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Editor’s Introduction The Education Issue

“I don’t think there’s any such thing as teaching people photography, other than influencing them a little,” said Imogen Cunningham, the largely self-taught American photographer, who in later life tutored alongside Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Dorothea Lange and Minor White at California School of Design. “People have to be their own learners. They have to have a certain talent.” It’s one of the central themes of our second annual special issue devoted to photography education, in which we profile two of the world’s most influential (and sharply contrasting) institutions – the Royal College of Art in London and Pathshala South Asian Media Institute in Dhaka – alongside reports on the workshop approach, and the experiences of laureates of the BMW Residency, both of which require a belief in self-learning and reflection. And while the methods may differ, the student-centred approach dominates. Rather than passively soaking up the knowledge of their masters, students are active participants, problem-solving on their own and developing a self-directed practice through which they learn about themselves as photographers. Nor is it a one-way street. Stephen Shore, who like Cunningham learnt photography through his own research and encounters with key artists and individuals, puts it best in an interview focused around his role at Bard College in New York and his own unorthodox path. “Teaching forces me to engage other parts of my mind in the process [of making photographs] because I now have to be verbal, which clarifies things for me,” he tells Michael Grieve. “Teaching is a process that is truly altruistic and truly selfish without contradiction.” Simon Bainbridge, editor

Cover From the series Stardust © Debashish Chakrabarty, a recent graduate of Pathshala South Asian Media Institute.

Introduction: August 2016

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Open Stage © Samsul Alam Helal.

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Second Street East at First Avenue East, Kalispell, Montana, August 22, 1974. From the series Uncommon Places © Stephen Shore, courtesy 303 Gallery, New York.

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Ayaka Sekimoto, Tokyo, 2015 © Kenji Hirasawa.

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From the series Noises in the Blood © Lua Ribeira.

Featured: August 2016

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38 – 43 Pathshala South Asian Media Institute After almost two decades of growth, Bangladesh’s development hub for new photography talent is achieving global reach and proving that education can help remake a nation’s image. 44 – 50 Royal College of Art As head photography at the RCA, Olivier Richon has revolutionised the MA programme to embrace fine-art principles. He tells us what he looks for in students and why having the chance to make mistakes is key to learning.

52 – 66 Stephen Shore The legendary photographer on his teaching programme at Bard College in New York. He discusses his own unorthodox education under the influence of Andy Warhol and John Szarkowski, and explains why teaching is more than an act of altruism. 76 – 82 Personal Workshops Students and teachers reflect on a growing trend that offers an alternative to mainstream education and the chance to work up close with some of the biggest names in photography. Featured: August 2016

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Intelligence: Cooper Telling Tales: VasanthaRobbie Yogananthan

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Index

on the notion of home via childhood tales and the epic journey of Ulysses Features 38 How the Pathshala South Asian Media Institute in Dhaka is helping put photographers at the forefront of Bangladesh’s creative economy 44 The Royal College of Art’s Olivier Richon discusses his educational philosophy and restoring the fine-art status of photography education 52 Stephen Shore explains the ethos behind the acclaimed photography programme at New York’s Bard College 68 Past recipients of the BMW Residency at the Musée Nicéphore Niépce on how creative freedom forced them to push their own boundaries 76 From Tokyo to Paris, the photography workshop is being reinvented. We look at four of the most innovative

Agenda 11 The winners of this year’s BJP Breakthrough prepare to take centre stage at Free Range 14 Any Answers: Broomberg & Chanarin 16 Polly Braden’s book Great Interactions records and interprets the lives of people with learning disabilities

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Projects Simone Sapienza examines a Vietnam beyond its infamous history in Charlie Surfs on Lotus Flowers Rocco Venezia brings his passion for research to his end-of-year project, Nekyia Matthew Broadhead explores the earth-bound lunar landscapes where astronauts once roamed in Heimr Ashley Bourne peers into life at Caldey Island monasteries in Benedict’s House Giulia Parlato’s Isola muses

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Index: August 2016

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Intelligence 85 Little Big Man founder Nick Haymes on flourishing as an indie imprint 88 Creative brief: Max Barnett, founder and editor-in-chief of Pylot, discusses the magazine’s analogue, no-retouching, ethos. 90 Simon Baker, Tate Modern’s curator of photography, offers an insight into the institution’s approach to collecting images, ahead of the opening of its new extension

