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Best area schools for your kids HOPE & how to pay for college Coming home after graduation

STAR students â–  North Fulton scholars rock the SATs â–  Local schools lead the state in top scores


2013 Edition

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Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media


2013 Edition

Childhood is a non-stop adventure. So when accidents happen, trust the doctors with the expertise to treat growing bones and growth plates the right way. choa.org/fracture.

©2013 Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Inc. All rights reserved.

Dedicated to All Better

CHILDREN’S AT FORSYTH - 410 PEACHTREE PKWY., AT THE AVENUE® FORSYTH CHILDREN’S AT NORTH POINT - 3795 MANSELL ROAD, ALPHARETTA

Appen Media | 2013 Edition | Education Answer Book™

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2013 Edition

Welcome

to your 2013 Answer Book ® Welcome to our first “Education Answer Book” and the 45th Answer Book we have published since 1992. This publication is loaded with information, articles and data about schools from kindergarten through college. If you are new to the area or are contemplating moving here, you will find this publication of great value. If you already live here, we have plenty of information that you will find handy and useful. Whether you use it for the school calendars, or to help make a decision about sending your child to public or private school or are considering boarding school or in the process of preparing for college, this Education Answer Book will come in handy. We are especially excited to have been able to include a college section in this issue and we anticipate continuing to add more relevant information to help local residents make all important college decisions such as how to pay for it; how to prepare for it; and where to go. Whether you are an area business, a student or a parent, education is key to our future. With the growth, industry and the dynamic nature of North Atlanta, it will play an even more important role for all of us. I expect to see tremendous growth in the education sector here in North Atlanta including the already planned new Gwinnett Tech campus in Alpharetta and other educational institutions that will surely come. Our future is bright, and Appen Media plans to be here providing you with consistent, reliable and valuable education-related information going forward.

Content

Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 6 GAschools411.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 7 Early Foundation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 10 School News Starts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 14 Private School Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pages 18-19 Pre-K and Preschool. . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 20 Special Needs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 22 New to School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 23 SAT Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pages 28-29 School Calendars. . . . . . . . . . . .Pages 31, 33 School District Maps. . . . . . . . . . . . . Pages 36, 37 Education 101. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 38 College Guide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pages 39-52 HOPE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pages 50, 51 School Board members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 55

RAY APPEN Publisher If you missed advertising in this year’s Education Answer Book drop us an email at Advertising@NorthFulton.com or call us at 770442-3278 so we can remind you next year when we start working on the 2014 issue. Additionally, we publish quarterly education special focus editions in the weekly papers, so we’ll be glad to send you the schedule for those as well.

PUBLISHER S Ray & Christina Appen TO ADVERTISE IN THE 2013 ANSWER BOOK CALL: 770-442-3278 x100

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Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

To request copies for your organization, please call 770-442-3278 ext. 100

Reproduction of any content is strictly prohibited without prior written permission from the publisher. All efforts have been made to verify content. The Answer Book publishes the North Fulton Edition in the fall, The Medical Edition publishes at the beginning of the year. 319 N. Main Street, Alpharetta, GA 30009 www.northfulton.com

E D IT O R IA L Hatcher Hurd Jonathan Copsey Aldo Nahed Candy Waylock Katie VanBrackle news@northfulton.com

P R O DU C T I ON Kelly Brooks David Brown Kellie Jureka Geoffrey Thurow

ADV ER T IS ING Phyllis Anderton Hans Appen Helen Bausano Linda Cohen Lynn Danson Mike Dorman Susan Hernandez June Meltzer Jade Roders Kaylie Belcik advertising@northfulton.com

Email additions/corrections for the 2014 edition to Kellie@northfulton.com. Please recycle


2013 Edition

Appen Media | 2013 Edition | Education Answer Book™

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2013 Edition

North Fulton schools and students continue to shine I started working as the education reporter for Appen Media in 1997 when I had only a toddler at home and couldn’t tell you the names of five schools in North Fulton. Of course, at the time, the list was much shorter. This was pre-SPLOST, prebuilding boom, but definitely post enrollment explosion when every nuclear family with the 2.5 kids in tow was migrating to North Fulton. The result of the suburban influx was nearly every school in North Fulton was bursting at the seams, with students packed into portables, closets turned into teaching space, and teachers and administrators trying their best to handle schools with enrollments often twice the school’s capacity. Today, more than 20 new schools have been built in Roswell, Alpharetta, Johns Creek and Milton, and severe overcrowding has been replaced with slight inconvenience in most cases. While redistricting kids

Candy Waylock Education Editor candy@northfulton.com

to new schools is never easy (and I’ve been through some harrowing processes!), I think you would find few people who would want a return to the “old days” of portable cities. The bricks and mortar and addresses may have changed, but the one element of my job I still enjoy most is writing about the accomplishments and accolades poured upon the Fulton School System—especially schools in my North Fulton “beat.” There is an old adage in journalism that “it’s not news when you do your job,” but I don’t find that to be true when our

students are hitting it out of the park on a continual basis. I will always find room for the stories of success. It’s not a perfect school system, and not everyone who has been in a decision-making position has always done the right thing for the students. But for the most part the negative headlines have been few. I’ve covered the Fulton County Board of Education longer than six of the seven board members have been in office, and been through six superintendents. I like having the history (and my archives of past stories) to help provide background for most issues at a deeper level than most of my peers. I know where a few skeletons are buried, and not afraid to unearth a few when necessary! Most of all, I am thankful Appen Media recognizes how important education is to our readers and our community--and allows me to cover it exclusively. Most newspapers don’t have a dedicated education reporter.

I know that I am an anomaly in the media world, where trying to do more with less is critical to remaining in business. So what’s in store for education in my next 16 years? Hard to say, but I would venture a guess that it will not look radically different than in my past 16 years. I have cautious optimism that leaders will recognize that schools are not businesses, teachers are not expendable management and students are not factory workers. And most importantly, that one size, and one policy, does not fit every school. Enough said. But the bottom line is schools are strong when the community and parents are involved and active. The fact that North Fulton schools and students continue to shine, year after year, is a testament to that involvement and commitment…and I look forward to many more years of reporting these stories.

Where Your Child’s Story Unfolds If King’s Ridge Christian School (KRCS) is where your child’s story unfolds, then the unchartered map of their life becomes a journey guided by the experiences and relationships created along the way. As a Christ-centered school, enrollment in our multi-denominational, college preparatory PreK – 12th grade school allows students the years of progressive support to identify, unleash and showcase their individual potential surrounded by a community that knows, loves and accepts them.

Students Prepared “Well” King’s Ridge is about more than grades. Grades are critical, but the multiple outcomes of learning substantiate the value of tuition. KRCS students possess the skills employers seek in their work force and extend far beyond college preparation. Our students write well, speak well and relate well. How do we know King’s Ridge graduates perform well in these areas? 100% of our high school graduates are accepted into 4-year colleges and universities. Personalized college placement support starts in 9th grade and AP scores to qualify for college credit are in the top 15% of all U.S. students. It is our desire that King’s Ridge students become resilient and adaptive leaders with a strong connection to their faith and purpose. Our alumni continue their stories long after King’s Ridge. They carry a legacy and it is our goal to provide them with the tools needed to connect the dots between their learning, faith and future.

Christian Life and Journey for Life Impact Our journey of faith does not follow a formula. It is often unpredictable by what life puts in our path and it is how we respond that allows our faith to grow. Students learn a broader view of the world through the Christian education curriculum. A solid foundation of Biblical knowledge is developed in Lower School and Middle School. By the time

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students reach High School, the focus becomes more personal with courses such as Ethics and Practical Theology. As a Christian school, we recognize that each individual was made to be unique by design. God-given talents and passions are revealed and identified in the Journey for Life Impact curriculum that begins as early as PreK and continues into high school and throughout the alumni years. Each King’s Ridge student works through a series of steps to define their purpose by identifying skills and gifts. Their journey is enriched by the collective wisdom of faculty, coaches and community mentors who, along with their parents, speak into their lives to build confidence and empower them to become the leaders who God intended them to be.

Faculty Who Invest Ask any student about their experience at King’s Ridge and you will most likely hear about one of their favorite faculty members, advisors or coaches. Students and faculty collaborate on the journey of learning. Students notice and remark about the difference.

Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

Strong relationships with teachers result in motivated and inspired students. Each child’s potential is revealed by identifying their strengths and challenges and using that knowledge in the classroom, on the stage, playing field or court.

