering (865) 573-7672 FAX: (865) 573-1352 Toll Free: (877) 754-8524 3305 Maloney Rd Knoxville, TN 37920

Klotz Associates (281) 589-7257 FAX: (281) 589-7309 1160 Dairy Ashford Rd Ste 500 Houston, TX 77079-3098 www.klotz.com

Legat Architects (312) 756-1261 FAX: (312) 258-1555 651 W Washington Blvd Ste 1 Chicago, IL 60661-2123 www.legat.com Leighton Consulting Inc (805) 654-9257 FAX: (805) 620-1977 1822 Goodyear Ave Ventura, CA 93003-8081 www.leightonconsulting.com

KM International (810)-688-1234 FAX: (810) 688-8765 Toll Free: (800) 492-1757 6561 Bernie Kohler Drive North Branch, MI 48461 www.kminb.com KPFF Inc (206) 622-5822 FAX: (206) 622-8130 1601 5th Ave Ste 1600 Seattle, WA 98101-3665 www.kpff.com Krieger & Stewart Inc (951) 684-6900 FAX: (951) 684-6986 3602 University Ave Riverside, CA 92501-3331 www.kriegerandstewart.com KSA Engineers Inc (903) 236-7700 FAX: (903) 236-7779 140 E Tyler St Ste 600 Longview, TX 75601-7256 www.ksaeng.com Landau Associates Inc (425) 778-0907 FAX: (425) 778-6409 130 2nd Ave S Edmonds, WA 98020-3512 www.landauinc.com

Liqui-Force Services (USA) Inc (519) 322-4600 FAX: (519) 322-4606 2015 Spinks Rd Kingsville, MI www.liquiforce.com

LOT Maintenance Inc (918) 446-4111 FAX: (918) 446-1310 909 W 23rd St Tulsa, OK 74107-2817 www.lotmaintenance.com Louisiana Cat FAX: (985) 536-4549 Toll Free: (866) 843-7440 3799 W Airline Hwy Reserve, LA 70084-5717 www.louisianamachinery.com

Manhard Consulting Ltd (775) 882-5630 FAX: (775) 885-7282 3476 Executive Pointe Way Ste 12 Carson City, NV 89706-7956 www.manhard.com Manhattan Construction (Florida Inc) (407) 483-8915 FAX: (407) 483-8914 3705 Westview Dr # 1 Naples, FL 34104-4048 www.manhattanconstructiongroup. com

Lowe Engineers LLC (404) 312-1843 990 Hammond Dr Ste 900 Atlanta, GA 30328-5510 LSA Associates Inc (760) 931-5471 FAX: (760) 918-2458 703 Palomar Airport Rd Ste 260 Carlsbad, CA 92011-1056 Lucity Inc (913) 341-3105 FAX: (913) 341-3128 Toll Free: (800) 492-2468 10561 Barkley Ste 500 Overland Park, KS 66212 www.gbams.com

Maple Leaf Construction Ltd (204) 783-7091 FAX: (204) 786-3106 777 Erin St Winnipeg, MB R3G 2W2 Markham Contracting Co Inc (623) 869-9100 22820 N 19th Ave Phoenix, AZ 85027-1310 Martinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Power Sweeping Inc (316) 684-9600 FAX: (316) 684-5100 2857 Bath Pike Nazareth, PA 18064-9010

LiRo Engineers Inc (716) 882-5476 FAX: (716) 882-9640 690 Delaware Ave Buffalo, NY 14209

Lynch & Associates-Engineering Consultants LLC (262) 402-5040 FAX: (262) 402-5046 5482 S Westridge Drive New Berlin, WI 53151

Mason Bruce & Girard (503) 224-3445 707 SW Washington St Ste 1300 Portland, OR 97205-3530

Little Falls Machine Inc (320) 632-9266 FAX: (320) 632-3484 300 Lindbergh Drive South Little Falls, MN 56345 www.fallsplows.com

M Con Pipe and Products Inc (519) 632-9112 FAX: (519) 632-7440 2691 Greenfield Rd PO Box 1191 Ayr, ON N0B 1E0

Mattern & Craig Inc (423) 245-4970 FAX: (423) 245-5932 429 Clay St Kingsport, TN 37660-3654 www.matternandcraig.com

LJB Inc (937) 259-5000 FAX: (937) 259-5100 2500 Newmark Dr Miamisburg, OH 45342-5407 www.ljbinc.com

MacKay & Sposito Inc (360) 695-3411 FAX: (360) 695-0833 1325 SE Tech Center Dr Ste 140 Vancouver, WA 98683-5554 www.mackaysposito.com

McClellan Sales Inc Toll Free: (888) 206-2569 2851 84th Lane NE Blaine, MN 55449-7211

Lloyd Gosselink & Townsend (512) 322-5810 816 Congress Ave Ste 1900 Austin, TX 78701-2478

MacQueen Equipment Inc (651) 645-5726 FAX: (651) 645-6668 595 Aldine St Saint Paul, MN 55104-2297 www.macqueeneq.com

McGuire and Hester (510) 632-7676 FAX: (510) 562-5210 9009 Railroad Ave Oakland, CA 94603-1245

LMK Technologies (815) 433-1275 FAX: (815) 433-0107 1779 Chessie Ln Ottawa, IL 61350-9687

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Mead and Hunt (843) 839-1490 FAX: (843) 839-1491 1012 38th Ave No Ste 301 Myrtle Beach, SC 29577-3255 www.rpmengineers.com

Missman (309) 797-0704 FAX: (309) 797-0756 333 E State St Ste 201 PO #4327 Rockford, IL 61104-1037

Meridian Engineering Inc (801) 569-1315 FAX: (801) 569-1319 9217 S Redwood Rd Ste A West Jordan, UT 84088-5827 www.merid-eng.com

MKEC Engineering Consultants Inc (916) 626-5591 FAX: (916) 626-3363 411 N Webb Rd Wichita, KS 67206-2521 www.mkec.com

Mesa Associates Inc (423) 424-7300 FAX: (423) 424-7303 629 Market Street Ste 200 Chattanooga, TN 37402

MMM Group Limited (905) 882-7316 FAX: (905) 882-7300 100 Commerce Valley Dr W Thornhill, ON L3T 0A1 www.mmm.ca

Mesiti-Miller Engineering Inc (831) 426-3186 FAX: (831) 426-6607 224 Walnut Ave Ste B Santa Cruz, CA 95060-3836 www.m-me.com Metadome (608) 249-8644 FAX: (608) 249-8922 2136 E Dayton St Madison, WI 53704-4723 www.metadome.com Meyer Products LLC (216) 486-1313 FAX: (216) 486-3073 18513 Euclid Ave Cleveland, OH 44112-1018 www.meyerproducts.com Meyers Nave Riback Silver & Wilson (510) 808-2000 FAX: (510) 444-1108 555 12th St Ste 1500 Oakland, CA 94607-4095 www.meyersnave.com MGC Contractors Inc (602) 437-5000 FAX: (602) 470-4000 4110 E Elwood St Phoenix, AZ 85040-1922 www.mgccontractors.com MGP Inc (847) 656-5698 FAX: (847) 579-4699 701 Lee St Ste 1020 Des Plaines, IL 60016-4500 MH Corbin (614) 873-5216 FAX: (614) 873-8095 8420 Estates Ct Plain City, OH www.mhcorbininc.com Milone & MacBroom Inc (203) 271-1773 FAX: (203) 272-9733 99 Realty Dr Cheshire, CT 06410-1656 www.miloneandmacbroom.com Minuteman Trucks Inc (508) 668-3112 FAX: (508) 660-0027 Toll Free: (800) 225-4808 2181 Providence Hwy Walpole, MA 02081-2528 www.minutemantrucks.com

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MNS Engineers Inc (805) 692-6921 FAX: (805) 692-6931 201 N Calle Cesar Chavez Ste 300 Santa Barbara, CA 93103-3256 www.mnsengineers.com Mobiltech Power Systems Inc (450) 420-5965 900 Michele-Bohec Blvd Ste 106 Blainville, QC J7C 5E2 Monroe Truck Equipment Inc (608) 329-8105 FAX: (608) 328-8390 Toll Free: (800) 356-8134 1051 W 7th Street Monroe, WI 53566-9100 www.monroetruck.com Montage Enterprises (908) 362-5353 FAX: (908) 362-5405 PO Box 631 Blairstown, NJ 07825-0631 www.montageent.com Moore Twining Associates Inc (559) 268-7021 FAX: (559) 268-7126 2527 Fresno St Fresno, CA 93721-1804 www.mooretwining.com M1orbark Inc (989) 866-2381 FAX: (989) 866-2280 Toll Free: (800) 233-6065 PO Box 1000 Winn, MI 48896 www.morbark.com Morrison-Maierle Inc (602) 273-2900 FAX: (602) 273-2901 Toll Free: (866) 401-4846 PO Box 6147 Helena, MT 59604-6147 www.m-m.net

MotionLink (404) 998-5200 1201 West Peachtree Street Ste 3300 Atlanta, GA 30309 www.motionlink.com

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MRL Equipment Company Inc (406) 869-9900 FAX: (406) 896-8880 5379 Southgate Dr Billings, MT 59101-4638 MSA Consulting Inc (760) 320-9811 FAX: (760) 323-7893 34200 Bob Hope Dr Rancho Mirage, CA 92270-1762 www.msaconsultinginc.com MSA Professional Svc (608) 242-6627 FAX: (608) 242-5664 2901 International Ln Ste 300 Madison, WI 53704-3177 www.msa-ps.com Mulkey Engineers & Consultants (704) 566-4360 FAX: (704) 537-2811 7500 E Independence Blvd Ste 100 Charlotte, NC 28227-9482 www.mulkeyinc.com Murray & Trettel Inc (847) 963-9000 600 First Bank Dr Palatine, IL 60067-8185 www.weathercommand.com Murray Smith & Associates Inc (208) 947-9033 FAX: (208) 947-9034 1649 W Shoreline Dr Ste 200 Boise, ID 83702-6701 www.msa-ep.com Mustang Cat (713) 452-7263 FAX: (713) 690-2287 PO Box 1373 Houston, TX 77251-1373 MWH Americas (702) 878-8010 FAX: (702) 878-7833 3010 W Charleston Blvd Ste 100 Las Vegas, NV 89102-1969 www.mwhglobal.com National Ready Mixed Concrete Association (720) 648-0323 456 Lorraway Dr Castle Rock, MD 80108-9066 NCE (513) 248-1144 FAX: (972) 991-9334 401 Milford Parkway Milford, OH 45150 www.ncenet.com Neel-Schaffer (615) 383-8420 FAX: (615) 383-9984 210 25th Ave N Ste 800 Nashville, TN 37203-1616 www.neel-schaffer.com Neenah Foundry Company (920) 729-3632 FAX: (314) 596-4632 Toll Free: (800) 558-5075 2121 Brooks Ave Neenah, WI 54956 www.nfco.com

Nevada Material Services (702) 382-4433 FAX: (702) 382-0273 151 Cassia Way Henderson, NV 89014-6616 www.nevadareadymix.com

New-Com Inc (702) 642-3331 FAX: (702) 642-9936 6600 Amelia Earhart Ct Ste B Las Vegas, NV 89119-3535 www.nclasvegas.com Ninyo & Moore (858) 576-1000 FAX: (858) 576-9600 5710 Ruffin Rd San Diego, CA 92123-1013 www.ninyoandmoore.com NMC (402) 891-8600 FAX: (402) 891-7607 11002 Sapp Brothers Dr Omaha, NE 68138-4812 www.nmccat.com Northern Pump & Well Co (517) 322-0219 FAX: (517) 322-0135 6837 W Grand River Ave Lansing, MI 48906-9145 Northwest Utility Contractors Association (503) 742-8877 FAX: (503) 650-7555 PO Box 301251 Portland, OR 97294-9251 www.nucaorswwa.com NV5 (858) 385-0500 FAX: (858) 385-0400 15070 Avenue of Science Ste 100 San Diego, CA 92128-3438 www.nolte.com NW Engineers LLC (503) 601-4401 FAX: (503) 601-4402 3409 NW John Olsen Place Hillsboro, OR 97124-5808 www.nw-eng.com Oates Associates Inc (314) 588-8381 FAX: (314) 588-9605 720 Olive St Ste 1660 Saint Louis, MO 63101-2312 www.oatesassociates.com Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien & Gere (502) 587-7884 FAX: (502) 587-7895 730 W Main St Ste 200 Louisville, KY 40202-2640 www.obg.com Occidental Chemical Corporation FAX: (231) 845-4312 Toll Free: (888) 293-2336 1600 S Madison Street Ludington, MI 49431 www.oxycalciumchloride.com Oelrich Construction Inc (352) 472-1334 25125 W Newberry Rd Newberry, FL 32669-4251


Ohio CAT (440) 838-2001 FAX: (440) 658-2010 7700 Medusa Rd Bedford, OH 44146-5547 Oldcastle Precast Inc (801) 399-1171 FAX: (801) 392-7849 PO Box 12730 Ogden, UT 84412-2730 www.oldcastleprecast.com Olsson Associates (402) 458-5009 1111 Lincoln Mall Ste 111 Lincoln, NE 68508-3907 Olsson Associates (402) 458-5009 7250 N 16th St Ste 210 Phoenix, AZ 85020-5282 Olsson Associates (402) 458-5009 7301 W 133rd St Ste 200 Overland Park, KS 66213-4774 www.oaconsulting.com Olympic Foundry Inc (206) 764-6200 FAX: (206) 764-1170 5200 Airport Way S Seattle, WA 98108-1725 www.olympicfoundry.com OMNNI Associates Inc (920) 830-6171 FAX: (920) 830-6100 1 N Systems Dr Appleton, WI 54914-1654 www.omnni.com Ontario Concrete Pipe Association (519) 489-4488 FAX: (519) 578-6060 447 Frederick St Kitchener, ON N2H 2P4 www.ocpa.com Onward Engineering (714) 533-3050 FAX: (714) 948-8978 300 S Harbor Blvd Ste 814 Anaheim, CA 92805 Open Spatial (303) 922-7815 5701 Lonetree Blvd Ste 211 Rocklin, CA 95765-3795 www.openspatial.com OPW Fuel Management Systems (708) 485-4200 FAX: (708) 485-7137 Toll Free: (800)-422-2525 6900 Santa Fe Dr Hodgkins, OH 60525 www.opwfms.com Osborn Consulting Inc (425) 214-4754 Toll Free: (888) 391-8517 1800 112th Ave NE Ste 220E Bellevue, WA 98004-2962

Ossian Inc (563) 324-3381 FAX: (563) 324-0751 Toll Free: (800) 553-8011 635 S Elmwood Ave Davenport, IA 52802 www.ossian.com Otak (503) 699-4526 FAX: (503) 635-5395 808 SW 3rd Ave Ste 300 Portland, OR 97204-2426 www.otak.com Othon Inc Consulting Engineers (713) 975-8555 FAX: (713) 975-9068 11111 Wilcrest Green Dr Ste 128 Houston, TX 77042-4786

Pavement Restorations Inc (731) 707-0731 FAX: (731) 613-2019 10162 Stinson St Milan, TN 38358-6482 www.gotpotholes.net

Petrochem Materials Innovation LLC (760) 603-0961 FAX: (760) 603-0962 Toll Free: (800) 353-9732 6168 Innovation Way Carlsbad, CA 92009

Pavement Services Inc (503) 235-0377 3835 NE Tillamook St Portland, OR 97212-5338

Phelps Engineering (913) 393-1155 FAX: (913) 393-1166 1270 N Winchester Olathe, KS 66061-5878 www.phelpsengineering.com

Pavement Technology Inc (440) 892-1895 FAX: (440) 892-0953 24144 Detroit Rd Westlake, OH 44145-1515 www.pavetechinc.com

P&L Utilities LLC (704) 454-7996 PO Box 143 Harrisburg, NC 28075

PBS Engineering + Environmental (503) 248-1939 FAX: (503) 248-0223 4412 SW Corbett Ave Portland, OR 97239-4207 www.pbsenv.com

PACE Inc (602) 275-8066 FAX: (602) 393-3026 PO Box 4805 Scottsdale, AZ 85261-4805 www.pacewater.com

PCA-Southeast Region (770) 497-0079 230 Grove Rd Collierville, GA www.secement.org

Pakpour Consulting Group Inc (925) 224-7717 FAX: (925) 224-7726 5776 Stoneridge Mall Rd Ste 320 Pleasanton, CA 94588-2838 www.pcgengr.com

PCL Construction Inc (480) 829-6333 FAX: (480) 829-8252 1711 W Greentree Dr Ste 201 Tempe, AZ 85284-2717 www.pcl.com

Paragon Partners Ltd (714) 379-3376 FAX: (714) 373-1234 Toll Free: (888) 899-7498 5762 Bolsa Ave Ste 201 Huntington Beach, CA www.paragon-partners.com

Pease Engineering & Architecture (704) 376-6423 FAX: (704) 332-6177 1520 South Blvd Ste 210 Charlotte, NC 28203-3713 www.jnpease.com PECO Energy Company (215) 841-6485 FAX: (215) 841-6906 2301 Market St Fl 9 Engineering Services Philadelphia, PA 19103-1380 www.exeloncorp.com

Parker Farm Service (704) 657-2332 FAX: (704) 739-3713 PO Box 668 126 Bessie Dr Kings Mountain, NC 28086-0668

PENGWYN (614) 488-2861 FAX: (614) 488-0019 2550 W 5th Ave Columbus, OH 43204-3815 www.pengwyn.com

Parsons Brinckerhoff (480) 966-8295 FAX: (480) 966-9234 999 3rd Ave Ste 3230 Seattle, WA 98104-4025 www.pbworld.com

Pennoni Associates Inc (302) 655-4451 FAX: (302) 654-2895 121 Continental Dr Ste 207 Newark, DE 19713-4341 www.pennoni.com

Parsons Brinckerhoff (480) 966-8295 FAX: (480) 966-9234 350 W Washington Ste 300 Tempe, AZ 85281-1496 www.pbworld.com