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Technology 97 Our verdict on Nikon's new top-of-the-range D5 103 Versatile and affordable: four of the best new lenses 106 Elinchrom EL-Skyport Plus HS – a wireless flash for Sony Archive 114 Margaret Harker, the UK’s first female professor of photography, on the distinction between education and training

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Telling Tales: Vasantha Yogananthan

Featured artist: Paul Raas

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Agenda

The winners of the second edition of BJP Breakthrough showcase their work at London’s Old Truman Brewery Breakthrough winners Words by Tom Seymour

Back for the second year, BJP Breakthrough picks out the best new talent from photographers currently studying or recently graduated from a UK or international course. This year Jan McCullough has scooped the Graduate Series award with Home Instruction Manual, while the Graduate Single Image award went to Piotr Karpinski for Woman in the Church No.1. Simone Sapienza won the Undergraduate Series award for Charlie surfs on Lotus Flowers, while Daragh Soden won the Undergraduate Single Image award with a shot from his series Young Dubliners. McCullough’s work [4] was inspired by a 1950s handbook for military wives that “sets out exacting rules on how one’s personal space

should be arranged”. Seeking out other equally didactic guides, she rented an unfurnished suburban house, decorated it according to their advice and photographed the results. “The series felt very much considered as a whole,” said Karen McQuaid, curator at The Photographers’ Gallery and one of the panel judges. “A lot of work had obviously gone into it before any photographs were taken.” Sapienza’s project is similarly oblique, and deliberately so. “I don’t trust photographers who erect themselves as bearers of truth and I don’t trust editors, or curators, or lecturers who try to confine you within comfortable borders,” he says. Charlie surfs on Lotus Flowers was shot in Vietnam [2] but takes a fresh approach to a country often defined by its violent history or picture-perfect tourist brochures. “This is one of the only series we saw where every image was strong in its own right,” says judge Liv Siddall, editor of Rough Trade magazine. 1

We introduce this year’s BJP Breakthrough winners, set to shine at the Free Range graduate shows. Plus, artists and photographers Broomberg and Chanarin open up and we look at Lens Culture award winner Polly Braden’s new book on disability. Agenda: Breakthrough Winners

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Daragh Soden, Undergraduate Single Image award. Bus Couple from the series Young Dubliners © Daragh Soden.

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Simone Sapienza, Undergraduate Series award. From the series Charlie surfs on Lotus Flowers © Simone Sapienza.

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Piotr Karpinski, Graduate Single Image award. Woman in the Church No.1 from the series Let’s Talk About Life & Death Darling © Piotr Karpinski.

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Jan McCullough, Graduate Series award. From the series Home Instruction Manual © Jan McCullough.

Agenda: Breakthrough Winners

Daragh Soden, graduating his year the University of South Wales, won the Undergraduate Single Image award with a photograph [1] from his series inspired by growing up in Dublin and his subjects’ experience in times of austerity. Panel judge Bruno Bayley, European managing editor of Vice UK, says Bus Couple “felt warm, celebratory and uplifting”. Piotr Karpinski, who graduated from Middlesex University in 2015, won the Graduate Single Image award with a photograph [3] from his series Let’s Talk About Life & Death Darling. “I tend to depict my state of mind when creating a picture and I think of death extensively,” he says. “I love that it feels like a highly crafted portrait, taken in a highly spontaneous way that thumbs its nose at traditional rules,” says photographer, filmmaker and panel judge Dean Chalkley. Printed and framed by Theprintspace, the winners’ work is exhibited at The Old Truman Brewery during the Free Range shows. It will also be showcased on WeTransfer, which has more than 80 million visitors a month. BJP Breakthrough opens 23 June at Shop 13, The Old Truman Brewery, 15 Hanbury Street, London E1 6QR. bjpbreakthrough.com


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To your door. Buy the next issue of BJP direct from us and have it delivered straight to your door. www.thebjpshop.com 18

Intelligence: Robbie Cooper


Introducing Class of 2016, the first edition of our pick of this year’s best photography graduates from British and Irish courses. Interviews by Sophie Wright

