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REAL-TIME CITY The city as an ambient interface

Achilleas Psyllidis | Bas Kalmeyer 1


Actualities Workshop AR01TWF020 | AR0155

REAL-TIME CITY Spring semester 2013 19.04 - 26.04.2013

Tutors: Achilleas Psyllidis A.Psyllidis@tudelft.nl achilleas@thewhyfactory.com Bas Kalmeyer bas@thewhyfactory.com

Workshop Overview Syllabus & Projects

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3


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Table of Contents 1. The Syllabus 7

1.1 Introduction 9 1.2 The sites 10 1.3 The method + workshop structure 12 1.4 Deliverables 15 1.5 Brief workshop schedule 16 1.6 Matrix of Sensors 18 1.7 List of Questions 20 1.8 Timetable 22 The Blog 24

2. The Projects

9 real-time urban systems for the city of Rotterdam

27

The Interactive Map 28 Group 01: PLAYplein 31 Group 02: Planteractive 75 Group 03: Runnerdam 97 Group 04: LOCOmotion 139 Group 05: Urban SoundClouds 161 Group 06: FilterBubble 209 Group 07: Real-Time Motion Loop

251

Group 08: COOLspot 277 Group 09: SRL - Stress Relief Lane

309

Appendix #1 343 References

Appendix #2 347 Workshop Photos

Credits 358

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6


1

The Syllabus

7


Studio Roosegaarde, “Smart Highway - Dynamic Paint” (2012) 8


1.1 Introduction Cities are manifestations of multi-relational networks, which perpetually become far more complex as we experience a shift from an industrial economy to one driven by the forces of (digital) information and services. Two of the most critical phenomena that drive the proliferating complexity of the contemporary urbanities can, on the one hand be identified in the rapid global urbanization processes and on the other, in the perpetual pervasiveness of information technologies within the urban environments. This consecutive ubiquity of urban systems and networks utilizing digital technologies for their operation, generates enormous amounts of digital traces that reflect in real-time how people make use of space and infrastructures in the city. Industry-driven societies have, instead, been characterized by a plethora of visible activity patterns in the physical spaces of the city, reflecting the production streams (e.g. protruding factory chimneys in an endless production of smoke). But, as ambient technologies gratingly diffuse within the urban environments the “by-products” of human activity, in turn, become less and less traceable. These digital, invisible traces, which represent what Neil Leach has characterized as the contemporary city’s “pulse”, figuratively appear as an additional, intangible layer hovering above the urban fabric. Thus, contrary to the prevailing theories and predictions of the 90s that the physicality of the city will be diminished by the virtual domain, contemporary urban configurations are proliferating globally, while incorporating media technologies in a dynamic, hybrid state between the physical and the digital. In other words, they increasingly represent emergent inter-relations between people, activities, context and technologies. Yet, how can the perception of ICT media and the derivative ambient data as superimposed layers over the existing city drastically affect the urban layout? Does this overlaid ontology render digital information capable of shaping the urban space in the same way that built components do? Or does it presuppose the primary role of the built environment in constituting our everyday experiences in the city? Can digital information equally co-constitute these experiences? Embedded within such a dynamic context, the workshop aims at developing interactive urban systems, plugged in existing open public spaces, in the form of ambient interfaces. These systems are intended to serve as interactive platforms for both citizens and municipal planning authorities, that apart from harnessing and visualizing real-time diverse quantifiable data, derived from everyday urban activities, they would also be able to provide feedback-loop processes to, ultimately, influence the physical and behavioral patterns of the city. The workshop will focus on real-time systems that are perceived as integral parts of the urban environment and less on the development of specialized application or website platforms, which are conceptually as well as physically separated from the actual environment from which the data originate, thereby turning the urban experience into a virtual one. Further, the challenge for the systems proposed will be to create a relational model of the different parameters each platform is concerned with, so that the impact on the urban fabric will not only respond to individual parameters, but would rather refer to the repercussions resulting from a relation that can be established between different elements and attributes of the city (e.g. between people and traffic levels, between people and environmental conditions etc). 9


1.2 The sites The workshop utilizes as case area the city of Rotterdam. Different public spaces, equal to the amount of student groups formed, will operate as test-beds for the development of case-specific interactive urban systems. Two distinguishing aspects characterize Rotterdam as a challenging case study. Firstly, its multicultural diversity inasmuch as people from 173, mostly non-Western, different nationalities constitute half of the city’s inhabitants (in 2011, according to the Dutch Center for Research and Statistics) and, secondly, its ground-up reconstruction and re-habitation after the sheer devastation during World War II. Such a multifaceted context – which is also very willing to change – can establish an influential field to attain a trans-scalar understanding of the relational networks between people and space, utilizing the proposed urban platforms.

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1.3 The method + workshop structure Students will familiarize themselves with relevant examples and already conducted research for reference and inspiration. Therefore, content-related reading and reference material will be provided, prior to the beginning of the workshop. Following the kick-off presentation (Friday, April 19th), a brainstorming session will take place, which will last no longer than three hours. At the end of this particular session, student groups – according to the assigned focus sites – will present briefly their first ideas and reflections on how they perceive an interactive urban system, its functionality and the way in which the system can potentially be embedded in the urban fabric. During the intermediary weekend, students have the opportunity to visit their assigned sites, so that they can collect relevant data material useful for the workshop process and have the opportunity for reality-testing of their draft concepts on-site. By utilizing their first ideas and on-site observations, students will directly begin to clarify their urban system concepts in further detail. Mid-term review will take place on Tuesday, April 23rd with invited experts. In the presentation, participants are expected to deploy a concrete methodological framework regarding each proposed ambient system. Further, they should be able to describe their following intentions towards the finalization of the project. Remarks and feedback acquired during the mid-term presentation will be further implemented in the development and final determination of each group’s proposal. Since we are aiming at examining how local changes can have a global impact on the wider-city level, on Thursday, April 25th we will also focus on potential ways in which the diverse proposal can be inter-connected in a relational, networked model that can result in larger-scale repercussions. Friday, April 26th late afternoon, the Final Review will take place, where all student groups will present their proposals to their fellow peers and invited guests.