Perma-Patch (410) 764-7117 FAX: (410) 764-7137 6123 Oakleaf Ave Baltimore, MD 21215-3316 Perteet Inc (425) 252-7700 FAX: (425) 339-6018 2707 Colby Ave Ste 900 Everett, WA 98201-3565 www.perteet.com

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Power Equipment Leasing Company (815) 886-1776 FAX: (815) 886-1161 Toll Free: (800) 521-0246 605 Anderson Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 Pratt Industries (864) 423-5144 FAX: (866) 546-7728 Toll Free: (800) 546-7728 255 Morley Ct Duncan, SC 29334-8603

Parametrix (253) 269-1330 FAX: (253) 269-6899 1002 15th Street SW, Ste 220 Auburn, WA 98001-6502 www.parametrix.com

Patrick Engineering Inc (630) 795-7200 FAX: (630) 724-1620 4970 Varsity Dr Lisle, IL 60532-4101 www.patrickengineering.com

Portland General Electric (503) 463-4382 FAX: (503) 463-4308 4245 Kale St NE Salem, OR 97305-2333 www.portlandgeneral.com

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Precision Concrete Cutting Midwest FAX: (801) 224-0062 Toll Free: (877) 224-0025 3191 North Canyon Road Provo, UT 84604 www.safesidewalks.com.com Precision Contracting Services Inc (561) 743-9737 FAX: (561) 743-0775 15834 Guild Ct Jupiter, FL 33478-6436 Preferred Materials Inc (813) 612-5740 FAX: (239) 495-7527 5701 E Hillsborough Ave Ste 1122 Tampa, FL 33610-5428 www.apac.com Primera Engineers Ltd (312) 242-6391 FAX: (312) 606-0415 100 S Wacker Dr Ste 700 Chicago, IL 60606-4028 Principal Engineering Inc (985) 624-5001 FAX: (985) 624-5303 1011 N Causeway Blvd Ste 19 Mandeville, LA 70471-3419 Professional Pavement Products Inc (904) 448-4074 FAX: (904) 733-8800 Toll Free: (888) 717-7771 9556 Historic Kings Rd S Ste 315 Jacksonville, FL 32257-2012 www.pppcatalog.com Project Delivery Group LLC (503) 364-4004 3150 22nd St SE Salem, OR 97302-1161

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Project Dimensions Inc (949) 476-2246 4 Park Plz Ste 700 Irvine, CA 92614-2554 Project Engineering Consultants Ltd (602) 906-1901 FAX: (602) 906-3080 2310 W Mission Ln Ste 4 Phoenix, AZ 85021-2812 www.pec.us.com Project Flagging Inc (207) 729-5158 FAX: (207) 729-5246 PO Box 490 Brunswick, ME 04011-0490 www.mainestaff.com ProTex the PT Xperts LLC (602) 272-7891 3206 S Fair Ln Tempe, AZ 85282-3120 Psomas (714) 751-7373 FAX: (714) 545-8883 3 Hutton Centre Dr Ste 200 Santa Ana, CA 92707-8794 www.psomas.com PTMW Inc (785) 232-7792 FAX: (785) 232-7793 5040 NW US Highway 24 Topeka, KS 66618-3815 Public Works Equipment and Supply Inc (704) 289-6488 FAX: (704) 283-2266 4519 Old Charlotte Hwy Monroe, NC 28110 www.pweasi.com Public Works Magazine/Hanley Wood Business Media (773) 824-2400 FAX: (773) 824-2401 5600 N River Rd Ste 250 Rosemont, IL 60018-5118 www.pwmag.com Public Works Training.com (906) 231-7590 322 Shelden Ave Ste 4 Houghton, MI

Puget Sound Energy (253) 476-6304 FAX: (253) 476-6323 PO Box 90868 Tacll Bellevue, WA 98009-0868 www.pse.com QPR (678) 624-0721 FAX: (678) 746-2238 Toll Free: (800) 388-4338 12735 Morris Road, Ste 150 Alpharetta, GA 30004 www.qprusa.com

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Regional Truck Equipment (630) 543-0330 FAX: (630) 543-9806 255 W Laura Dr Addison, IL 60101-5013 www.regionaltruck.com

RNOW Inc (414) 541-5700 FAX: (414) 543-9797 8636R W National Ave Milwaukee, WI 53227-1738 www.rnow-inc.com

Qwick Kurb Inc (813) 645-5072 FAX: (813) 645-4856 Toll Free: (800) 324-8734 1916 US 41 South Ruskin, FL 33570

Reid Middleton (425) 741-3800 FAX: (425) 741-3900 728 134th St SW Ste 200 Everett, WA 98204-5322 www.reidmiddleton.com

Roadbond Service Company FAX: (254) 835-5297 Toll Free: (800) 305-6190 6413 Hill City Highway PO Box 8085 Tolar, TX 76476

R2H Engineering Inc (702) 260-7000 FAX: (702) 260-7070 2610 W Horizon Ridge Pkwy Ste 205 Henderson, NV 89052-2870 www.r2h.com

Renaissance Infrastructure Consulting (RIC) (913) 488-1256 13917 Flint St Overland Park, KS 66221-8023

Roadway Concepts LLC (813) 874-3600 4726 N Lois Ave Tampa, FL 33614-7082

R360 (832) 442-2127 FAX: (281) 873-3265 3 Waterway Square Pl Ste 110 The Woodlands, TX 77380-3488

RFE Engineering Inc (916) 772-7800 FAX: (916) 772-7804 2260 Douglas Blvd Ste 160 Roseville, CA 95661-4209 www.rfeengineering.com

Roadway Management Inc (407) 566-4200 FAX: (407) 566-4201 1936 Lee Road Ste 200 Winter Park, FL 32789 www.hubbard.com

RH2 Engineering Inc (425) 951-5400 FAX: (425) 398-2774 22722 29th Dr SE Ste 210 Bothell, WA 98021-4401 www.rh2.com

Robinson Consultants Inc (613) 592-6060 FAX: (613) 592-5995 350 Palladium Dr Ste 210 Kanata, ON K2V 1A8

Rain For Rent (831) 422-7813 FAX: (831) 422-0218 PO Box 1968 Salinas, CA 93908 Rangerbid.com (616) 261-4984 FAX: (616) 583-1573 601 Gordon Industrial Ct SW Byron Center, MI 49315-8356 www.rangerbid.com

Rosco Inc FAX: (718) 297-0323 Toll Free: (800) 227-2095 9021 144th Pl Jamaica, NY 11435-4227

Rate Studies (615) 426-4404 4636 Lebanon Pike #112 Hermitage, TN 37076-1316 RBF Consulting (949) 472-3505 FAX: (949) 472-8373 14725 Alton Pkwy Irvine, CA 92618-2027 www.rbf.com Ready Mixed Concrete Association of ON (905) 507-1122 FAX: (905) 890-8122 #3-365 Brunel Rd Mississauga, ON L4Z 1Z5 Redman Consulting Group Inc (386) 427-9339 FAX: (386) 427-4549 7017 S Atlantic Ave New Smyrna Beach, FL 32169-5009

PubWorks FAX: (760) 280-6660 Toll Free: (888) 920-0380 PO Box 6502 Snowmass Village, CO 81615-6502 www.pubworks.com

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Quincy Engineering Inc (916) 368-9181 FAX: (916) 368-1308 11017 Cobblerock Dr Ste 10 Rancho Cordova, CA 95670-6286 www.quincyengineering.com

Reed Engineering Group Ltd (214) 350-5600 FAX: (214) 350-7510 2424 Stutz Dr Ste 400 Dallas, TX 75235-6500 www.reed-engineering.com Reed Systems Ltd (845) 647-3660 FAX: (845) 647-5651 PO Box 209 Ellenville, NY 12428-0209 www.reedsystemsltd.com Reef Industries Inc (713) 507-4251 Toll Free: (800) 231-6074 9209 Almeda Genoa Rd Houston, TX 77075-2339 www.reefindustries.com

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Roush Cleantech (734) 466-6710 FAX: (734) 779-7281 12170 Globe St Livonia, MI 48150

RHOMAR Industries Inc (417) 866-5592 FAX: (417) 866-5593 2107 East Rockhurst Street Springfield, MO 65802 www.rhomar.com Rick Engineering Company (805) 544-0707 FAX: (805) 544-2052 711 Tank Farm Rd Ste 110 San Luis Obispo, CA 93401-7075 www.rickengineering.com Riley Construction Company Inc (262) 658-4381 FAX: (262) 658-0312 5301 99th Ave Kenosha, WI 53144-2296 www.rileycon.com RJ Behar & Company Inc (954) 680-7771 FAX: (954) 680-7781 6861 SW 196th Ave Ste 302 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33332-1663 www.rjbehar.com RJN Group Inc (630) 682-4700 Toll Free: (800) 227-7838 200 W Front St Wheaton, IL 60187-5111 www.rjn.com

ROWE Professional Services Company (810) 664-9411 FAX: (810) 664-3451 Toll Free: (800) 837-9131 128 N Saginaw St Lapeer, MI 48446-2661 www.rowepsc.com RtVision Inc (320) 632-0760 PO Box 394 Little Falls, MN 56345 www.rtvision.com RV Anderson Associates Limited (416) 497-8600 FAX: (416) 497-0342 2001 Sheppard Ave East, Ste 400 Toronto, ON M2J 4Z8 www.rvanderson.com S & C Engineers Inc (510) 272-2970 FAX: (510) 272-2972 1814 Franklin St Ste 600 Oakland, CA 94612-3438 www.scengineers.com S & S Tree & Landscaping Specialists (651) 357-0465 FAX: (651) 451-1787 405 Hardman Ave S South Saint Paul, MN 55075-2415


Safe Site Utility Services LLC (602) 606-8882 FAX: (623) 444-2218 8194 W Deer Valley Rd Ste 106 PMB 223 Peoria, AZ 85382 www.safesitellc.com Salaber Associates Inc (707) 693-8800 FAX: (707) 693-8801 180 S 1st St Ste 10 Dixon, CA 95620-3439 www.saiservices.com Salt Institute (613) 564-0534 FAX: (703) 548-2194 700 N Fairfax St Ste 600 Alexandria, VA 22314-2085 www.saltinstitute.org Salt River Project (602) 236-4637 FAX: (602) 236-2737 PO Box 52025 Phoenix, AZ 85072-2025 www.srpnet.com San Diego Gas and Electric (858) 636-5716 FAX: (858) 636-3967 8315 Century Park Ct Ste 210 San Diego, CA www.semprautilities.com Sayre Associates Inc (605) 332-7211 FAX: (605) 332-7222 216 S Duluth Ave Sioux Falls, SD 57104-3614 Schlagel & Associates PA (913) 322-7154 FAX: (913) 492-8400 14920 W 107th St Lenexa, KS 66215-4018 www.schlagelassociates.com Schwarze Industries Inc (573) 442-4537 FAX: (573) 442-4543 3200 Penn Ter Ste 100 Columbia, MO www.schwarze.com SCI Engineering Inc (636) 757-1055 FAX: (636) 949-8269 130 Point West Blvd Saint Charles, MO 63301-4408 www.sciengineering.com Sealcoating Inc (781) 428-3400 FAX: (781) 428-3430 825 Granite St Braintree, MA 02184-5329 www.sealcoatinginc.com Sealmaster (317) 780-1310 FAX: (317) 780-1315 Toll Free: (800) 477-8436 1010 E Sumner Ave Indianapolis, OH Seminole Tribe of Florida (954) 894-1060 FAX: (954) 989-1172 3107 N State Road 7 Hollywood, FL 33021-2102

SEPI Engineering & Construction Inc (919) 789-9977 1025 Wade Ave Raleigh, NC 27605 www.sepiengineering.com

Slope Care LLC FAX: (407) 277-2394 207 N Goldenrod Road Ste 400 Orlando, FL 32807 www.slopecare.com

Stonebrooke Engineering (952) 402-9202 FAX: (952) 403-6803 12279 Nicollet Ave Burnsville, MN 55337-1650 www.stonebrookeengineering.com

Serco Inc (571) 449-0374 FAX: (972) 323-2639 Toll Free: (800) 933-4834 1818 Library St Reston, VA 20190-6242

SNI Solutions (309) 944-3168 FAX: (309) 944-4620 Toll Free: (888) 840-5564 205 N Stewart St Gemeseo, IL 61254 www.snisolutions.com

Strand Associates Inc (608) 251-4843 FAX: (608) 251-8655 910 W Wingra Dr Madison, WI 53715-1943 www.strand.com

SFM Services Inc (305) 818-2424 FAX: (305) 818-3510 9700 NW 79th Ave Hialeah, FL 33016-2514 www.sfmservices.com Shafer Kline & Warren Inc (573) 442-4537 FAX: (573) 442-4543 3200 Penn Ter Ste 100 Columbia, MO www.skw-inc.com SharpeSoft Inc (530) 671-6499 FAX: (530) 671-5739 Toll Free: (800) 777-0786 925 Market Street Yuba City, CA 95991-4210 www.sharpeipm.com Shenandoah Fleet Maintenance and Management LLC (540) 347-7407 FAX: (703) 656-4795 PO Box 3121 Warrenton, VA 20188 Short Elliott Hendrickson Inc (651) 470-2448 FAX: (888) 908-8166 Toll Free: (800) 325-2055 3535 Vadnais Center Dr Ste 200 Saint Paul, MN 55110-5108 www.sehinc.com Siewert Equipment (585) 482-9640 FAX: (585) 482-4149 175 Akron St Rochester, NY 14609-7297 www.siewertequipment.com Site-Safe LLC (270) 242-0636 FAX: (270) 242-3507 PO Box 287 609 West Main Street Clarkson, KY 42726-0287 www.sitesafeonline.com Skillings Connolly Inc (360) 491-3399 FAX: (360) 491-3857 PO Box 5080 5016 Lacey Blvd SE Lacey, WA 98509-5080 www.skillings.com Slater Hanifan Group Inc (702) 284-5300 FAX: (702) 284-5399 5740 Arville St Ste 216 Las Vegas, NV 89118-3070 www.shg-inc.com Sletten Construction of Nevada (702) 739-8770 FAX: (702) 739-9932 5825 S Polaris Ave Las Vegas, NV 89118-3104

Southeastern Surveying & Mapping Corporation (407) 292-8580 FAX: (407) 292-0141 6500 All American Blvd Orlando, FL 32810-4350 www.southeasternsurveying.com Southwest Gas Corporation (602) 484-5212 PO Box 52075 Phoenix, AZ 85072-2075 www.swgas.com Standard Equipment Company (312) 829-1919 FAX: (312) 829-6142 Toll Free: (800) 633-2997 2033 W Walnut St Chicago, IL 60612-2317 www.standardequipment.com Stanley Consultants Inc (563) 264-6477 FAX: (563) 264-6658 225 Iowa Ave Muscatine, IA 52761-3764 www.stanleygroup.com Stantec (403) 341-3320 FAX: (403) 342-0969 4522-57 Avenue Innisfail, AB T4G 1X2 www.stantec.com Stasi Brothers Asphalt Corp (516) 334-1229 FAX: (516) 334-1245 435 Maple Ave Westbury, NY 11590-3216 www.stasibrothers.com Stay Alert Safety Services Inc (336) 993-2828 FAX: (336) 993-6929 272 Clayton Forest Dr PO Box 467 Kernersville, NC 27284-3796 www.stayalertsafety.com Stenstrom Excavation & Blacktop Group (815) 398-3478 FAX: (815) 229-0978 2422 Center St Rockford, IL 61108-7446 www.rstenstrom.com Sternberg Lighting (847) 588-3400 FAX: (847) 588-3440 Toll Free: (800) 621-3376 555 Lawrence Ave Roselle, IL 60172 www.sternberglighting.com

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Strawser Construction Inc (614) 276-5501 FAX: (614) 276-0570 1595 Frank Rd Columbus, OH 43223-3737 www.strawserinc.com Stringfellow Inc (615) 226-4900 FAX: (615) 226-8685 Toll Free: (800) 832-4404 2710 Locust St Nashville, TN 37207 Sturgis Materials Inc (913) 371-7757 FAX: (913) 371-7764 PO Box 5133 Kansas City, KS 66119-0133 Summit Associates (925) 363-5560 FAX: (925) 363-5511 2300 Clayton Rd Ste 1380 Concord, CA 94520-2161 www.summitcm.com Sun Peaks Utilities (250) 578-5416 FAX: (250) 578-5516 1280 Alpine Rd Sun Peaks, BC V03 5N0 www.sunpeaksutilities.com Sunland Asphalt (602) 323-2800 FAX: (602) 288-5047 PO Box 50699 Phoenix, AZ 85076 Sunrise Engineering Inc (801) 523-0100 12227 Business Park Drive, #220 Salt Lake City, UT 84020 www.sunrise-eng.com Swenson Products Inc FAX: (815) 393-4964 Toll Free: 888-825-7323 PO Box 127 127 Walnut St Lindenwood, IL 61049-0127 www.swensonproducts.com Swinerton Management & Consulting (415) 984-1287 FAX: (415) 984-1292 260 Townsend St San Francisco, CA 94107-1719 www.swinerton.com Taber Consultants (916) 371-1690 3911 West Capitol Avenue West Sacramento, CA 95691-2116 www.taberconsultants.com

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Taylor Wiseman & Taylor (704) 527-2535 FAX: (704) 527-2537 700 Forest Point Circle Ste 116 Charlotte, NC 28273 www.taylorwiseman.com

Tierra Right of Way Services (520) 319-2106 FAX: (520) 323-3326 1575 E River Rd # 201 Tucson, AZ 85718-5831 www.tierra-row.com

Team Consultants Inc (817) 467-5500 3101 Pleasant Valley Ln Ste 101 Arlington, TX 76015-2916

Tighe & Bond (413) 562-1600 FAX: (413) 562-5317 53 Southampton Rd Westfield, MA 01085 www.tighebond.com

Telco Supply Company (580) 622-2170 FAX: (580) 622-2451 124 W Vinita Ave PO Box 775 Sulphur, OK 73086-3821 www.telcosupply.com