Projects

Counting the likes of Robert Frank and William Eggleston as key inspirations, it is no surprise that 25-year-old Simone Sapienza is guided by a similarly resolute independence. A former engineering student, he quit to pursue the “most difficult but more enjoyable path”, enrolling in documentary photography at the University of South Wales. The young photographer was taken by its reputation and dynamic approach to teaching. “Colin Pantall showed us a different way to study theory, not the usual boring, chronological history of photography,” he recounts. “First lecture was lights off, volume up and I Fink U Freeky by Die Antwoord to speak about Roger Ballen. That was the right course!” Sapienza’s approach to photography has veered away from the descriptive photojournalism he first enjoyed into a more exploratory direction. “I don’t trust photographers who erect themselves as the bearers of truth; I don’t even trust some editors, or curators, or lecturers who try to confine you within certain, comfortable borders,” he explains. The photographer’s graduation project illustrates this line of thought. Determined to find a Vietnam that lies beyond its infamous history, he spent six weeks in the country

trying to penetrate its complex present, and in doing so investigate the growing contrast between communism and capitalism in Vietnam, and the consequent tension between control and freedom. The result is two complementary bodies of work: Charlie surfs on Lotus Flowers [overleaf], which addresses the control of the one-party Communist government, and United States of Vietnam [below], which looks at the slow victory of capitalism over communism and its consequences for Vietnam’s economy. Using a combination of a staged, typological form of photography in United States of Vietnam, and a more autonomous, naturalistic style for Charlie surfs on Lotus Flowers, Sapienza intends to leave something for the viewer to work out. “They have to try to put their feet in the author’s shoes,” he says. “They just need to get the leitmotiv of your project, not the full, descriptive content. In that exchange lives the real core of the project.” The Italian photographer, who is the undergraduate series winner in BJP’s Breakthrough Awards, plans to move back to Sicily to work on new projects, describing the region as a promising hub of photographic activity for southern Europe. Aside from collaborating with other projects in the area, Sapienza’s proactive outlook extends into his own work: he is the co-founder of a photobook festival called Gazebook, which will take place for the second time this September in Punta Secca, in the Province of Ragusa. “It’s a kind of reunion by the beach, where you can enjoy photography informally but still with great content. It’s also a way to give value to our beloved Sicily,” he says. simonesapienza.com

Simone Sapienza Projects: Class of 2016

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“Teaching is a process that is truly altruistic and truly selfish without contradiction,” says Stephen Shore – high school dropout, worldrenowned artist and director of the acclaimed photography programme at Bard College in New York. He tells Michael Grieve about his education under the influence of Andy Warhol and John Szarkowski, and what he has gained from passing on his knowledge.

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The Education Issue: Stephen Shore


The Education Issue: Stephen Shore

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1:35 a.m. at a Chinese Restaurant, Andy Warhol at   69 Bayard Street, Brooklyn, 1965, from Warhol

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(L-R) Lou Reed, Sterling Morrison, Nico, Moe Tucker and John Cale (aka The Velvet Underground) at The Factory, New York, 1965-67, from Warhol

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The Education Issue: Stephen Shore


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My rendezvous with Stephen Shore is at the C/O gallery in Berlin, where he is about to open a retrospective of his life’s work (now showing at Huis Marseilles in Amsterdam). Before we meet I am invited to view the show, which is in a state of ordered chaos. Prints lie on the floor or are propped up against the walls in anticipation of being hung, while busy gallery installers measure and drill with precision. My eye is instantly captivated by his iconic photographs, but to view them outside the confines of the book is to meet them on a more intimate level by virtue of their large scale. My realisation is that Shore’s work can only really be fully appreciated on this level, and such is my absorption that it’s as if I had never seen his work before. The American photographer arrives promptly, and after introductions reaches for a biscuit and explains he has had no time for breakfast. Behind him are two huge piles of the book, Survey, waiting in anticipation of the exhibition opening. The ones on the left, he tells me, have been signed; the others are awaiting his attention. Shore is very attentive, yet has a quiet manner, warm and gracious, with a smile in his eyes – surprisingly so, perhaps, for a photographer whose work initially seems

detached. Of course, his photography is not at all detached, for here in pictures we see an intelligent and curious artist who resists the temptation to impose his ego on the world, but rather holds back to relish and observe. Shore’s images are picked out with a precise and sensitive eye – one that can find the most exotic revelations in the most banal and unspectacular scenes. His aesthetic has become commonplace, so much so that it’s hard to remember how pioneering it was when he started. Shore didn’t work alongside William Eggleston, but the pair met in 1973 and became friends; between them they introduced colour photography to the documentary and art worlds when it was widely regarded as commercial and vulgar. Their projects were radical and unromantic, documenting petrol stations, cars, streets, supermarkets and all the paraphernalia of a consumer society. Their main visual concern was the idealised landscape of America. The focus of our conversation is premised on Shore’s role as a teacher, and his own unorthodox, yet remarkable, education. What rapidly unfurls is that he is a man of contradictions, and someone who has always used problems to his advantage. Since 1982