Future Vision & Admission Tours King’s Ridge Christian School is a multidenominational, college preparatory PreK- 12th grade school with a dynamic growth in enrollment to drive the opening of a new high school building in fall 2013. Located in Alpharetta, King’s Ridge serves families in north Fulton, east Cobb, Cherokee and Forsyth counties. Group admission tours are held on a regular schedule throughout the school year and starting in mid-March, admission tours are held by appointment. Register for tours by contacting the Admission Office at 770.754.5738 x136. Visit www.kingsridgecs.org for additional information. —Content supplied by King's Ridge Christian School


2013 Edition

The Bolles School: All Things Possible in academics, arts, athletics, boarding The Bolles School, a Northeast Florida independent college preparatory day and boarding school founded in 1933, has long been known as one of the top educational institutions in the country. This prominence is rooted in an enduring All Things Possible mindset that encourages students to discover their strengths and excel in them throughout their Bolles experience. “Our motto at Bolles is ‘pursuing excellence through integrity, courage and compassion,’ and that so accurately explains why a Bolles education inspires such a high level of character and quality in our boarding and day students,” said Head of School Brian Johnson. The Bolles School includes four beautiful and diverse campuses in Northeast Florida. Students in grades PreK-5 attend the Bolles Lower School Whitehurst Campus in Jacksonville or the Bolles Lower School Ponte Vedra Beach Campus in Ponte Vedra Beach. Sixth-, seventh- and eighth-grade students enjoy the private, historic surroundings of the Bolles Middle School Bartram Campus. The Bolles Upper School San Jose Campus accommodates grades 9-12. The school’s boarding program houses 90 students from eight states and

22 countries in grades 7-12. Bolles offers a comprehensive program in the fine and performing arts as part of a complete education for students in every grade level. Disciplines include dance, drama, instrumental music, vocal music, and visual arts through academic classes and extracurricular activities. Approximately 85% of the Bolles student body participates in more than 100 performances and gallery shows within the fine and performing arts department each year. Bolles academics enable students to develop a sense of exploration and personal values. That experience begins at the school’s two lower school levels, continues at the middle school level and culminates at the Bolles Upper School San Jose Campus. Bolles offers courses in five languages (including Chinese and Japanese) and 20 Advanced Placement Courses. Students have the opportunity to participate in exchange programs with schools in Spain, Japan, China, and France, and one study abroad program in Spain. Bolles’ educators are highly educated in their fields – 10 hold doctoral degrees and 91 hold master’s degrees. Technology also supports academics in important ways, including iPads in lower

school classrooms, robotics instruction at the middle school level, and video technology upgrades in upper school classrooms. The Bolles School athletic program has been recognized by several organizations as one of the best in the nation.  In 2009, ESPN RISE ranked Bolles as the #1 boys’ athletic program in the country and MaxPreps named Bolles the third best overall athletic program nationally in the same year. In 2005, Sports Illustrated ranked Bolles as the ninth best athletic program out of 38,000 high schools in the nation over the previous 10 years. Overall, Bolles has won 106 state championships in 15 different sports.

Since 1972 Bolles has had swimmers represented at each Olympics. A total of 48 Bolles students or former students have participated in the Olympics, representing a total of 28 countries or territories. Bolles swimming alumni include 10 Olympic medalists, winning a total of 13 medals. Bolles is a winning strategy. And never is that more clear than spring, when Bolles seniors commit to their college plans. The Class of 2012’s 193 graduates and one postgraduate student, for example, were accepted to 173 different colleges and universities and are now attending 83 different colleges and universities around the country. Together, they were offered, or qualified

for, more than $3.9 million of merit-based scholarships for their first year of college. Students, faculty and staff at The Bolles School take an All Things Possible approach to all areas of education. With world-class faculty and resources, Bolles students are able to sharpen their strengths – and shine. Bolles students understand that pursuing excellence through courage, integrity, and compassion is not only the school motto, but the foundation for a successful life. For more information about The Bolles School, visit www. Bolles.org. — Content supplied by The Bolles School.

GAschools411 Quick school resource links Association of Boarding Schools: boardingschools.com Association Montessori Internationale: Montessori-ami.org Atlanta Area Association Independent Schools: aaais.org Department of Education (GA): doe.k12.ga.us Fulton County BOE: FultonSchools.org Fulton Schools Links FultonSchools.org/ Georgia Association Christina Schools: coe.uga.edu/gac Ga. Asso. For Private Schools for Exceptional Children(learning issues): gapsec.org Forsyth County BOE: forsyth.k12.ga.us Georgia Master Edu. Resource gacollege411.org Great Schools (non profit) greatschools.org Ga. Charter School Association: gacharters.org Ga. Independent School Asso. Gisa-schools.org National Asso. Private Special Ed. Ctrs: napsec.org National Christina School Asso. nationalchristina.org Southern Association of Colleges & Schools: sacs.org Southern Asso. of Independent Schools: sais.org

GreatSchools.org (a non-profit) wants to get parents more involved in their children’s education by providing in-depth information about any K-12 school in the United States, including state test scores and parent reviews and comments. If you are searching for a school for your child or moving to a new location and want to find a house in the area of the best school, Greatschools is an invaluable resource. They also have an app, which is very handy when you’re out and about and still want to do research. GAcollege411.org is perhaps the best resource for parents who live in Georgia and have children who are in school and plan to go to college. It covers a wide range of topics ranging from finding money to help pay for college to skills assessment, career planning, writing resumes and much more. If you take any piece of information from this Education Answer Book it should be the awareness of this great resource. Fulton School Links is simply the short cut to a ton of resources on Fulton County’s BOE website. Appen Media | 2013 Edition | Education Answer Book™

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2013 Edition

Pediatric Urgent Care in Your Neighborhood Your closest Urgent Care Centers: Children’s at Forsyth At Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, our Urgent Care Centers are staffed with pediatricians and nurses who have special training to help care for the unique needs of children and teens. When it comes to kids and teens, we understand their growing bodies because pediatrics is all we do. If your child’s doctor isn’t available, our pediatricians are standing by nights, weekends and on major holidays to help diagnose and treat your child. In addition to a pediatric-trained staff, we have equipment that is specifically designed with children in mind. We know that when it’s your child, you want them to feel better quickly. Our on-site lab and X-ray services help to quickly diagnose your child in one location. And, if your child requires an X-ray, you can take comfort in knowing that Children’s utilizes advanced technology to reduce radiation doses by up to 50 percent compared to adult facilities. We will also electronically send prescriptions to your pharmacy, so it is ready when you get there. Accidents and illnesses are often unavoidable, so it’s important to have a plan and know where to go for care.

(The Avenue Forsyth) 410 Peachtree Parkway, Ste 300 Cumming, GA 30041 404-785-3100 choa.org/forsyth

Children’s at North Point

Urgent Care Center Hours: Monday to Friday: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Holidays Hours: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. • Memorial Day • Fourth of July • Labor Day • Thanksgiving • Christmas • New Year’s Day

Your closest Children’s Emergency Department:

3795 Mansell Road Alpharetta, GA 30022 404-785-8540 choa.org/northpoint

Scottish Rite

1001 Johnson Ferry Road NE Atlanta, GA 30342 404-785-5252 choa.org/scottishrite

Some physicians and affiliated healthcare professionals on the Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta team are independent providers and are not our employees.

—Content supplied by Children's Healthcare of Atlanta

Rivers Academy - Students Thrive in Unique Environment Rivers Academy is a fully accredited college prep school serving grades 4th through 12th. We are unique in that we serve students that are in pursuit of a passion at an elite level, unattainable with the constraints of a traditional school schedule. Rivers Academy students can get their academic and elective requirements met in a three day school week, leaving them time to practice, perform and travel. The hectic days of running from place to place and the inevitable exhaustion that follows become non issues. Our students can meet and exceed academic requirements and pursue their passions without sacrificing either. Rivers Academy is focused on student’s academics while keeping their authentic self intact along with offering them a social life and school events including prom, field trips and graduation. With advanced curriculum, small class sizes and positive peer interactions, an exceptional learning environment is provided. Our teachers are highly educated, devoted, and remarkable at delivering accelerated content. Students develop superior mastery and critical thinking skills while taking ownership of their learning. Rivers’ staff work together with parents to develop the whole child through mutual respect and character-driven

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expectations. Our approach to each stage of development is predicated on the academic and social needs of the students as they move through their formative school years.

Intermediate:

During the 4th and 5th grade, a child experiences a period of tremendous intellectual, emotional, and physical change. Consciousness begins to turn outward and there is a demand for students to move away from the what and understand the why and how. With caring teachers and high expectations our culture lends itself to optimizing academic foundations while leading to more confidence in the discovery of individual gifts and talents.

Middle School:

In the middle school years, it is crucial to help a student navigate through their academic development. We see them as what they’re going to become as well as who they currently are. Our students are in a secure environment that allows them to grow and learn without the negative pressures to conform as they discover their voice and creative self.  Keeping a child a “child” while acquiring tools towards independence is at the core of

Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

our middle school mission.

High School:

The challenge of getting through the chatter of the high school student’s electronic life and creating great thinkers is a focus we bring everyday into our classrooms. We offer the opportunity to learn without distraction in engaging classes with dedicated teachers. Students find others who are like themselves; motivated, respectful and serious about their goals. Our

students are not only prepared for college academically but have also mastered time management, independent thinking and ownership of work. Rivers Academy continues to live out its mission each day as it serves families that want to support their children’s dreams and reclaim the right to a quality education.