Time Striping Inc (479) 474-0452 FAX: (479) 474-0498 PO Box 1236 Van Buren, AR 72957-1236

Terra Associates Inc (713) 993-0333 FAX: (713) 993-0743 1445 North Loop W Ste 450 Houston, TX 77008-1667 www.terraassoc.com

Timmerman Equipment Company (908) 534-4126 FAX: (908) 534-2320 PO Box 71 3554 Rte 22 W Whitehouse, NJ 08888-0071 www.timmermanequipment.com

Terra Engineering (312) 467-0123 FAX: (312) 467-0220 225 W Ohio 4th Fl Chicago, IL 60654-4151 www.terraengineering.com

Titan Machinery Inc (952) 445-5400 FAX: (952) 445-0365 Toll Free: (800) 795-9274 6340 County Road 101 E Shakopee, MN 55379-9052

Terracare Associates (720) 587-2533 FAX: (720) 587-2571 7272 S Eagle St Centennial, CO 80112-4244

TKDA (651) 292-4400 FAX: (651) 292-0083 Toll Free: (800) 247-1714 444 Cedar Street Ste 1500 Saint Paul, MN 55101

Terry Asphalt Materials Inc (614) 276-5501 FAX: (614) 276-0570 1950 Williams Rd Alma, MI 48801-2085 www.terryasphaltmaterials.com

Toro Company (952) 887-8863 FAX: (952) 887-8693 8111 Lyndale Ave S Bloomington, MN 55420

TETRA TECH (425) 635-1000 FAX: (425) 635-1150 400 112th Ave NE Ste 300 Bellevue, WA 98004-5543 www.tetratech.com The Altum Group (760) 346-4750 FAX: (760) 340-0089 73710 Fred Waring Dr Ste 219 Palm Desert, CA 92260-2574 www.thealtumgroup.com

Trackless Vehicles Ltd (519) 688-0370 FAX: (519) 688-3644 48 Main St Courtland, ON N0J 1E0 www.tracklessvehicles.com

The Chazen Companies (518) 273-0055 FAX: (518) 273-8391 547 River St # 6 Troy, NY 12180-2269

Transfield Dexter Gateway Service Ltd (506) 832-2857 FAX: (506) 832-3408 PO Box 1036 Hampton, NB E5N 8H1

The Papers Inc FAX: 574-658-4701 Toll Free: (800) 733-4111 206 S Main St Milford, IN 46542-3004 www.themunicipal.com

TranSystems Corporation (816) 329-8600 FAX: (816) 329-8701 2400 Pershing Rd Ste 400 Kansas City, MO 64108-2526 www.transystems.com

Thompson Pump & Manufacturing Company (386) 767-7310 FAX: (386) 761-0362 Toll Free: (800) 767-7310 4620 City Center Drive Port Orange, FL 32129 www.thompsonpump.com

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Trillium Municipal Supply Inc (905) 891-0635 321 Lakeshore Road West PO Box 59548 Mississauga, ON L5H 1G9 www.trilliummunicipal.com

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Trius Inc (631) 244-8600 FAX: (631) 244-8660 458 Johnson Ave Bohemia, NY 11716 Trotter and Associates Inc (630) 587-0470 FAX: (630) 587-0475 40W201 Wasco Rd Ste D Saint Charles, IL 60175-8535 www.taiengr.com Truck Country (563) 556-3773 FAX: (563) 582-8925 Toll Free: (800) 553-5642 2099 Southpark Ct Ste 2 Dubuque, IA 52003-8095 True North Consultants Inc (630) 717-2880 FAX: (630) 689-5881 1240 Iroquois Ave Ste 206 Naperville, IL 60563-8538 TRULINE Sheet Piling System (239) 591-6234 1415 Panther Lane, Ste 234 Naples, FL 34109 Turtle Southeast Inc (727) 518-0962 FAX: (727) 518-9621 PO Box 1858 Largo, FL 33779-1858 www.turtlese.com Twining Inc (998) 383-6660 FAX: (998) 282-2580 732 Carnegie Dr Ste 100 San Bernardino, CA 92408-3589 www.twininginc.com TY Lin International (925) 365-3960 2483 Lariat Ln Walnut Creek, CA 94596-6606 www.tylin.com

United Rotary Brush (913) 888-8450 FAX: (913) 541-8336 (800) 851-5108 USA (800) 463-6292 Canada 15607 W 100th Ter Lenexa, KS 66219-1362 www.united-rotary.com United Survey Inc (440) 439-7250 FAX: (440) 439-4890 25145 Broadway Ave Oakwood Village, OH 44146-6398 www.unitedsurvey.org Universal Field Services (918) 494-7600 FAX: (918) 494-7650 PO Box 35666 Tulsa, OK 74153-0666 www.ufsrw.com University of Wisconsin-Madison EPD (608) 263-2400 FAX: (608) 263-3160 432 N Lake St Engineering Professional Development Madison, WI 53706-1415 www.epd.engr.wisc.edu Urban Engineers Inc (215) 922-8080 FAX: (215) 922-8082 530 Walnut St Fl 14 Philadelphia, PA 19106-3685 www.urbanengineers.com Uretek (281) 290-1111 PO Box 1929 13900 Humble Rd Tomball, TX 77377-1929 www.uretekusa.com Uretek ICR Gulf Coast (281) 894-4990 FAX: (281) 720-1222 11603 Windfern Rd Ste A Houston, TX 77064-4866 www.uretekicr.com URS Corporation (303) 740-3863 FAX: (303) 694-3946 7720 N 16th St Ste 100 Phoenix, AZ 85020-4493 www.urs.com

TYMCO (254) 799-5546 FAX: (254) 799-2722 Toll Free: (800) 258-9626 225 E Industrial Waco, TX 76705 www.tymco.com Unique Paving Materials Corporation (216) 441-4880 FAX: (216) 341-8514 Toll Free: (800) 441-4880 3993 E 93rd St Cleveland, OH 44105 www.UniquePavingMaterials.com United Resource LLC (734) 338-7730 FAX: (734) 338-7735 32940 Capitol St Livonia, MI 48150-1743

US Infrastructure of Carolina Inc (704) 342-3007 FAX: (704) 342-1666 1043 E Morehead St Ste 203 Charlotte, NC 28204-2898 www.usi-eng.com USABlueBook (847) 775-6901 FAX: (847) 775-6908 Toll Free: (800) 548-1234 PO Box 9006 Gurnee, IL 60031-9006 www.usabluebook.com Utility Service Company (404) 281-9442 136 Fairway Oaks Dr Perry, GA 31069 www.utilityservice.com


V3 Companies (630) 729-6172 FAX: (630) 724-9202 7325 Janes Ave Ste 100 Woodridge, IL 60517-2256 www.v3co.com

Wade Trim (734) 947-9700 FAX: (734) 947-9726 25251 Northline Rd Taylor, MI 48180-4596 www.wadetrim.com

Weiler Engineering Corporation (847) 697-4900 FAX: (847) 697-4915 1395 Gateway Dr Elgin, IL www.weilerengineering.org

Willdan Engineering (714) 940-6300 FAX: (714) 940-4920 2401 E Katella Ave Ste 450 Anaheim, CA 92806-5982 www.willdan.com

Vacuum Trucks of Canada (248) 349-0904 777 Doheny Dr Northville, MI 48167-1957 www.vacuumtruckscanada.ca

Wallace Group (254) 772-9272 FAX: (254) 776-2924 PO Box 22007 Waco, TX 76702-2007 www.wallace-group.com

West Coast Arborists Inc (714) 991-1900 2200 E Via Burton Street Anaheim, CA 92806

William Frick and Company (847) 918-2215 FAX: (847) 918-3701 2600 Commerce Drive Libertyville, IL 60048

Vance Brothers Inc (816) 923-4325 FAX: (816) 923-6472 Toll Free: (800) 821-8549 5201 Brighton Ave Kansas City, MO 64130-3113 www.vancebrothers.com

Wallis Engineering (360) 852-9173 FAX: (360) 694-1043 215 W 4th St Ste 200 Vancouver, WA 98660-3370

WEST Consultants Inc (858) 487-9378 FAX: (858) 487-9448 2601 25th St SE Ste 450 Salem, OR 97302 www.westconsultants.com

Williams Architects (630) 221-1212 FAX: (630) 221-1220 500 Park Blvd Ste 800 Itasca, IL 60143 www.williams-architects.com

Walter P Moore (713) 630-7300 FAX: (713) 630-7396 1301 McKinney St Ste 1100 Houston, TX 77010-3064 www.walterpmoore.com

West Side Tractor Sales (630) 355-7150 FAX: (630) 355-7173 1400 W Ogden Ave Naperville, IL 60563-3909 www.westsidetractorsales.com

Wilson & Company (801) 634-3164 FAX: (801) 302-0998 10913 S River Front Pkwy Ste 125 South Jordan, UT 84095-3502 www.wilsonco.com

Walters-Morgan Construction Inc (785) 539-7513 FAX: (785) 539-6521 2616 Tuttle Creek Blvd Manhattan, KS 66502-4479 www.waltersmorgan.com

Western Environmental Testing Laboratory (775) 722-5041 FAX: (775) 355-0817 475 E Greg St Ste 119 Sparks, NV 89431-8517

Winter Equipment Company (440) 946-8377 FAX: (440) 942-0607 1900 Joseph Lloyd Pkwy Willoughby, OH 44094-8030 www.winterequipment.com

Westland Group Inc (998) 989-9789 11023 Eucalyptus St Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730-7689

Wood Rodgers Inc (916) 341-7760 FAX: (916) 341-7767 3301 C St Ste 100B Sacramento, CA 95816-3350 www.woodrodgers.com

Vaughn & Melton Consulting Engineers Transportation (828) 253-2796 FAX: (828) 253-4864 1318 Patton Ave Ste F Asheville, NC 28806-2624 Veolia Water Milwaukee LLC (304) 235-1626 FAX: (304) 235-1619 8500 S 5th Ave Oak Creek, WI 53154-3506 www.veoliawaterna.com Verizon Networkfleet FAX: (858) 450-3246 Toll Free: (866) 869-1353 6363 Greenwich Drive Ste 200 San Diego, CA 92122 www.networkfleet.com/fleetsolutions/ Visu-Sewer Inc (262) 695-2340 FAX: (262) 695-2359 W230 N4855 Betker Dr Pewaukee, WI 53072-1430 www.visu-sewer.com Volvo Construction Equipment (717) 530-6640 312 Volvo Way Shippensburg, PA 17257-9209 www.volvoce.com/na VT LeeBoy Inc FAX: (704) 483-5802 500 Lincoln County Parkway Ext Lincolnton, NC 28092 www.leeboy.com VTN Consulting (702) 873-7550 FAX: (702) 873-1703 2727 S Rainbow Blvd Las Vegas, NV 89146-5148 www.vtnnv.com WG Zimmerman Engineering Inc (562) 594-8589 5772 Bolsa Ave Ste 200 Huntington Beach, CA 92649-1134 www.wgze.com

Waltman Construction (530) 587-7017 FAX: (530) 587-7033 PO Box 8400 Truckee, CA 96162 www.waltmanconstruction.com Wastequip/Toter (704) 872-8171 FAX: (704) 878-0734 841 Meacham Rd Statesville, NC 28677-2983 www.toter.com Water Resource Engineering Associates (805) 653-7900 FAX: (806) 653-0610 Toll Free: (800) 259-2837 2300 Alessandro Drive Ste 215 Ventura, CA 93001-3778 www.wreassoc.net Wausau Equipment Company Inc (262) 784-6066 FAX: (262) 784-6720 1905 S Moorland Rd New Berlin, WI 53151-2321 www.wausau-everest.com WBK Engineering (630) 443-7755 FAX: (630) 443-0533 116 W Main St Ste 201 Saint Charles, IL 60174-1854 www.wbkengineering.com Webtech Wireless (604) 434-7337 FAX: (604) 434-5270 Toll Free: (866) 287-0135 4299 Canada Way Ste 215 Burnaby, BC V5G 1H3 www.webtechwireless.com

Weston & Sampson (978) 532-1900 FAX: (978) 977-0100 Toll Free: (800) 726-7766 5 Centennial Drive Peabody, MA 01960-7985 www.westonandsampson.com WGK Inc (601) 925-4444 FAX: (601) 924-6708 PO Box 318 Clinton, MS 39060-0318 www.wgkengineers.com Whelen Engineering Company Inc (860) 526-9504 FAX: (860) 526-1302 51 Winthrop Rd Chester, CT 06412-1036 www.whelen.com White Shield Inc (509) 547-0100 FAX: (509) 547-8292 320 N 20th Ave Pasco, WA 99301-4963 www.whiteshield.com

WorkSafe USA Inc (217) 487-7045 FAX: (217) 487-7212 326 Hopple Hills Dr Springfield, IL 62707 www.worksafeusainc.com Wright Construction Group Inc (239) 481-5000 FAX: (239) 481-2448 5811 Younquist Rd Fort Myers, FL 33912 Wright-Pierce (207) 725-8721 FAX: (207) 729-8414 99 Main St Topsham, ME 04086-1292 www.wright-pierce.com WSP Canada Inc Toll Free: (800) 670-7220 780 King W Street Sherbrooke, BC

WHPacific Inc (425) 951-4876 FAX: (425) 951-4808 12100 NE 195th St Ste 300 Bothell, WA 98011-5767 www.whpacific.com Wilkinson Corporation (989) 843-6163 FAX: (989) 843-6451 8290 Lapeer Rd Mayville, MI 48744-9305 www.wilkinsoncorp.net

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Annual Buyer’s Guide (categorical listing) The annual Buyer’s Guide in the April issue of the APWA Reporter is provided as a service by the American Public Works Association to its members to assist in identifying the corporate members that represent the consulting, service and manufacturing firms serving the public works industry today. It is by no means an attempt to list all of the firms serving the industry, only those that are APWA members as of February 18, 2015. The Buyer’s Guide is not intended to provide endorsement of any particular products or services listed herein. APWA makes every effort to achieve accuracy, but cannot be held responsible for inadvertent omissions or incorrect entries. If any errors are detected, please notify the Finance/Membership Department at (800) 848-APWA.

Business Services, ADA Compliance/ Risk Mitigation Cole & Associates Inc Lynch & Associates-Engineering Consultants LLC Precision Concrete Cutting Midwest Business Services, Advertising Equipment World International Municipal Signal Association Stonebrooke Engineering Business Services, Appraisal/ Appraisal Review Becher-Hoppe Associates Inc Mesa Associates Inc Paragon Partners Ltd Universal Field Services Business Services, Asset Management Services Adhara Systems Inc AgileAssets Inc Applied GeoLogics Azteca Systems/Cityworks Cal Engineering & Geology Inc Carollo Engineers CarteGraph CFA Software Inc Collier Engineering Company Inc Colorado Barricade Data Transfer Solutions EJ Group Inc ESG Operations ESRI Exp Services Inc Fay Spofford & Thorndike Inc Fugro Roadware Inc GeoEngineers Gulf Industries Inc HDR Inc Holbrook Asphalt HVJ Associates Inc IMS Infrastructure Management Services LiRo Engineers Inc LNV Inc Open Spatial Paragon Partners Ltd Parsons Brinckerhoff PubWorks Rangerbidcom Robinson Consultants Inc

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Southeastern Surveying & Mapping Corporation Tighe & Bond Universal Field Services Webtech Wireless Business Services, Asset Management Software Azteca Systems/Cityworks Carollo Engineers CarteGraph CFA Software Inc Civic Engineering & Information Technology Inc CollectiveData Inc EJ Group Inc Fugro Roadware Inc Lucity Inc Open Spatial Paragon Partners Ltd PubWorks RJN Group Inc Verizon Networkfleet Volvo Construction Equipment Webtech Wireless Business Services, Certification International Municipal Signal Association Business Services, Communication EnviroIssues Equipment World International Municipal Signal Association Stonebrooke Engineering Telco Supply Company The Papers Inc Webtech Wireless Business Services, Consulting Angus-Young Associates Inc Associated Transportation Engineers Bolton & Menk Inc Bowman Bowman Novick Cal Engineering & Geology Inc CFA Software Inc CollectiveData Inc Colorado Barricade Creighton Manning Engineering LLP Dewberry Dokken Engineering Earth Systems Inc EBA-A Tetra Tech Company

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Encore Group Engineering Resources Engineering Service Inc EPS Group Inc Equipment World ESI Consultants Ltd ESRI Evans Mechwart Hambleton & Tilton Inc Exeltech Consulting Inc Fay Spofford & Thorndike Inc Fugro Roadware Inc GHD GPD Group Guida Surveying Inc Hannum Wagle & Cline Engineering Hansen Thorp Pellinen Olson Inc Hey and Associates Inc HNTB Corporation Howard/Stein-Hudson Associates Inc HVJ Associates Inc HWA GeoSciences Inc Hydro Designs Inc IMS Infrastructure Management Services Interwest Consulting Group James J Benes & Associates Inc Jones & Carter Inc Killeen Engineering & Surveying Kleinfelder Klotz Associates KPFF Inc Landau Associates Inc Larkin Lamp Rynearson LiRo Engineers Inc Lynch & Associates-Engineering Consultants LLC MacKay & Sposito Inc Mattern & Craig Inc Mesa Associates Inc Moore Twining Associates Inc Murray & Trettel Inc Murray Smith & Associates Inc NV5 NW Engineers LLC Oates Associates Inc Otak Paragon Partners Ltd Parsons Brinckerhoff Pease Engineering & Architecture Perteet Inc Principal Engineering Inc Project Engineering Consultants Ltd Quincy Engineering Inc

R2H Engineering Inc RFE Engineering Inc Robinson Consultants Inc ROWE Professional Services Company Schlagel & Associates PA SCI Engineering Inc Southeastern Surveying & Mapping Corporation Southwest Gas Corporation Stantec Terra Associates Inc Tierra Right of Way Services Tighe & Bond True North Consultants Inc Universal Field Services US Infrastructure of Carolina Inc VTN Consulting Water Resource Engineering Associates Westland Group Inc Weston & Sampson Willdan Engineering Wood Rodgers Inc Business Services, Cooperative Contracts Federal Signal Corporation Environmental Solutions Group Business Services, Data Conversion CarteGraph Evans Mechwart Hambleton & Tilton Inc Paragon Partners Ltd RJN Group Inc Southeastern Surveying & Mapping Corporation Business Services, Ditch Management & Services KE&G Construction RH2 Engineering Inc Business Services, E-Commerce Equipment World Telco Supply Company Business Services, Education and Training Atlantic Detroit Diesel-Allison LLC Behnke Materials Engineering CFA Software Inc Colorado Barricade


