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Appleton Public Library Friends of Appleton Public Library 225 N Oneida Street Appleton, WI 54911 (920) 832-6177 www.apl.org

Fine Print SUMMER 2014

APPLETON PUBLIC LIBRARY | FRIENDS OF APPLETON PUBLIC LIBRARY

Be a Friend Today!

All new or increased gifts to the Friends of APL will be matched by a generous donation from the Salmon Foundation. This means your $25 gift will equal $50. Your $100 gift will equal $200. We invite you to consider adding a donation to your summer giving today!

Visit www.apl.org/friends for more information

Building on Success


6

Tracing Your Family Tree

7

Building Projects

8

Be a Friend!

10

Volunteers of the Year

12

Fox Cities Book Fest Wrap Up

2 | Fine Print • Summer 2014

14

Expanding Appleton Ready to Read

16

Summer Reading

18

What’s Appleton Reading?

Watching?

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3

Building on Success

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Contents...

What’s Appleton Serving the community for over 110 years, Appleton Public Library currently operates from an 85,000 square foot facility at 225 N. Oneida Street. Established under state law by the City of Appleton, APL is governed by a nine-member citizen Board of Trustees.

Movies

1

American Hustle

3

Saving Mr. Banks

5

APL houses and serves as resource library for the Outagamie Waupaca Library System (OWLS), a federated system of 16 member libraries.

Appleton Public Library Phone Numbers Administration.........................(920) 832-6170 Children’s Desk........................ (920) 832-6187 Circulation Desk......................(920) 832-6179 Information Desk.....................(920) 832-6177 Reference Desk......................(920) 832-6173

Appleton Public Library Summer Hours Monday.............................. 9:00 am - 8:00 pm Tuesday.............................. 9:00 am - 8:00 pm Wednesday....................... 9:00 am - 8:00 pm Thursday............................. 9:00 am - 8:00 pm Friday.................................. 9:00 am - 6:00 pm Saturday............................. 9:00 am - 1:00 pm Sunday................................ Closed

Appleton Public Library Upcoming Closures

12 Years a Slave

2

4

Gravity

What’s Appleton

Listening To?

Music

1

Bad Blood Bastille

3

AM Arctic Monkeys

5

Marshall Mathers Eminem

Independence Day...............................July 4 Labor Day...................................September 1

Frozen Soundtrack

www.apl.org info@apl.org | refquest@apl.org

Frozen

2

Night Visions Imagine Dragons

4

After the Disco Broken Bells

Interested in one of these items? Call 832-6177 to place your hold today! Fine Print • Summer 2014 | 19


Reading? Fiction

1

Missing You Harlan Coben

3

NYPD Red 2 James Patterson Marshall Karp

5

Fine Print is published quarterly by Appleton Public Library. Printing for Fine Print is provided by the Outagamie Waupaca Library System (OWLS). Mail correspondence to: Appleton Public Library - Fine Print 225 N Oneida Street Appleton, WI 54911 Email correspondence to: info@apl.org

The Target David Baldacci

2

The Fault in Our Stars John Green

4

Divergent Veronica Roth

Non-Fiction

1

10 Day Detox Diet Mark Hyman

Flash Boys Michael Lewis

2

3

10% Happier Dan Harris

The Monuments Men Robert Edsel

4

5

Twelve Years a Slave Soloman Northup

Interested in one of these items? Call 832-6177 to place your hold today! 18 | Fine Print • Summer 2014

APL Mission Learn, know, gather, grow - your center of community life. APL Vision Where potential is transformed into reality. Contact Us For information about services, programs or materials please call us at (920) 832-6177. Connect With Us!

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Spring Edition

What’s Appleton

Building on Success I

’ve been reviewing old newspaper clippings about the library from the late 1970s when the need, affordability and location of the current library was being debated. Looking at these articles has been a helpful history lesson as well as the source of a few giggles - Gabby the Bear made her first appearance during this time! I thought I would share some insights from looking at the past in the context of today’s conversations about the future of the Appleton Public Library. ...Continued on the following page.

Fine Print • Summer 2014 | 3


Building on Success

First, we are getting the same questions today that were brought up 35 years ago. For example, questions about using other libraries such as local universities or public schools were brought up in the article “Alternatives to new library?” by Tom Richards on November 2, 1978.

Babies

Birth - 24 Months

Mr. Richard’s response mirrored a response I recently provided to the same question on April 5. The suggestion to use other libraries has come up repeatedly and the reality is these are very different libraries with different collections and different user needs. We have little collection duplication and the spaces mentioned above are designed and paid for by their users. For example, Lawrence is generous in that they allow the public to use their facility in a limited way, but as a private university are under no obligation to do so, and their collection is geared toward the academic curriculum they provide as a liberal arts institution. We learned from our Community Conversations in 2012 that school media centers are often in difficult to reach places and with the amount of security required in schools today, they are not good spaces for the general public to wander in and out of. Second, planning the future of your public library is, and should be an extensive community-wide dialog. The old news clippings show how many diverse opinions there were and how long this process took. Libraries often experience problems with perception because often people understand the services they personally use, but don’t realize the depth or breadth of other services offered. On February 26, 1978, the article “Library is more than ‘book place’ and it sometimes can get noisy” provides a review of the services the library offered the previous year. In it, the writer acknowledges that many are often surprised at all the library has to offer. This has not changed. Today’s libraries fulfill many important roles: • libraries pool resources for the collective good • libraries serve as a meeting place with programmed activities • libraries serve as a “third place” providing opportunities for the unplanned and the serendipitous • libraries serve as a means of exchanging ideas and information • libraries serve as a place to produce new, creative content