See RIVERS, Page 25


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2013 Edition

Loving to learn at Peachtree Park Prep Rushing through your afternoon to hurry and pick up your child as early as you can from their preschool?? Not to worry if your child is a student at Peachtree Park Prep (PPP) ! A very unusual thing happens at PPP on an almost daily basis…. parents arrive for pick up and leave without their child because they want to stay and continue the fun activities and exciting learning… loving to learn at PPP! Peachtree Park Prep is proud to be celebrating their 17th year of serving families of North Fulton County and the surrounding Gwinnett communities. The advanced curriculum is enhanced by specialty instruction in Art, Music, Spanish & Chinese Language Lab, Computer, and Physical Education, offered complimentary, Toddlers through First Grade. Combining high academic standards with an outstanding, long term faculty and administrative staff, Peachtree Park Prep is the hallmark of early private education. Test scores rank students, Pre-K and Kindergarten level, “higher than most schools across the nation”, as noted by ITBS Assessment Scoring Center and has given Peachtree Park Prep accolades as winner of BEST PRESCHOOL from several publications and internet services. Peachtree Park Prep also enjoys an outstanding reputation with the area’s private and public schools. PPP is very proud to have welcomed

many of the area’s private school Admissions Directors for their own private tour of PPP to observe the teaching methods and curriculum used due to the high academic achievements noticed and the high acceptance rate of students going into private school education. “We are very proud that parents will travel to our school even if it might

be a little out of their way for some of our Gwinnett families in Sugarloaf and Norcross and our Milton/ Roswell families. It’s great to know they feel it’s worth it for their child”, notes owner Kay Paschal. “The school is superb! The very long-term, loving faculty and administrative staff at Peachtree Park Prep says a lot about the

way the school is run. If parents of preschool children only knew all the wonderful things going on at PPP, you couldn’t build a school big enough to enroll everyone who wanted to bring their child to PPP…. and a 25% sibling discount too!” Summer Camp at Peachtree Park has been referred to by many as “the best kept secret in Alpharetta”. There are several mega-camps in the area, but the quality of faculty counselors and the awesome field trip venues of PPP’s “BEST SUMMER CAMP …EVER” ranks this day camp heads above the rest. With the right blend of outside physical events~field trips all over the Southeast~TrySomethingNew hobby and academic interests, the campers of PPP enjoy physical fitness, travel, and stay “summersharp”, returning to school reenergized! The Preppie Camp of PPP for Toddlers & Preschoolers features just the right blend of field trips, physical fitness fun, water play, and in-house field trips to compliment the academic camp instruction of each day. ~COME SEE WHAT EVERYONE IS TALKING ABOUT~ Infants~Toddlers~Preschool~ Kindergarten~First Grade~After School, Morning Prep, Summer Day Camp. Johns Creek 770-497-6680/ Alpharetta Campus 770-667-8854. peachtreeparkprep.com LOVING TO LEARN AT PPP ~ WE’RE AS HAPPY AS CAN BE

Building an early foundation By CAROLYN ASPENSON news@northfulton.com

Teaching early childhood education has been around for decades, but in recent years, prekindergarten has emerged as a natural warm-up for a traditional K-12 education. The state of Georgia pre-kindergarten program is offered at many daycare, Montessori and elementary schools throughout both Fulton and Forsyth counties. To begin pre-K, a child must be 4 years old by Sept. 1 of that school year. But how does a parent know if their child is ready for the jump into pre-K? Reg Griffin of the Georgia Department of Early Care and Learning says not to worry. “Our pre-K program is designed to help children develop the necessary social skills to begin a successful start in elementary school,” Griffin said. Griffin said the foundation of the Georgia pre-K program is to introduce children to basic schoolrelated skills such as raising their hand and sitting and paying attention. “Most 4-year-olds are on a level playing field,” he said, “and the program focuses on introductory education, like counting to 20 and basic reading

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skills.” Griffin said there is a curriculum model each pre-K is required to follow, and several curricula companies have designed programs to meet state requirements. Still, pre-K is optional, and many choose not to send their children to a formal school at age 4. In Georgia, pre-K is free for anyone who wants it. Other states offer pre-K for children from lowerincome families, so they can catch up to their more affluent peers in vocabulary and social skills. According to Spark Action, over five million children attend some type of preschool program to help prepare the student academically and socially for kindergarten and beyond. Kelly Piatty, of Primrose School Steeplechase in Cumming, said they often refer parents of potential pre-K students to the state website for information. “We focus on things like letter recognition, social skills, using their imagination and basic reading skills,” she said. Heather Phagan sent her son Sam to pre-K this year. “I was already working on the basics, but he’s is already writing his name and counting,” Phagan said.

Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

How to get a head start on preparing your child for pre-K Read to your child and introduce him or her to picture books with word recognition. Teach your child colors and numbers. Talk to your child about sharing and taking turns. Teach your child how to express emotion without hitting or showing frustration. Have your child evaluated by a teacher or counselor if you feel your child isn’t ready for pre-K.


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2013 Edition

BRIDGEWAY CHRISTIAN ACADEMY: Strong Faith. Strong Families. Strong Futures. Bridgeway Christian Academy (BCA) is a school community unlike any other. At Bridgeway you will find strong leaders and teachers dedicated to providing a Christ-centered learning environment that encourages parent involvement and reinforces the beliefs and values taught in the Christian home. The purpose of BCA is to assist parents in growing and equipping children to become learned, discerning, fruitful disciples of Christ. Serving families with students in preschool through eighth grade, Bridgeway strives to help our students reach their full potential based on their unique gifts, strengths, and needs. Bridgeway is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) and the Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI). A proven curriculum challenges students on each grade level while emphasizing a biblical worldview. Each classroom is equipped with an interactive Smartboard enhancing the interactive learning experience. In addition to academics a strong emphasis is placed on character development and community service with opportunities available for all grades and a quarterly requirement of five hours of service time for Middle School students. Service projects range from hosting a fall festival at a local homeless shelter for women and children, to raising money for cystic fibrosis, to making crafts with residents in nearby assisted living facilities. Bridgeway students also lead weekly chapels featuring live drama and music

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performed by individuals as well as the Middle School praise band. Bridgeway’s rich fine arts department includes art, band, drama, and music. A fine arts festival is held each spring showcasing the students’ artistic talents in visual as well as performing arts. Students in grades fifth and up have the opportunity to participate in a wide range of inter-scholastic sports including basketball, golf, soccer, tennis, and volleyball. The Bridgeway Lions currently reign as the NAML - A Boys Varsity Soccer Champions and the Girls Volleyball (both JV and Varsity) Champions – for the second consecutive year. This year Bridgeway launched the “BCA Leadership Institute” dedicated to helping students develop leadership skills to better prepare them for the challenges of high school, college, and adulthood. The first step was to partner with Atlanta-based, nonprofit organization Growing Leaders to integrate an exciting leadership training program into the middle school Bible curriculum. Recognized as one of the most effective programs for training and inspiring the next generation of leaders, Habitudes covers the art of self-leadership – how to master and manage your own discipline, emotions, character, identity, and time; building relationship skills in leaders; the fundamentals of leadership including vision, planning, leading change, focus, initiative and the power of example; and transforming organizational culture. Bridgeway plans to expand the “Leadership Institute”

Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

to include a practicum for eighth grade students with real-world projects within local businesses. The practicum will give students the unique opportunity to integrate school subjects and real world skills such as problem solving, communication, and analytical thinking. Bridgeway graduates and their parents consistently say that Bridgeway prepared them to handle the pressures of high school by making wise, faith-based decisions, and that they are MORE prepared academically for high school than their peers. Bridgeway will be celebrating its 15th anniversary in the fall of 2013. Located in Alpharetta, GA, Bridgeway offers personal tours Monday – Thursday between 8:30 am and 1 pm. Please contact the BCA Admissions Office at 678.942.1126, or visit Bridgeway online at www.bridgewayca.org to schedule a personal tour.


2013 Edition

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2013 Edition

Fulton Science Academy Private School Incorporating Innovation in Education Fulton Science Academy Private School offers students a real difference in education. In addition to our competitive admission criteria, grade level placement decisions are multi-faceted, weighted more on student ability and social maturity than their age. We offer S.T.E.A.M. education to meet the growing demand for higherlevel logic and reasoning skills that will be necessary for the future success of our students. Additionally, we work to develop student presentation, writing, organization, and timemanagement abilities from the earliest grades, so that our students are wellprepared for all their future endeavors. Our educational model coupled with our nationally award winning faculty yields the highest level of student achievement possible.

Our school is very unique due to our high population of gifted students. At present, over 85% of our students are enrolled in gifted and advanced level classes. Other than our rigorous curriculum to challenge these students, we continually seek opportunities to help these students develop their potential. Adding to our award winning Science Olympiad, Tech Fair, Mathematics, and Robotics teams, we are now beginning to prepare our students for International Olympiads in such areas as Informatics, Physics, and Mathematics. To further engage our unique population, FSAPS elementary grades incorporate the Stanford University Education Program for Gifted Youth into their weekly curriculum. This program is designed to challenge and move students to the next level

in their academic abilities. Also, in addition to weekly art, computer, and music classes, our elementary grades engage in robotics classes to satisfy all areas of a S.T.E.A.M. curriculum. Further for middle school students, we have incorporated an engineering program into their weekly studies. Gateway To Technology is a program, which features a projectbased curriculum designed to challenge and engage the natural curiosity and imagination of students. Our students envision, design, and test their ideas with the same advanced modeling software used by top engineering and technology companies. Students study mechanical and computer control systems, as well as, design robotics and animation. Additionally, they explore the importance of energy, including innovative

ways to reduce, conserve, and produce it using solar, thermal, and wind power. The knowledge that our students gain and the skills they build from the GTT program create a strong foundation for further S.T.E.A.M. learning in high school and beyond. At FSAPS development of the whole student is just as important as academics.

Physical education is a part of every school day to allow for the healthy physical development and increased energy of all students. We, also, provide foreign language studies in all grades for more fully developed communication skills. In addition to these

See FSA, Page 35

Fulton becomes state’s largest charter school system School board receives charter from state to promote more flexibility at school level By CANDY WAYLOCK candy@northfulton.com

The Fulton County School System became the state’s largest charter school system this year, paving the way for innovation and flexibility for the system’s 94,000 students in 103 local schools. School officials emphasize the action authorizes the Fulton School System to become a charter district – not a system of charter schools. Therefore, some schools may opt to remain relatively unchanged, while others may seek greater flexibility depending on the needs of the school. “As a lifetime educator, this is a game-changer,” said Fulton Superintendent Robert Avossa. “Being a charter system will provide our district more autonomy to do the things that can really increase student achievement and guide continual improvement.” Beginning this school year, local schools can seek approval to waive some education requirements in order to implement innovations and programs school leaders believe will lead to improved performance. In a charter system, overall governance remains with the Fulton County Board of Education, which must approve any waivers requested by each individual school. Any policies adopted at the school board level must still be followed system-wide.