Encore Group ESRI Hydro Designs Inc International Municipal Signal Association LJB Inc Manhard Consulting Ltd Public Works Trainingcom Salaber Associates Inc Siewert Equipment Tighe & Bond Business Services, Insurance IDS Engineering Group Southwest Gas Corporation Business Services, Legal Services Lloyd Gosselink & Townsend Meyers Nave Riback Silver & Wilson Business Services, Publications Equipment World ESRI International Municipal Signal Association Public Works Magazine/Hanley Wood Business Media The Papers Inc Twining Inc Business Services, Right-of-Way Acquisition Cole & Associates Inc First Group Engineering HDR Inc Interwest Consulting Group Mesa Associates Inc Paragon Partners Ltd ROWE Professional Services Company RtVision Inc Skillings Connolly Inc Tierra Right of Way Services TranSystems Corporation Universal Field Services Wilson & Company Business Services, Right-of-Way Appraisal Lochmueller Group Mesa Associates Inc Paragon Partners Ltd RtVision Inc Slater Hanifan Group Inc Universal Field Services Business Services, Right-of-Way Coordination Dokken Engineering Freese and Nichols GovHR USA Interwest Consulting Group Larkin Lamp Rynearson LDA Engineering Lochmueller Group Mattern & Craig Inc Mesa Associates Inc Northwest Utility Contractors Association Paragon Partners Ltd RtVision Inc Southeastern Surveying & Mapping Corporation

Tierra Right of Way Services Universal Field Services Business Services, Sign Management Software AgileAssets Inc Azteca Systems/Cityworks CarteGraph Fugro Roadware Inc Lucity Inc Professional Pavement Products Inc PubWorks RtVision Inc Business Services, Software AgileAssets Inc Azteca Systems/Cityworks CarteGraph CFA Software Inc CollectiveData Inc EJ Group Inc Encore Group ESRI Fugro Roadware Inc Lucity Inc MotionLink OPW Fuel Management Systems Paragon Partners Ltd PubWorks RtVision Inc SharpeSoft Inc Webtech Wireless Business Services, Trade Associations Northwest Utility Contractors Association

Everglades Farm Equipment GovDeals GS Equipment Co Inc HOLT CAT Jesco Inc KM International Louisiana Cat McClellan Sales Inc Ohio CAT Rain For Rent Rangerbidcom Sletten Construction of Nevada Thompson Pump & Manufacturing Company Titan Machinery Inc Volvo Construction Equipment West Side Tractor Sales Winter Equipment Company

Construction Equipment & Supplies, Service Maintenance Amick Equipment Company Inc Atlantic Detroit Diesel-Allison LLC Custom Underground Inc Louisiana Cat Maintenance Facility Consultants Div of Whitman Requardt & Assoc RJN Group Inc Shenandoah Fleet Maintenance and Management LLC

Construction Equipment & Supplies, Demolition CrowderGulf Helac Corporation New-Com Inc Volvo Construction Equipment West Side Tractor Sales

Construction Equipment & Supplies, Storage Buildings ClearSpan Fabric Structures Gateway Industrial Products Inc Oldcastle Precast Inc PTMW Inc

Construction Equipment & Supplies, Detectable Warning Franklin Paint Company Inc Professional Pavement Products Inc Construction Equipment & Supplies, Drilling Equipment & Services Meyer Products LLC Moore Twining Associates Inc West Side Tractor Sales

Construction Equipment & Supplies, Attachments Cherry Valley Tractor Sales GS Equipment Co Inc Harrison Hydraulic Solutions Helac Corporation Titan Machinery Inc Volvo Construction Equipment West Side Tractor Sales

Construction Equipment & Supplies, Geotextiles Crafco Inc Etna Supply Reef Industries Inc

Construction Equipment & Supplies, Auctions Surplus GovDeals Rangerbidcom

Construction Equipment & Supplies, Masonry Stasi Brothers Asphalt Corp Sturgis Materials Inc

Construction Equipment & Supplies, Bridge Expansion Joints Crafco Inc Dynamic Surface Applications Ghirardelli Associates

Construction Equipment & Supplies, Personal Protective Apparel QPR

Construction Equipment & Supplies, Concrete Forming Accessories & Supplies Curbco Nevada Material Services Occidental Chemical Corporation Sletten Construction of Nevada TRULINE Sheet Piling System Construction Equipment & Supplies, Construction Tools/Equipment Altec Industries Cherry Valley Tractor Sales Construction Accessories

Construction Equipment & Supplies, Inflatable Seals Sealmaster

Construction Equipment & Supplies, Retaining Walls E Meier Contracting Inc Fred Weber Inc Oldcastle Precast Inc Sturgis Materials Inc TRULINE Sheet Piling System

Construction Equipment & Supplies, Seals Gateway Industrial Products Inc Sealmaster Siewert Equipment

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Construction Equipment & Supplies, Sprayers Cherry Valley Tractor Sales Franklin Paint Company Inc Ossian Inc RHOMAR Industries Inc

Construction Equipment & Supplies, Survey Equipment Fugro Roadware Inc K & A Engineering Inc Construction Equipment & Supplies, Trench Shoring TRULINE Sheet Piling System Construction Equipment & Supplies, Vehicles Altec Industries Case Construction Equipment Cherry Valley Tractor Sales Everglades Farm Equipment GovDeals GVM Snow Equipment Harrison Hydraulic Solutions J&J Truck Bodies & Trailers Minuteman Trucks Inc Mustang Cat Power Equipment Leasing Company Timmerman Equipment Company Truck Country WorkSafe USA Inc Construction Management & Services, Bridge Design and Manufacturing Caltrop Corporation Chastain & Associates LLC Crafton Tull Dokken Engineering ESI Consultants Ltd Exeltech Consulting Inc Fred Weber Inc Granite Construction Company Granite Technologies Great West Engineering HNTB Corporation HW Lochner Kissick Construction Company Inc Oldcastle Precast Inc Parametrix Quincy Engineering Inc R2H Engineering Inc TKDA WGK Inc

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Construction Management & Services, Debris Management AshBritt Environmental CrowderGulf Herzog Contracting Corp Morbark Inc Construction Management & Services, Disaster Recovery AshBritt Environmental CrowderGulf Herzog Contracting Corp Jones & Carter Inc Morbark Inc PubWorks TETRA TECH Willdan Engineering Construction Management & Services, Emergency Management CrowderGulf Dewberry Morbark Inc Thompson Pump & Manufacturing Company Construction Management & Services, Pipe Manufacturing M Con Pipe and Products Inc Oldcastle Precast Inc Emergency Management & Security, Barricades Oldcastle Precast Inc Professional Pavement Products Inc Reef Industries Inc Site-Safe LLC Emergency Management & Security, Closed Circuit Televisions (CCTV) United Resource LLC Emergency Management & Security, Damage Prevention GeoDesign Inc Southwest Gas Corporation Emergency Management & Security, Emergency Signage Reef Industries Inc Emergency Management & Security, Flood Protection HDR Inc Horner & Shifrin Inc LDA Engineering LNV Inc Short Elliott Hendrickson Inc Thompson Pump & Manufacturing Company TRULINE Sheet Piling System WEST Consultants Inc Emergency Management & Security, Lights/Hazard Lights Harrison Hydraulic Solutions Sternberg Lighting Emergency Management & Security, Traffic Control Equipment AirX Utility Surveyors Professional Pavement Products Inc

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Engineering & Technology, Construction Management 4Leaf Inc Achen-Gardner Construction LLC Alfred Benesch & Co American Engineering Testing Inc Ames Construction Inc ARS Engineers Inc Baxter & Woodman Consulting Engineers BHC RHODES Civil Engineers & Surveyors BL Companies Inc Blair Church & Flynn Consulting Engineers Bollinger Lach & Associates Inc Bolton & Menk Inc BURY Carollo Engineers Carroll Engineering Inc CDG Engineers & Associates Inc CESNW Inc Chastain & Associates LLC Ciorba Group Inc Civic Engineering & Information Technology Inc Cobb Fendley & Associates Inc Collier Engineering Company Inc Collins Engineers Inc Creighton Manning Engineering LLP CRS Consulting Engineers CTS Group DBA Construction Inc Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Escoto Inc Dokken Engineering Drake Haglan & Associates Inc EBA-A Tetra Tech Company EFK Moen LLC Encore Group Engineering Resources Environmental Partners Group Inc EPS Group Inc Erlandsen & Associates Inc ESI Consultants Ltd Exeltech Consulting Inc Fay Spofford & Thorndike Inc First Group Engineering Fisher & Arnold Inc Fred Weber Inc Freese and Nichols Fugro Consultants Inc GBA Architects and Engineers GHD Gkkworks Gonzales Companies LLC GovHR USA GPD Group Greeley and Hansen Gremmer & Associates Inc Gresham Smith and Partners Hannum Wagle & Cline Engineering Hansen Thorp Pellinen Olson Inc Harris & Associates Hart Crowser Inc HNTB Corporation HR Green Inc Huitt-Zollars Inc HW Lochner HWA GeoSciences Inc Interwest Consulting Group Jacobs Jones & Carter Inc Klotz Associates

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KPFF Inc LDA Engineering LiRo Engineers Inc LNV Inc Lochmueller Group Locklear & Associates Inc Lynch & Associates-Engineering Consultants LLC MacKay & Sposito Inc Manhattan Construction (Florida Inc) Markham Contracting Co Inc Mattern & Craig Inc Mead and Hunt Milone & MacBroom Inc Missman MMM Group Limited Morrison-Maierle Inc NW Engineers LLC Oelrich Construction Inc Onward Engineering Pakpour Consulting Group Inc Parametrix Parsons Brinckerhoff Patrick Engineering Inc Primera Engineers Ltd Principal Engineering Inc Project Engineering Consultants Ltd Psomas Quincy Engineering Inc RFE Engineering Inc Rick Engineering Company Riley Construction Company Inc RJ Behar & Company Inc ROWE Professional Services Company RtVision Inc S & C Engineers Inc Salaber Associates Inc Sayre Associates Inc Schlagel & Associates PA SEPI Engineering & Construction Inc SharpeSoft Inc Skillings Connolly Inc Slater Hanifan Group Inc Sletten Construction of Nevada Stanley Consultants Inc Stantec Stonebrooke Engineering Strand Associates Inc Summit Associates Sunrise Engineering Inc Swinerton Management & Consulting Terra Associates Inc Terra Engineering TETRA TECH Tighe & Bond TKDA Trotter and Associates Inc TY Lin International Urban Engineers Inc US Infrastructure of Carolina Inc V3 Companies Vaughn & Melton Consulting Engineers Transportation VTN Consulting Wade Trim Wallace Group Water Resource Engineering Associates WBK Engineering Weston & Sampson

WHPacific Inc Wilson & Company Engineering & Technology, Data Collection Systems Andregg Geomatics ARS Engineers Inc BHC RHODES Civil Engineers & Surveyors CFA Software Inc Civic Engineering & Information Technology Inc EBA-A Tetra Tech Company FORCE America Inc Freese and Nichols Fugro Roadware Inc Guida Surveying Inc HBK Engineering LLC IMS Infrastructure Management Services International Road Dynamics LDA Engineering Locklear & Associates Inc Lynch & Associates-Engineering Consultants LLC MotionLink PubWorks Terra Engineering Trotter and Associates Inc VTN Consulting Weston & Sampson Engineering & Technology, Environmental Engineering 4Leaf Inc Alfred Benesch & Co American Engineering Testing Inc ARCADIS Aspect Consulting LLC Ayres Associates Aztec Engineering BL Companies Inc Bolton & Menk Inc Burgess and Niple Carroll Engineering Inc Civiltech Engineering Inc Clark Dietz Engineers CRS Consulting Engineers Diaz Yourman & Associates Dokken Engineering EBA-A Tetra Tech Company Engineering Service Inc England-Thims & Miller Inc Environmental Partners Group Inc Exeltech Consulting Inc Fay Spofford & Thorndike Inc Fisher & Arnold Inc Foth Gateway Industrial Products Inc GEC GeoDesign Inc GeoEngineers GHD Greeley and Hansen Gresham Smith and Partners Hannum Wagle & Cline Engineering Hansen Thorp Pellinen Olson Inc Hart Crowser Inc HR Green Inc HVJ Associates Inc HW Lochner Klotz Associates Landau Associates Inc


LDA Engineering LiRo Engineers Inc Lochmueller Group Locklear & Associates Inc Milone & MacBroom Inc Moore Twining Associates Inc Morrison-Maierle Inc MSA Consulting Inc MSA Professional Svc NV5 Osborn Consulting Inc Parametrix PBS Engineering + Environmental Project Engineering Consultants Ltd RBF Consulting RV Anderson Associates Limited SEPI Engineering & Construction Inc Short Elliott Hendrickson Inc Skillings Connolly Inc Stanley Consultants Inc Stantec Sunrise Engineering Inc Taber Consultants Thompson Pump & Manufacturing Company Tighe & Bond TranSystems Corporation Trotter and Associates Inc Urban Engineers Inc V3 Companies Wade Trim Wallace Group Water Resource Engineering Associates WBK Engineering Western Environmental Testing Laboratory WGK Inc WHPacific Inc Willdan Engineering Wilson & Company Wood Rodgers Inc Wright-Pierce Engineering & Technology, Fleet Computerized Management AgileAssets Inc Azteca Systems/Cityworks CFA Software Inc Civic Engineering & Information Technology Inc CollectiveData Inc EJ Group Inc FORCE America Inc FUELMASTER/Syn-Tech Systems Lucity Inc MotionLink OPW Fuel Management Systems PubWorks Terra Engineering TranSystems Corporation Verizon Networkfleet Webtech Wireless Engineering & Technology, Fleet Management AgileAssets Inc CarteGraph CFA Software Inc CollectiveData Inc CompassCom Software EJ Group Inc ESG Operations

ESRI FUELMASTER/Syn-Tech Systems International Road Dynamics MotionLink OPW Fuel Management Systems PubWorks Shenandoah Fleet Maintenance and Management LLC Terra Engineering TranSystems Corporation Verizon Networkfleet Webtech Wireless Weston & Sampson Engineering & Technology, Geotechnical Engineering Alfred Benesch & Co Alpha Geotechnical & Materials American Engineering Testing Inc Aspect Consulting LLC Cal Engineering & Geology Inc CESARE Inc CMT Engineering Laboratories Collins Engineers Inc Diaz Yourman & Associates Earth Systems Inc EBA-A Tetra Tech Company Environmental Partners Group Inc Exp Services Inc Foundation Engineering Inc Fugro Consultants Inc GeoDesign Inc GeoEngineers Gresham Smith and Partners Hart Crowser Inc Holdrege & Kull Consulting Engineers and Geologists HVJ Associates Inc HW Lochner HWA GeoSciences Inc Kaskaskia Engineering Group LLC Landau Associates Inc LandMark Consultants Inc Leighton Consulting Inc Locklear & Associates Inc Moore Twining Associates Inc PBS Engineering + Environmental Project Engineering Consultants Ltd Reed Engineering Group Ltd Stonebrooke Engineering TETRA TECH Tighe & Bond TranSystems Corporation Willdan Engineering Wood Rodgers Inc Engineering & Technology, GIS AgileAssets Inc Andregg Geomatics ARS Engineers Inc Azteca Systems/Cityworks BL Companies Inc Bolton & Menk Inc BURY Carollo Engineers CarteGraph CESNW Inc Civic Engineering & Information Technology Inc Cole & Associates Inc Collier Engineering Company Inc CompassCom Software Crafton Tull

Data Transfer Solutions Dewberry EBA-A Tetra Tech Company Environmental Partners Group Inc EPS Group Inc Erlandsen & Associates Inc ESRI Fugro Roadware Inc GBA Architects and Engineers GEC GeoEngineers Gewalt Hamilton Associates Inc GovHR USA GPD Group Great Valley Consultants Greeley and Hansen Gremmer & Associates Inc Guida Surveying Inc HBK Engineering LLC HDR Inc Henry Meisenheimer & Gende Inc HR Green Inc Interwest Consulting Group Jones & Carter Inc Kleinfelder Klotz Associates Krieger & Stewart Inc Landau Associates Inc Larkin Lamp Rynearson LDA Engineering Lochmueller Group LSA Associates Inc Lucity Inc MacKay & Sposito Inc Mason Bruce & Girard Mesa Associates Inc MGP Inc Milone & MacBroom Inc MMM Group Limited MotionLink MSA Consulting Inc Oates Associates Inc Olsson Associates OMNNI Associates Inc PACE Inc Paragon Partners Ltd Pennoni Associates Inc Project Engineering Consultants Ltd Psomas PubWorks RBF Consulting Rick Engineering Company Safe Site Utility Services LLC Short Elliott Hendrickson Inc Southeastern Surveying & Mapping Corporation Strand Associates Inc Sunrise Engineering Inc Terra Engineering The Altum Group Tierra Right of Way Services Tighe & Bond Trotter and Associates Inc Universal Field Services Urban Engineers Inc US Infrastructure of Carolina Inc Vaughn & Melton Consulting Engineers Transportation VTN Consulting Wallace Group WBK Engineering Webtech Wireless WEST Consultants Inc