Teens

Grades 6-

12

Applebee's Arby's Bagelicious Chili's Chipotle Cousins Culver’s Frank’s Pizza Palace Funset Boulevard Half-Price Books

Heid Music Hey Daisy The History Museum at the Castle HutHot Mongolian Grill Great American Cookie Company The Learning Shop Monkey Joe's Muncheez

Kids

Birth - Gra

de 7

Adults 18+ years

Olive Garden Papa John’s Papa Murphy's Rocky Rococo Stevi B's Super Bowl Swimtastic Target Texas Roadhouse

Fine Print • Summer 2014 | 17


SUMMER

READING

PROGRAMS

Sign Up Today!

2014 Sponsors 16 | Fine Print • Summer 2014

• libraries provide an opportunity for citizens to lead healthy, successful lives providing equal opportunity to those who tend to be socially excluded or may not have the means or stature that many of us are fortunate enough to have • libraries help create a community of informed and active citizens • libraries stimulate the economy • libraries preserve what is unique and special about the local culture • libraries serve as a symbol of how the community sees itself These are all important, but libraries are also a significant investment. This is precisely why the APL Board of Trustees chose a deliberate approach of completing a community-oriented mission, vision and services plan, followed by an assessment of the facility and if it could accommodate that plan. All this work continues to be available and updated on our building process website - www.apl150.org. Third, throughout these conversations about the future; politics, parking, design and funding took center stage in the headlines. We are grateful for the attention we have received from the media about the library project because it helps communicate with as many people as possible, but the reality is that headlines can’t convey the years and thousands of hours of work that have been put into this planning process. The importance of the library as a facility is how successful it can accommodate the mission and vision of the library. My favorite experience visiting a library had nothing to do with what the building looked like. It had to do with the activities and civic interaction I was able to observe. This memorable library found a way to provide exactly what the community needed because they knew their community so well. We are working to do the same thing here. We offered our Community Conversations initiative with over 20 focus groups in 20122013 and completed the APL 150 service plan reaching toward our 150th anniversary in 2047 because we wanted to develop the library that fit your priorities, hopes and dreams for the future. Most importantly, the staff of Appleton Public Library continue to work tirelessly to offer amazing collections, programs and services for the community just as they did during the previous building process. While decisions about the future of the library facility are important and will garner a lot of headlines in the years ahead, it shouldn’t overshadow all the wonderful things that happen at the library every day. I hope you enjoy these stories about the extraordinary library service and collaborations we are working on while all headlines about the building are making history.

Colleen Rortvedt Library Director Fine Print • Summer 2014 | 5


Tech Connect

Tracing Your Family Tree By Tasha Saecker Assistant Director

O

ne of our most popular online resources at APL is Ancestry. Ancestry: Library Edition has historical records on over six billion people and is a great tool for people to trace their family history, but it can only be used in the library. Thanks to our success with this limited access, we knew we had to find a way to offer genealogy resources that you could access right from home. Enter World Vital Records, which also hosts a wide variety of data that can help you trace your family tree. U.S. Census records from 1790 to 1940 are available as well as the U.S. Social Security Death Index, which contains over 89 million names. If you have traced your family overseas, you have access to data from other countries as well. Census, births, deaths and marriages from the UK and Ireland are available. Canadian and Australian census records, newspapers and also specific province and territory records can be accessed. Click on the “world” tab and you can view records from over 40 different countries. At APL, you can build on what you know about your family, research your roots, and learn where you came from. These powerful resources can help you and so can our knowledgeable staff. Even though you can access this new resource from home, feel free to come in and ask questions too!

6 | Fine Print • Summer 2014

That is where Yee came into the picture. Yee arrived at APL in the summer of 2012 as an intern from the University of Wisconsin. In early 2013, we applied for a federal grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to pilot Appleton Ready to Read. We were awarded the grant, with which we were able to hire Yee as our first part-time Hmong Family Outreach Specialist. The work Yee and staff members from the library have completed in 2013 was so successful, the City of Appleton added the Hmong Family Outreach Specialist position to the library’s budget. Fast forward to this year. With a successful year of Hmong family outreach under our belts, we knew it was time to expand to the other leading English language learning community in the Fox Cities, the Hispanic population. We were recently awarded a grant from the Basic Needs Giving Partnership Fund within the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region supported by the U.S. Venture Fund for Basic Needs, the J.J. Keller Foundation and other community partners to fund our first part-time Hispanic Family Outreach Specialist, Norma Oliveras. Other community members and organizations have graciously supported Appleton Ready to Read including; Bemis Company, Will and Ruth Bloedow, Bouwer Family Foundation, Friends of APL and Thrivent Financial Foundation. Appleton Public Library’s role in this initiative is to help show parents how to be their child’s first teacher and prepare them to enter kindergarten ready to learn to read. We also help non-English speaking parents to feel comfortable using our library. We strive to fulfill these goals through the following services: Home Visits Yee and Norma make home visits to present current practices for developing early literacy skills. During the visit Norma and Yee focus on the importance of reading and writing with children. Parents receive a toolkit, including a book, crayons and a coloring book to encourage families to engage in pre-literacy activities together. Library Tours During this portion of the program, parents receive a tour of Children’s Services, have the chance to sign up for a library card and learn how to select material for their children.