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Studio Roosegaarde, “Smart Highway - Interactive Light” (2012) 13


Achilleas Psyllidis - Collision studies of agents in urban networks; scripted in Processing (2012) 14


1.4 Deliverables The material participants will be required to provide during the workshop will briefly include: 1. What if…? Short description of the concept in regard to each urban system, which includes at least two quantifiable components/aspects (sensors) within an interlocking perspective. 2. How to harness data/What to measure? Axonometric views showing the nature of data measured, adjusted to each specific focus area. What kind of sensors will be implemented? How will the system be distributed in the urban fabric? 3. Functionality / How does it work? Series of diagrams (up to 5) explaining the methodological framework of each proposed system. These diagrams will then be animated in a .gif format. 4. How does it look like? Visual representations (street-view photoshop images) showing how the system will be embedded within the urban environment of each focus site. 5. Towards a relational model Each group will prepare a more advanced animated representation that apart from the system’s functionality will also reflect the group’s perspective on how people can be effectively engaged with the system. Ultimately, all individual proposals will be aggregated into a larger networked model that will reflect the potential repercussions that the inter-connected local systems can have on the global scale of the city. The end-results will be directly related to the “what if…?” section, as a form of concept proof.

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1.5 Brief Workshop Schedule April 19th – April 26th 2013

Friday, April 19th: Kick-off presentation Distribution into groups and site assignment Brainstorming session First concepts & reflections on the objective Sat + Sun, April 20th – 21st :

Site visit

Monday, April 22nd: Methodological framework development Design proposal clarification Tuesday, April 23rd: Mid-term Review Guest experts: Mark Shepard (University of Buffalo NY) Martijn de Waal (TheMobileCity.nl, Uni. of Amst.) Nimish Biloria (TU Delft, Hyperbody) Wednesday, April 24th:

Proposals development

Thursday, April 25th: Proposals development Relational model of proposals Friday, April 26th: FINAL REVIEW Invited guests: Maarten Piek (Ministry of Infrastructure &Milieu) Willemieke Hornis (Ministry of I&M) Nimish Biloria (TU Delft, Hyperbody)

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Studio Roosegaarde, “Smart Highway - Induction Priority Lane” (2012) 17


1.6 Matrix of sensors

AIR QUALITY

ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS

Accelerometer Air flow meter CO2 sensor

+ +

Hygrometer Infrared point sensor

+

Infrared thermometer NOx sensor Oxygen sensor

+ +

+ +

Position sensor Pressure sensor Proximity sensor RFID Speed sensor Thermal sensor Touch sensor Touch screen

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+


OCCUPANCY LEVELS

TRAFFIC LEVELS

INTERFACING

+

+ + + + + +

+ + + + +

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1.7 List of Questions

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21


1.8 Timetable FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

19.04

20.04

21.04

12:30 - 13:30

17:00 -

Lu 13:30 - 14:30 [Zaal P] KICK-OFF PRESENTATION 14:30 - 17:00 BRAINSTORMING SESSION

SITE VISIT Groups visit their assigned sites and collect data

17:00 - 18:00 [Zaal P] First Concepts and Reflections on the objectives

* Mid-term Review visiting critics: _Mark Shepard (Assist. Prof. at the University of Buffalo NY) via skype meeting _Martijn de Waal (Writer, Researcher, Strategist, Founder of TheMobileCity.nl weblog) _Nimish Biloria (Assist. Prof. and Research Manager of Hyperbody, TU Delft)

22

22

[Zaal U] Developm Methodo Framewo

09:00 - 12:30

13:30 - 17:00

MON

Final Review visiting critics and Ministry of Infrastructure and Environment representatives: _Willemieke Hornis (Senior policy advisor, Ministry of Infrastructure and Environment) _Maarten Piek (Senior policy advisor, Ministry of Infrastructure and Environment) _Nimish Biloria (Assist. Prof. and Research Manager of Hyperbody, TU Delft)

[Zaal U] Design P Developm (Function diagrams system compone


NDAY

2.04

ment of ological ork

unch

Proposal ment nality s/

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

23.04

24.04

25.04

26.04

[Zaal U] Design Proposal Development

Lunch

[Zaal U] Design Proposal Development

ents etc.)

17:00 - 18:00 [Zaal U] MID-TERM REVIEW with invited experts*

[Zaal C] Integration of Mid-term remarks

Lunch

[Zaal U] Design Proposal Development (Axonometrics, Streetview Visualizations etc.)

[Zaal U] Design Proposal Development

Lunch

[Zaal U] Development of the Relational Model incorporating all proposed urban systems

[Zaal U] Finalization of Proposals

Lunch

15:00 - 18:00 [Zaal U] FINAL REVIEW with I&M Ministry Representatives and invited experts*

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The “Real-Time City” Blog (http://real-time-city.blogspot.nl) 24


25


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The Projects 9 real-time urban systems for the city of Rotterdam

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Interactive map of the projects, situated in the city of Rotterdam 28


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Schouwburgplein, one of the most important public squares in Rotterdam, after continuous interventions throughout the years, remains underused. People and relevant activities are situated around the square, rather than within it. Our main challenge is, thus, how to engage people in making more active use of the square itself, so that this integral urban space is re-vitalized. Can the new media technologies facilitate the conditions and provide new opportunities for a potential engagement of people with this highly important urban public space? What new activities could emerge? With regard to the aforementioned considerations, we proposed the transformation of the square into an interactive playground, organized in three different activity zones, by utilizing the already existing infrastructure (light cranes, ventilation boxes etc.). INTERFACE #1: THE INFO ZONE The first area is both reactive as well as interactive. Its goal is to provide real-time information about the activities around the square, the parking lot beneath it as well as any kind of newsfeed. It is active between 8am and 12pm. The Info Zone cannot be customized, though there are three possible options to actively interact with it. The first one is the screen mode, facilitated by a touch screen panel situated in the air boxes on the square. People are capable of obtaining specific information about the different activities around the square, such as the restaurant’s special day menus, movie times, etc. The interface also provides the opportunity to make a reservation for these different activities. A second option refers to the real-time info; important news related to the city, country or even worldwide is, subsequently, projected on the screen, in such a way that the zone functions as an analogue of living room TV. The last option deals with the real-time interaction, giving the possibility to actively interact with the surroundings by sending messages, which are then projected on the screen. This particular function is actuated when a large group of people is sensed in that area. The Info Zone provides a real time experience, which brings people together and attracts passers-by to the square. INTERFACE #2: THE GAME ZONE The second area of the project is the most interactive one. It aims to actively engage the users by providing a large variety of playgrounds. The interface has two different modes: the interactive field mode, on the one hand, where the users can dynamically decide what precisely is going to be projected on the square floor surface, in intervals of 5-10 minutes, and the reactive/passive field mode, on the other, which reacts to the case when nobody wants to use the playground, by providing respectively a sound game projected on the floor that aims at engaging the people who pass by. In addition, this particular zone provides numerous customization options, but the most important one can be identified in the multiplayer mode, where the field is divided in 4 different projections at the same time. In this case, the interface utilizes all the already existing infrastructural elements in the square and, more specifically, the 3 ventilation boxes (by embedding touch screens, proximity sensors and speakers), the 4 lamp cranes (used as projectors), the floor surface (with embedded pressure sensors and LEDs) and the screen on the cinema façade, to project what is happening in the ‘playfield’ in real time. The Game Zone will provide new insights in terms of the efficient and sustainable use of public (infrastructural) facilities as normal playgrounds or even sport centers and social clubs, while supporting innovative scenarios for city festivities. INTERFACE #3: THE GREY ZONE The third area is solely reactive. Its goal is to provide entertainment, fun and education for people either approaching the square or exiting the cinema and concert hall. This particular zone remains active between 7pm and 12am. The Grey Zone cannot be customized. However, there are three possible options for someone to experience. Firstly, the ‘gizmo’ that appears as a small icon following a single person passing through a square, inviting him/ her for further interaction. Secondly, the small visualization that appears when a group of people stands on the square. The last option and, simultaneously, the most spectacular one, combines visual 3d mapping on both the floor surface and the surrounding façades, together with audio effects. The latter option is actuated only when a large group of people occupies this particular area of the square. The projections last around 5 minutes. They can, also, be adjusted to the Pathé’s (cinema) or concert hall’s schedule. The Grey Zone provides an unusual and surprising experience that brings people together and attracts passers-by.