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Westland Group Inc Weston & Sampson White Shield Inc Willdan Engineering Wood Rodgers Inc WSP Canada Inc Engineering & Technology, Internet Technologies AgileAssets Inc Azteca Systems/Cityworks CarteGraph Civic Engineering & Information Technology Inc Encore Group ESRI KPFF Inc RtVision Inc Telco Supply Company Terra Engineering TranSystems Corporation VTN Consulting Engineering & Technology, Locators AirX Utility Surveyors BURY Etna Supply MotionLink Safe Site Utility Services LLC Southeastern Surveying & Mapping Corporation Terra Engineering Webtech Wireless Engineering & Technology, Mapping AirX Utility Surveyors Andregg Geomatics ARS Engineers Inc Ayres Associates B & E Engineers Baxter & Woodman Consulting Engineers BL Companies Inc Bolton & Menk Inc BURY CESNW Inc Collier Engineering Company Inc Crafton Tull Creighton Manning Engineering LLP CRS Consulting Engineers Dewberry ESRI Guida Surveying Inc Interwest Consulting Group Jones & Carter Inc K & A Engineering Inc Klotz Associates Krieger & Stewart Inc LDA Engineering Lochmueller Group Lowe Engineers LLC MacKay & Sposito Inc Mesa Associates Inc Milone & MacBroom Inc MMM Group Limited MSA Consulting Inc Paragon Partners Ltd Pennoni Associates Inc Psomas RFE Engineering Inc Rick Engineering Company ROWE Professional Services Company

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Safe Site Utility Services LLC Schlagel & Associates PA Southeastern Surveying & Mapping Corporation Stonebrooke Engineering Sunrise Engineering Inc Terra Engineering TETRA TECH The Altum Group Tierra Right of Way Services Trotter and Associates Inc Universal Field Services Verizon Networkfleet VTN Consulting Wade Trim Water Resource Engineering Associates Webtech Wireless WEST Consultants Inc Westland Group Inc White Shield Inc WHPacific Inc Wood Rodgers Inc Engineering & Technology, Pavement Rehabilitation & Roadway Design Affinis Corp AHBL Inc ARS Engineers Inc Ayres Associates Becher-Hoppe Associates Inc BL Companies Inc Bollinger Lach & Associates Inc Bolton & Menk Inc Cal Engineering & Geology Inc Cole & Associates Inc Collins Engineers Inc CRS Consulting Engineers DeAngelo Brothers Inc Diaz Yourman & Associates Dibble Engineering Dokken Engineering Earth Systems Inc EBA-A Tetra Tech Company EPS Group Inc Fay Spofford & Thorndike Inc Flynn Brothers Contracting GeoDesign Inc GeoEngineers GHD GovHR USA Hannum Wagle & Cline Engineering Hansen Thorp Pellinen Olson Inc Harris & Associates Holbrook Asphalt HVJ Associates Inc HWA GeoSciences Inc J2 Engineering & Environmental Design James J Benes & Associates Inc JSD Professional Services Inc J-U-B Engineers Inc KCI Associates of NC Kimley-Horn and Associates Inc Klotz Associates KSA Engineers Inc Lawson-Fisher Associates PC LCC Inc LDA Engineering LiRo Engineers Inc LNV Inc Lochmueller Group

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Locklear & Associates Inc Lynch & Associates-Engineering Consultants LLC Mattern & Craig Inc Milone & MacBroom Inc MNS Engineers Inc Moore Twining Associates Inc Morrison-Maierle Inc Mulkey Engineers & Consultants Neel-Schaffer NW Engineers LLC Oates Associates Inc Onward Engineering Pavement Services Inc Project Engineering Consultants Ltd Quincy Engineering Inc Reed Engineering Group Ltd Reid Middleton RFE Engineering Inc ROWE Professional Services Company Short Elliott Hendrickson Inc Skillings Connolly Inc Stonebrooke Engineering Sunrise Engineering Inc Terra Associates Inc TranSystems Corporation Trotter and Associates Inc Wade Trim Walter P Moore WHPacific Inc Wilson & Company Wood Rodgers Inc Engineering & Technology, Subsurface Utility Engineering AirX Utility Surveyors American Engineering Testing Inc Applied Professional Services Inc ARS Engineers Inc Aztec Engineering Berg & Associates Inc BHC RHODES Civil Engineers & Surveyors BL Companies Inc Carollo Engineers CESARE Inc Civic Engineering & Information Technology Inc Cole & Associates Inc Collins Engineers Inc CRS Consulting Engineers Dewberry Dokken Engineering EAC Consulting Inc ESI Consultants Ltd Exeltech Consulting Inc Fay Spofford & Thorndike Inc GHD Gonzales Companies LLC Gresham Smith and Partners HBK Engineering LLC Klotz Associates LDA Engineering MSA Consulting Inc Murray Smith & Associates Inc Ninyo & Moore NW Engineers LLC Oates Associates Inc OMNNI Associates Inc Othon Inc Consulting Engineers Pennoni Associates Inc Reed Engineering Group Ltd

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Reid Middleton Safe Site Utility Services LLC Short Elliott Hendrickson Inc Southeastern Surveying & Mapping Corporation Stonebrooke Engineering Strand Associates Inc Sunrise Engineering Inc Taylor Wiseman & Taylor Terra Engineering Tighe & Bond TKDA TranSystems Corporation Trotter and Associates Inc Twining Inc Vaughn & Melton Consulting Engineers Transportation VTN Consulting Wade Trim Westland Group Inc Weston & Sampson Wood Rodgers Inc Engineering & Technology, Surveying Affinis Corp AHBL Inc AirX Utility Surveyors Alfred Benesch & Co ARS Engineers Inc Ayres Associates B & E Engineers Becher-Hoppe Associates Inc BL Companies Inc Blair Church & Flynn Consulting Engineers Bolton & Menk Inc Burgess and Niple BURY Calvin Giordano & Associates Carroll Engineering Inc CEI CenterPoint Energy Minnegasco Civic Engineering & Information Technology Inc Cole & Associates Inc Crafton Tull CRS Consulting Engineers David Evans and Associates Inc Dibble Engineering Doland Engineering LLC EFK Moen LLC Engineering Associates Engineering Service Inc EPS Group Inc Erlandsen & Associates Inc First Group Engineering Fugro Consultants Inc Fugro Roadware Inc GBA Architects and Engineers GEC GeoDesign Inc Gewalt Hamilton Associates Inc GovHR USA GPD Group Great Valley Consultants Great West Engineering Gremmer & Associates Inc Guida Surveying Inc HBK Engineering LLC Henry Meisenheimer & Gende Inc Hyatt Survey Services Inc J2 Engineering & Environmental

Design Jacobs Jones & Carter Inc JSD Professional Services Inc J-U-B Engineers Inc KCI Associates of NC Killeen Engineering & Surveying Kimley-Horn and Associates Inc KPFF Inc Krieger & Stewart Inc KSA Engineers Inc LCC Inc LDA Engineering LNV Inc Lochmueller Group Lowe Engineers LLC Lynch & Associates-Engineering Consultants LLC MacKay & Sposito Inc Mattern & Craig Inc Milone & MacBroom Inc MNS Engineers Inc Morrison-Maierle Inc MSA Consulting Inc Mulkey Engineers & Consultants Neel-Schaffer Northern Pump & Well Co Oates Associates Inc Olsson Associates OMNNI Associates Inc Parametrix Pennoni Associates Inc Phelps Engineering Project Engineering Consultants Ltd Psomas Quincy Engineering Inc RBF Consulting Reid Middleton Renaissance Infrastructure Consulting (RIC) RFE Engineering Inc ROWE Professional Services Company Sayre Associates Inc SEPI Engineering & Construction Inc Skillings Connolly Inc Southeastern Surveying & Mapping Corporation Stantec Stonebrooke Engineering Strand Associates Inc Sunrise Engineering Inc TETRA TECH The Altum Group The Chazen Companies Trotter and Associates Inc V3 Companies Vaughn & Melton Consulting Engineers Transportation VTN Consulting Wade Trim Wallace Group WBK Engineering Westland Group Inc White Shield Inc WHPacific Inc Wilson & Company Wood Rodgers Inc WSP Canada Inc Engineering & Technology, Testing/ Inspection Affinis Corp


Alpha Geotechnical & Materials American Engineering Testing Inc Ayres Associates Azteca Systems/Cityworks Behnke Materials Engineering Biggs Cardosa Associates Inc Bolton & Menk Inc Cal Engineering & Geology Inc Calvin Giordano & Associates Chastain & Associates LLC CMT Engineering Laboratories Collins Engineers Inc Construction Testing Services Inc Earth Systems Inc Engineering Associates Foundation Engineering Inc Fugro Consultants Inc GeoDesign Inc Gonzales Companies LLC Hannum Wagle & Cline Engineering Hansen Thorp Pellinen Olson Inc Holdrege & Kull Consulting Engineers and Geologists HVJ Associates Inc HW Lochner Hydro Designs Inc IMS Infrastructure Management Services Inspection Services Inc LandMark Consultants Inc Larkin Lamp Rynearson LDA Engineering Leighton Consulting Inc Locklear & Associates Inc Mattern & Craig Inc Milone & MacBroom Inc Moore Twining Associates Inc Northern Pump & Well Co NW Engineers LLC PBS Engineering + Environmental Principal Engineering Inc Project Engineering Consultants Ltd Reed Engineering Group Ltd SCI Engineering Inc Salaber Associates Inc SharpeSoft Inc Southeastern Surveying & Mapping Corporation Stonebrooke Engineering Summit Associates Sunrise Engineering Inc The Chazen Companies Trotter and Associates Inc TY Lin International United Resource LLC Urban Engineers Inc Wade Trim Walter P Moore Western Environmental Testing Laboratory Engineering & Technology, Transportation Affinis Corp Alfred Benesch & Co A-N West Inc ARCADIS ARS Engineers Inc Atlantic Detroit Diesel-Allison LLC Avalon Engineering Inc Ayres Associates Aztec Engineering Azteca Systems/Cityworks

Baxter & Woodman Consulting Engineers Behnke Materials Engineering Berg & Associates Inc Biggs Cardosa Associates Inc BL Companies Inc Bollinger Lach & Associates Inc Bolton & Menk Inc Brown & Gay Engineers Inc Burgess and Niple Cal Engineering & Geology Inc Carroll Engineering Inc CEI Chastain & Associates LLC Ciorba Group Inc Civic Engineering & Information Technology Inc Civiltech Engineering Inc CivTech Inc Clark Dietz Engineers Clark Patterson Lee Cobb Fendley & Associates Inc Cole & Associates Inc Collins Engineers Inc Collins Engineers Inc Crafton Tull CRS Consulting Engineers David Evans and Associates Inc Dewberry Diaz Yourman & Associates Dibble Engineering Dokken Engineering Drake Haglan & Associates Inc EBA-A Tetra Tech Company EFK Moen LLC England-Thims & Miller Inc EPS Group Inc ESI Consultants Ltd Exeltech Consulting Inc Exp Services Inc Fay Spofford & Thorndike Inc First Group Engineering Fisher & Arnold Inc Foth Fred Weber Inc GBA Architects and Engineers GEC Gewalt Hamilton Associates Inc GHD Gonzales Companies LLC GPD Group Great Valley Consultants Great West Engineering Gremmer & Associates Inc Guida Surveying Inc Gulf Industries Inc Hannum Wagle & Cline Engineering Hansen Thorp Pellinen Olson Inc HBK Engineering LLC Henry Meisenheimer & Gende Inc HNTB Corporation HR Green Inc Jones & Carter Inc Kaskaskia Engineering Group LLC Klotz Associates LDA Engineering LNV Inc Lochmueller Group Locklear & Associates Inc Lucity Inc Lynch & Associates-Engineering Consultants LLC MacKay & Sposito Inc

Martinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Power Sweeping Inc Mattern & Craig Inc Mesiti-Miller Engineering Inc Milone & MacBroom Inc Moore Twining Associates Inc MotionLink MSA Consulting Inc MSA Professional Svc Murray Smith & Associates Inc NW Engineers LLC Oates Associates Inc Olsson Associates Othon Inc Consulting Engineers Parametrix Pavement Services Inc Pennoni Associates Inc Primera Engineers Ltd Project Engineering Consultants Ltd Psomas Quincy Engineering Inc R2H Engineering Inc Reid Middleton Renaissance Infrastructure Consulting (RIC) RFE Engineering Inc Rick Engineering Company Robinson Consultants Inc ROWE Professional Services Company RV Anderson Associates Limited Sayre Associates Inc Short Elliott Hendrickson Inc Skillings Connolly Inc Slater Hanifan Group Inc Stanley Consultants Inc Stantec Stonebrooke Engineering Strand Associates Inc Sunrise Engineering Inc Terra Associates Inc Terra Engineering TETRA TECH The Chazen Companies Tighe & Bond TKDA Trotter and Associates Inc TY Lin International Urban Engineers Inc V3 Companies Verizon Networkfleet WG Zimmerman Engineering Inc Wade Trim Walter P Moore WBK Engineering Weston & Sampson WGK Inc WHPacific Inc Wilson & Company Wood Rodgers Inc WSP Canada Inc Engineering & Technology, Water/ Wastewater Engineering Aerostar SES LLC Affinis Corp Alfred Benesch & Co A-N West Inc ARCADIS ARS Engineers Inc Ayres Associates Baxter & Woodman Consulting Engineers Becher-Hoppe Associates Inc

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BL Companies Inc Bollinger Lach & Associates Inc Bolton & Menk Inc Brown & Gay Engineers Inc Burgess and Niple BURY Carollo Engineers Carroll Engineering Inc Chastain & Associates LLC Civic Engineering & Information Technology Inc Civiltech Engineering Inc Cole & Associates Inc Collins Engineers Inc CTS Group David Evans and Associates Inc DeAngelo Brothers Inc Dewberry Diaz Yourman & Associates Dibble Engineering EBA-A Tetra Tech Company EFK Moen LLC Engineering Service Inc England-Thims & Miller Inc Environmental Partners Group Inc EPS Group Inc Erlandsen & Associates Inc Erler & Kalinowski Inc ESI Consultants Ltd ESRI Exp Services Inc Fay Spofford & Thorndike Inc Fisher & Arnold Inc Forsgren Associates Inc Foth Freese and Nichols GBA Architects and Engineers GeoEngineers Gonzales Companies LLC GovHR USA GPD Group Great Valley Consultants Great West Engineering Greeley and Hansen Gresham Smith and Partners Hannum Wagle & Cline Engineering Hansen Thorp Pellinen Olson Inc Henry Meisenheimer & Gende Inc HR Green Inc Jones & Carter Inc K & A Engineering Inc Kaskaskia Engineering Group LLC Kleinfelder Klotz Associates Landau Associates Inc Larkin Lamp Rynearson Lawson-Fisher Associates PC LDA Engineering LNV Inc Lochmueller Group Locklear & Associates Inc Lucity Inc MacKay & Sposito Inc Mattern & Craig Inc Mead and Hunt Milone & MacBroom Inc Moore Twining Associates Inc Morrison-Maierle Inc MSA Consulting Inc MSA Professional Svc Mulkey Engineers & Consultants Murray Smith & Associates Inc MWH Americas

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Neel-Schaffer NW Engineers LLC Oates Associates Inc Olsson Associates OMNNI Associates Inc Onward Engineering Osborn Consulting Inc Othon Inc Consulting Engineers PACE Inc Parametrix PBS Engineering + Environmental Pennoni Associates Inc Primera Engineers Ltd Principal Engineering Inc Project Engineering Consultants Ltd PubWorks R2H Engineering Inc RBF Consulting Rick Engineering Company RJ Behar & Company Inc Robinson Consultants Inc ROWE Professional Services Company RV Anderson Associates Limited Sayre Associates Inc SEPI Engineering & Construction Inc Short Elliott Hendrickson Inc Skillings Connolly Inc Slater Hanifan Group Inc Stanley Consultants Inc Strand Associates Inc Sunrise Engineering Inc Terra Associates Inc Terra Engineering TETRA TECH Thompson Pump & Manufacturing Company Tighe & Bond TKDA TranSystems Corporation Trotter and Associates Inc V3 Companies Vaughn & Melton Consulting Engineers Transportation WG Zimmerman Engineering Inc Wade Trim Wallace Group Water Resource Engineering Associates WBK Engineering Westland Group Inc Weston & Sampson WGK Inc WHPacific Inc Wilson & Company Wood Rodgers Inc WSP Canada Inc Engineering & Technology, Water Supply Planning/Permitting Engineering Service Inc Erlandsen & Associates Inc Erler & Kalinowski Inc Fisher & Arnold Inc Gonzales Companies LLC Great West Engineering Greeley and Hansen LDA Engineering Lynch & Associates-Engineering Consultants LLC Stanley Consultants Inc The Chazen Companies

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Engineering & Technology, Well Construction Northern Pump & Well Co Utility Service Company WSP Canada Inc Environmental Equipment & Services, Brownfield Redevelopment Aerostar SES LLC Alfred Benesch & Co Ayres Associates GeoEngineers GHD HDR Inc Herzog Contracting Corp HR Green Inc HWA GeoSciences Inc Kleinfelder Landau Associates Inc OMNNI Associates Inc Parametrix PBS Engineering + Environmental The Chazen Companies Tighe & Bond Environmental Equipment & Services, Cathodic Protection Universal Field Services Environmental Equipment & Services, Corrosion Engineering HDR Inc RHOMAR Industries Inc Environmental Equipment & Services, Culverts Alberta Highway Services Ltd Alfred Benesch & Co DBA Construction Inc Environmental Partners Group Inc Etna Supply GeoEngineers Landau Associates Inc M Con Pipe and Products Inc Oldcastle Precast Inc Parametrix Skillings Connolly Inc Tighe & Bond Trillium Municipal Supply Inc Water Resource Engineering Associates Environmental Equipment & Services, Geosynthetics Landau Associates Inc Environmental Equipment & Services, Hazardous Material Management Aerostar SES LLC Alfred Benesch & Co Exp Services Inc GeoDesign Inc Hart Crowser Inc Holdrege & Kull Consulting Engineers and Geologists Landau Associates Inc White Shield Inc Environmental Equipment & Services, LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design)