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A charter school, on the other hand, operates under an agreement, or charter, with the board of education and for the most part functions as a separate entity. Avossa, who has been at the helm of Fulton Schools for just over a year, is familiar with the charter system concept. His previous employer, the Charlotte-Mecklenburg (N.C.) School System was a charter system, and Avossa has long supported decision-making at the school level as opposed to a central office. Existing charter schools in Fulton County will continue to operate under their individual charters approved by the board, and are not impacted by this conversion. Fulton Schools has been working toward this goal for more than two years as the state has pushed for school systems to adopt a more locally centered style of government. Fulton Schools will phase in the charter system implementation over a five-year period, beginning with the 2012-2013 school year. Schools would be expected to have a functioning governance council by the 2014-2015 school year after school-level training. These governing boards, which consist of school staff, parents and community members, will replace the Local Schools Advisory Councils (LSAC) and will set direction for the school. While some parents and principals expressed concern with the potential for over-reaching governance boards, school system officials said charter status does not hand the school over to the governance council. “These councils would have the flexibility to look

Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

at innovations, but any innovations by the council could only be implemented [if approved] by the system staff and reviewed by the superintendent,” said Avossa. “It’s designed with appropriate checks and balances.” Focus on people, curriculum and finance under charter system Local schools can seek flexibility in three areas: people, curriculum and finances. • People – System-wide, policies could be approved to allow non-traditional teachers. Through a charter system, Fulton can hire people who may not have a teaching degree, but have valuable experience. Other items under “people” could include mandated parent involvement, adopting a student dress code and other flexibility that an individual school may want. • Curriculum – Schools can seek waivers from seat-time requirements, and focus on mastery of tasks. At the local level, schools could add courses and subjects, restructure TAG or seek waivers from other current regulations. • Finances – Charter status allows freedom from some state-mandated spending requirements, allowing budgets to be based on need. This freedom could extend to the local school level, allowing local schools a greater say in how budgets are allocated. Items that could not be waived under a charter include a host of federal and state regulations, including provisions of the No Child Left Behind Law, state assessments such as the CRCT and End of Course Tests, civil rights laws, fair labor standards and program requirements for students with special needs.


2013 Edition

Fulton Science Academy Private School

FSA Faculty and Administration Have an 11 Year History of Providing Award Winning Educational Excellence National Blue Ribbon Winning Administration & Faculty

Top Honors at Academic Competitions

Highest Accolades in Robotics and Technology Tournaments

Top Scores in Nationally Normed Tests

Our Formula For Success Continues … Rigorous Engineering,Arts Arts&&Math) Math) Rigorousand andInnovative InnovativeS.T.E.A.M. S.T.E.A.M.Curriculum Curriculum(Science, (Science, Technology, Technology, Engineering, Small School School Environment Small of students 15 students class (Pre-K through && 2020 students perper class (6 through 8) 8) MaxMax of 15 perper class (Preschool through5)5) students class (6 through iPads for Grades 6 through 8 SmartBoards in Every Classroom iPads for Grades 6 through 8 - SmartBoards in Every Classroom Gifted Program--Grade GradeLevel Level Acceleration Acceleration and Gifted Program and Progression Progression Opportunities Opportunities High School Level Classes for MS High School Level Classes for MS Students Students NationallyNormed NormedMAP MAPand andITBS ITBS Testing Testing (Grades Nationally (Grades K-8) K-8) Stanford University Education Program for Gifted Youth Duke TIP SAT Preparation Stanford University Education Program for Gifted Youth - Duke TIP SAT Preparation Local, Out of State & International Field Trips Foreign Language Program Starting Pre-K Local, Out of State & International Field Trips - Foreign Language Program Starting ininPreschool Music, Arts, Computer and Robotics Classes Weekly - Physical Education Class Daily Music, Arts, Computer and Robotics Classes Weekly - Physical Education Class Daily Top Performing Academic Teams - Free After School Clubs Top Performing Academic Teams - Free After School Clubs Free Tutoring - Band and Orchestra - Uniforms Free Tutoring - Band and Orchestra - Uniforms College Mentorship Program - Active Parent Volunteer Organization College Mentorship Program - Active Parent Volunteer Organization Enrollment is open to ALL Georgia residents - Competitive Admission Criteria No September 1st cut-off for Pre-K, Kindergarten and 1st Grade

Enroll through 8th8th Grade) Enroll Today (Pre-K (Preschool through Grade) www.fultonscienceacademy.org | ph:(678) 366-2555 admission@fultonscienceacademy.org Appen Media | 2013 Edition | Education Answer Book™

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2013 Edition

Mount Pisgah Christian School: College Prep. Life Ready. Being prepared for college is important. But to be successful, today’s students must be ready to face the challenges of life. That’s the Pisgah difference. The essence of Mount Pisgah Christian School’s mission is best described as: College Prep. Life Ready. Pisgah provides a loving and nurturing environment where children are challenged and inspired to discover, explore, and pursue their God-given talents and abilities. Faculty members are committed to developing relationships that build trust and create a safe atmosphere where students can think, ask questions, and grow closer in their walk with God. Pisgah builds relationships and connections, partnering with families to help children discover inner talent and potential. The Pisgah standard is high – excellence. The administration and faculty value the unique nature of each student and are dedicated to the academic success of each individual. Personalized instruction and one-on-one relationships between faculty and students are Pisgah trademarks. As other area schools dramatically increase class sizes, Pisgah maintains a personal approach to

education. The Life Ready Advisement program guides students through the education process and produces dramatic results, initially in self-discovery and academic performance, and ultimately, in college acceptances and lifelong success. Pisgah has a remarkable record of 90% of graduates accepted to their first college of choice. Pisgah’s innovative programs provide a multitude of choices with opportunities for travel, mission work, creative learning programs and exciting class offerings (examples include: trips to Italy and the Holy Land, Government Studies in Washington, D.C., Forensic Science, Media Production, Sports Ethics, and Baroque Painting). State of the art technology in all instructional classrooms provides engaging hands-on experiences. iQuest offers condensed schedules for students who are pursuing a passion outside of the classroom (athletics, arts, etc.). Pisgah Pathfinders assists families needing before or after school care for children in kindergarten through fifth grade. With a comprehensive approach to learning, Pisgah reaches the whole child through mind, body, and

spirit. The exceptional athletic and arts programs allow students to discover talents and build self-confidence. Impressive theater, choral, band and visual arts presentations provide excellent opportunities for students to express creativity. The 33-acre Patriot Athletic Campus hosts exciting football, soccer, track, softball, and baseball games and the state of the art Powerhouse Strength and Conditioning Training Center gives Pisgah athletes a competitive edge. Pisgah offers one of metro Atlanta’s most comprehensive middle school athletic programs. In addition, the varsity and junior Patriot programs are led by award-winning coaches who are exceptionally qualified and dedicated. Students experience true acceptance at Pisgah. From infants to high school seniors, Pisgah meets the needs of every child. Dedicated teachers have a passion for working with children, opening a new world before their eyes in the classroom, on the stage, on the playing field, in worship services, and in the local, national, and worldwide mission fields. Experience Pisgah and discover the difference when students are prepared for college and ready for life. Visit the school website:

www.experiencepisgah.org. Schedule your personal tour by calling the Office of Admissions at 678-336-3443.

—Content supplied by Mount Pisgah Christian School

Voters approve charter schools amendment to constitution Growth in charter schools continues to rise each year By CANDY WAYLOCK candy@northfulton.com

Georgia voters overwhelmingly passed a constitutional amendment in November to re-establish the State Charter Schools Commission, providing another pathway for the approval of charter schools. House Bill 797 allows for a seven-member Charter School Commission appointed by political leaders to approve charter schools in local districts — without the approval of the local board of election. The amendment to the constitution was necessary to overturn the state Supreme Court’s decision two years ago, which ruled the previous State Charter Commission unconstitutional because it mandated local tax revenues be used to fund the stateapproved schools. The new legislation does not require the use of

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local funding for state charter schools, but rather an allocation from the state each year based on a perpupil formula and other methods. With the passage of HB 797, petitioners now have three paths to gaining approval for a charter school: Submit an application to the local board of education for approval as a local charter school (would allow charter school to receive local funding in addition to state funding). Submit a locally denied application to the State Board of Education to become a state chartered special school. With the passage of HB 797, apply directly to the State Charter Commission for approval to become a state charter school. There is, however, a caveat to the third option, explained Lou Erste, director of the Charter Schools Division for the state DOE. “Charter petitioners can apply directly to the State Charter Commission without first petitioning their local board only if they are proposing to serve a statewide attendance zone,” said Erste. “Otherwise, they must be denied by a local board of education before they can apply to the commission.”

Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

If approved by the State Charter Schools Commission, the charter school must still be approved by a majority vote of the State Board of Education. Charter schools are public schools which operate within an agreement, or charter, from either the local board of education or the state, which provides some freedom from state and local education mandates. In exchange for this flexibility, charter schools must perform at the same level, or higher, than the academic achievements of peer students in traditional public schools in the district. Last school year, Georgia had 217 charter schools serving 56 school districts. In all, nearly 131,000 Georgia public school students were enrolled in either a conversion or start-up charter school or a charter system school. This school year, that number grew by more than 100,000 when the Fulton County School System became the state’s largest charter school system. Most of the growth in charter school students is within charter systems (such as Fulton Schools); however, student enrollment in conversion and start-up charter schools increased more than 16 percent from the previous year.


2013 Edition

Appen Media | 2013 Edition | Education Answer Book™

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2013 Edition

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* This map trademarked by Appen Media ** May not be all inclusive. Please email kellie@northfulton.com with additions or changes.

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Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media


2013 Edition 1. Alpharetta Christian Academy is located at 44 Academy St., Alpharetta, Ga. and can be contact at 770-475-5762. 29. Blessed Trinity Catholic High School is located at 11320 Woodstock Road, Roswell, Ga. and can be contacted at 678-2779083. Blessed Trinity encompasses grades 9-12 with an enrollment of 960 students. 2. Bridgeway Christian A c a d e m y is located at 4755 Kimball Bridge Road, Alpharetta, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-751-1972, 678942-1126 or bridgewayca.org. Bridgway encompasses Pre-school – Eighth grade students with an enrollment of 205. Tuition ranges from $1,600 - $3,800 and enrolls from January – August. Bridgeway is not a boarding school. 3. Chandler Academy is located at 13580 Hopwell Road, Milton, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-3460509. 30. Chrysalis Experimental Academy is located at 10 Mansell Ct. East, Suite 500, Roswell, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-649-7077. Chrysalis encompasses grades 6-12 with an enrollment of 42. 4. Cornerstone Christian Academy is located at 5295 Triangle Parkway, Peachtree Corners, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-4419222. 31. Cornerstone School is located at 4888 Browns Bridge Road, Cumming, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-205-8202. Cornerstone encompasses Pre-K - 10th grade students with an enrollment of 350.

33. Fellowship Christian School is located at 10965 Woodstock Road, Roswell, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-993-1650. Fellowship encompasses K-4 - 12th grade students with an enrollment of 785. 9. Friendship Christian A cad em y is located at 3160 Old Atlanta Road, Suwanee, Ga. and can be contacted at 678-845-0418. 10. Fulton Science Academy is located at 1675 Hembree Road, Alpharetta, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-753-4141 or fultonscienceacademy.org. FSA encompasses Pre-K – Eighth grade students with an enrollment of 250. Tuition averages at $8,500 and has open enrollment. FSA is not a boarding school. 47. Greater Atlanta Christian School is located at 1575 Indian Trail Lilburn Road, Norcross, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-243-2000. 46. Home Sweet Homeschool is located at 41 Church St., Alpharetta, Ga. and can be contacted at 678-339-2777 or homesweethomeschool.net. Home Sweet Homeschool encompasses K - fifth grade. 11. High Meadows School is located at 1055 Willeo Road, Roswell, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-9932940. 12. Holy Redeemer Catholic School is located at 3380 Old Alabama Road, Johns Creek, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-4101454. 13. Horizon Christian Academy is located at 2160 Freedom Parkway, Cumming, Ga. and can be contacted at 678-947-3583.

5. The Cottage School is located at 700 Grimes Bridge Road, Roswell, Ga and can be contacted at 770641-8688.

34. Kids R Kids 52 is located at 3036 Old Atlanta Road, Cumming, Ga. and can be contacted at 678-6483175.

6. Covenant Christian Academy is located at 6905 Post Road, Cumming, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-674-2990.

14. King’s Ridge Christian School is located at 2765 Bethany Bend, Alpharetta, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-754-5738 or kingsridgecs.org. King's Ridge encompasses Pre-K – Twelfth grade students with an enrollment of 715. Tuition ranges from $12,311 — $15,230 and has its first round of enrollment April 5, then rolling admissions thereafter. King's Ridge is not a boarding school.

32. Crabapple Montessori School is lcoated at 12387 Crabapple Road, Alpharetta, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-569-5200. Crabapple encompasses 18 months – 12 years old with an enrollment of 160. 7. Cresco Montessori School is located at 4040 Johns Creek Parkway, Suwanee, Ga. and can be contacted at 678-381-0020. 8. Eaton Academy is located at 1000 Old Roswell Lakes Parkway, Roswell, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-645-2673.

35. Legacy Community Academy is located at 11940 Alpharetta Highway, Suite 146, Alpharetta, Ga. and can be contacted at www. LookatLegacy.org or 678-6242234. 15. Let’s Learn Academy is located

at 11660 Alpharetta Highway, Suite 320, Roswell, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-754-0085. 16. The Lionheart School is located at 225 Roswell St., Alpharetta, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-7724555. 17. McGinnis Woods Country Day School is located at 5368 McGinnis Ferry Road, Alpharetta, Ga. and can be contacted at 770664-7764 or mcginniswoods.org. McGinnis Woods encompasses Pre-K – Eighth grade students with an enrollment of 275. Tuition ranges from $8,875 - $ 11, 575 and has rolling admissions. McGinniss Woods in not a boarding school. 18. Mill Springs Academy is located at 13660 New Providence Road, Alpharetta, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-360-1336. 36. Montessori School of Alpharetta is located at 3290 Old Alabama Road, Alpharetta, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-6671277. Montessori of Alpharetta encompasses 15 months – 12 year olds with an enrollment of 52. 37. Montessori School of Cumming is located at 4601 Post Road, Cumming, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-205-6773. Montessori of Cumming has an enrollment of 57. 19. Montessori Academy at Sharon Springs is located at 2830 Old Atlanta Road, Cumming, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-205-6277. 20. Montessori Kids Academy is located at 3034 Old Atlanta Road, Cumming, Ga. and can be contacted at 678-208-0774. 21. Montessori at Vickery is located at 6285 Post Road, Cumming, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-7779131. 22. Mount Pisgah Christian School is located at 9820 Nesbit Ferry Road, Johns Creek, Ga. and can be contacted at 678-336-3443 or experiencepisgah.org. Mount Pisgah encompasses Pre-school – Twelfth grade students with an enrollment of 995. Tuition ranges from $9,045 - $17,385. Mount Pisgah is not a boarding school. 38. Nesbit Ferry Montessori is located at 9330 Nesbit Ferry Road, Alpharetta, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-552-8454. Nesbit Ferry encompasses 2 year olds – fourth grade with an enrollment of 155. 23. Pinecrest Academy is located at 955 Peachtree Parkway, Cumming, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-

888-4477. 39. North Atlanta International Academy is located at 1235 Peachtree Parkway, Bldg. 600, Cumming, Ga. and ca be contacted at 770-205-5574. North Atlanta International encompasses Pre-K - fifth grade students with and enrollment of 65. 40. Perimeter Christian School is located at 9500 Medlock Bridge Road, Duluth, Ga. and can be contacted at 678-405-2300. Perimeter encompasses K - eighth grade. 24. Porter Academy is located at 200 Cox Road, Roswell, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-594-1313. 41. Rivers Academy is located at 38 North Main St., Alpharetta Ga. and can be contacted at 770-475-0081. 25. Riverside Military Academy is located at 2001 Riverside Drive, Gainesville, Ga. and can be contacted at 800-462-2338 or 770538-2938. 42. Roswell Bodukan is located at 11516 Woodstock Road, Roswell, Ga. and can be contacted at 770649-6868. 43. Saint Francis School is located at 13440 Cogburn Road, Alpharetta, Ga. and can be contacted at 678-339-9989 . St. Francis encompasses K - 12th grade students with an enrollment of 750. 26. Swift School is located at 300 Grimes Bridge Road, Roswell, Ga. and can be contacted at 678-2054988. 44. The Atlanta Academy is located at 2000 Holcomb Woods Parkway, Roswell, Ga. and can be contacted at 678-461-6102. Atlanta Academy encompasses K-3 - eighth grade students with an enrollment of 245. 27. Village Montessori School is located at 1610 Woodstock Road,Roswell, Ga. and can be contacted at 770-552-0834. 45. Wesleyan School is located at 5405 Spalding Drive, Norcross, Ga. and can be contacted at 770448-7640. Wesleyan encompasses K - 12th grade students with an enrollment of 1,035. 28. Woodward Academy's north campus is located at 6565 Boles Road, Johns Creek and can be contacted at 404-765-4001 or woodward.edu. Woodward encompasses Pre - K – Twelfth grade students with an enrollment of 2,670. Tuition ranges from $10,000 - $21,950. Woodward is not a boarding school.