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GROUP 01

PLAYplein Laura Coma Fuste; Mariana Pazos Gonzalez; Barbara Jakubowska

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Schouwburgplein

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1a. Current situation Lack of activity WITHIN the square; activity only around the square due to cinema, bars and shops.

PEDESTRAIN/BIKE FLOW MOTOR/VEHICLE FLOW

EVENT AREA

PEOPLE 34


35


1b. Purpose To create an interactive and adaptive play ground environment through sensory and technological systems that enhance the real time city experience WITHIN the square

PEDESTRAIN/BIKE FLOW MOTOR/VEHICLE FLOW

EVENT AREA

PEOPLE 36


37


1c. Criteria

What to do?

38

For Whom?


1 When and how long?

3

2

What are the options?

39


1d. Generic Functional Diagram 1. INFO zone 24:00

8:00

2. GAME zone 22:00

17:00

3. GREY zone 24:00

19:00 40


m

3

2

1

41


2. How it works? SENSORS

Proximity sensor

To

Detects the presence of nearby objects without any physical contact.

Direc syste the in

ACTUATORS

Speakers Projects the sound of the activity

42


ouch screen

ct interaction with the em and environment via nterface

Touch sensor Detects pressure on a certain area caused by an object.

Projector

Facade leds

Projects activity-related visualizations

Integraded visual system in the facade projects like a pc screen 43


3a. The interface #1 INFO ZONE 24:00

8:00

Interaction with the surroundings by providing real-time information everyone passing by; car drivers and visitors from 8:00 till 24:00

1

44

3

2

passive real-time information and active interaction through real-life news, wifi and text message system


Option 1: screen mode i

i

i

i

i i

i

i

i

i

12:30 20째C

i

Option 2: real-time news i

i

i

i

i i

i

i

i

i

i

12:30 20째C Option 3: real-time interaction ou at y E E #S plein PLAY t, to h tonig te! # ra celeb

i

i

i

i

i i

i

i

i

i

i

12:30 20째C >>>> # from Laura #........sponsord by birdy.........>>>> 45


3a. Streetview “real-time news”

46


24:00

8:00

47


3b. The interface #2 GAME ZONE 22:00

17:00

Provide a large variety of playground facilities. Sense of community OPTION 1_GENERAL PLAYGROUND Everybody

Active interaction: 5-10 min (temporary) Passive interaction: Permanent

1

48

3

2

number: Group or single users music: record a song where: book a place animaton: project the acoustic graphic privacy: private headphones


OPTION 1_GENERAL PLAYGROUND

INTERFACE

OPTION 2_MULTIPLE PLAYGROUNDS speakers

touch screen

OPTIO

2. P

Pian

Purp

Provid Sense

Targ

Everyb

Dura

active passiv

passi Opti

INTERFACE speakers

REAL-TIME

- GROU - RECO

49


3b. Functional diagram of the g 2. PLAYGROUN

N 2_MULTIPLE PLAYGROUNDS

Piano Game Purpose:

Provide a large variety of playgroun Sense of community.

SENSORS

Target:

Everybody

Duration:

active interaction: 5-10min. TEMPO passive interaction: PERMANENT

Options:

PLAYGROUND

ROJECTOR

o Game

REAL-TIME VIDEO SCREEN

ose:

a large variety of playgrounf facilities. f community.

et:

ody

tion:

nteraction: 5-10min. TEMPORARY interaction: PERMANENT

ACTUATORS corridors active playground ons:

PS 50 _______SINGLE USER

pressure sensors

passive corridors

- GROUPS _______SINGLE USER - RECORD THE “SONG” - BOOK A PLACE -PROJECT THE ACOUSTIC GRAPHIC -PRIVATE HEADPHONES


game zone ND

22:00

17:00

nf facilities.

ORARY

51


3b. Streetview “the piano game”

52


22:00

17:00

53


3c. The interface #3 GREY ZONE 24:00

19:00

Just for fun, education, break activity, providing “food for thought� people approaching and/or coming out of the cinema/concert hall 5min projections

1

54

3

2

Gizmo Small visualisation Big visualisation + sound


Possible Options

Gizmo

Small Visualisation

Big Visualisation + Sound 55


3c. Functional diagram of the “g

3. SCREENSAVER The 3D Image

SENSORS

Purpose

Education Fun Attracting attention Giving “food for thought”

Target

People approaching cinema/concert hall

Duration 5mins

ACTUATORS

56


grey zone�

24:00

19:00

57


3c. Streetview “3D mapping”

58


VIDEO SCREEN

-PRO -PRI

24:00

19:00

passive corridors

active playground

passive corridors

pressure sensors

59


CT THE ACOUSTIC GRAPHIC E HEADPHONES

3c. Streetview “Gizmo animation”

60


24:00

19:00

61


4a. Short animation: empty square

62


63


4b. Short animation: activation

64


65


Gizmo / Small visualisation / Big + sound interaction 4c.visualisation Short animation:

66


67


4d. Short animation: actuation

68


69


4e. Short animation: engagement

70


71


5. Applicability

72


CONTEXT related Technique

i

GLOBAL scale Logic

i i i i i

73


The Planteractive proposal elaborates on how new media technologies could engage people in caring about the green elements within the urban environment. We developed an urban vegetation management system in the north of Rotterdam (Benthemplein/Waterplein), which is, on the one hand, managed by a centralized and fully automatic municipal system that collects sensors’ data and responds to them. At the same time, our system operates on an individual level as well, inviting citizens to participate and look after their city themselves. More precisely, Planteractive makes use of rainwater collected from roofs and ground surfaces nearby, in order to irrigate a green area on a reused railway track, as it also uses city’s organic waste to renew and fertilize the soil by turning it into compost. In addition, we elaborated on a social game, in which users can sign in via a dedicated internet-application and actively participate in the system. One of our goals was to motivate the inhabitants to feel more responsible for their green urban spaces by establishing a personal connection with their plants. The game includes a fun factor and, at the same time, it teaches citizens to care for the nature themselves in real life, thus potentially improving social relationships between the city’s inhabitants. By using a network of sensors the system is able to indicate what the plants need and alarm either the municipality or the citizens involved into this real-life game. Since it is hard to maintain elevated urban green spaces due to the quite thin layer of soil in addition to the high humidity loss, the system is capable of facilitating the care for such green spaces, by making use of free resources such as rainwater and organic waste. Overall, the Planteractive system enhances the quality of the urban environment and, at the same time, establishes stronger connections between the citizens, the municipal authorities and the environment they live in.

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GROUP 02

Planteractive Marlene Stepp; Mindaugas Sutavicius; Daan van Gool

75


76


Benthemplein

77


Overview

Loc Sun Temp Hum Soil m Fertiliz Tim

Sen Responses

Reac

Munic

Hum 78


cation nlight perature midity moisture zer level mer

nsors

ction

Moist Dry

Signals

Good

Hungry ft for Time le nce na mainte

Wet

Winy Maas Lvl 3 782pts

Overfed

6m 3d 4h 5

DryM

oist

Wet

HungryG

ood

Overfed

Time left for maintenance

3d 4h 56m

G

Public

Personal

cipality

man 79


Sensors Location Sunlight Temperature Humidity Soil moisture Fertilizer level Timer 80


Shade

Partial shade

-10˚C

15˚C

40˚C

Normal

Humid

Arid

DryM Hungry

Time left for maintenance

Sun

oist

Wet

Good

Overfed

3d 4h 56m 81


82


83


84


Water Cycle

85


86


Compost Cycle

87


The planter

Sensors

88


Plants

Wet Moist Dry Hungry ft for Time le ance mainten

Good

Signal

Overfed

6m 3d 4h 5

Winy Maas Lvl 3 782pts

Dry

Moist

Wet

Hungry

Good

Overfed

Time left for maintenance

3d 4h 56m

G

89


Implementation Public planter User signs up Personal planter

90


91


Game progress Make an account

Take care of needs

Gain points

Level up

Get rewards!

92


Daan van Gool 25 yr Student of Architecture

Water Food Maintenance ng!

+3pt!

teri a w d o Go

Lvl 3

33/50pts

Food!

Expert plants! Friends! 93


Goals of the game

“Social games require a good bu and long-term goals and an eng - Erica Swallow on social gaming, Short-term goals

+3pt

! Points - Daily points for healthy plants - For watering, feeding & maintenance - Babysit someone else’s plants - Sharing results on Facebook Information - Educational value - Weekly neighbourhood update

94


uild-up, a mixture of short-term gagement with the community� march 2013, Forbes Long-term goals Lvl 3

33/50pts

Levels - Unlock more complex plant species - Unlock more types (root crops / cover crops / herbaceous / shrubs / trees) - Unlock more alloted space Achievements - Bloom / harvest - Prizewinner - Completing a lifecycle - Completing an ecosystem

G

Comunity - Create a better environment - Meet likeminded people

Actual food! 95


As a general principle, our system aims to collect a certain amount of input from several sources. These indexed data will be analyzed to, further, permit the generation of a certain jogging route. The users of these particular routes will become the devices that, in turn, produce output information. One possible application could, for instance, involve tourists visiting the city or joggers, as more precisely developed in our proposal. The jogger can decide to experience an anonymous self-referring route either by using commercial applications or the RUNNERDAM device, which provides an algorithmically-generated route and shares useful information with the municipality and the city inhabitants. The jogger, whether experienced or amateur, reaches one of the hotspots distributed in the urban fabric, where he/she scans his/her credit card and, subsequently, borrows two guiding bangles, providing the opportunity to input several information and desires. The system will gather the indexed data, along with other relevant information and, ultimately, generate a certain route which can be adjusted while jogging. Meanwhile, several information about the route and the user desires will be shared (anonymously) with the municipality. The system comprises two devices: _the hotspot, gathering diverse kinds of information and data via a multiplicity of sensors. _the bangles: generating the (GPS-tracked) route and detecting physiological data. Finally, it is important to be mentioned that RUNNERDAM operates on two levels: firstly, it augments the personal jogging experience within the urban environment and, secondly, it harnesses information at a global urban scale to permit adaptable urban planning interventions.

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GROUP 03

Runnerdam Chiara Cirrone; Jonathan Lazar; Matthew Tanti

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98


Veerhaven

99


DATA INPUT

100


101


102


103


ROUTE GENERATION

104


105


OUTPUT TO INFORM 106


MATION DATABASE 107


TOURISTS’ ROUTING

108


109


TOURISTS’ ROUTING

110


111


TOURISTS’ ROUTING

112


113


JOGGER’S OPTIONS

114


115


116


117


118


119


INFORMATION INDEXING

120


121


ROUTE ADAPTATION

122


123


DATA SHARING

124


125


DEVICE #1: THE HOTSPOT

126


127


DEVICE #1: Data input & Sensors

128


129


DEVICE #2: THE BANGLES

130


131


DEVICE #2: Data input & Sensors

132


133


RUNNERDAM: Functional Levels

134


135


136


137


Our aim is to utilize people as energy sources and provide them the opportunity to experience this and its, subsequent, impact on the urban environment. The system we propose is situated in the central station of Rotterdam; a place utilized every day by more than 110.000 people. In general, two main kinds of users can be identified: firstly, people that are in a hurry, so that they manage to catch their train on time and, secondly, people that have spare time, either because they came too early or because they actually missed their train. We aim at operating with both kinds of users as energy suppliers. In our proposal, specialized tiles that generate energy when you step on them will be utilized (as the ones used in the dance club Watt, in Rotterdam). Out of these tiles, a linear track is generated, connecting the main entrance and the different train platforms. People in a hurry, run directly to the train and, by doing so, they produce electricity. On the other hand, people that have to wait can take advantage of their spare time by running on a circular track, situated in the entrance hall. All energy produced, is subsequently stored in a huge battery, located in the hall, with the battery status clearly indicated on its surface, so that everyone is aware of the amount of energy generated. This will, hopefully, motivate people to run (or dance) harder. The electricity stored in the battery is, subsequently, distributed throughout the city of Rotterdam to facilitate different functions, thus rendering the station users as active urban-infrastructure supporters, only by walking, running or simply waiting. Potential applications include lighting and electricity in the bus cabins, fountain springs support or more experimental examples, such as rotating a Ferris wheel. The intensity of these activities depends on the flow of people in the station.