April 2015

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Affinis Corp Anderson & Associates Inc BHC RHODES Civil Engineers & Surveyors BURY Carollo Engineers Crafton Tull ESI Consultants Ltd Fay Spofford & Thorndike Inc Gewalt Hamilton Associates Inc GHD Gkkworks GovHR USA GPD Group Jones & Carter Inc Kleinfelder Klotz Associates Leighton Consulting Inc LNV Inc McGuire and Hester Morrison-Maierle Inc Olsson Associates OMNNI Associates Inc PBS Engineering + Environmental Pennoni Associates Inc RBF Consulting Sletten Construction of Nevada Strand Associates Inc Swinerton Management & Consulting Terra Engineering Westland Group Inc Environmental Equipment & Services, Litter Collection Equipment Carolina Industrial Equipment Inc Public Works Equipment and Supply Inc RNOW Inc TYMCO Environmental Equipment & Services, Recycling Equipment Amick Equipment Company Inc Bell Equipment Company KM International MacQueen Equipment Inc Morbark Inc RNOW Inc Stringfellow Inc Equipment Maintenance, Air Compressors Airworks Compressors Corp Diesel Equipment Company QPR Siewert Equipment West Side Tractor Sales Equipment Maintenance, Environmental Equipment Aggregate Industries SWR Inc Atlantic Detroit Diesel-Allison LLC Everglades Farm Equipment GapVax Inc MacQueen Equipment Inc Murray & Trettel Inc Siewert Equipment Stringfellow Inc Thompson Pump & Manufacturing Company

Equipment Maintenance, Fleet Construction Equipment Atlantic Detroit Diesel-Allison LLC Casper’s Truck Equipment CompassCom Software Diesel Equipment Company Everglades Farm Equipment GovDeals GS Equipment Co Inc Harrison Hydraulic Solutions HOLT CAT Johnston North America Power Equipment Leasing Company Truck Country Verizon Networkfleet Volvo Construction Equipment West Side Tractor Sales Equipment Maintenance, Vehicles Atlantic Detroit Diesel-Allison LLC Donovan Equipment Co Inc Everglades Farm Equipment GovDeals Harrison Hydraulic Solutions Power Equipment Leasing Company Roush Cleantech Shenandoah Fleet Maintenance and Management LLC Standard Equipment Company Truck Country Facilities, Building Construction/ Design Aggregate Industries SWR Inc American Engineering Testing Inc Ayres Associates BL Companies Inc Bowman Bowman Novick Camosy Construction Carollo Engineers Collins Engineers Inc Construction Accessories Crafton Tull CTS Group Dewberry ESI Consultants Ltd Exeltech Consulting Inc FGM Architects Gateway Industrial Products Inc GHD Gkkworks Henry Meisenheimer & Gende Inc HNTB Corporation Legat Architects LNV Inc Maintenance Design Group Moore Twining Associates Inc New-Com Inc Oates Associates Inc O’Brien & Gere Olsson Associates PCL Construction Inc Primera Engineers Ltd PTMW Inc R2H Engineering Inc Reid Middleton Riley Construction Company Inc Strand Associates Inc Swinerton Management & Consulting TKDA Walter P Moore WHPacific Inc Wright Construction Group Inc


Facilities, Consultants/Contractors Affinis Corp American Engineering Testing Inc Associated Transportation Engineers BHC RHODES Civil Engineers & Surveyors Bowman Bowman Novick Camosy Construction Crafton Tull CTS Group Earth Systems Inc Engineering Service Inc ESI Consultants Ltd HNTB Corporation Hydro Designs Inc Kleinfelder LiRo Engineers Inc Moore Twining Associates Inc Olsson Associates PCL Construction Inc R2H Engineering Inc Reid Middleton United Resource LLC Universal Field Services Facilities, Doors/Curtains Gateway Industrial Products Inc Facilities, Energy/Electrical Arizona Public Service Co Burns & McDonnell CTS Group GHD LNV Inc Morrison-Maierle Inc PECO Energy Company Portland General Electric Puget Sound Energy Siewert Equipment Strand Associates Inc TKDA Facilities, Graffiti Abatement RHOMAR Industries Inc Facilities, Health/Safety/Security Construction Accessories PBS Engineering + Environmental William Frick and Company Facilities, Janitorial Products/ Services HD Supply Occidental Chemical Corporation SFM Services Inc Facilities, Management/ Infrastructure Azteca Systems/Cityworks CFA Software Inc Ciorba Group Inc CTS Group DeAngelo Brothers Inc Interwest Consulting Group Riley Construction Company Inc Terracare Associates WHPacific Inc Facilities, Restoration/Maintenance/ Recycling Carollo Engineers ESG Operations HD Supply R2H Engineering Inc

Facilities, Theft Prevention William Frick and Company Fleet, Cleaning Equipment & Supplies Carolina Industrial Equipment Inc DuBois Chemicals Inc Everglades Farm Equipment GapVax Inc Johnston North America Public Works Equipment and Supply Inc Stringfellow Inc Fleet, Component Parts Airworks Compressors Corp Auto Truck Group Casper’s Truck Equipment Certified Power Inc Diesel Equipment Company FORCE America Inc Grand Traverse Diesel Services Inc Harrison Hydraulic Solutions J&J Truck Bodies & Trailers Mailhot Industries USA Inc Meyer Products LLC Minuteman Trucks Inc Power Equipment Leasing Company Fleet, Cranes Casper’s Truck Equipment Everglades Farm Equipment GovDeals J&J Truck Bodies & Trailers Power Equipment Leasing Company Regional Truck Equipment Titan Machinery Inc Fleet, Electronic Backing Safety Devices Diesel Equipment Company Global Sensor Systems Inc Regional Truck Equipment RNOW Inc Fleet, Heavy Equipment/Machinery Altec Industries Everglades Farm Equipment GovDeals Highway Equipment Company HOLT CAT HP Fairfield LLC J&J Truck Bodies & Trailers Morbark Inc MRL Equipment Company Inc Parker Farm Service RNOW Inc Timmerman Equipment Company Titan Machinery Inc Trius Inc Volvo Construction Equipment VT LeeBoy Inc West Side Tractor Sales Fleet, Hydraulic Systems Airworks Compressors Corp Certified Power Inc FORCE America Inc Harrison Hydraulic Solutions J&J Truck Bodies & Trailers Mailhot Industries USA Inc PENGWYN

Fleet, Lighting Casper’s Truck Equipment Diesel Equipment Company Etna Supply Harrison Hydraulic Solutions Whelen Engineering Company Inc Fleet, Material Application Controllers OPW Fuel Management Systems Reed Systems Ltd Fleet, Monitoring Systems Certified Power Inc CFA Software Inc CompassCom Software FORCE America Inc FUELMASTER/Syn-Tech Systems MotionLink OPW Fuel Management Systems Verizon Networkfleet Volvo Construction Equipment Webtech Wireless Fleet, Power Accessories Airworks Compressors Corp Certified Power Inc FORCE America Inc Harrison Hydraulic Solutions Minuteman Trucks Inc

Fleet, Sensor Systems Global Sensor Systems Inc Fleet, Snow Blowers Bell Equipment Company J&J Truck Bodies & Trailers RNOW Inc Stringfellow Inc Titan Machinery Inc Trackless Vehicles Ltd Fleet, Snow Plows Bell Equipment Company Carolina Industrial Equipment Inc Casper’s Truck Equipment Flink Co Gabrielli Truck Sales J&J Truck Bodies & Trailers LOT Maintenance Inc Meyer Products LLC Monroe Truck Equipment Inc Public Works Equipment and Supply Inc Reed Systems Ltd Regional Truck Equipment Stringfellow Inc Titan Machinery Inc Trackless Vehicles Ltd Trius Inc Truck Country

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Fleet, Tires Everglades Farm Equipment Truck Country Fleet, Towing Casper’s Truck Equipment Truck Country

Fleet, Safety Equipment 3rd Eye MobileVision AirX Utility Surveyors Alamo Industrial Construction Accessories Diesel Equipment Company Minuteman Trucks Inc RHOMAR Industries Inc Rosco Inc Stay Alert Safety Services Inc WorkSafe USA Inc

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Fleet, Sweepers Amick Equipment Company Inc Bell Equipment Company Carolina Industrial Equipment Inc Federal Signal Corporation Environmental Solutions Group GovDeals J&J Truck Bodies & Trailers Johnston North America LOT Maintenance Inc MacQueen Equipment Inc Public Works Equipment and Supply Inc RNOW Inc Standard Equipment Company Stringfellow Inc Timmerman Equipment Company Trackless Vehicles Ltd TYMCO VT LeeBoy Inc

Fleet, Trucks AirX Utility Surveyors Atlantic Detroit Diesel-Allison LLC Auto Truck Group Bell Equipment Company Dickson Equipment Everglades Farm Equipment Falcon Equipment Ltd Flink Co Gabrielli Truck Sales GapVax Inc GeoDesign Inc GovDeals Grand Traverse Diesel Services Inc Harrison Hydraulic Solutions J&J Truck Bodies & Trailers Johnston North America MacQueen Equipment Inc Minuteman Trucks Inc Monroe Truck Equipment Inc RNOW Inc Standard Equipment Company Stringfellow Inc Trius Inc Truck Country WorkSafe USA Inc Fleet, Vehicle Service Equipment Everglades Farm Equipment OPW Fuel Management Systems Standard Equipment Company Verizon Networkfleet Grounds and Urban Forestry Supplies, Blades and Cutting Edges Cherry Valley Tractor Sales Little Falls Machine Inc Meyer Products LLC Montage Enterprises Parker Farm Service Titan Machinery Inc Winter Equipment Company

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Grounds and Urban Forestry Supplies, Brush Chippers Cherry Valley Tractor Sales Everglades Farm Equipment LOT Maintenance Inc Montage Enterprises Morbark Inc Parker Farm Service Timmerman Equipment Company

Grounds and Urban Forestry Supplies, Lighting Systems Etna Supply IPRF Olympic Foundry Inc Sternberg Lighting Grounds and Urban Forestry Supplies, Loaders Alamo Industrial Case Construction Equipment Casperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Truck Equipment Cherry Valley Tractor Sales Everglades Farm Equipment Little Falls Machine Inc NMC Parker Farm Service Titan Machinery Inc Volvo Construction Equipment VT LeeBoy Inc West Side Tractor Sales

Grounds and Urban Forestry Supplies, Brush Cutters Alamo Industrial Cherry Valley Tractor Sales Everglades Farm Equipment LOT Maintenance Inc Montage Enterprises Morbark Inc Parker Farm Service Grounds and Urban Forestry Supplies, Brushes/Sweepers Alamo Industrial Everglades Farm Equipment Johnston North America Montage Enterprises Parker Farm Service Titan Machinery Inc Trackless Vehicles Ltd TYMCO United Rotary Brush VT LeeBoy Inc

Grounds and Urban Forestry Supplies, Lubrication Systems Certified Power Inc Grounds and Urban Forestry Supplies, Marking Equipment EZ-Liner Industries Franklin Paint Company Inc Professional Pavement Products Inc Grounds and Urban Forestry Supplies, Mowing Equipment Alamo Industrial Atmax Equipment Co Cherry Valley Tractor Sales Everglades Farm Equipment LOT Maintenance Inc Montage Enterprises Parker Farm Service RNOW Inc Slope Care LLC Terracare Associates Toro Company Trackless Vehicles Ltd

Grounds and Urban Forestry Supplies, Drills Winter Equipment Company Grounds and Urban Forestry Supplies, Erosion Control Construction Accessories DeAngelo Brothers Inc Ess Brothers & Sons Inc Helac Corporation HWA GeoSciences Inc Neenah Foundry Company Terra Associates Inc TRULINE Sheet Piling System Grounds and Urban Forestry Supplies, Graders Case Construction Equipment Little Falls Machine Inc Titan Machinery Inc Volvo Construction Equipment VT LeeBoy Inc West Side Tractor Sales Winter Equipment Company

Grounds and Urban Forestry Supplies, Paint Franklin Paint Company Inc Professional Pavement Products Inc

Grounds and Urban Forestry Supplies, Grinders Cherry Valley Tractor Sales Everglades Farm Equipment Franklin Paint Company Inc Morbark Inc Professional Pavement Products Inc Timmerman Equipment Company

Grounds and Urban Forestry Supplies, Pumps Associated Pump & Supply FORCE America Inc Gilbarco Veeder-Root Thompson Pump & Manufacturing Company Grounds and Urban Forestry Supplies, Sign Tools & Supplies American Traffic Safety Materials Inc Construction Accessories William Frick and Company

Grounds and Urban Forestry Supplies, Irrigation Etna Supply Terra Associates Inc Terracare Associates

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Grounds and Urban Forestry Supplies, Park & Playground Equipment Neenah Foundry Company

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Grounds and Urban Forestry Supplies, Stormwater Management Ayres Associates DeAngelo Brothers Inc Engineering Service Inc Environmental Partners Group Inc Erler & Kalinowski Inc Etna Supply GeoDesign Inc Gewalt Hamilton Associates Inc Gonzales Companies LLC GovHR USA Gremmer & Associates Inc Hart Crowser Inc Holdrege & Kull Consulting Engineers and Geologists HWA GeoSciences Inc Krieger & Stewart Inc Larkin Lamp Rynearson Lucity Inc Mattern & Craig Inc Moore Twining Associates Inc Oldcastle Precast Inc PACE Inc Sayre Associates Inc Slope Care LLC Sturgis Materials Inc The Altum Group Thompson Pump & Manufacturing Company United Resource LLC Grounds and Urban Forestry Supplies, Trench Excavation Helac Corporation Grounds and Urban Forestry Supplies, Vegetation Management Alamo Industrial BMC Corporation LOT Maintenance Inc Montage Enterprises Primera Engineers Ltd S & S Tree & Landscaping Specialists Terracare Associates Leadership & Management, Architecture Becher-Hoppe Associates Inc Bowman Bowman Novick Burns & McDonnell BURY Crafton Tull Dewberry GPD Group GRAEF HNTB Corporation Huitt-Zollars Inc Kleinfelder LNV Inc MacKay & Sposito Inc Maintenance Design Group Oates Associates Inc OMNNI Associates Inc Pease Engineering & Architecture R2H Engineering Inc TKDA Williams Architects Wilson & Company

Leadership & Management, Engineering Affinis Corp A-N West Inc Anderson & Associates Inc Becher-Hoppe Associates Inc Behnke Materials Engineering BHC RHODES Civil Engineers & Surveyors BURY Cal Engineering & Geology Inc Certified Power Inc CESNW Inc Cole & Associates Inc Collier Engineering Company Inc Collins Engineers Inc Crafton Tull CRS Consulting Engineers CTS Group Dewberry Diaz Yourman & Associates Dokken Engineering Earth Systems Inc EBA-A Tetra Tech Company Engineering Resources Environmental Partners Group Inc ESI Consultants Ltd Evans Mechwart Hambleton & Tilton Inc Exeltech Consulting Inc Fay Spofford & Thorndike Inc Forsgren Associates Inc GeoEngineers GovHR USA GPD Group Guida Surveying Inc Hannum Wagle & Cline Engineering Hansen Thorp Pellinen Olson Inc Harris & Associates HDR Inc Hey and Associates Inc HNTB Corporation HR Green Inc Huitt-Zollars Inc HWA GeoSciences Inc Interwest Consulting Group Jones & Carter Inc K & A Engineering Inc Killeen Engineering & Surveying Kleinfelder Landau Associates Inc Larkin Lamp Rynearson LiRo Engineers Inc LNV Inc Locklear & Associates Inc Lynch & Associates-Engineering Consultants LLC MacKay & Sposito Inc Mattern & Craig Inc MMM Group Limited Moore Twining Associates Inc Morrison-Maierle Inc MSA Consulting Inc Oates Associates Inc Olsson Associates OMNNI Associates Inc Parametrix PBS Engineering + Environmental Pease Engineering & Architecture Pennoni Associates Inc R2H Engineering Inc Reid Middleton RFE Engineering Inc


ROWE Professional Services Company Schlagel & Associates PA Short Elliott Hendrickson Inc Southwest Gas Corporation Strand Associates Inc Terra Associates Inc Terra Engineering TKDA TranSystems Corporation URS Corporation Water Resource Engineering Associates WBK Engineering WEST Consultants Inc Westland Group Inc Wilson & Company Leadership & Management, Environmental Anderson & Associates Inc CRS Consulting Engineers Diaz Yourman & Associates Environmental Partners Group Inc Exeltech Consulting Inc Forsgren Associates Inc GeoDesign Inc GeoEngineers HDR Inc Hey and Associates Inc HNTB Corporation HR Green Inc Kleinfelder Landau Associates Inc LiRo Engineers Inc LNV Inc Locklear & Associates Inc MMM Group Limited Moore Twining Associates Inc Morrison-Maierle Inc OMNNI Associates Inc Parametrix PBS Engineering + Environmental Pease Engineering & Architecture RtVision Inc Short Elliott Hendrickson Inc Skillings Connolly Inc Tierra Right of Way Services TranSystems Corporation Water Resource Engineering Associates WBK Engineering Westland Group Inc Leadership & Management, Project Management Anderson & Associates Inc Becher-Hoppe Associates Inc BHC RHODES Civil Engineers & Surveyors BURY Calvin Giordano & Associates CDG Engineers & Associates Inc CESNW Inc CMTS LLC Collier Engineering Company Inc Collins Engineers Inc CTS Group Dokken Engineering Encore Group Engineering Resources EnviroIssues Envirolink Inc Environmental Partners Group Inc

Exeltech Consulting Inc Forsgren Associates Inc GEC Harris & Associates Hey and Associates Inc HNTB Corporation HR Green Inc IMS Infrastructure Management Services Interwest Consulting Group Kleinfelder Larkin Lamp Rynearson LiRo Engineers Inc LNV Inc Lynch & Associates-Engineering Consultants LLC MacKay & Sposito Inc MMM Group Limited Moore Twining Associates Inc Morrison-Maierle Inc MotionLink OMNNI Associates Inc Paragon Partners Ltd Pease Engineering & Architecture R2H Engineering Inc Riley Construction Company Inc ROWE Professional Services Company RtVision Inc S & C Engineers Inc Schlagel & Associates PA Terra Engineering Universal Field Services Water Resource Engineering Associates Westland Group Inc WHPacific Inc Wilson & Company Solid Waste, Cleaning Equipment Heil of Texas Public Works Equipment and Supply Inc Solid Waste, Cleaning Vehicles Meyer Products LLC Public Works Equipment and Supply Inc Stringfellow Inc Truck Country Solid Waste, Collection Dickson Equipment Emterra Environmental Heil of Texas MacQueen Equipment Inc Public Works Equipment and Supply Inc Redman Consulting Group Inc Standard Equipment Company Solid Waste, Container Handling Equipment Amick Equipment Company Inc MacQueen Equipment Inc RNOW Inc Solid Waste, Dump Truck Bodies Air-Flo Manufacturing Inc Casperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Truck Equipment Flink Co Heil of Texas Monroe Truck Equipment Inc