Play and Learn Classes Parents are encouraged to attend the Play and Learn classes where they learn how to help their child develop necessary pre-reading skills, social skills and confidence through interactive, playcentered learning. Partner Referrals Families are referred to Appleton Ready to Read partners as appropriate. These partners play a crucial role in delivering the necessary services beyond what we can provide. AASD provides 3-5 year-old developmental screening and recommends early intervention programs to assist children. Outagamie County Birth to 3 Early Intervention screens infants and toddlers for developmental delays and provides early intervention services to those children who are eligible. Head Start provides early childhood education to children who come from low income families. Fox Valley Literacy Council provides support to parents who face literacy challenges. We are very proud of this community initiative and we are excited to be able to expand the outreach services to include our Hispanic population. We would like to extend our gratitude to all of the sponsors, staff members and library supporters that have helped to communicate the importance of early childhood education to our community.

For more information about Appleton Ready to Read, please call Appleton Public Library Children’s Services at (920) 832-6188 or stop by the Children’s Services department.

Fine Print • Summer 2014 | 15


Children’s Services

Public Services

Expanding Building Projects Appleton Ready to Read By Sue Ritchie Public Services Library Clerk

By Tanya Misselt Children’s Services Supervisor

B

uilding on the successful outreach of Yee Vue, APL Children’s Services Hmong Family Outreach Specialist, we are pleased to announce the hiring of Norma Oliveras, APL Children’s Services Hispanic Family Outreach Specialist. Norma has a bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of Puerto Rico, as well as ten years of experience working for Head Start with children, families and community partners. Yee and Norma are part of a broader local initiative created by the library called Appleton Ready to Read. Several community organizations are involved in this initiative including; Appleton Area School District, Fox Valley Literacy Council, Outagamie County Birth-5 Early Intervention and UW-Oshkosh Head Start. Appleton Ready to Read was created as a result of the 2011 Fox Cities LIFE study, which showed a decline in local third grade reading scores. Further research shows that children who speak English as a second language tend to enter kindergarten without the same skills as their peers and are less likely to be prepared to learn to read. Early childhood brain development also tells us that pre-literacy skills should be developing between birth and age five. With all of this research in hand, we knew we needed to get to English language learning children before they entered kindergarten, in order to help develop the pre-literacy skills they would need to be ready to read.

Read 14 | Fine Print • Summer 2014

Write

Talk

Sing

B

uilding is nothing new at the Appleton Public Library. In fact, building projects are in progress every day. Such projects come in the form of a toddler building upon a growing vocabulary by attending a children's story time, a teen being the architect of her own art created during a school night meeting with friends, or a job seeking patron spending time on a computer before submitting a resume with the potential to reconstruct their future. Here at APL, relationships are built one layer at a time through the sharing of a good book, joining a spouse for an afternoon movie, or taking advantage of endless technology tools that can dig up answers for those wishing to learn how to design a healthy dinner, grow a garden from a muddy patch of earth, or hammer together a birdhouse. Parents wanting to connect the pieces, as well as their families, arrive together at the library and work to build a life-long love of learning. Confidence is built in front of a self-check machine when one of the smiling children successfully checks out a long-awaited hold and happily adds it to the family book bag. The bag has something for everyone and is certain to contain a special book or movie to be enjoyed before bedtime; cementing in the last brick of the day. The community has an invitation to come inside the library's construction zone, where on a daily basis, the walls come down as patrons gather to play, learn, and explore possibilities. Open the door and discover how APL is committed to establishing a firm foundation for a successful future.

Play Fine Print • Summer 2014 | 7


Be a Friend! L

earn, know, gather and grow – your center of community life. The mission of the Appleton Public Library is simple, yet powerful.

Friends of Appleton Public Library has a simple mission as well – to support our library through advocacy and financial contributions. Be a Friend. This summer our goal is to build on our success and increase our number of Friends. The Salmon Foundation also knows the importance of widening our circle of Friends. They will match new and increased Friends donations. This means your first-time or increased gift will be doubled; your $25 donation is worth $50, your $50 donation is $100. There’s no better time to become a Friend. Did you know you can join Friends online? Go to our webpage at www.apl/friends and look for the “donate” button - it’s that easy! Gifts of any size are welcome and make you a Friend of Appleton Public Library. Your support strengthens the Appleton Public Library by enabling our community to learn, know, gather and grow.

