APUS 50 years celebration

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Table of Contents Land Acknowledgement

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Letter from the Executive

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Introduction

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Can we make waves?

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Year of Firsts

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A Lobbying Force

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Letters to Joyce Denyer

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What have you done for us lately APUS?

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Education is a Right

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Coming to Voice Anthology

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La beautĂŠ est dans la rue

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Stories of Resistance

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Our Road to North Borden

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LAND ACKNOWLEGEMENT


We would like to acknowledge this sacred land on which the University of Toronto operates. It has been a site of human activity for 15,000 years. This land is the territory of the Huron-Wendat and Petun First Nations, the Seneca, and most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit River. The territory was the subject of the Dish with One Spoon Wampum Belt Covenant, an agreement between the Iroquois Confederacy and Confederacy of the Ojibwe and allied nations to peaceably share and care for the resources around the Great Lakes. Today, the meeting place of Toronto is still the home to many Indigenous people from across Turtle Island and we are grateful to have the opportunity to work in the community, on this territory. Revised by the Elders Circle (Council of Aboriginal Initiatives) on November 6, 2014.

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For over fifty years, part-time students have enrolled in, commuted to, studied at and ultimately graduated from the University of Toronto. The Association of Part-Time Undergraduate Students (APUS) was founded in November 1968 to serve these dedicated and tenacious students. As we dove into the APUS archives to begin preparing for our 50th anniversary, we found students’ dreams, frustrations and successes suspended in time in Assembly and Board minutes, APUS annual reports, newsletters, University committee reports and past publications, anthologies, and posters. Back issues of our official newsletter The Voice are filled with jokes, cartoons, editorials, academic advice, warnings of deadlines, notices of free coffee, poems and hand-drawn embellishments, photos of awards ceremonies, barbeques, receptions and socializing. These archives show the serious tension present in the daily lives of part-time students through the mid-twentieth to early twenty-first century in a context of growing national student activism. Part-time students balanced home, work and school responsibilities while making significant and long-lasting contributions to the University of Toronto community.


LETTER FROM THE EXECUTIVE

We can list APUS’ many accomplishments achieved by these part-time student lobbyists. By 1974, APUS transformed then extension students into full members of the student body and successfully lobbied for the establishment of Woodsworth College, which would serve the needs of part-time students. APUS members spent endless hours lobbying campus, provincial and federal administrators on various issues, especially to secure governmental and university-funded bursaries for part-time students. Perhaps most meaningful have been the day-to-day services offered at our offices: countless pages photocopied, cups of coffee and tea given out, questions answered and bureaucratic problems solved. Volunteers, staff and Executives mailed out an annual Handbook to over 15,000 students, and equally mailed out course evaluations twice a year until the Faculty of Arts and Science took over the job in more recent years. APUS published a popular Student Summer Survival guide for over a decade, awarded APUS bursaries and scholarships to part-time students, and established an affordable health and dental plan for members. Then there is APUS as an outlet for creative expression, community-building, and supporting marginalized students across all three campuses. Our archives show reports from committees on childcare, sexual harassment policies, and student space; organizing with disabled students, Black students, LGBTQ2S students, mature students, and student-parents; workshops on free education, open mic nights, community barbeques. In this 50th anniversary magazine, we present a collection of memories from the APUS archives that convey the commitment and passion in the history of part-time student activism. APUS Executive Commitee, 2018

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“[There is] more to part-time studies than just scheduling courses at night.� - Minutes of the Fall APUS Assembly October 15, 1972.



From its beginnings in November 1968, APUS has successfully advocated for part-time students’ rights. In the 1970s, APUS activities included advocating for representation on University committees, equal access to library resources, health services and financial aid, meeting with the Ontario government, publishing the first Voice newsletters, and administering course evaluations.

Excerpt from the Campbell Implemetation Committee by Kurt Loeb, September 13, 1970

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YEAR OF FIRSTS: 1970

r

e ng th

hi Publis

Comm

te wslet e N e Voic

unica tion w ith Ne w Stu dents


An I ndep ende

nt A s

soci

ation

s

am Progr n o i t a nt n Orie w o r Ou

Excerpt from the Final Report for the year 1969-1970 by President Joyce Denyer, October 17, 1970

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A LOBBYING FORCE


nce Student Experie n o e rc Fo sk Ta Report of the

the newspap er

Excerpt from Annual Report 1983-1984 March 26, 1984.

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Letters to our Founder, Joyce Denyer, 1970


“SO WHA

Excerpt from Handbook for U of T Part-time Undergraduates by APUS, Article by Kurt Loeb, 1970-71.


AT HAVE YOU DONE FOR US LATELY APUS?”

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In February 2000, APUS partnered with student groups, faculty, labour unions and community members to call for free post-secondary education at the University of Toronto.


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Remarks from Chris Ramsaroop, APUS Anthology Project, 2003.


Part-Time Students Coming to Voice: APUS Anthology Project 2003

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UniversitĂŠ populaire


La beautĂŠ est dans la rue

In recent years we were inspired by our roots: the student movement and student activism of the 1960s.

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STORIES OF RESISTANCE

In our 50th year, APUS continues to defend the rights of part-time and marginalized students on all three campuses at the University of Toronto and in our many communities.


Background Image: Landmines Exploding-2015 by Najia Fatima

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5oth Anniversary Magazine - Septmber 2018 Association of Part-Time Undergraduate Students Editorial Team Najia Fatima Caitlin Campisi Jennifer Coggon Katerini Hatziantonis APUS Executive Committee 2018-2019 Jennifer Coggon Mala Kashyap Susan Froom Jaime Kearns Richie Pyne

APUS would like to thank our members, past and present, for making it possible to reach our 50th anniversary. Thanks to the dedication, determination and passion of our members, staff and volunteers over the past fifty years, we continue to have the privilege to advocate for the rights of part-time students. We would also like to thank Omazzi printing for their support and outstanding service. ŠAPUS ŠAll contributors https://apus.ca/ Printed at Omazzi Printing Toronto- www.omazzii.ca/ No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission or the copyright of the holder(s).