Stringfellow Inc Wausau Equipment Company Inc WorkSafe USA Inc Solid Waste, Facilities ClearSpan Fabric Structures CTS Group HDR Inc Solid Waste, Solid Waste Sanitation Amick Equipment Company Inc AshBritt Environmental Bell Equipment Company Carollo Engineers Heil of Texas Herzog Contracting Corp Solid Waste, Waste Receptacles RNOW Inc Stringfellow Inc Transportation, Asphalt Equipment & Materials AirX Utility Surveyors Alberta Highway Services Ltd American Paving Fabrics Inc Asphalt Pavement Alliance California Pavement Maintenance Colas Solutions Inc Cold Mix Manufacturing Contractor Compliance & Monitoring Inc Crafco Inc Cutler Repaving Inc Ergon Asphalt & Emulsions Inc Flynn Brothers Contracting Fred Weber Inc Gallagher Asphalt Corporation Geneva Rock Products Inc HG Meigs LLC Herzog Contracting Corp HOLT CAT KM International Maple Leaf Construction Ltd Pavement Restorations Inc Perma-Patch Professional Pavement Products Inc Public Works Equipment and Supply Inc QPR Stenstrom Excavation & Blacktop Group Strawser Construction Inc Terry Asphalt Materials Inc Turtle Southeast Inc Unique Paving Materials Corporation Uretek Volvo Construction Equipment VT LeeBoy Inc West Side Tractor Sales Transportation, Asphalt Pavement Recycling Alberta Highway Services Ltd Asphalt Pavement Alliance Carolina Industrial Equipment Inc Colas Solutions Inc Cutler Repaving Inc Earth Systems Inc Flynn Brothers Contracting Gallagher Asphalt Corporation Herzog Contracting Corp

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HOLT CAT KM International Maple Leaf Construction Ltd Pavement Restorations Inc Pavement Technology Inc Turtle Southeast Inc Twining Inc Unique Paving Materials Corporation Uretek Transportation, Catch Basin Cleaners Cretex Specialty Products DeAngelo Brothers Inc Ess Brothers & Sons Inc Federal Signal Corporation Environmental Solutions Group GapVax Inc MacQueen Equipment Inc Public Works Equipment and Supply Inc Timmerman Equipment Company United Resource LLC Transportation, Catch Basin Risers Cretex Specialty Products DeAngelo Brothers Inc Ess Brothers & Sons Inc Transportation, Concrete Alberta Highway Services Ltd American Engineering Testing Inc Asphalt Pavement Alliance Construction Accessories Crafco Inc CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation/Rapid Set Products DBA Construction Inc Earth Systems Inc Foothills Paving & Maintenance Inc Geneva Rock Products Inc Industrial Systems Ltd Moore Twining Associates Inc Nevada Material Services Perma-Patch Ready Mixed Concrete Association of ON Stenstrom Excavation & Blacktop Group Unique Paving Materials Corporation Transportation, Crack Sealing Materials & Equipment Alberta Highway Services Ltd Asphalt Pavement Alliance Colas Solutions Inc Crafco Inc DBA Construction Inc Ess Brothers & Sons Inc MacQueen Equipment Inc Pavement Restorations Inc Pavement Technology Inc Professional Pavement Products Inc QPR Strawser Construction Inc Terry Asphalt Materials Inc Unique Paving Materials Corporation Vance Brothers Inc Waltman Construction Wastequip/Toter

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Transportation, Diesel Engines Atlantic Detroit Diesel-Allison LLC Diesel Equipment Company

MRL Equipment Company Inc Pavement Restorations Inc

Transportation, Dust Control Colas Solutions Inc Compass Minerals America Inc Great Lakes Chloride Inc Pavement Technology Inc Reed Systems Ltd TYMCO Wilkinson Corporation Transportation, Ground Speed Sensors/Adapters Diesel Equipment Company International Road Dynamics Verizon Networkfleet Transportation, Highway/Street Construction Tools & Accessories American Engineering Testing Inc Asphalt Pavement Alliance Bergkamp Inc Brandon Industries Inc DBA Construction Inc Diesel Equipment Company MRL Equipment Company Inc QPR Transportation, Interlocking Asphalt Pavement Alliance Crafco Inc Pavement Restorations Inc Transportation, Load Covering Systems Asphalt Pavement Alliance Transportation, Maintenance Equipment Airworks Compressors Corp Bergkamp Inc California Pavement Maintenance Construction Accessories Everglades Farm Equipment Gulf Industries Inc KM International MRL Equipment Company Inc Professional Pavement Products Inc VT LeeBoy Inc Winter Equipment Company Transportation, Marking Supplies Alberta Highway Services Ltd Asphalt Pavement Alliance EZ-Liner Industries Franklin Paint Company Inc MRL Equipment Company Inc Pavement Restorations Inc Professional Pavement Products Inc Time Striping Inc Transportation, Pavement Markings AirX Utility Surveyors American Paving Fabrics Inc Asphalt Pavement Alliance Fahrner Asphalt Sealers LLC Franklin Paint Company Inc Gulf Industries Inc Interprovincial Traffic Services Ltd Jarrett Builders Inc Moore Twining Associates Inc

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Transportation, Pavement Preservation Alberta Highway Services Ltd American Paving Fabrics Inc Bergkamp Inc BioSeal California Pavement Maintenance Carolina Industrial Equipment Inc Colas Solutions Inc Crafco Inc Cutler Repaving Inc Donelson Construction Company LLC E Meier Contracting Inc Ergon Asphalt & Emulsions Inc Fahrner Asphalt Sealers LLC Foothills Paving & Maintenance Inc Fugro Roadware Inc Gallagher Asphalt Corporation Holbrook Asphalt HWA GeoSciences Inc International Road Dynamics Jarrett Builders Inc KM International Lucity Inc Pavement Restorations Inc Pavement Technology Inc Petrochem Materials Innovation LLC QPR RHOMAR Industries Inc Sealcoating Inc Stenstrom Excavation & Blacktop Group Strawser Construction Inc Sunland Asphalt Terry Asphalt Materials Inc Transfield Dexter Gateway Service Ltd Uretek Vance Brothers Inc Waltman Construction Transportation, Railroad Crossing Systems Pavement Restorations Inc Transportation, Restoration Systems Asphalt Pavement Alliance Colas Solutions Inc Uretek ICR Gulf Coast Transportation, Safety Apparel/Gear AirX Utility Surveyors QPR Time Striping Inc WorkSafe USA Inc Transportation, Sidewalks & Maintenance Alberta Highway Services Ltd Asphalt Pavement Alliance Collier Engineering Company Inc Construction Accessories DBA Construction Inc Metadome Pavement Restorations Inc Precision Concrete Cutting Midwest

April 2015

Transportation, Spray Injection Patching Fahrner Asphalt Sealers LLC Foothills Paving & Maintenance Inc

Transportation, Subgrade Improvement American Paving Fabrics Inc Colas Solutions Inc DBA Construction Inc Earth Systems Inc HWA GeoSciences Inc Roadbond Service Company Transportation, Tanker Trucks J&J Truck Bodies & Trailers Truck Country Turtle Southeast Inc Transportation, Testing Equipment Certified Power Inc Crafco Inc IMS Infrastructure Management Services MH Corbin Perma-Patch Transportation, Traffic Calming DBA Construction Inc Interprovincial Traffic Services Ltd Interwest Consulting Group Milone & MacBroom Inc Pavement Restorations Inc Qwick Kurb Inc Skillings Connolly Inc Transportation, Traffic Safety Equipment 3rd Eye MobileVision AirX Utility Surveyors Alamo Industrial Bartlett Consolidated Inc Construction Accessories Gulf Industries Inc MRL Equipment Company Inc QPR Qwick Kurb Inc RHOMAR Industries Inc Site-Safe LLC Stay Alert Safety Services Inc Time Striping Inc WorkSafe USA Inc Transportation, Traffic Signage AirX Utility Surveyors American Traffic Safety Materials Inc Brandon Industries Inc Construction Accessories McClellan Sales Inc Professional Pavement Products Inc QPR Time Striping Inc Transportation, Traffic Warning Signals AirX Utility Surveyors QPR Site-Safe LLC Transportation, Transmissions Atlantic Detroit Diesel-Allison LLC FORCE America Inc

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Transportation, Truck Bodies & Equipment Casper’s Truck Equipment Everglades Farm Equipment Falcon Equipment Ltd Johnston North America MRL Equipment Company Inc Power Equipment Leasing Company Reed Systems Ltd Regional Truck Equipment Stringfellow Inc Timmerman Equipment Company WorkSafe USA Inc Transportation, Vehicles & Equipment Airworks Compressors Corp AirX Utility Surveyors Casper’s Truck Equipment ENZ USA INC Everglades Farm Equipment GapVax Inc Global Sensor Systems Inc GovDeals KM International Minuteman Trucks Inc Monroe Truck Equipment Inc MRL Equipment Company Inc Public Works Equipment and Supply Inc Rosco Inc Roush Cleantech Site-Safe LLC Stringfellow Inc Trackless Vehicles Ltd Truck Country Turtle Southeast Inc Verizon Networkfleet Wausau Equipment Company Inc WorkSafe USA Inc Water/Sewers, Magnetic Locator Ess Brothers & Sons Inc HD Supply USABlueBook Water/Sewers, Maintenance Services Colas Solutions Inc DeAngelo Brothers Inc ENZ USA INC Ess Brothers & Sons Inc Liqui-Force Services (USA) Inc Maple Leaf Construction Ltd P&L Utilities LLC Thompson Pump & Manufacturing Company United Resource LLC Utility Service Company Visu-Sewer Inc Water/Sewers, Manhole Rehabilitation Blois Construction Inc Cretex Specialty Products DBA Construction Inc Ess Brothers & Sons Inc LOT Maintenance Inc NW Engineers LLC United Survey Inc


Water/Sewers, Manhole Risers Crafco Inc Cretex Specialty Products Ess Brothers & Sons Inc Etna Supply Neenah Foundry Company Oldcastle Precast Inc Water/Sewers, Manhole Service Equipment Ess Brothers & Sons Inc Liqui-Force Services (USA) Inc McClellan Sales Inc USABlueBook Water/Sewers, Manholes Blois Construction Inc Cretex Specialty Products DBA Construction Inc Design Precast & Pipe Inc Ess Brothers & Sons Inc Etna Supply Neenah Foundry Company Oldcastle Precast Inc Olympic Foundry Inc P&L Utilities LLC Water/Sewers, Root/Grease Control Ess Brothers & Sons Inc P&L Utilities LLC Visu-Sewer Inc Water/Sewers, Sanitary Sewer Rehabilitation Blois Construction Inc Cretex Specialty Products Engineering Service Inc Ess Brothers & Sons Inc Flynn Brothers Contracting GovHR USA Insituform Technologies Inc Larkin Lamp Rynearson LOT Maintenance Inc Murray Smith & Associates Inc NW Engineers LLC PCL Construction Inc Public Works Equipment and Supply Inc Thompson Pump & Manufacturing Company United Resource LLC United Survey Inc Visu-Sewer Inc Weston & Sampson Water/Sewers, Sewer Cleaning Engineering Service Inc Ess Brothers & Sons Inc Gabrielli Truck Sales GapVax Inc Maple Leaf Construction Ltd United Resource LLC United Survey Inc Visu-Sewer Inc Water/Sewers, Sewer TV Inspection Blois Construction Inc Ess Brothers & Sons Inc LOT Maintenance Inc Maple Leaf Construction Ltd United Resource LLC United Survey Inc Visu-Sewer Inc

Water/Sewers, Sludge Management Ess Brothers & Sons Inc Larkin Lamp Rynearson PCL Construction Inc United Resource LLC Veolia Water Milwaukee LLC Water/Sewers, Sustainability Equipment Carollo Engineers ClearSpan Fabric Structures Ess Brothers & Sons Inc NMC PCL Construction Inc USABlueBook Water/Sewers, Treatment Services Carollo Engineers ESG Operations Ess Brothers & Sons Inc HDR Inc Liqui-Force Services (USA) Inc O’Brien & Gere P&L Utilities LLC PCL Construction Inc Sun Peaks Utilities Veolia Water Milwaukee LLC Water Resource Engineering Associates Weston & Sampson Water/Sewers, Trench Shoring Ess Brothers & Sons Inc Water/Sewers, Water Meters Engineering Service Inc Erler & Kalinowski Inc Ess Brothers & Sons Inc Etna Supply Hydro Designs Inc USABlueBook Water/Sewers, Waterworks American Samoa Power Authority Blois Construction Inc Engineering Service Inc Erler & Kalinowski Inc ESG Operations Ess Brothers & Sons Inc HD Supply Hydro Designs Inc Maple Leaf Construction Ltd MGC Contractors Inc Murray Smith & Associates Inc PCL Construction Inc Sun Peaks Utilities USABlueBook Veolia Water Milwaukee LLC Winter Maintenance, Anti-Icing Systems Bell Equipment Company Cargill Deicing Technology Carolina Industrial Equipment Inc Certified Power Inc Compass Minerals America Inc FORCE America Inc GVM Snow Equipment International Road Dynamics Monroe Truck Equipment Inc Occidental Chemical Corporation Ossian Inc Reed Systems Ltd

Swenson Products Inc Timmerman Equipment Company Wausau Equipment Company Inc Winter Maintenance, Blades & Scrapers FallLine Corporation Little Falls Machine Inc Monroe Truck Equipment Inc Parker Farm Service Trackless Vehicles Ltd Waltman Construction Wausau Equipment Company Inc Winter Equipment Company Winter Maintenance, Blowers LOT Maintenance Inc MacQueen Equipment Inc Parker Farm Service Trackless Vehicles Ltd Wausau Equipment Company Inc Winter Maintenance, Brine Making Amick Equipment Company Inc Bell Equipment Company Cargill Deicing Technology Carolina Industrial Equipment Inc FORCE America Inc GVM Snow Equipment Industrial Systems Ltd MacQueen Equipment Inc Occidental Chemical Corporation Reed Systems Ltd Timmerman Equipment Company Wilkinson Corporation Winter Maintenance, Chemical Storage Tanks GVM Snow Equipment Swenson Products Inc Wilkinson Corporation Winter Maintenance, Chemicals Compass Minerals America Inc Great Lakes Chloride Inc GVM Snow Equipment Industrial Systems Ltd Occidental Chemical Corporation Ossian Inc Reed Systems Ltd Wilkinson Corporation Winter Maintenance, Deicers Cargill Deicing Technology Certified Power Inc Great Lakes Chloride Inc GVM Snow Equipment Highway Equipment Company Industrial Systems Ltd Monroe Truck Equipment Inc Occidental Chemical Corporation Ossian Inc Reed Systems Ltd Wausau Equipment Company Inc Winter Maintenance, Plows Air-Flo Manufacturing Inc Alberta Highway Services Ltd Bell Equipment Company Carolina Industrial Equipment Inc Falcon Equipment Ltd Flink Co Highway Equipment Company

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HP Fairfield LLC Little Falls Machine Inc Monroe Truck Equipment Inc Reed Systems Ltd Toro Company Trackless Vehicles Ltd Truck Country Waltman Construction Wausau Equipment Company Inc Winter Maintenance, Salt Cargill Deicing Technology Compass Minerals America Inc Industrial Systems Ltd Occidental Chemical Corporation Ossian Inc Salt Institute Sturgis Materials Inc Winter Maintenance, Salt Inhibitors Industrial Systems Ltd Ossian Inc Salt Institute Winter Maintenance, Salt Storage ClearSpan Fabric Structures Dome Corporation of North America Gateway Industrial Products Inc GVM Snow Equipment Salt Institute Winter Maintenance, Snow Wings FallLine Corporation Little Falls Machine Inc Monroe Truck Equipment Inc Wausau Equipment Company Inc Winter Maintenance, Spreaders Air-Flo Manufacturing Inc Bell Equipment Company Bergkamp Inc Carolina Industrial Equipment Inc Casper’s Truck Equipment Certified Power Inc FallLine Corporation Flink Co FORCE America Inc Gabrielli Truck Sales GVM Snow Equipment Highway Equipment Company Little Falls Machine Inc Monroe Truck Equipment Inc Montage Enterprises Ossian Inc Parker Farm Service Reed Systems Ltd Stringfellow Inc Swenson Products Inc Timmerman Equipment Company Trackless Vehicles Ltd Winter Maintenance, Tire Chains GVM Snow Equipment Winter Maintenance, Weather Information Services Murray & Trettel Inc

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ASK ANN...

Q

“I think I saw something in this column a while back about getting high-speed Internet to rural communities but I think it was for a specific issue. We are out in the middle of nowhere and really need to get this service to our residents. Is there any way to make the big companies install it for us?”

A

I hear this question from folks all over the U.S. They tell me they are losing out on educational opportunities because they can’t

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hire a teacher to teach an advanced placement course so your students miss out. If broadband was available, the district could link up with adjoining districts so students could take part remotely in the course. Doctors are confronted with unusual medical cases and may not have to send patients “hundreds of miles” to tertiary-care hospitals if the doctors were equipped with broadband. They can consult with an expert online and the patient could even be examined online. In some areas, conventional broadband providers find it hard to make a business case for extending access to sparsely populated areas. And in other areas, there’s little or no competition, and even if people there have access to broadband, it’s priced so high they can’t afford it. The U.S. Agriculture Chief, Tom Vilsack, recently shared information about his department’s Community Connect program which makes grants for broadband and will soon reopen its loan program, which provides financing for broadband in unserved or underserved areas. Community Connect is targeted specifically for small rural communities. The grants can range from $200,000 to $1 million, depending on the scope of the project. The department is still in the process of writing rules and regulations for how the new money should be distributed to unserved and underserved areas. If your community is interested in expanding broadband access, you should seek technical assistance from BroadbandUSA, a program of the U.S.