T

Book Fest Wrap Up

By Brian Kopetsky Community Partnerships Supervisor

he 7th year of the Fox Cities Book Festival is now in the books and we can mark it down as another success. This year’s festival brought in over 50 authors at events all over the area. All told, more than 5,000 people attended this year’s Book Festival. It’s the successes that drive us forward with each year. Where other similar festivals have faltered, or failed altogether, we seem to be learning lessons every year and putting them to use. Putting together the Book Festival has always felt like a marathon; you start as early as possible, find your pace and try to keep just enough energy in reserve for the sprint at the end. This year felt a little different; the run up was not quite as arduous. We made the most of the time we had and developed some new partnerships that not only helped us out logistically and financially, but give us a solid template to work from for years to come. Of course it goes without saying that all of our partners; including organizations and individuals are the engine that makes this all possible. This year we seemed to have more support than ever. Of course, all the planning and support in the world won’t save you if what you present to the community is subpar. This year I thought we did a good job in presenting a varied

8 | Fine Print • Summer 2014

line-up of authors that appealed to the many tastes of our community. And our authors certainly didn’t let us down. The authors at the events I attended were happy to share their stories, both written and personal. One of the best parts of the festival is the authors’ willingness to share their knowledge and experiences with people. Here at APL, we had multiple talks about everything from getting the beginning your story right, to having your work published. Even those who were not actively writing seem to enjoy getting the behind-the-scenes tours of the publishing world. For those who were more interested in stories, we had multiple readings and meet the author sessions. It’s amazing to be part of an event where community members can meet and engage with so many authors, and of course get their books signed! In fact one of the few criticisms I heard, and it’s one we hear every year, is that we had too many great events going on and it was hard to choose. While we do our best to spread things out to allow people to get to many events as possible, there is part of me that, instead of taking it as a criticism, takes it as a compliment. After all who can be mad at being allowed choices? Fine Print • Summer 2014 | 13


o i t n a r b e l e

•

Summe

l a u n n

A th

7

x o F

s e i t i C

C

r

Community Partnerships

F k o o B

l a tes iv

June 12 | 5:00 - 7:00 pm Refreshments Scavenger Hunt Face Painting e-Reader Demos Digital Creation Lab Access Behind-the-Scenes Tour

Fun For All Ages!


Volunteer Corner

VOLUNTEERS of the year

APL names 2014 volunteers of the year with special award

W

Peter and Sarah were co-presidents of Friends of Appleton Library (FOAL), the sister organization that raised funds for library services and programs. The variety of ways they have contributed their time and talents to APL has expanded since then. Peter served in 2010 as the first president of Friends of Appleton Public Library, after the merger of FOAL with the Appleton Library Foundation. He was president of the board for three years, leading them through an extensive strategic planning process, as well as with the start of APL’s strategic planning

10 | Fine Print • Summer 2014

The Gilberts and their daughters Susannah and Emily have contributed several hundred volunteer hours, many of which predate when APL started tracking volunteer hours. The Gilberts are part of a group of extremely committed patrons and Friends who over the years provided the foundation of APL’s volunteer program. APL and Friends of APL decided to name the Appleton Public Library’s Volunteer of the Year award after the Gilbert family because they each generously volunteer not for any kind of special recognition but out of an authentic sense of mission to the library, to APL’s patrons and to what libraries provide communities.

Above right: Sarah and Peter receiving their Volunteer of the Year award at APL.

By Colleen Holz Volunteer Coordinator e are proud to announce our 2014 volunteers of the year - Peter and Sarah Gilbert. The Gilberts are steady, unassuming champions of APL and of libraries in general. Wherever help is needed, from lending a hand with a library event to providing guidance in leadership roles, Peter and Sarah have eagerly assisted.

Poets and is serving on the City of Appleton’s Sidewalk Poetry Committee. Sarah coordinates the Alternative Gift Market at All Saints Episcopal Church, where both Peter and Sarah assist with a variety of activities.

process. Peter has also served in many APL volunteer roles, including assisting with children’s programs and greeting for the Friends Membership Drive. Sarah has volunteered in a variety of ways at the library, including: shelving, delivering books to patrons who cannot make it to the library, assisting with children’s programs and serving with the Friends Membership Committee. The committee did such a great job greeting, it inspired APL to implement regularly scheduled library greeters, a role Sarah fills every month. The Gilberts fulfill several other volunteer roles in the Fox Cities, as well as state-wide. Peter serves on the Outagamie Waupaca Library System and the Fox Valley Library System boards and is active in numerous ways with the Wisconsin Library Association. Sarah is Regional Vice President for the Central Fox Valley Chapter of the Wisconsin Fellowship of

Right: Sarah and Peter at the Friends of APL I Love My Library dinner.

Congratulations! Congratulations to Madison Hill, who was nominated by Appleton Public Library for the Volunteer Center for East Central Wisconsin’s Youth Alliance Award. Madison has volunteered nearly 200 hours in Public Services, Children’s Services and Materials Management functions.