138


GROUP 04

LOCOmotion Anna De Putti; Koen Schaballie; Rene Dekart Singgih

139


Rotterdam CS

140


141


1. Site analysis

142


143


LOCO-m

2. System

people as Energ morning

amount people

Flow of people:

LOCO-motion

Flow of people: 110.000 per day, people as 330.0000 byEnergy 2025 distributor morning

afternoon

amount people

time

People = Pote Mass Flow people =P 1) passing people 1) passing peop 2) waiting people

2) waiting peop

Flow of people: 110.000 each day

Locomo

Rotterdam

Mass people = Potential Kenetic Energy 1) passing people 2) waiting people 144

Energy stored


motion

gy distributor afternoon

time

: 110.000 each day

ential Kinetic Energy Potential Kenetic Energy

ple ple

otion

Energy used throughout the city

m CS

in Battery

145


3. Components

220V AC

INVERTER

ACCU

12V DC

146

SEF 1


Energy floor SEF 2

...

SEF 40

147


4. People as Energy-suppliers

People

148


149


5. Energy is distributed throughout

150


t the city

151


6. Implementation of Components

152


153


7. How much Energy is produced?

How much Energ

50 cm

50 cm

SEF

Power: 2-20 W

length [m] Front lane 70 Middle lane 170 Stair branch (14x) 6 Circle track 100 Dance floor 30 Total

Windmill

Nuclear Plant Borssele NL

154


gy is produced? # panels [-] 3.500 12.240 1.512 3.200 300

low densitiy power [kW] 11 37 5 0 0

high densitiy power [kW] 70 245 30 64 6

20.752

52

415

power [kW] 2.000

2.500.000

155


8. How can the Energy be used?

How the Energy

50 cm

50 cm

SEF

Power: 2-20 W

length [m] Front lane 70 Middle lane 170 Stair branch (14x) 6 Circle track 100 Dance floor 30 Total

LED Streetlight Orange (Na) Streetlight White (TL) Traffic Light Light bulb Big TV Huge projector Fountain pump (11m) 156


y can be used? # panels [-] 3.500 12.240 1.512 3.200 300

low densitiy power [kW] 11 37 5 0 0

high densitiy power [kW] 70 245 30 64 6

20.752

52

415

power [kW]

Ammount

0 0,001

414.040

0,01

41.504

0,02

20.752

0,07

5.929

0,10

4.150

0,20

1537

0,35

1186

1,00

415 157


158


159


Where is the surprise in the contemporary home-work-home daily routine? What is the value of a physical contact in contrast to a virtual contact? What makes our immediate surroundings enjoyable? These topics are explored through our project by using Music as a tool. It is widely accepted that music is important for people. It relates to human emotions (personal mood) and creates atmosphere in the public space (city mood). The idea is to analyze what people are listening to, draw conclusions about their emotional state (by harnessing music data) and examine possible consequences of this emotional map on the everyday life within the urban environment. Rotterdam, as a case-site, is particularly interesting because it was completely rebuilt after its sheer devastation during World War II. As a result, it does not possess a strong historical core or a visible building-process timeline. Instead, the urban fabric is new, generic and – sometimes – chaotic. Our proposal intends, thus, to explore how to recreate an urban identity by reflecting the identity of its inhabitants. Our primary focus is on creating opportunities for people to change their own surroundings without much effort, by establishing the conditions for random encounters and introducing surprise as an important factor of the repetitive daily routine. ‘Soundcloud devices’ embedded in different neighborhoods capture music from passers-by and reproduce it out loud. Each neighborhood generates its own sound-cloud resulting in 3 impact levels on the city: firstly, a personal-level impact (in the form of an eye contact or a surprise in the daily routine or even an unexpected interaction), secondly, a neighborhood-level impact (change in the atmosphere, changing routes or daily habits) and, finally, a city-level impact (in terms of a reconfigured public space, as well as a redefined city identity). The municipality collects (anonymous) information from each Neighborhood Soundcloud, analyzes this information and reacts respectively by adding, for instance, new program in an existing urban area. Different scenarios spice up the everyday life, encourage people to physically interact with one another and redefine their immediate urban environment without much effort. Besides, the population is no longer distributed according to their social or economic status. Instead, different groups of people are dispersed and intertwined with one another.

160


GROUP 05

Urban SoundClouds Nikola Docekal; Marija Mateljan; Marta Rota

161


162


Meent

163


164


What? 165


We are creating opp to change their own What

a. its b. its

166


portunities for people surroundings. comprises the surrounding?

appearance (atmosphere) s inhabitants (people)

What? 167


168


Why? 169


Why changing the

Rotterdam was com World War II, hence historical core;

contemporary lifest

the necessity for ch

170


surrounding?

mpletely rebuilt after e it is missing a

tyle becomes too generic;

hanging daily routine

Why? 171


172


How? 173


174


with music as a tool by mapping emotions by creating opportunities

How? 175


176


177


178


179


180


181


182


183


184


Yes, but how exactly?

185


What do these devices look like?

186


trash can

street light

floor 187


How loud are they?

m 70

0 dB

D

188

50 m


dB

max 0 dB

140

Jet aircraft, 50 m away

130

Threshold of pain

120

Threshold of discomfort

110

Chainsaw, 1 m distance

100

Disco, 1 m from speaker

90

Diesel truck, 10 m away

85

Piano, 1 m

80

Kerbside of busy road, 5 m

70 Urban Soundcloud, 1 m 60

Conversational speech, 1 m

55

Neighborhoods awake

50

Average home

45

Neighborhoods sleeping

40

Quiet library

30

Quiet bedroom at night

70 dB

189


190


191


When does the music play?

MONDAY / TUESDAY / WEDNESDAY / THURS activity

hours 7 9 9 12 12 14 14 16 16 18 18 22 22 24 24 7 1

3

5

10

min

20

UNIT = 1 MINUT LEGEND

192

no music interval

music interval

song playing


SDAY

MON

TUE

WED

THU

FRI

SAT

SUN

7-9 am

9-12 am

nutes

TE

12-14 pm

14-16 pm

16-18 pm

18-22 pm

22-24 pm 5 min 20 min 24-7 am

no music LEGEND

On / Off

193


194


195


196


197


198


199


Impact of the project?

200


minute

real-time

day

week

year

long-term

201


202


Don’t underestimate the power of music!