Department of Commerce. Contact the USDA’s Rural Development office and ask for information on Community Connect. The link is: www.rd.usda. gov/programs-services/communityconnect-grants.

Q

“Enough is enough already! We have gotten 60 inches of snow this year and the winter isn’t even over yet. We are running out of places to put it. We’ve filled all our vacant lots. A suggestion has been made that we push or dump it in the nearby river. What’s going to happen to us if we do this?”

A

It has indeed been a record year for snow in the Northeast and I can only imagine the frustration at not having any place to move it. Dumping it in rivers or the ocean might seem like a good alternative when everything else is full. Normally, dumping plowed snow into waterways is considered a bad idea. Snow that’s been on roads and highways is filthy. It’s mixed with chemical-laced road salt, motor oil, dog poop, trash and who knows what else. Not only that but some of the snow could potentially freeze in chunks and threaten boat traffic or create hazard pushing against bridge pilings. So far, the Environmental Protection Agency is not regulating the dumping of snow into rivers or oceans. I hope they don’t get into that business! Some states have their own laws that forbid coastal towns from doing so unless the snow threatens public safety and they get an emergency waiver. This requirement is not surprising since many of our rivers and harbors have been polluted and overrun by sewage for many decades, and states have been forced to spend billions of dollars cleaning them up. My sources tell me more cities are utilizing “snow farms” further inland so that the soil can filter out contaminants as it melts and runs toward the sea or river. During storms,

cities like Boston and New York will also ship some of their snow to melters, which send the water to treatment plants to remove contaminants. We all realize that emergency situations can cause us to override these concerns. When cities accumulate an insane amount of snow, it can become dangerous. The snow piled up alongside roadways can get so high that drivers can’t see. Pedestrians stop using sidewalks and start stumbling down streets. My best advice would be to contact your state department of natural resources/environmental quality to see what they will allow. By now, you have probably already resolved the issue but it’s never too late to plan for the next “snowmageddon” because it always manages to come!

Q

“We are seeing many technologies added to the vehicles we purchase for our fleet every year. While we only dreamed of having backup cameras previously, it is now cheaper to buy a vehicle with that package than it is to install it after the purchase. What impact will these various new technologies have on how we purchase and operate our fleets?”

A

I understand there are “voice alert systems” that can be added to buses that provide an audible warning signal that will broadcast a heads-up message to anyone who might be in the bus’s path. Similar “talking bus” systems, using externally mounted speakers, have been tested in Portland, Ore., Baltimore and Washington, DC. In Cleveland, transit officials say that the use of the alerts—which in that city consist of a female voice warning that the bus is turning—have contributed to a reduction of bus-pedestrian fatalities to zero since they were installed on 400 vehicles in 2009. The cost for the Cleveland program, the most comprehensive in the nation so far, was www.apwa.net

$600,000 paid from federal stimulus funds. The program is not without opponents. Reaction to the advent of talking buses was met with skepticism by advocates in Washington, believing “talking buses bully pedestrians into accepting responsibility for an incident that might occur” and call the move “safety theater.” Rob Pitingolo at Greater Greater Washington (a group organized to promote informed and civically engaged communities to support a growing and inclusive region and speak up for livable communities and quality education) says, “After all, if someone is unfortunately struck, shouldn’t they have seen it coming? It is logic designed to distract attention away from the incident itself, and prematurely assign responsibility.” Noise pollution is also another concern in a crowded city. Opponents here believe that “degrading the public realm with unnecessary noise doesn’t make anything safer.” With all the varying levels of noise that already surround a busy intersection in, say, New York, one more noise might be more irritating than effective. People may likely be able to subconsciously block out the noise the same way they block out the other auditory offenses in the city—jackhammers, elevated trains, honking, revving engines and the like. And, after all, half of the pedestrians in any city are walking around wearing headphones as it is! We’ll watch for results.

Ask Ann... Please address all inquiries to: Ann Daniels Director of Accreditation APWA, 2345 Grand Blvd., Suite 700 Kansas City, MO 64108-2625 Fax questions to: (816) 472-1610 E-mail: adaniels@apwa.net

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GET CERTIFIED IN 2015!

APWA is proud to announce that the Certified Public Fleet Professional (CPFP) eligibility requirements have been updated for 2015 and now allow individuals with private fleet experience a chance to earn their certification!

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Your Time. Get Certified. For more information visit: apwa.net/certification


MARKETPLACE Products in the News

Tippmann Post Driving Equipment introduces side mount adapter for driving u-channel posts The Tippmann Side Mount Adapter fastens quickly to all u-channel posts ranging in size from 2 lb. per foot all the way up to a 4 lb. per foot post. Whether you are driving an 8 ft. post or a 14 ft. post, this adapter will allow you to drive from a height you are comfortable with and your feet on the ground. This adapter is equipped with 11 sturdy attachment pins, which fit all major manufacturer u-channel hole patterns. The side mount adapter is then held in place by a long retaining pin and clevis. Learn more about this adapter as well as view online video demonstrations by visiting propanehammer.com. Or call toll free for a free brochure: (866) 286-8046.

ClearSpan™ is the industry leader for sand and salt storage ClearSpan™ Fabric Structures, the preferred choice for sand and salt storage, provides design-build and energy-efficient solutions for material, equipment and other storage needs. Just recently, the Township of Wayne Department of Public Works in Wayne, N.J., installed a 65’ wide by 100’ long ClearSpan Hercules Truss Arch building for their salt supply. The ClearSpan buildings feature abundant natural light and spacious interiors without support posts. With minimal foundation requirements, the structures can be permanent or temporary, and are easy to relocate. Made in the USA, they can be built to any length and up to 300’ wide. According

to George Holzapfel, Wayne’s public works director, “[The building] is well received. Material stored is safe from the elements and access for trucks and equipment is excellent.” For more information, call 1-866-643-1010 or visit www. clearspan.com/ADAPWA.

TAGSTER™ – Easy and Safe Graffiti Removal! TAGSTER™ Graffiti Remover is the safe, biodegradable, non-toxic, noncaustic, and nonflammable way for public works departments to eliminate graffiti and tagging problems. Whether you are trying to remove a declaration of love or gang symbols, TAGSTER unique gelled solution will allow you to wipe it away easily and safely. Removes graffiti from metal, concrete, wood, rock, plastic, restroom privacy panels or virtually any surface! For more information, call RHOMAR Industries, Inc., at (800) 688-6221.

Sustainable waste-to-energy facility approved for construction in Tennessee PHG Energy (PHGE) and the City of Lebanon, Tennessee, have signed a contract that will provide an environmentally sustainable method of waste disposal and produce green power in the process. The waste-to-energy technology, which will go online early next year, is a downdraft gasification plant that will cleanly convert up to 64 tons per day of blended waste wood, scrap tires and sewer sludge into a fuel gas that will generate up to 300Kw of electricity. The generation of this www.apwa.net

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power will provide for the plant’s internal power needs as well as contribute electricity to the wastewater treatment plant where it will be located. The plant is projected to keep more than 8,000 tons of material out of landfills each year— the equivalent of a line of trucks over four miles long. For more information regarding PHG Energy, please visit www. phgenergy.com or contact Nancy Cooper at (615) 471-9093.

Bergkamp’s new MA30 applies Mastic Surface Treatment to preserve asphalt pavement Bergkamp Inc., based in Salina, Kansas, offers the MA30 Frictional Mastic Surface Treatment Applicator that allows contractors and government agencies to apply Frictional Mastic Surface Treatment over highways, roads, parking lots and airport runways to protect the surface and extend the life of the pavement. It applies a material mix that is made to precise specification, which results in fewer operator calculations and on-the-job adjustments, minimizing operator training time. The full-length ribbon mixer works to maintain the proper material consistency, regardless of the truck engine speed during transport to the job site. The Frictional Mastic Surface Treatment is then applied over the existing pavement through a patent-pending, variable-width, lowpressure spray bar that has side-shift capabilities. For more information, contact Bergkamp at (785) 825-1375 or visit www.bergkampinc.com.

Solar pumps for closed and remote landfills help keep municipal, local sites in compliance Blackhawk Technology’s Apollo Solar Piston Pump™ is a popular choice for groundwater remediation at aging, closed landfills and at remote sites not served by electric or pneumatic power. Rugged, reliable and cost-effective, Apollo solar pumps are employed across the 96

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country at inactive sites experiencing potential ecological and regulatory issues, and to dewater gas wells for agencies wishing to increase methane flows. The above-ground driver is simple to install, and downhole components are the industry standard. Dependable Apollo solar pumps operate in latitudes as northerly as Toronto. See case studies at www. blackhawkco.com. Contact Mark Bertane, mbertane@ blackhawkco.com, 800-469-4887.

Ending the lift station waste Steel Toe Group now has the system that Europe uses to end the need to remove wastewater pumps when clogged with wipes, etc. The DIP System® provides the innovation and sustainability called for by every agency involved. It ends the odors, corrosion, raw sewage retention, trash removal, need for bar screens and rakes or baskets, and wet well cleaning that plagues neighborhoods and wastewater management. Your renovated wet well now becomes a clean, dry lift station that you manage remotely with pumps that clean themselves. Stop wasting time, labor, and personnel. Call (800) 4750101 or get a FREE EBook by requesting here: http://bit. ly/1JLYElR.

Laserfiche: Simple, elegant enterprise content management Laserfiche Connector provides an easy, “no coding required” way to integrate Laserfiche enterprise content management (ECM) software with line of business applications such as GIS. Public works organizations use Laserfiche to store and manage a wide variety of digital documents such as permit job files, maps and drawings, right-of-way agreement files and standard operating procedures, among others. By integrating Laserfiche with


GIS, field maintenance crews gain instant access to the scanned permits and record drawings they need on the job from laptops, tablets or smartphones. For more information, call (562) 988-1688 or visit www.laserfiche.com.

Simulation-based driver training solutions from Virtual Driver Interactive, Inc. Virtual Driver Interactive, Inc. is the leading provider of simulationbased driver training solutions for commercial and education applications. Virtual HD® is the industry’s first voice-controlled, interactive, simulation-based driver safety program designed for corporate fleets to improve hazard recognition skills and reduce crash risk. Industry-leading utility organizations including PSE&G, National Grid, Enmax, Minnesota Power, and Ameren are improving driver safety with Virtual HD. For more information, visit our website at www.driverinteractive.com or contact us at 877746-8332 or vdiwebinquiry@driverinteractive.com.

Wiser Riser™ – A ‘hole’ new technology in manhole cover risers The award-winning makers of PLATE LOCKS, a reusable road plate securing system sold around the world, have created Wiser Riser™, yet another unique product to answer a need within the roadwork community. Wiser Riser is the only manhole cover on the market made of strong, durable polypropylene that includes Plate Locks Roadway Safety Products’ exclusive wedge shaped spacers that bring the manhole cover level to street grade, even on an uneven road surface. Other brands are made of vulcanized rubber, which crumble, warp and degrade, and no other brand offers our patent-pending wedge spacers. For more information on this innovative new product, visit our website at www.wiserriser.com, call/text (541) 821-3622, or e-mail Chris Lane at chris@platelocks.com.

Emergency Utility Marking Kit Act quickly to secure downed areas when a storm hits. Featuring critical safety and warning supplies, the Emergency Utility Marking Kit will help you warn others of a potential electrical utility hazard. Kit includes tags, labels and markers conveniently stored in a durable camouflage duffle bag. Ideal as part of an Emergency Response and Pre-storm Preparedness program. Kit includes: Traffic Cone Sleeve (1), Utility Pole Wraps (2), Hard Hat Emergency Labels (10), Utility Cable ID Tags (25), Lock-Out Tags (5), “Danger” Marking Flags (50), Red “Danger” Tape (2 x 300-ft rolls), and one durable Camo Duffel Bag. The Emergency Utility Marking Kit is available for immediate purchase on shop. fricknet.com or contact William Frick & Company at marketing@fricknet.com.

Heavy-duty granulators SMS Series granulators from Herbold have been redesigned to cope with the most demanding heavyduty size reduction applications in a single step. These machines are manufactured with rotor widths ranging from 23½” to 78¾” and with drive capacities between 60 and 420 HP. The knife design is segmental, thus ensuring a quick and easy exchange of the cutting tools. Typical applications for these heavy duty granulators include heavy, thick-walled semi-finished products in PE, PP, POM and PA, pipes with high wall thicknesses and large purgings. They are also well suited for difficult-togrind materials such as aramid fibers (commonly used for manufacturing bullet-proof vests), carbon fibers and composite materials. For more information, call (401) 5975500 or visit www.herboldusa.com. www.apwa.net

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John Bosman, AIA, ALA, LEED AP (847) 395-6800 Public Works Construction Management Specialists

1.866.643.1010 ClearSpan.com/ADAPWA

Energy • Facilities • Federal Transportation • Water

Made in the USA.

ClearSpan is your preferred

solution for Salt Storage and more

800.489.6689 | www.kleinfelder.com

                                                                                                                         

888-206-2569 WWW.BESTGASMONITORS.COM

FREE SHIPPING

IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S.

SAFER STREETS for WINTER TRAVEL

CULVERT REHAB Dig and replace has been replaced.

• Brine Manufacturing Systems • Direct Application Systems • Overhead Spray Systems • Prewetting Systems • Pump Transfer Stations 800-458-5123

Easier. Faster. Safer.

1-800-CULVERT www.culvert-rehab.com

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MYTH: All fabric buildings are alike The Legacy Advantage: Tension Fabric | Rigid Steel Frames Design-Build | EPC | Full Construction Rapid Installation | Corrosion Resistant

legacy@legacybuildingsolutions.com 320-258-0500 | LegacyBuildingSolutions.com

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WORLD OF PUBLIC WORKS CALENDAR UPCOMING APWA EVENTS

National Public Works Week: May 17-23, 2015

International Public Works Congress & Exposition 2015 2016

Aug. 30-Sept. 2 Aug. 28-31

Phoenix, AZ Mineapolis, MN

For more information, contact Dana Priddy at (800) 848-APWA or send e-mail to dpriddy@apwa.net.

APRIL 2015

Always the third full week in May. For more information, contact Jon Dilley at (800) 848-APWA or send e-mail to jdilley@apwa.net. North American Snow Conference 2015 April 12-15 Grand Rapids, MI For more information, contact Brenda Shaver at (800) 848APWA or send e-mail to bshaver@apwa.net. 18-22 American Planning Association National Planning Conference, Seattle, WA, www.planning.org

7-8 Innovations Conference on Asphalt & Technology, Peoria, IL, http://icat.bradley.edu 12-15 APWA North American Snow Conference, Grand Rapids, MI, (800) 848-APWA, www.apwa.net 12-16 National Outdoor Recreation Annual Conference, Annapolis, MD, www.recpro.org

INDEX OF ADVERTISERS

19-23 National Association of County Engineers Annual Conference, Daytona Beach, FL, www. countyengineers.org 29-5/1 Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference, Tampa, FL, www.swana.org

When you contact an advertiser regarding a product, please tell them you saw their ad in the APWA Reporter. Thanks! – The Editor Legend: IFC = Inside Front Cover; IBC = Inside Back Cover; BC = Back Cover

Best Management Products, p. 35 www.bmpinc.com

J.A. Larue, p. 41 www.jalarue.com

Transpo Industries, Inc., p. 99 www.transpo.com/BondadeOffer.html

Blackhawk Technology Company, p. 15 www.blackhawkco.com

Kleinfelder, p. 99 www.kleinfelder.com

TYMCO International LTD, p. 63 www.tymco.com

Bonnell Industries, p. 9 www.bonnell.com

KM International, p. 19 www.kminternational.com

Vaisala Inc., p. 45 www.vaisala.com

Cargill Deicing, p. 3 www.cargilldeicing.com

Legacy Building Solutions, p. 99 www.legacybuildingsolutions.com

Walz Scale, p. 92 www.walzscale.com

Certified Power, p. 61 www.certifiedpower.com

McClellan Sales Inc., p. 99 www.mcsales.com

ClearSpan Fabric Structures, pp. 43, 99 www.ClearSpan.com/ADAPWA

Muncie Power Products, p. IBC www.munciepower.com

Construction Accessories, Inc., pp. 21, 100 www.jackjaw.com

National Joint Powers Alliance, p. IFC www.njpacoop.org Plastics Pipe Institute, p. 64 www.plasticpipe.org

CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation, p. 53 www.ctscement.com

Precision Concrete Cutting, p. 99 www.SafeSidewalks.com

DOGIPOT, p. 47 www.DOGIPOT.com

SnapTite, p. 99 www.culvertrehab.com

Henderson Manufacturing, p. 59 www.hendersonproducts.com

Spin Screed, p. 17 www.spinscreed.com

Henke Manufacturing Corp., p. 11 www.henkemfg.com

Tippmann Industrial Products, p. BC www.PropaneHammer.com

Highway Equipment Company, p. 39 www.highwayequipment.com APWA Reporter

• Fast, easy, safe sign post pulling • Lightweight, powerful all steel construction • Increase efficiency & reduce costs • Pulls U channel, square & round posts

RHOMAR Industries, Inc., p. 37 www.rhomar.com

GVM Snow Equipment, pp. 5, 99 www.gvminc.com

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Trackless Vehicles LTD, p. 55 www.tracklessvehicles.com

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Construction Accessories, Inc. 937.429.9089 • Sales@JackJaw.com www.jackjaw.com Dealer Inquiries Welcome

www.apwa.net CA Public Works 2.125x3 Ad_F.indd 1

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The April 2015 issue of the APWA Reporter, the official magazine of the American Public Works Association

201504 reporteronline  

The April 2015 issue of the APWA Reporter, the official magazine of the American Public Works Association