Fine Print • Summer 2014 | 11


Volunteer Corner

VOLUNTEERS of the year

APL names 2014 volunteers of the year with special award

W

Peter and Sarah were co-presidents of Friends of Appleton Library (FOAL), the sister organization that raised funds for library services and programs. The variety of ways they have contributed their time and talents to APL has expanded since then. Peter served in 2010 as the first president of Friends of Appleton Public Library, after the merger of FOAL with the Appleton Library Foundation. He was president of the board for three years, leading them through an extensive strategic planning process, as well as with the start of APL’s strategic planning

10 | Fine Print • Summer 2014

The Gilberts and their daughters Susannah and Emily have contributed scores of volunteer hours, many of which predate when APL started tracking volunteer hours. The Gilberts are part of a group of extremely committed patrons and Friends who over the years provided the foundation of APL’s volunteer program. APL and Friends of APL decided to name the Appleton Public Library’s Volunteer of the Year award after the Gilbert family because they each generously volunteer not for any kind of special recognition but out of an authentic sense of mission to the library, to APL’s patrons and to what libraries provide communities.

Above right: Sarah and Peter receiving their Volunteer of the Year award at APL.

By Colleen Holz Volunteer Coordinator e are proud to announce our 2014 volunteers of the year - Peter and Sarah Gilbert. The Gilberts are steady, unassuming champions of APL and of libraries in general. Wherever help is needed, from lending a hand with a library event to providing guidance in leadership roles, Peter and Sarah have eagerly assisted.

Poets and is serving on the City of Appleton’s Sidewalk Poetry Committee. Sarah coordinates the Alternative Gift Market at All Saints Episcopal Church, where both Peter and Sarah assist with a variety of activities.

process. Peter has also served in many APL volunteer roles, including assisting with children’s programs and greeting for the Friends Membership Drive. Sarah has volunteered in a variety of ways at the library, including: shelving, delivering books to patrons who cannot make it to the library, assisting with children’s programs and serving with the Friends Membership Committee. The committee did such a great job greeting, it inspired APL to implement regularly scheduled library greeters, a role Sarah fills every month. The Gilberts fulfill several other volunteer roles in the Fox Cities, as well as state-wide. Peter serves on the Outagamie Waupaca Library System and the Fox Valley Library System boards and is active in numerous ways with the Wisconsin Library Association. Sarah is Regional Vice President for the Central Fox Valley Chapter of the Wisconsin Fellowship of

Right: Sarah and Peter at the Friends of APL I Love My Library dinner.

Congratulations! Congratulations to Madison Hill, who was nominated by Appleton Public Library for the Volunteer Center for East Central Wisconsin’s Youth Alliance Award. Madison has volunteered nearly 200 hours in Public Services, Children’s Services and Materials Management functions.

Fine Print • Summer 2014 | 11


o i t n a r b e l e

•

Summe

l a u n n

A th

7

x o F

s e i t i C

C

r

Community Partnerships

F k o o B

l a tes iv

June 12 | 5:00 - 7:00 pm Refreshments Scavenger Hunt Face Painting e-Reader Demos Digital Creation Lab Access Behind-the-Scenes Tour

Fun For All Ages!


Be a Friend! L

earn, know, gather and grow – your center of community life. The mission of the Appleton Public Library is simple, yet powerful.

Friends of Appleton Public Library has a simple mission as well – to support our library through advocacy and financial contributions. Be a Friend. This summer our goal is to build on our success and increase our number of Friends. The Salmon Foundation also knows the importance of widening our circle of Friends. They will match new and increased Friends donations. This means your first-time or increased gift will be doubled; your $25 donation is worth $50, your $50 donation is $100. There’s no better time to become a Friend. Did you know you can join Friends online? Go to our webpage at www.apl/friends and look for the “donate” button - it’s that easy! Gifts of any size are welcome and make you a Friend of Appleton Public Library. Your support strengthens the Appleton Public Library by enabling our community to learn, know, gather and grow.

T

Book Fest Wrap Up

By Brian Kopetsky Community Partnerships Supervisor

he 7th year of the Fox Cities Book Festival is now in the books and we can mark it down as another success. This year’s festival brought in over 50 authors at events all over the area. All told, more than 5,000 people attended this year’s Book Festival. It’s the successes that drive us forward with each year. Where other similar festivals have faltered, or failed altogether, we seem to be learning lessons every year and putting them to use. Putting together the Book Festival has always felt like a marathon; you start as early as possible, find your pace and try to keep just enough energy in reserve for the sprint at the end. This year felt a little different; the run up was not quite as arduous. We made the most of the time we had and developed some new partnerships that not only helped us out logistically and financially, but give us a solid template to work from for years to come. Of course it goes without saying that all of our partners; including organizations and individuals are the engine that makes this all possible. This year we seemed to have more support than ever. Of course, all the planning and support in the world won’t save you if what you present to the community is subpar. This year I thought we did a good job in presenting a varied