he has been the director of the prestigious photography programme at Bard College in New York, and yet his own early education was the very antithesis of conventional learning, having dropped out of school at 17 and taking no formal training in photography. “As a teenager I had been giving myself an education in cinema – everything from independent, experimental art films to more mainstream European and Hollywood movies,” he tells me. “Inspired, I made a short film, which by coincidence was shown at the same theatre in New York as a film being shown by Andy Warhol. We were introduced and I asked Andy if I could come to The Factory to take some pictures. This would have been in 1965. “At this point I realised I could not maintain the pretence that I was a high school student and decided not to return for the last year. My rationale was that I could put on my school tie and jacket and sit in classes I had no interest in, or I could go and hang out with Warhol and his entourage at The Factory.” In hindsight, Shore understood what he learned from Warhol in these formative years, observing a tenacious artist in the process of making decisions about his artmaking each and every day. The Education Issue: Stephen Shore

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The Education Issue: Stephen Shore Telling Tales: Vasantha Yogananthan


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“At that time there was no way to understand The Factory from any historical perspective, so I did not think it was going to be an iconic place 50 years later, but it was clearly where things were going on at that moment, and Warhol was very open about his art-making process.” Warhol was making work drawn from the vernacular of contemporary society and, in a sense, Shore would go on to do the same with American Surfaces and Uncommon Places, capturing the everyday at a time of huge change in the US to build a bigger picture. At an early age Shore knew for certain that photography was his chosen medium. “Although I had heard him speak once, I had never met Walker Evans, but since the age of 10 my first photobook was American Photographs.” He had already begun to acquire an extensive library of books, and had good knowledge of contemporary photographers such as Robert Frank – this at a time when few people regarded photography as a serious art form. There are certain individuals who have shaped the history of the medium, and one of the most important is John Szarkowski, the director of photography at the Museum of Modern Art in New York from 1962 to 1991. Like Warhol, Szarkowski made constant decisions, but of a different kind. As a curator he was critical in advancing the kind of documentary photography that carried a more subjective perspective, guided by an artist’s sensibility to show reality rather than to change it. His New Documents show in 1967 saw Diane Arbus, Lee Friedlander and Garry Winogrand as the champions of a new kind of practice, followed later by the push towards colour with Eggleston, whom Szarkowski also championed. In 1966 Shore made a point of meeting the great curator with his pictures from The Factory. “In those days, Szarkowski really had nothing much to do and so it was not a problem to meet him,” Shore laughs, “and I met him many times. For me, this was my real education in photography, and more than anyone I regard him as my teacher. However, I did not take his word as gospel, as my initial meetings with him were not entirely positive. He was disparaging and would look at my conceptually based pictures, puff on his pipe and huff, ‘This is boring.’ I seem to recall that he thought my portraits did not have enough depth. I think most 22-year-olds would have folded at this point, but I was very stubborn and kept going back, perhaps to prove a point. The snapshot aesthetic of American Surfaces was too radical for Swarkowski as he thought I was not being careful about how I was structuring the pictures. It took him a while

to understand that I was consciously trying to structure them around the experience of seeing, so that they did not look composed. He was used to a range of visual approaches, but this fell outside of this range.” Since its invention, a powerful aspect of photography has been the unruly development of its democratic process. Paradoxically, many contemporary photographers have been largely inspired by the vernacular disregard for the medium as an art form. Shore’s interest in colour as a means of expression came from many factors, but mainly from a sense of closure with an exhibition of his conceptually based work at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York in 1971. Layers of meaning He went in search of a new direction, absorbing the democratic uses of photography in the everyday, even employing a Mick-aMatic – a plastic Mickey Mouse toy camera with a lens in the nose (Kodak would develop the film). “Everything but art photography was in colour, so it made sense to me that colour was the direction I should go in, even if photographers I admired, such as Paul Strand, claimed that higher emotions cannot be communicated with colour. At this time I curated an exhibition called All The Meat You Can Eat [at 98 Greene Street Loft], a show with all kinds of photography – from police, pornography, snapshots and postcards.” Even today, Shore is active on Instagram, one of the most democratic platforms for photography, and he recently enjoyed shooting fashion assignments, which he says is a different kind of experience; totally collaborative and counter to the lonely pursuit of being on the road. Eggleston was at “war with the obvious” but paradoxically fought his battles by photographing the obvious. Shore did something similar but from a more analytical and considered perspective, supported by the belief that pictures describe but do not explain. He criss-crossed the US by road, focusing on subjects that most others would regard as too insignificant or mundane to be worthy of a photograph – empty roads, spare motel lobbies, blank televisions, unwittingly sculptural shop window displays, jigsaw puzzles of postcard-perfect landscapes. Shore’s images make us look again at sights we usually take for granted, as well as referencing the history of photography and the iconography of the American landscape – and all with a beautiful light and colour palette. The photograph – Merced River, Yosemite National Park, California, 1979 – is a good example of this, depicting mothers