203


What is most difficult for people to live without in their life? 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Internet Mobile phone Music Tv Literature Newspapers Sports Radio Movies Art

70% 54% 40% 40% 24% 23% 21% 21% 13% 6%

Neither im nor unim

Unim

unim

When music is played in a public space, it can make people..

35%

31% 21%

Stay longer

204

Re-visit

Recommend the place to others

14%

Buy more


How important is music in your life?

28%

mportant mportant

61%

Important or very important

10%

mportant or very mportant

1%

Don’t know

for people music is important!

music can make you stay longer in the public space! 205


206


207


Nowadays, most of the people choose whichever restaurant they want to eat in, only by using a smartphone app. People make more choices and should, thus, be more effective in making them. The concept of the FilterBubble will bring ‘choice-making’ to another level by visualizing and sorting out all possibilities in regard to the surroundings, by means of an interactive projection. When our proposed system is turned on, a series of “bubbles” will be projected. These “bubble” resemble a number of choices, appearing on any surface. Users can make decisions by touching or stepping on the corresponding FilterBubble, depending on what surface they are projecting. This action will be recorded by the sensor and, subsequently, a ring of secondary bubbles will pop up for further decision making. In addition, the travel speed comprises one of the main factors that govern the information provided in those bubbles. The information (Options) shown in the latter will be different when a person is running or walking. This allows people to experience the city, either in an immediate surrounding area or in an area far from the starting point. One of the main benefits of our system constitutes the activation of urban life. The individual popped-up FilterBubbles are also visible to others, thus encouraging people to mutually interact. In other words, the system can be regarded as exposing people’s mindset and decision thinking at the same time and, therefore, triggering Interaction, Curiosity, Connection and mutual Attention.

208


GROUP 06

FilterBubble Dilsad Anil; Lawrence Lo; Tom Thijssen

209


Eendrachtsplein

210


211


Sensor - Reference

Ref: MIT Research - SixthSense http://fluid.media.mit.edu/projects/sixthsense 212


213


Sensor Principle

Options Provided 0 sec

214


Projector

Sensor

Data Input

(Decision Making) = MOVE

1st sec

215


Sensor Principle

TOOL - KIT Distance to surface: 1-5 M. Can be worn on your belt Reference of MIT gestures: add ‘coloured tips’

CAMERA MICROPHONE PROJECTOR

SMART DEVICE: FI PHONE CONNECTION TO BUBBLE NET

216


WORN AT YOUR BELT

217


Sensor Interface - Existing Urban Env

218


219


220


221


Activate Urban Life - Interaction

1st Person

222

Input Data

Portable Sensor


2nd Person

Visual Representation

Involved & Connected

Group Entertainment

People Nearby

223


Activate Urban Life - Interaction

224


?

Exposing Mindset decision making

225


Activate Urban Life - Interaction

??

226


Curiosity 227


Co n

ne ct

ed

Activate Urban Life - Interaction

228


Connection 229


Activate Urban Life - Interaction

230


Attention 231


Activate Urban Life - Interaction

Selection of Group Game

232


Participation of the others

233


Events & Routes

Input Data

People

Transition Hub (Plaza)

Normal Situations

Unpredictable Situation e.g. Accident

People

Input Data

Unpredictable Situations

234

Transition Hub (Plaza)

Or


Path 1

Options

Path 2

Criteria; Speed & Direction

Path 3 Path 4

Sensor

rigional Path (Route 1)

Government

Response

Transition Hub (Plaza)

Alternative Path (Route 2)

People

235


Events & Routes

10 m Cycli

236


minute ing Zone

10 minute Walking Zone

237


Events & Routes - Scenerio

at 19:00 Museum Park

Outdoor dinner

Local Bands performing 20:00- 22:00 Eendrachtsplein

Queen’s Night DJ Pancho Maassilo 23:00- o2:00

0.80 km 12 minu

Rotterdam Marathon

cen

Queen’s Day Activities

DJ Performance

path Football Mode

events

Bowling Mode

entertainment 238


Galerie Hommes Galerie Aalbrecht Galerie AAT 388 Galerie Frank Taal ...

Galleries

NAI Kuntshal Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen Stedelijk ...

Museums

m utes

Art of Rotterdam

ntral statio

Nature of Rotterdam

Heemtuin Kralingse Bos Langepad Rotterdam

Arboretum Trompenburg

finder city routes

exit Walking Person239


Events & Routes - Scenerio

at 19:00 Museum Park

Outdoor dinner

Local Bands performing 20:00- 22:00 Eendrachtsplein

Queen’s Night DJ Pancho Maassilo 23:00- o2:00

0.80 km 12 minu

Rotterdam Marathon

cen

Queen’s Day Activities

DJ Performance

path f Football Mode

events

Bowling Mode

entertainment 240


Galerie Hommes Galerie Aalbrecht Galerie AAT 388 Galerie Frank Taal ...

Galleries

NAI Kuntshal Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen Stedelijk ...

Museums

utes

Art of Rotterdam

ntral statio

Nature of Rotterdam

Heemtuin Kralingse Bos Langepad Rotterdam

Arboretum Trompenburg

finder city routes

exit Walking Person241


Events & Routes - Scenerio

at 19:00 Museum Park

Outdoor dinner

Local Bands performing 20:00- 22:00 Eendrachtsplein

Queen’s Night DJ Pancho Maassilo 23:00- o2:00

0.80 km 12 minu

Rotterdam Marathon

cen

Queen’s Day Activities

DJ Performance

path f Football Mode

events

Bowling Mode

entertainment 242


Galerie Hommes Galerie Aalbrecht Galerie AAT 388 Galerie Frank Taal ...

Galleries

NAI Kuntshal Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen Stedelijk ...