8 | Fine Print • Summer 2014

line-up of authors that appealed to the many tastes of our community. And our authors certainly didn’t let us down. The authors at the events I attended were happy to share their stories, both written and personal. One of the best parts of the festival is the authors’ willingness to share their knowledge and experiences with people. Here at APL, we had multiple talks about everything from getting the beginning your story right, to having your work published. Even those who were not actively writing seem to enjoy getting the behind-the-scenes tours of the publishing world. For those who were more interested in stories, we had multiple readings and meet the author sessions. It’s amazing to be part of an event where community members can meet and engage with so many authors, and of course get their books signed! In fact one of the few criticisms I heard, and it’s one we hear every year, is that we had too many great events going on and it was hard to choose. While we do our best to spread things out to allow people to get to many events as possible, there is part of me that, instead of taking it as a criticism, takes it as a compliment. After all who can be mad at being allowed choices? Fine Print • Summer 2014 | 13


Children’s Services

Public Services

Expanding Building Projects Appleton Ready to Read By Sue Ritchie Public Services Library Clerk

By Tanya Misselt Children’s Services Supervisor

B

uilding on the successful outreach of Yee Vue, APL Children’s Services Hmong Family Outreach Specialist, we are pleased to announce the hiring of Norma Oliveras, APL Children’s Services Hispanic Family Outreach Specialist. Norma has a bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of Puerto Rico, as well as ten years of experience working for Head Start with children, families and community partners. Yee and Norma are part of a broader local initiative created by the library called Appleton Ready to Read. Several community organizations are involved in this initiative including; Appleton Area School District, Fox Valley Literacy Council, Outagamie County Birth-5 Early Intervention and UW-Oshkosh Head Start. Appleton Ready to Read was created as a result of the 2011 Fox Cities LIFE study, which showed a decline in local third grade reading scores. Further research shows that children who speak English as a second language tend to enter kindergarten without the same skills as their peers and are less likely to be prepared to learn to read. Early childhood brain development also tells us that pre-literacy skills should be developing between birth and age five. With all of this research in hand, we knew we needed to get to English language learning children before they entered kindergarten, in order to help develop the pre-literacy skills they would need to be ready to read.

Read 14 | Fine Print • Summer 2014

Write

Talk

Sing

B

uilding is nothing new at the Appleton Public Library. In fact, building projects are in progress every day. Such projects come in the form of a toddler building upon a growing vocabulary by attending a children's story time, a teen being the architect of her own art created during a school night meeting with friends, or a job seeking patron spending time on a computer before submitting a resume with the potential to reconstruct their future. Here at APL, relationships are built one layer at a time through the sharing of a good book, joining a spouse for an afternoon movie, or taking advantage of endless technology tools that can dig up answers for those wishing to learn how to design a healthy dinner, grow a garden from a muddy patch of earth, or hammer together a birdhouse. Parents wanting to connect the pieces, as well as their families, arrive together at the library and work to build a life-long love of learning. Confidence is built in front of a self-check machine when one of the smiling children successfully checks out a long-awaited hold and happily adds it to the family book bag. The bag has something for everyone and is certain to contain a special book or movie to be enjoyed before bedtime; cementing in the last brick of the day. The community has an invitation to come inside the library's construction zone, where on a daily basis, the walls come down as patrons gather to play, learn, and explore possibilities. Open the door and discover how APL is committed to establishing a firm foundation for a successful future.

Play Fine Print • Summer 2014 | 7


Tech Connect

Tracing Your Family Tree By Tasha Saecker Assistant Director

O

ne of our most popular online resources at APL is Ancestry. Ancestry: Library Edition has historical records on over six billion people and is a great tool for people to trace their family history, but it can only be used in the library. Thanks to our success with this limited access, we knew we had to find a way to offer genealogy resources that you could access right from home. Enter World Vital Records, which also hosts a wide variety of data that can help you trace your family tree. U.S. Census records from 1790 to 1940 are available as well as the U.S. Social Security Death Index, which contains over 89 million names. If you have traced your family overseas, you have access to data from other countries as well. Census, births, deaths and marriages from the UK and Ireland are available. Canadian and Australian census records, newspapers and also specific province and territory records can be accessed. Click on the “world” tab and you can view records from over 40 different countries. At APL, you can build on what you know about your family, research your roots, and learn where you came from. These powerful resources can help you and so can our knowledgeable staff. Even though you can access this new resource from home, feel free to come in and ask questions too!