and their children bathing by a river on a hot day, the majesty of the mountains above them. It is a photograph with many visual and intellectual layers of meaning, and can be read as both an acknowledgement of, and respectful shift away from, the iconic Ansel Adams landscape photograph, The Tetons and the Snake River, 1942. Adams, like Shore, was a very precise photographer, but his belief in conservation and the ‘beauty comes first’ dictate propagates the romanticism of nature. Shore’s topographical approach, and his understanding that a picture does not have to show emotion to be emotional, means he always reflects the way that nature is occupied by humans. Shore once had dinner with Adams, who “drank straight vodka and complained that he once had a creative streak in the 1940s but now, as he would say, just ‘pot boils’. I learned from Adams to never repeat myself ”, says Shore. The teaching process Though he was never formally trained, Shore has always been interested in education and the ways people learn. In 1971, a radical educational theorist called Ivan Illich wrote a book titled Deschooling Society which argued that institutionalised schooling was ineffectual. “He had an institute in Mexico that was attended by leading educationalist theorists from America who taught workshops; I attended one for one month.” Even so, when he first arrived at Bard to teach, he found it hard to articulate his thinking about photography. “Teaching has changed me. At first it was a huge struggle as I was seeing wordlessly and I had to figure out the right words for myself. When I am out on the road taking pictures, I spend days not talking to anyone. When I am photographing I am thinking visually but I am not thinking in words. Decisions happen silently. Teaching forces me to engage other parts of my mind in the process because I now have to be verbal, which clarifies things for me. Also, I had nothing to model my teaching on as I had never attended a class, which is perhaps a good thing.” I suggest that he could just smoke a pipe and huff, “This is boring”, to which he humorously retorts, “And it would cut down the class size enormously! I also think there is a kind of development a person can go through only if they bring other people along with them. To progress as an artist something happens if you take people forward and bring them up, and this gives you a foundation to move forward.” Shore smiles and adds, “Teaching is a process that is truly altruistic and truly selfish without contradiction.” The Education Issue: Stephen Shore

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“Teaching has changed me... I think there is a kind of development a person can go through only if they bring other people along with them. To progress as an artist, something happens if you take people forward and bring them up – it gives you a foundation to move forward”

Bard College, situated in Annandaleon-Hudson, New York, with a campus covering nearly 1,000 acres, is a liberal arts university that grants enviable license to the teaching staff, and thanks to Shore, the photography programme is unique. It is confident and intelligent yet fundamentally basic in structure, helping students attain a sophisticated grasp of how photographic language operates in practical and theoretical terms, and how to use this understanding to construct their own work. The emphasis of the programme is to begin with the principle of understanding the photograph as a document, with all the complexities of meaning attached to this deceptive description. During each year there are two 15week semesters, beginning with a five-week programme focused on technical aspects, followed by 10 weeks expanding on their own visual language, applying what they’ve learned to a practical project that’s critiqued each week. “Students spend the second semester learning about ‘photographic seeing’, with nothing technical being taught. We teach the structural understanding of the image I talk about in my book, The Nature of Photographs,” Shore continues. “In the second year, they do one semester learning about the ‘view camera’, and another learning colour.” In fact, Shore doesn’t let them loose on colour until this point. He also waits until the third year to talk through digital imaging, although “we tend not to teach exotic Photoshop manipulation but rather digital as a way of photographing and

printing, essentially as you would in the darkroom. Really, what I want within the confines of a vague aesthetic approach is to nurture a diversity of approach,” he says. This is supported by a strong faculty of teachers, including the influential documentary photographer Larry Fink, who has taught there for the past 20 years. And there have been many graduating photographers who have benefited from the rigorous education at Bard. It becomes clear that Shore is deeply serious and supportive of the work of his students, and to illustrate this he proudly relates a visit to Foam in Amsterdam last summer. “By coincidence, in one room, there were three Bard graduates exhibiting work: Daniel Gordon, Lucas Blalock and Matthew Porter.” Shore then went to the bookshop and found a stack of books by Paul Salveson, who had won the Mack First Book Award in 2013. British artist, writer and associate professor at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Walead Beshty, graduated from Bard in 1999, before studying an MA at Yale University School of Art. Despite a hectic schedule, Beshty took the opportunity to praise his ex-teacher, telling me he feels a “huge amount of respect for his approach to teaching and his work... He is an incredibly open and generous teacher, while at the same time being a rigorous and deeply challenging interlocutor,” he says. “He was always receptive to ideas and interests that seemed well outside of his own practice, giving them more than fair audience and the benefit of the doubt.