Appen Media | 2013 Edition | Education Answer Book™

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2013 Edition

The difference between pre-kindergarten and preschool By CAROLYN ASPENSON news@northfulton.com

The state of Georgia does not require children enter a pre-kindergarten program, and many parents choose to keep or register their children for preschool instead. Children must be 4 years old by Sept. 1 to begin pre-K, whereas preschool children range in age from 3 to 6. “We have a learning-based preschool program that follows closely with our pre-K program, and we work off of lesson plans,” said April Escobar of Discovery Point in Cumming. “Our program prepares kids for pre-K with things like how to hold a pencil,” she said. Reg Griffin, chief communication officer for Bright from the Start at the Georgia Department of Early Care and Learning, says pre-kindergarten programs are designed to prepare a child for an elementary school education. “We require our pre-K schools to provide instruction using the Georgia Pre-K Content Standards, which are aligned with the Kindergarten Georgia Performance Standards,” Griffin said. Pre-K runs five days a week from

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8 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. and follows the county public school calendar, but preschool does not. “Kids come to preschool based on their family schedule,” Escobar said. “We don’t require a specific schedule.” Teachers teach pre-K programs while preschool programs do not require staff with teaching degrees. The state of Georgia has over 3,000 certified teachers teaching pre-K in both public and private schools, and the lead teacher must have a specialization in early childhood education. The Georgia pre-kindergarten program is a lottery-funded program and is free to Georgia residents. “We do not charge for pre-K,” said Kelly Piatty of Primrose School, Steeple Chase, “but we do have a fee for food, and we charge that on a monthly basis.” Preschool costs vary by facility but can cost up to $1,200 a month, including food. Heather Phagan’s son attends pre-K at Discovery Point. “I decided to go with the prekindergarten program for Sam,” she said, “because I felt it prepared him best for kindergarten.”

Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

Students rely on bus transportation By Candy Waylock candy@northfulton.com NORTH FULTON, Ga. – Fulton School buses service nearly 78,000 students who rely on bus transportation each day, with the fleet of yellow buses traveling more than 30,000 miles each day beginning before 6 a.m. and ending after 5 p.m. In the past, parents waited at the bus stop, guessing when the bus might arrive. Today, parents can get texts from the school if something unusual happens with bus times. Fulton students are more fortunate than many of their outof-county peers when it comes to bus transportation. The state only provides funding for those students who live more than a

mile-and-half from school. For safety reasons, Fulton provides transportation for every student whose walk to school may be considered “hazardous,” which translates into nearly 85 percent of the enrollment. To operate most efficiently, most buses run several routes along the 1,800 routes plotted. “For the most part, our drivers have several routes,” said Hale. “It allows us to be more efficient when we are able to use the buses for a double run.”

One Day in Fulton Schools

760 buses running 1,800 bus routes 30,000 miles traveled 78,000 students arrive 6,634 teachers in 102 schools 1 million textbooks opened 82,000 cafeteria meals 16 million square feet of classroom space


2013 Edition

Appen Media | 2013 Edition | Education Answer Book™

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2013 Edition

Special needs education in North Fulton remains strong By WILL HOUP news@northfulton.com

NORTH FULTON, Ga.—North Fulton prides itself in all fields of education, especially special education. From nationally recognized public schools to highly specialized private schools, the area offers a litany of services and choices for students with special needs and their parents. Parents have two main options in schooling their children—public school and private school. The same options are available for students with special needs. In public schools, North Fulton offers an array of services from smaller academic classes to occupational and speech therapy. “It really depends on the need for that child,” said Cristy Smith, the director of administrative services for Fulton County Schools’ Services for Exceptional Children. “Once we determine the child is eligible for services, the Individualized Education Process team (IEP) will decide the supports and services necessary to ensure education progress.” IEP is the method toward determining whether or not a child is eligible for special education services. It begins when a teacher identifies an area of weakness in a student’s performance. A parent, teacher team is then comprised. The team will determine, implement and monitor interventions for the student. The interventions will continue if they aid the student. If not, then the team may refer the student for a psychological evaluation and services through the special education department. “It’s an interesting process,” said Thomas Munn, the director of instruction for Fulton County schools’ Services for Exceptional

Special Needs Schools and Centers 1.

Alexander Academy, 1090 Powers Place, Alpharetta. 770-777-0475. 2nd – 12th. 15 Students. $5,000-$18,000/yr. alexsanderacademy.org

2.

Bedford School, 5665 Milam Rd., Fairburn. 770774-8001. 1st – 9th. 131 students $16,350/yr. thebedfordschool.org

3.

Brain Balance Achievement Centers, 30 E. Crossville Road, Roswell. 770-650-8010. 780 Peachtree Industrial Blvd., Suwanee. 770-614-4790. brainbalancecenters.com

4.

5.

6.

The Cottage School, 700 Grimes Bridge Rd., Roswell. 770-641-8688. 6th – 12th. 140 students. $22,950-$23,950/yr. cottageschool.org Hayden’s Way, 1005 Alderman Drive, Ste. 203, Alpharetta. 770-351-6304. K – 12th. 30 Students. $11,000-$21,000/yr. haydensway.com Jacob’s Ladder Neurodevelopmental School and Therapy Center. 407 Hardscrabble Rd., Roswell.

Children. “Not every child with a disability qualifies for special education services. Some very high-functioning children are doing just fine without extra support. “We are trying to identify why the child is struggling. Is the child struggling because of a disability or from the teacher’s teaching method?” Munn said. “What’s the impact of that disability? Is it impacting the learning? Just because I have a certain medical diagnosis, it doesn’t mean I need an IEP.” While all North Fulton public schools provide services for children with special needs, some have specific programs only offered at a few locations across the school district. These offerings are limited because the number of children in need for the specific programs occurs less frequently. For instance, a classroom designed for a deaf child who also needs sign language interpretation and intensive communication support will be only available at one public school. “If there’s a child at a school

where a special program is not offered, the district will provide transportation to the school that offers the programs deemed necessary by the IEP team,” Smith said. North Fulton also has several private schools designed for children with special needs as in the Lionheart School of Alpharetta, located on Roswell Street. Since opening in 2000, the school has become a wellknown name in the special education world. Lionheart serves 35 students in its fulltime program, offering a 2:1 teacher-to-student ratio, and provides additional services for children at other schools. “[We] focus on engagement and critical thinking,” said Tamara Spafford, the executive director of The Lionheart School. “Academic and therapeutic goals are defined and addressed for individual profiles throughout the day, which gives students the best chance to develop their strengths and progress successfully across multiple areas.

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Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

770-998-1017. PreK – 12th. 75 students. $29,000/yr. jacobsladdercenter.com 7.

Kaleidoscope ABA School, 153 Norcross St., Roswell. 770-993-7008. 2 – 10yrs. 9 students. $30,000/yr. kaleidosopeaba.org

8.

The Lionheart School, 225 Roswell St., Alpharetta. 770-772-4555. 6 – 21 yrs. 36 students. $25,000/yr. thelionheartschool.com

9.

Mill Springs Academy, 13660 New Providence Rd., Alpharetta. 770-360-1336. 1st – 12th. 320 students. $20,570/yr. millsprings.org

10. Porter Academy, 200 Cox Rd., Roswell. 770-5941313. PreK – 8th. 66 students. $18,000-$19,000/yr. porteracademy.org 11. The Swift School, 300 Grimes Bridge Rd., Roswell. 678-205-4988. 1st – 8th. 214 students. $21,495$21,895/yr. the swiftschool.org

“Our students have difficulty with academics, sensory processing, motor planning, visual and auditory processing, receptive and expressive language, attention, memory, executive function or social interactions.” The school also offers several job-training choices for students to teach them how to integrate back into their home communities for instance a campus coffee shop and a garden as well as work with the Alpharetta Parks and Recreation. State law requires that children with special needs be served in school until they are 21-years-old under the individuals with disabilities education act (IDEA). The Lionheart School tuition is $25,000 an academic term. There are several scholarships available such as the Georgia Special Needs Scholarship (SB10), the Georgia GOAL Scholarship program and Lionheart scholarships as well. Another alternative for parents of children with special needs is to contact a special

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education advocate. Debbie Dobbs is an educational consultant and child advocate. She runs the North Fulton Autism Support Group for Parents and Professionals. Dobbs in particular looks for funding resources for parents. She helps find alternative forms of funding like medical waivers and grants. She said that there are several options available, but the issue is their price. “Unfortunately, I hear parents saying how costly the options like home schooling, private schooling or online courses are,” Dobbs said. “There are numerous options that are available. However, there are limited resources. Parents have to fight harder and harder to gain access to appropriate services. “One of the best ways to find out about all this information is to talk to other families,” Dobbs said. “You might get a little from school to school. But you need talk to other moms and dads who are going through the same thing. There’s power in numbers.”

Call your account executive TODAY to reserve your spot or 770.442.3278 ext. 100


2013 Edition

Enrollment information needed for school Georgia law requires that children must be 5 years old by Sept. 1 in order to enroll in kindergarten, and 6 years old by Sept. 1 to enroll in first grade. The only exceptions are: Students who are age 5 by Dec. 31 and who have lived outside Georgia for the past two years AND been enrolled in a public or accredited private kindergarten may enroll in public kindergarten in Georgia. Students who are 6 by Dec. 31 and meet the above criteria may enroll in first grade in Georgia.

Parents required to verify residency

Students who attend schools in the Fulton County School System must meet the criteria for residency in order to enroll. The criteria include: • The dwelling in which the student resides must appear on the tax rolls of Fulton County. • The student resides with his/her parent or legal guardian. • The student resides with a foster parent. • The student is an emancipated minor. • The student is homeless. Parents or legal guardians must sign a notarized “Affidavit of Residency” for each child each year confirming the

student is a resident of Fulton County.

Registration Requirements

Ear, Eye and Dental Screening No child entering a Georgia school for the first time shall be admitted unless the child has a certificate of eye, ear and dental screening. This Georgia Department of Human Resources certificate (Form 3300) must be signed by the Health Department or a licensed Georgia physician.

Immunization certificate

Georgia requires students to be immunized against measles, mumps, polio, rubella, whooping cough, tetanus, diphtheria, hepatitis B, haemophilus influenza and varicella. Immunization information must be on the proper Georgia Department of Human Resources form; these are available through the Fulton County Department of Health and Wellness or local physicians (Form 3231).  