6 | Fine Print • Summer 2014

That is where Yee came into the picture. Yee arrived at APL in the summer of 2012 as an intern from the University of Wisconsin. In early 2013, we applied for a federal grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to pilot Appleton Ready to Read. We were awarded the grant, with which we were able to hire Yee as our first part-time Hmong Family Outreach Specialist. The work Yee and staff members from the library have completed in 2013 was so successful, the City of Appleton added the Hmong Family Outreach Specialist position to the library’s budget. Fast forward to this year. With a successful year of Hmong family outreach under our belts, we knew it was time to expand to the other leading English language learning community in the Fox Cities, the Hispanic population. We were recently awarded a grant from the Basic Needs Giving Partnership Fund within the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region supported by the U.S. Venture Fund for Basic Needs, the J.J. Keller Foundation and other community partners to fund our first part-time Hispanic Family Outreach Specialist, Norma Oliveras. Other community members and organizations have graciously supported Appleton Ready to Read including; Bemis Company, Will and Ruth Bloedow, Bouwer Family Foundation, Friends of APL and Thrivent Financial Foundation. Appleton Public Library’s role in this initiative is to help show parents how to be their child’s first teacher and prepare them to enter kindergarten ready to learn to read. We also help non-English speaking parents to feel comfortable using our library. We strive to fulfill these goals through the following services: Home Visits Yee and Norma make home visits to present current practices for developing early literacy skills. During the visit Norma and Yee focus on the importance of reading and writing with children. Parents receive a toolkit, including a book, crayons and a coloring book to encourage families to engage in pre-literacy activities together. Library Tours During this portion of the program, parents receive a tour of Children’s Services, have the chance to sign up for a library card and learn how to select material for their children.

Play and Learn Classes Parents are encouraged to attend the Play and Learn classes where they learn how to help their child develop necessary pre-reading skills, social skills and confidence through interactive, playcentered learning. Partner Referrals Families are referred to Appleton Ready to Read partners as appropriate. These partners play a crucial role in delivering the necessary services beyond what we can provide. AASD provides 3-5 year-old developmental screening and recommends early intervention programs to assist children. Outagamie County Birth to 3 Early Intervention screens infants and toddlers for developmental delays and provides early intervention services to those children who are eligible. Head Start provides early childhood education to children who come from low income families. Fox Valley Literacy Council provides support to parents who face literacy challenges. We are very proud of this community initiative and we are excited to be able to expand the outreach services to include our Hispanic population. We would like to extend our gratitude to all of the sponsors, staff members and library supporters that have helped to communicate the importance of early childhood education to our community.

For more information about Appleton Ready to Read, please call Appleton Public Library Children’s Services at (920) 832-6188 or stop by the Children’s Services department.

Fine Print • Summer 2014 | 15


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2014 Sponsors 16 | Fine Print • Summer 2014

• libraries provide an opportunity for citizens to lead healthy, successful lives providing equal opportunity to those who tend to be socially excluded or may not have the means or stature that many of us are fortunate enough to have • libraries help create a community of informed and active citizens • libraries stimulate the economy • libraries preserve what is unique and special about the local culture • libraries serve as a symbol of how the community sees itself These are all important, but libraries are also a significant investment. This is precisely why the APL Board of Trustees chose a deliberate approach of completing a community-oriented mission, vision and services plan, followed by an assessment of the facility and if it could accommodate that plan. All this work continues to be available and updated on our building process website - www.apl150.org. Third, throughout these conversations about the future; politics, parking, design and funding took center stage in the headlines. We are grateful for the attention we have received from the media about the library project because it helps communicate with as many people as possible, but the reality is that headlines can’t convey the years and thousands of hours of work that have been put into this planning process. The importance of the library as a facility is how successful it can accommodate the mission and vision of the library. My favorite experience visiting a library had nothing to do with what the building looked like. It had to do with the activities and civic interaction I was able to observe. This memorable library found a way to provide exactly what the community needed because they knew their community so well. We are working to do the same thing here. We offered our Community Conversations initiative with over 20 focus groups in 20122013 and completed the APL 150 service plan reaching toward our 150th anniversary in 2047 because we wanted to develop the library that fit your priorities, hopes and dreams for the future. Most importantly, the staff of Appleton Public Library continue to work tirelessly to offer amazing collections, programs and services for the community just as they did during the previous building process. While decisions about the future of the library facility are important and will garner a lot of headlines in the years ahead, it shouldn’t overshadow all the wonderful things that happen at the library every day. I hope you enjoy these stories about the extraordinary library service and collaborations we are working on while all headlines about the building are making history.

Colleen Rortvedt Library Director Fine Print • Summer 2014 | 5


Building on Success

First, we are getting the same questions today that were brought up 35 years ago. For example, questions about using other libraries such as local universities or public schools were brought up in the article “Alternatives to new library?” by Tom Richards on November 2, 1978.

Babies

Birth - 24 Months

Mr. Richard’s response mirrored a response I recently provided to the same question on April 5. The suggestion to use other libraries has come up repeatedly and the reality is these are very different libraries with different collections and different user needs. We have little collection duplication and the spaces mentioned above are designed and paid for by their users. For example, Lawrence is generous in that they allow the public to use their facility in a limited way, but as a private university are under no obligation to do so, and their collection is geared toward the academic curriculum they provide as a liberal arts institution. We learned from our Community Conversations in 2012 that school media centers are often in difficult to reach places and with the amount of security required in schools today, they are not good spaces for the general public to wander in and out of. Second, planning the future of your public library is, and should be an extensive community-wide dialog. The old news clippings show how many diverse opinions there were and how long this process took. Libraries often experience problems with perception because often people understand the services they personally use, but don’t realize the depth or breadth of other services offered. On February 26, 1978, the article “Library is more than ‘book place’ and it sometimes can get noisy” provides a review of the services the library offered the previous year. In it, the writer acknowledges that many are often surprised at all the library has to offer. This has not changed. Today’s libraries fulfill many important roles: • libraries pool resources for the collective good • libraries serve as a meeting place with programmed activities • libraries serve as a “third place” providing opportunities for the unplanned and the serendipitous • libraries serve as a means of exchanging ideas and information • libraries serve as a place to produce new, creative content