Museums

utes

Art of Rotterdam

ntral statio

Nature of Rotterdam

Heemtuin Kralingse Bos Langepad Rotterdam

Arboretum Trompenburg

finder city routes

exit

Walking Person 243


Events & Routes

path fin

exit

244


Kunsthal 0.8 km, 4 min. left 12kmph

Harbour Tour

Into the Wild

nder

city routes

Bicycle 245


246


247


248


249


Nowadays, we derive the information we need in regard to public transport mostly from route maps, timetables and dedicated mobile applications. On the one hand, all the aforementioned ways might be convenient but, on the other, they sometimes rely on our experience to use these systems effectively. Our main question and challenge, thus, deals with how we can provide the city inhabitants with an interactive platform that offers real-time, ambient information about transport and mobility patterns in a more effective way. With regard to this consideration, we chose as a case-site the heavy-traffic junction of Weena, as a challenging location to further test our ideas. The proposed system comprises also a mobile platform, though based on a radically different rationale, in terms of providing information. The user first signs in to the platform and customizes it, in order to get only the information that is useful to his/her everyday mobility, within a specific area of the city and in regard to particular means of transport. Following that, the interactive platform reacts in an ambient and automatic way. When the users approach the specified area of interest, they automatically get notified about the next bus or tramlines, as well as about the walking distance towards the nearest stops. The notification procedure is activated by the time the user enters a specific radius around the bus or tram stops, while the information he/she receives refer to a wider radius of mobility patterns. In this way, people do not have the necessity to search into their smartphone’s transportation app – subsequently losing sufficient amount of time – but rather get automatically notified in an ambient manner about the information they have already subscribed for. This customization potential reduces the amount of annoying and non-useful notifications. Apart from the immediate impact on the user’s mobility patterns, the system is capable of storing anonymous data, that are firther processed and analyzed by the municipal authorities, so that they adapt the public transportation system of the city to the citizens’ needs.

250


GROUP 07

Real-time Motion Loop Xuefei Li; Yi-hsuan Lin; Shuting Tao

251


252


Weena

253


What’s now? Currenlty we mostly rely on Now itthe is convinient to find either set timetables, as they approaches and the settled appear on flat screens in every timetable when are stop or station, oryou on dedicated planning to go somewhere. mobile applications, whenever With the simply steady we need to arrange our trasportimetable, tation planspeople withincannot the city.get to But, is what it possible to takesituation this a know the traffic step is in further? real-time.

254


255


What are the usual troubles?

15min

256


later

257


What if ...? What wepropose can provide real-time What ifwe is thatathe traffic information system, that autoreal-time traffic information matically sents relevant notifications is automatically sent to people to people according tointerests. their personal according to personal interests and notified needs? to the With getting In this way, people have the updated traffic situation, it opportunity to make more effective use of the provides people more public meanstoofbetter transport. possibilities organise

tram1 bus23 tram3

tram8 bus42

individual schedual.

tram1 bus23 tram3

258

tram1


bus40

tram5 tram10

bus40 bus23

tram5

tram3

tram10 tram8

259


2. Sensors’ Overview TYPE OF SENSORS

GPS TRACKING 01

PUBLIC TRANS METRO//T

GPS TRACKING 02

PEO

PROXIMITY SENSOR

260

LOCA

STO


ATION

MEASURE

SPORT SYSTEM TRAM//BUS

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION

OPLE

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION

OPS

OCCUPANCY LEVELS

261


3. Functional Diagram

EMPTY - SYSTEM OFF

INDUCING AREA- PUBLIC TRANSPORT

-- DATA COLLECTION SYSTEM ON ---STEP 01

262


INDUCING AREA- PEOPLE

APP OFF

263


-- INDIVIDUAL APPLICATION SYSTEM ON ---STEP 02

-- DATA DELIVERING SYSTEM ON ---STEP 03

264


APP ON

Tram 1 will arrive at Weena in 3min. You are 2min walk away from Weena Station (300m). Tram3 ...

INFORMATION SENDING

265


-- Smart Phone Application Platform

Please select the info. you want to receive. Welcome.

Tram 1 Tram3 Bus34

Automatically Enrolled

266

Customisation


Tram 1 will arrive at Weena in 3min.

How do you like this application?

You are 2min walk away from Weena Station (300m).

Comments?

Tram3 ...

Provided Information

Feedback Collection

267


Where will the systems be in urban fabric?

268


+

269


Feedback and Benefit

2

1

5

Real-time Traffic

270


3

4

Information Network

271


4. The Interface

272


273


274


275


We propose the COOLspot, the direct opposite to the HOTspot (the digital connection place within the city or a building). The COOLspot comprises the city’s no-signal zone. No Internet, no social media, no digital information and any access to it.

‌just you and the built environment!

276


GROUP 08

COOLspot Milo Janssen; Dapeng Sun

277


Coolsingel/Mauritsweg

278


279


280


281


282


283


2. Sensors’ Overview

Modem

284


Anti-modem Equipment ---Electronic signal jammer Urban surface---Electromagnetic Shielding

285


3. Functional Diagrams

286


287


288


289


Functional diagram-outside

CHECK YOUR SMART DIVICE [phone/watch/gla

290


ass] TO SEE IF YOU’RE INSIDE THE COOLSPOT

Pavement Square

291


Functional diagram-inside

Brainstorm

Meeting room

292


Auditorium

293


4. The Interface

294


295


296


297


298


299


300


301


302


303


304


305


306


307


Our observation concerning today’s large cities has to do with the business of people, loud noises, lack of time, large amount of workload, and not sufficient sunlight. All these we see as issues that make the life quality of people lower and lead to season depression and increased stress levels. And our question is: what can be the added value in the everyday life of citizens that will counteract to the problem of big cities? Based on research, the Netherlands has an annual average of 17.6% of sunlight. This highly affects the mood of people and also the stress levels. Similar cities where seasonal depression has been noticed is Austria, Sweden, Denmark, Germany but also New York and Tokyo, where although the weather is significantly better, due to the pollution and highrise buildings people still don’t get enough sunlight. Thus, we propose to provide artificial ‘sunlight’ and the daily necessary vitamin D aiming to decrease stress, increase the productivity of people and benefit the interactions between them. What we propose is an interactive, kinetic system that adapts to the user and reflects his stress levels. We aim to achieve this as a new circulation lane in the city, as a new way of moving inside the urban fabric, the STRESS RELIEF LANE. The idea constitutes of three aspects: a handrail that detects temperature when touched and monitors stress levels, the street lane that projects information to the user while walking concerning his temperature and stress levels, and the light tubes that appear above ground level only when they trace increased stress and ‘follow’ the user while he walks towards his destination. Based on the occupancy of the lane and the amount of stress, the shapes and movement the light tubes create, will be actively reflected to the city. Therefore, a real-time installation is created that becomes part of the daily routine of people and functions as an ambient interface in the urban fabric. Using the already existing infrastructure for tram stops we aim to embed solar and wind collection and use the energy to power our tubes and provide light during 24 hours a day and 7 days per week, as a form of heliotherapy, taking a negative aspect of a city (stress) and transform it into a positive feature (light). The use of technology and applications with the system makes the users interact more, keep track of their data synchronizing their phones every time they enter and exit the lane. In this way the municipality can get information about the stress level of an area of the city and this can become a starting point to map the movement in the city and the circulation of people (speed/time/consistency) based on their stress levels.