Birth Certificate

Must be government issued -hospital certificates are not acceptable. Birth certificates may be requested from: Georgia Department of Human Resources Vital Records

2600 Skyland Drive, NE Atlanta, Ga. 30319-3640 phone: 404-679-4701 fax: 404-524-4278

Proof of Residency

Two documents proving residence in the attendance area must be provided for all students. Records for verification of residency must include any two of the following: • Copy of home mortgage payment book • Current utility bill (gas, electric or water) • Apartment lease showing name of legal guardian • Homeowner’s insurance registration/card • Current paycheck stub • Current bank statement • Driver’s license showing legal guardian’s current address with one of the above • Copy of sales contract • Receipt to have utilities connected

Social Security Number

Social Security numbers are voluntary. Waivers are available in local schools. Applications for Social Security numbers are also available in local schools. Migrant number is acceptable.

Academic Records

If possible, please bring most recent report card, withdrawal form from previous school and/ or transcripts. These are essential for proper placement of students. Students in grades 7-12 also will need copies of any discipline records. Parents of children entering pre-K, kindergarten or sixth grade have additional requirements: • Pre-Kindergarten or Kindergarten: The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) for children 5 years of age or younger. The number of doses needed depends on age. A second dose of the varicella (chicken pox) vaccine or provide laboratory proof of immunity. A second dose of the mumps vaccine. Two doses of the Hepatitis A vaccine or provide laboratory proof of immunity (for children born on or after January 1, 2006). • Sixth Grade Two doses of measles vaccine. Two doses of mumps vaccine. One dose of rubella vaccine (or laboratory proof of immunity against measles, mumps or rubella). Two doses of the varicella (chicken pox) vaccine or provide proof of immunity documented by a physician.

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2013 Edition

Northview High makes magazine’s “Best High Schools” list Only North Fulton high school on U.S. News and World Report’s list By CANDY WAYLOCK candy@northfulton.com

JOHNS CREEK, Ga. –Northview High School in Johns Creek was rated among the nation’s best high schools in U.S. News & World Report’s recently released survey of more than 20,000 public high schools from across the nation. According to the 2012 report, Northview ranked 219 nationally and fourth-best in Georgia, earning it gold status among the nation’s public schools. Riverwood High School in Sandy Springs also scored among the top 500 schools, ranking 291 nationally and fifth-best in Georgia. No other Fulton high schools scored in the top 500. “Being acknowledged nationally by U.S. News & World Report says a great deal about Fulton’s educational programs and our ability to prepare students for a future beyond high school,” said Fulton Schools Superintendent Robert Avossa. “This shows that our high schools are not only the

best in Georgia, but also the best in the United States.” This is the fourth year the publication has compiled a list of the nation’s top schools. It also compiles a separate ranking for the nation’s top charter schools and magnet schools. The US News and World Report’s rating system is based on a formula that considers performance on state tests, Advanced Placement exams and International Baccalaureate exams, and also looks at schools that performed better than the state average for their least advantaged students. In addition, strong ratings in teacher-student ratios, college readiness, and math and English scores helped determine the schools’ rankings. Officials with US News and World Report noted the ratings system was designed specifically to grade schools across a broad spectrum, and not just solely on test scores. “A great high school must serve all of its students well, not just those who are college-bound, and

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that it must be able to produce measurable academic outcomes to show the school is successfully educating its student body across a range of performance indicators,” said Robert Morse of US News and World Report. In all, U.S. News and World Report evaluated date from nearly 22,000 schools, and then ranked

Several area high schools land on Newsweek’s list of top high schools By CANDY WAYLOCK candy@northfulton.com

NORTH FULTON, Ga. – Five area high schools were rated among the top high schools in the country by Newsweek magazine, which rates schools based on their participation and performance in college preparatory courses. Area high schools on the list of the top 1,000 schools include Northview (99), Chattahoochee (248), Alpharetta (268), Milton (415) and Johns Creek (845). Riverwood Charter High School in Sandy Springs also made the list, coming in at 258 in the nation. Since 1998, Newsweek has ranked the top public high schools in the country based on a ratio that primarily takes into account the total number of Advanced Placement (AP) and/or International Baccalaureate (IB) tests taken, divided by the number of graduating seniors. Taking these higher-level courses is imperative to college success, according to research by the U.S. Department of Education, which showed the best predictors of college graduation were not

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Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

the top 5,000 highest-scoring schools as gold, silver or bronze in its 2012 rankings. The data came from every state in the country, with the exception of Nebraska, which did not submit enough date to be analyzed). The top 500 schools were gold schools, followed by silver (501 through 2,000) and the remaining 3,000 awarded bronze recognition.

good high school grades or test scores, but whether or not a student had “an intense academic experience in high school.” Newsweek writer Jay Mathews, who compiles the list each year, says landing on the list of top schools is a relatively easy task for schools to achieve. “A school can reach that level if only half of its students take one AP, IB or Cambridge test in their junior year and one in their senior year,” he explained in a question-and-answer session accompanying the listing. Newsweek’s list of top high schools often draws critics who argue many of the schools on the list have high dropout rates and low test scores and should not be on a list of top schools. “There are schools with lots of lowincome students and great teachers who have found ways to get them involved in college level courses,” said Mathews, in his response. Students who take AP or IB classes, then pass the test at the conclusion of the course, can earn full or partial college credit. In North Fulton, only Riverwood High School offers the International Baccalaureate program.


2013 Edition

New principals named at four area schools ATLANTA, Ga. — The Fulton County Board of Education recently approved the hiring of nine new principals for the 2012-2013 school year, including new placements at four North Fulton schools.

Debra Doss, Creek View Elementary School Debra Doss, currently a principal with Roanoke City Schools in Virginia, was named the new Creek View Elementary principal, replacing former principal Matt Rogers who resigned to take a position in Atlanta. Doss has nearly 10 years of principal leadership experience and previously was an elementary school assistant principal and teacher. A longtime resident of Virginia where she attended college, Doss earned her bachelor’s degree in early childhood education from Longwood University,

Rivers:

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and her master’s degree in reading education from Radford University.

Tiffany Hutchens, Medlock Bridge Elementary School Tiffany Hutchens joins Medlock Bridge Elementary School as its new principal, replacing Margaret Pupillo who recently took at job in central administration. An assistant principal at Abbotts Hill Elementary for eight years, Hutchens also was a fifth-grade teacher and Early Intervention Program teacher at Medlock Bridge and previously taught at State Bridge Crossing Elementary. She was an inaugural graduate of Fulton County Schools’ Promising Principals Program. Hutchens earned a bachelor’s degree in elementary education from Kennesaw State University and a master’s degree in educational wakeboarder, without compromising her high school education.  The teachers appreciate the students pursuing their passions and support them academically to ensure success.” Pam King, Parent of Shelby" I cannot say enough positives about Rivers Academy.  We found a balance between playing tennis full time and

leadership from the University of Georgia.

Norman Sauce, Barnwell Elementary School Norman Sauce, Ed.D. joins Fulton County Schools from California, where he has served as an assistant principal and formerly was a social studies teacher. Before embarking on a career in school administration, Sauce was named Teacher of the Year, Teacher of the Month and Most Inspirational Teacher in his schools. Sauce earned a bachelor’s degree in U.S. and medieval histories from California State University and a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from the University of California. He also holds a doctorate in education from the University of Southern California.

Rako Morrissey, New Prospect Elementary School Rako Morrissey, Ed.D., an assistant principal with Cobb County Schools, becomes New Prospect Elementary School’s principal, replacing Charlie Faulkner who retired last year. In addition to school leadership experience, she has taught at both the elementary and middle school levels in Cobb County, Marietta City Schools and Henry County. Morrissey attended Kennesaw State University, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in Education, a master’s degree in adolescent education, and a doctorate in leadership and learning. She also holds a specialist’s degree in mathematics education from the University of West Georgia. — By Candy Waylock

school for our son. He is not only getting a top notch education but a positive social environment as well.” Catherine Honroth, Parent of Jackson  “Rivers has been a wonderful fit for our girl’s gymnastic and figure skating demands. The entire staff is terrific,

mindful, and committed to the success of their unique clientele.” Denise Carlton, Parent of Hannah and Hali For Information Please Visit: www.riversacademy.com. —Content supplied by Rivers Academy

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2013 Edition

Cambridge High doors open for new year Seniors lead way as 2012-13 term begins By JONATHAN COPSEY jonathan@northfulton.com

MILTON, Ga. — In 2012, North Fulton saw the opening of its newest school – Cambridge. Serving students in Milton and Alpharetta, the brand-spanking-new school had a good run in its first months of service. With all-new furnishings and even that new-building smell, the students took in the sights July 24 of their new home for the next few years – the large gymnasium, the media center, their classrooms and multiple theater rooms. “I love it,” said Ethan David, who is a freshman this year and is in the band. “It’s a different style than other schools. The clocks and the big staircase are cool.” Each hallway has traditional round clocks jutting out from the walls, reminding students how long they have to get to their next class. “I’m excited about it,” said fellow trombone player Justin Harrell, a sophomore transferring from Milton High School. Harrell said he made the switch from Milton because Cambridge offered more opportunities for leadership, thanks to its slightly smaller size. Cambridge had an enrollment of about 1,100 students, less than half that of Milton. “The level of excitement is out of control,” said PTSA volunteer Veronica Buckman. “Every time kids have to start something new, they get anxious, but these kids are going to make [Cambridge] something special.” Exploring the new media room, located right at the entrance of the school, beside a large spiral staircase, sophomore Noah Sannes and some friends said they were impressed with their school. “It’s really nice and amazing,” Sannes said. He is coming from Alpharetta High.