Teens

Grades 6-

12

Applebee's Arby's Bagelicious Chili's Chipotle Cousins Culver’s Frank’s Pizza Palace Funset Boulevard Half-Price Books

Heid Music Hey Daisy The History Museum at the Castle HutHot Mongolian Grill Great American Cookie Company The Learning Shop Monkey Joe's Muncheez

Kids

Birth - Gra

de 7

Adults 18+ years

Olive Garden Papa John’s Papa Murphy's Rocky Rococo Stevi B's Super Bowl Swimtastic Target Texas Roadhouse

Fine Print • Summer 2014 | 17


Reading? Fiction

1

Missing You Harlan Coben

3

NYPD Red 2 James Patterson Marshall Karp

5

Fine Print is published quarterly by Appleton Public Library. Printing for Fine Print is provided by the Outagamie Waupaca Library System (OWLS). Mail correspondence to: Appleton Public Library - Fine Print 225 N Oneida Street Appleton, WI 54911 Email correspondence to: info@apl.org

The Target David Baldacci

2

The Fault in Our Stars John Green

4

Divergent Veronica Roth

Non-Fiction

1

10 Day Detox Diet Mark Hyman

Flash Boys Michael Lewis

2

3

10% Happier Dan Harris

The Monuments Men Robert Edsel

4

5

Twelve Years a Slave Soloman Northup

Interested in one of these items? Call 832-6177 to place your hold today! 18 | Fine Print • Summer 2014

APL Mission Learn, know, gather, grow - your center of community life. APL Vision Where potential is transformed into reality. Contact Us For information about services, programs or materials please call us at (920) 832-6177. Connect With Us!

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Spring Edition

What’s Appleton

Building on Success I

’ve been reviewing old newspaper clippings about the library from the late 1970s when the need, affordability and location of the current library was being debated. Looking at these articles has been a helpful history lesson as well as the source of a few giggles - Gabby the Bear made her first appearance during this time! I thought I would share some insights from looking at the past in the context of today’s conversations about the future of the Appleton Public Library. ...Continued on the following page.

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Tracing Your Family Tree

7

Building Projects

8

Be a Friend!

10

Volunteers of the Year

12

Fox Cities Book Fest Wrap Up

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Expanding Appleton Ready to Read

16

Summer Reading

18

What’s Appleton Reading?

Watching?

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Building on Success

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Contents...

What’s Appleton Serving the community for over 110 years, Appleton Public Library currently operates from an 85,000 square foot facility at 225 N. Oneida Street. Established under state law by the City of Appleton, APL is governed by a nine-member citizen Board of Trustees.

Movies

1

American Hustle

3

Saving Mr. Banks

5

APL houses and serves as resource library for the Outagamie Waupaca Library System (OWLS), a federated system of 16 member libraries.

Appleton Public Library Phone Numbers Administration.........................(920) 832-6170 Children’s Desk........................ (920) 832-6187 Circulation Desk......................(920) 832-6179 Information Desk.....................(920) 832-6177 Reference Desk......................(920) 832-6173

Appleton Public Library Summer Hours Monday.............................. 9:00 am - 8:00 pm Tuesday.............................. 9:00 am - 8:00 pm Wednesday....................... 9:00 am - 8:00 pm Thursday............................. 9:00 am - 8:00 pm Friday.................................. 9:00 am - 6:00 pm Saturday............................. 9:00 am - 1:00 pm Sunday................................ Closed

Appleton Public Library Upcoming Closures

12 Years a Slave

2

4

Gravity

What’s Appleton

Listening To?

Music

1

Bad Blood Bastille

3

AM Arctic Monkeys

5

Marshall Mathers Eminem

Independence Day...............................July 4 Labor Day...................................September 1

Frozen Soundtrack

www.apl.org info@apl.org | refquest@apl.org

Frozen

2

Night Visions Imagine Dragons

4

After the Disco Broken Bells

Interested in one of these items? Call 832-6177 to place your hold today! Fine Print • Summer 2014 | 19


Appleton Public Library Friends of Appleton Public Library 225 N Oneida Street Appleton, WI 54911 (920) 832-6177 www.apl.org

Fine Print SUMMER 2014

APPLETON PUBLIC LIBRARY | FRIENDS OF APPLETON PUBLIC LIBRARY

Be a Friend Today!

All new or increased gifts to the Friends of APL will be matched by a generous donation from the Salmon Foundation. This means your $25 gift will equal $50. Your $100 gift will equal $200. We invite you to consider adding a donation to your summer giving today!

Visit www.apl.org/friends for more information

Building on Success


Summer 2014 Newsletter