308


GROUP 09

SRL Stress Relief Lane Vasiliki Koliaki; Karolos Michailidis

309


310


Coolsingel

311


312


313


314


315


316


317


318


319


320


321


322


323


324


325


326


327


328


329


330


331


332


333


334


335


336


337


338


339


340


341


342


Appendix #1 References

343


References

This is an indicative list of relevant reading material for reference and inspiration: Aurigi, Alessandro. “New Technologies, Same Dilemmas: Policy and Design Issues for the Augmented City.” Journal of Urban Technology 13, no. 3 (2006): 5-28. Bilandzic, Mark, and Marcus Foth. “A Review of Locative Media, Mobile and Embodied Spatial Interaction.” International Journal of Human-Computer Studies 70, no. 1 (2012): 66-71. Biloria, Nimish. “Interactive Morphologies: An Investigation into Integrated Nodal Networks and Embedded Computation Processes for Developing Real-Time Responsive Spatial Systems.” Frontiers of Architectural Research 1, no. 3 (2012): 259-71. Burke, Anthony, Tierney, Therese (Ed.). “Network Practices: New Strategies in Architecture and Design”. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2007. Châtelet, Valérie (Ed.). “Interactive Cities”. Anomalie Digital No 6. Orleans: HYX, 2007. Dodgson, Mark, and David Gann. “Technological Innovation and Complex Systems in Cities.” Journal of Urban Technology 18, no. 3 (2011): 101-13. Dongyoun, Shin, Stefan Muller Arisona, and Gerhard Schmitt. “A Crowdsourcing Urban Simulation Platform Using Mobile Devices and Social Sensing.” In CAAD Futures 2011, edited by Pierre Leclercq, Ann Heylighen and Geneviève Martin, 233-46. Liege: Les Éditions de l’Université de Liège, 2011. Firmino, Rodrigo José, Fábio Duarte, and Tomás Moreira. “Pervasive Technologies and Urban Planning in the Augmented City.” Journal of Urban Technology 15, no. 2 (2008): 77-93. Foth, Marcus (Ed.). “Handbook of Research on Urban Informatics: The Practice and Promise of the Real-Time City”. Hershey, New York: Information Science Reference, 2009. Greenfield, Adam, and Mark Shepard. “Urban Computing and Its Discontents.” New York: The Architectural League of New York, 2007. Kloeckl, Kristian, Oliver Senn, and Carlo Ratti. “Enabling the Real-Time City: Live Singapore!” Journal of Urban Technology 19, no. 2 (2012): 89-112. Kristian Kloeckl, Oliver Senn, Giusy Di Lorenzo, Carlo Ratti. “Live Singapore! - an Urban Platform for Real-Time Data to Program the City.” (2011). McCullough, Malcolm. “New Media Urbanism: Grounding Ambient Information Technology.” Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design 34 (2007): 383-95. Moere, Andrew Vande, and Dan Hill. “Designing for the Situated and Public Visualization of Urban Data.” Journal of Urban Technology 19, no. 2 (2012): 25-46.

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Powell, Alison. “Wi-Fi, Resistance, and Making Infrastructure Visible.” In The Wireless Spectrum: The Politics, Practices and Poetics of Mobile Media, edited by Barbara Crow, Michael Longford and Kimberly Sawchuk, 172-86. Toronto, Canada: University of Toronto Press, 2010. Robinson, Ricky, Markus Rittenbruch, Marcus Foth, Daniel Filonik, and Stephen Viller. “Street Computing: Towards an Integrated Open Data Application Programming Interface (Api) for Cities.” Journal of Urban Technology 19, no. 2 (2012): 1-23. Rutherford, Jonathan. “Rethinking the Relational Socio-Technical Materialities of Cities and Icts.” Journal of Urban Technology 18, no. 1 (2011): 21-33. Shepard, Mark (Ed.). “Sentient City: Ubiquitous Computing, Architecture and the Future of Urban Space”. New York & Cambridge Massachusetts: Co-published by The Architectural League of New York & The MIT Press, 2011. Townsend, Anthony M. “Life in the Real-Time City: Mobile Telephones and Urban Metabolism.” Journal of Urban Technology 7, no. 2 (2000): 85-104. Vaccari, Andrea, Francesco Calabrese, Bing Liu, and Carlo Ratti. “Towards the Socioscope: An Information System for the Study of Social Dynamics through Digital Traces.” In The 17th ACM SIGSPATIAL International Conference on Advances in Geographic Information Systems, 52-61: Association for Computing Machinery, 2009.

345


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Appendix #2 Workshop photos

347


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357


Credits Concept, Design and Editor: Achilleas Psyllidis Workshop Tutors: Achilleas Psyllidis Bas Kalmeyer Visiting critics: Nimish Biloria (Assist. Prof. Hyperbody, TU Delft) Martijn de Waal (The Mobile City Platform & University of Amsterdam) Willemieke Hornis (Senior Policy Advisor, Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure & Environment) Mark Shepard (Assoc. Prof. University at Buffalo, State University of New York) Blog design and development: Achilleas Psyllidis Syllabus Text & Editors: Achilleas Psyllidis Bas Kalmeyer Project texts Editor: Achilleas Psyllidis Interactive Map design: Achilleas Psyllidis

MSc Course: AR01TWF020 | AR0155 - Actualities Workshop MSc course at The Why Factory, Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) April 2013 (Spring Semester)

Contact: Achilleas Psyllidis

A.Psyllidis@tudelft.nl achilleas@thewhyfactory.com

Bas Kalmeyer

bas@thewhyfactory.com

Web: http://www.thewhyfactory.com/ http://real-time-city.blogspot.nl/ http://issuu.com/apsyllidis/docs/ar01twf020_syllabus_issuu

358


Workshop Participants: Dilsad Anil Chiarra Cirrone Laura Coma Fusté Anna De Putti Nikola Docekal Barbara Jakubowska Milo Janssen Vasiliki Koliaki Jonathan Lazar Xuefei Li Yi-hsuan Lin Lawrence Lo Marija Mateljan Karolos Michailidis Mariana Pazos Gonzalez Mata Rota Koen Schaballie René Dekart Singgih Marlene Stepp Dapeng Sun Mindaugas Šutavicius Matthew Tanti Shuting Tao Tom Thijssen Daan van Gool

©2013 The Why Factory, Achilleas Psyllidis and Bas Kalmeyer All right reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher.

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Profile for Achilleas Psyllidis

REAL-TIME CITY :: The Book  

Booklet including all projects developed for the REAL-TIME CITY Workshop held at TU Delft, from April 19 till April 24, 2013. Lecturers: _A...

REAL-TIME CITY :: The Book  

Booklet including all projects developed for the REAL-TIME CITY Workshop held at TU Delft, from April 19 till April 24, 2013. Lecturers: _A...

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