“In many ways, working with him was the catalyst for my belief that a key element of being an artist is being a teacher,” he continues. “While stylistically my approach to teaching is quite different, my belief in the value of teaching – in remaining open to ideas and practices that I wouldn’t have to confront otherwise, and, perhaps most importantly, that one learns and becomes a better artist by teaching – are all the result of his influence.” It goes without saying that Shore has had a profound influence on both the history of photography and contemporary image-makers. His lifetime of work has taught all serious photographers that no matter how you approach recording reality, it comes with a particular level of thinking, perception and sensibility. This became even clearer to me while shooting Shore’s portrait behind C/O in a messy area dotted with tools and scaffolding. Builders had just laid down molten-hot tarmac exactly where I wanted Shore to stand in front of a dark wall, arbitrarily splattered with white paint. But, standing on a board, fully respecting my decision and, perhaps absorbing the joyful absurdity of the moment, he stood without complaint while vapour escaped from the ground around him, evaporating into the cold air. Finally, out of the confusion of reality and through the confines of the viewfinder, the disparate visual forms, like pieces of a jigsaw, fell into place, albeit with a knowing eye for the unruly abstractions of composition. stephenshore.net

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4-Part Variation, 1969, from Conceptual

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Ruth Shore, Fred Shore, 1970, from Conceptual

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Granite, Oklahoma, July 1972, from American Surfaces

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Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, July 1972, from American Surfaces

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Kanab, Utah, June 1972, from American Surfaces

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Holbrook, Arizona, June 1972, from American Surfaces

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Fifth Street and Broadway, Eureka, California, 2 September 1974, from Uncommon Places

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Ginger Shore, West Palm Beach, Florida, 14 November 1977, from Uncommon Places

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Merced River, Yosemite National Park, California, 13 August 1979, from Uncommon Places

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Church Street and Second Street, Easton, Pennsylvania, 20 June 1974, from Uncommon Places

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Luzzara, Italy, 1993, from Luzzara

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Los Angeles, California, December 2005, for AnOther Magazine

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Hebron, West Bank, 21 January 2010, from Israel

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Hebron, West Bank, 25 March 2011, from Israel

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Mar Saba monastery, Judean Desert, Israel, 20 September 2009, from Israel

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All photographs Š Stephen Shore, courtesy 303 Gallery, New York

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On show Stephen Shore: Retrospective is showing at Huis Marseilles in Amsterdam until 4 September huismarseille.nl

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Next issue September 2016 It’s the great issue of our time, yet the so-called migration crisis is shrouded by ignorance, politics and propaganda. And little in the mainstream media sheds light on the subject. We talk to the photographers helping us see the bigger picture. Sam Invin’s contemplative portraits of asylum seekers speak of their loss of identity as they wait in limbo. Plus Daniel Garcia Subscribe for just £39 for the next by Direct Debit; thereafter paying annually (still saving 31%). You’llon also receive and£65.95 Thomas Saxby Foreigner, Patrick Willocq and Save a free Tote Bag worth £10 with UK orders only, upon renewal (your second payment). Promoted offer is redeemable by UK the Children onmaytheir collaboration with refugee children, and subscribers only. Price and savings vary depending on the country, payment method, subscription term and product Magnum Photos on the grand narrative of people movement type; ie, Print, Digital or Pack. Images used are for illustrative purposes only. Offer ends 06 January 2016. and its commitment to group projects and digital distribution. On sale 03 August 2016 Image © Sam Invin, courtesy of Fabrica

New Media Telling Tales:Intelligence: Vasantha Yogananthan

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British Journal of Photography - August 2016  

Meet the teachers in our special issue devoted to photography learning. Featuring Stephen Shore on his own unorthodox education and how teac...

British Journal of Photography - August 2016  

Meet the teachers in our special issue devoted to photography learning. Featuring Stephen Shore on his own unorthodox education and how teac...

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