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HATCHER HURD/Staff

Sophomore Victor Catenzaro is excited about the first day of classes at his new school. “It’s big and confusing, but it’s going to be great.” It seems to be the consensus that the student body is excited for the coming school year. “I’m excited for school to start,” said senior Marin Becker. “I never thought I’d say that.” It was not all smiles for Cambridge. In football, the Bears performed largely as expected - poorly. It came as no surprise for a team playing a varsity schedule against mostly AAAAA opponents with a roster consisting predominantly of freshmen and sophomores. They ended their season with only one win, against North Springs; however, the scores tell of a team that played competitively the entire season. Look forward to a more veteran team in 2013.

HATCHER HURD/Staff

Cambridge Principal Ed Spurka makes the first announcements to students. Tickets for the first football game were on him for all students wearing spirit wear.

Cambridge High School opened fall 2012 with 1084 students.

Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

HATCHER HURD/Staff


2013 Edition

Area high schools top state’s Advanced Placement list NORTH FULTON, Ga. – In coordination with Advanced Placement (AP) Day in Georgia on Feb. 8, State Superintendent John Barge released the list of 367 high schools across the state named “AP Honor Schools.” Included on the list, was every high school in North Fulton. “Georgia has much to be proud of when it comes to the success of Advanced Placement,” said Barge. “Much of this success can be attributed to the dedication to rigor and excellence at each of our AP Honor Schools.” Advanced Placement (AP) classes and exams are administered by the College Board, which also administers the SAT college entrance exam. AP classes offer rigorous college-level learning options to students in high school. Most education experts concur that students who take AP classes are better prepared for the rigor and structure of college, and perform better overall in their college classes. The 2012 AP Honor Schools in Georgia are named in five categories, based on the results of 2011 AP classes and exams. Schools in Fulton County that were recognized in each category include: • AP Challenge Schools: Schools of 900 or fewer students with students testing in four of the core areas (English,

math, science and social studies) – Fulton Science Academy HS • AP Merit Schools: Schools with at least 20 percent of the student population taking AP exams and at least 50 percent of all AP exams earning scores of 3 or higher – Alpharetta, Centennial, Chattahoochee, Johns Creek, Milton, Northview, Roswell • AP STEM Schools: Schools with students testing in at least two AP math courses and two AP science courses – Alpharetta, Centennial, Chattahoochee, Fulton Science Academy HS, Johns Creek, Milton, Northview, Roswell • AP STEM Achievement Schools: Schools with students testing in at least two AP math courses and two AP science courses and at least 40 percent of the exam scores on AP math and AP science exams earning scores of 3 or higher – Alpharetta, Centennial, Chattahoochee, Fulton Science Academy HS, Johns Creek, Milton, Northview, Roswell • AP Access and Support Schools: Schools with at least 30 percent of their AP exams taken by students who identified themselves as AfricanAmerican and/or Hispanic and 30 percent of all AP exams earning scores of 3 or higher. — Candy Waylock

The Preschool Place at Congregation Dor Tamid provides students the opportunity to learn and grow while establishing positive Jewish values in an open, caring, and safe school environment, in partnership with families and the community. Emphasis is placed on developing individual responsibility and nurturing the spiritual, educational, cultural and social needs of each child.

11165 Parsons Road Johns Creek, GA 30097 Preschoolplace.dortamid.org 770.623.8849 preschoolplace@dortamid.com Risa Walter, Director

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ABBY BREAUX

Fulton students lead the state in top SAT scores Six North Fulton schools among the best 10 in Georgia By CANDY WAYLOCK candy@northfulton.com

NORTH FULTON, Ga. — Led by a triple-digit increase at Johns Creek High School and Northview’s annual top showing, scores on the spring 2012 Scholastic Aptitude Test were the best in the state, if not the nation. The average for the seven traditional high schools in North Fulton was 1682 – besting the system average by 98 points and the state average by 230 points. Nationwide, the 2012 SAT score was 1498, continuing a downward trend that has resulted in the lowest math scores posted since 1999. The maximum score on the SAT is 2400. Despite mixed news at the state and national level, North Fulton students, as a whole, have continued to improve their scores each year, although the increases for some schools are offset by falling scores at others. Most notably are the scores at Alpharetta High School, which despite narrowly making it into the 10th spot among state schools, has seen its average score fall 57 points since its high point of 1717 in 2010. Scores also fell from last year at Chattahoochee and Centennial. Northview High School continues to dominate all traditional high schools in the state, with an average score of 1769. Only the Gwinnett School of Mathematics, Science and Technology scored higher (1941); however, Northview tested nearly five times more students. Rounding out the top 10 list among the state’s nearly 460 public high school were Johns Creek in fourth place with an average score of 1729, Milton High in seventh (1681), Roswell High in eighth (1677), Chattahoochee High in ninth (1674) and Alpharetta in

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10th (1660). In just a year’s span, Johns Creek High School has seen its scores rocket from 1561 in 2010 to 1729 this year – an overall increase of 168 points in a threeyear span. Only six schools in the state scored above a 1700. Additionally, five recent Fulton graduates earned perfect 2400 scores on the reading, math and writing sections of the exam, and six students earned perfect scores on the reading and math sections. Georgia education officials have maintained the state’s relatively low averages are behind most other states because Georgia tests the majority of its graduating school students. This year, 81 percent of 2012 graduates took the test – compared to an average 31 percent nationwide. Participation numbers are even higher among Fulton County’s students, with 88 percent of the graduation class of 2012 taking the test. Georgia ranks seventh among participation rates, but falls towards the bottom of the list when compared on average test scores alone. “States with higher participation rates typically see lower average scores on the SAT and often see dips when the number of students taking the exam increases,” said State Superintendent John Barge in explaining the gap between Georgia and its peers. The College Board, which administers the SAT, joins education officials in admonishing the media, which insists on running state rankings based on average scores alone. “Media and others often rank states, districts and schools on the basis of SAT scores despite repeated warnings that such rankings are invalid. The SAT is a strong indicator of trends in the college-bound population, but it should never be used alone for

Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

such comparisons because demographics and other non-school factors can have a significant effect on scores,” explained Barge. As far as where SAT scores are being sent from Georgia students, the top 10 receiving schools are: 1. University of Georgia 2. Georgia Southern University 3. Georgia State University 4. Kennesaw State University 5. Valdosta State University 6. Georgia Tech 7. University of West Georgia 8. Georgia College and State University 9. Auburn University 10. North Georgia College and State University

About the SAT: The SAT is a college entrance exam that is developed, administered and scored by the College Board. It is designed to test the subject matter learned by students in high school and the critical thinking skills necessary to succeed in college. The test has three sections – critical reading, mathematics and writing – each worth 800 points, for a highest possible score of 2400. Last year, the College Board changed the way it reports scores by including all tests taken through June. Previously, the organization released only scores occurring through March of each year. This allows the data to be fully representative of the class of 2012. In Fulton County, PSAT testing occurs for students in ninth, 10th and 11th grades to help strengthen their academic preparation and to identify personal strengths and weaknesses before they take the test. Princeton Review SAT preparation classes also are offered through high schools at reduced costs and free SAT prep classes are offered online through the College Board.


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Dhara Patel, a senior at Milton High scored 2360 on her SAT. Patel says the secret, “Eight 2.5 inch thick SAT books stacked by my sofa.”

Jiaxiu Zhong, senior at Chattahoochee High, scored a 2400 on her SAT. “My personal experience has been that reading and paying attention in class are two important factors that are frequently overlooked.”

Erin Flynn, senior at Roswell High, scored 2300 on her SAT. Her advice: “Reading high-quality literature — not “Twilight” or “The Hunger Games” — and practicing basic math helps develop the skills needed for the test, but the best preparation I had came from doing many practice SAT tests. It is from the practice tests that I learned how to play the game of the SAT.”

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Christie Sui, a senior at Johns Creek High, scored 2330 on her SAT. “Practice helps tremendously. I familiarized myself with the test by doing lots of practice and paced it so that it wouldn’t be overwhelming. There is always a lot of pressure to do well and it was rewarding to know that my hard work paid off in the end.”

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ABBY BREAUX

Katie Zheng, senior at Alpharetta High, scored 2400 on her SAT. “My advice is to keep calm while you’re taking the test and to bring food, because you get tired easily. Recognize the patterns in the questions and how they are being asked.”

Lily Zhang, senior at Northview High, scored 2400 on her SAT. “When I found out my score on the SAT, I thought I was dreaming, because I checked really early in the morning. I called my dad as soon as I found out. My advice is to do lots of practice tests and make sure you time yourself.”

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2013 Edition

Area schools plan renovations, additions through 2017 By Candy Waylock candy@northfulton.com

ATLANTA – The Fulton County Board of Education is finalizing a priority list of projects to be completed with the proceeds from the Special Purpose Local Options Sales Tax (SPLOST), which was renewed by voters in November for a fourth, five-year term. School officials anticipate collecting approximately $892 million from the one-cent sales tax from August 2012 through July 2017. Though many millions will be raised, the list of needs in the school district will likely exceed the revenue, say Fulton officials, requiring the district to prioritize the projects. The list of projects and priorities will be finalized in April, allowing time for board members to gather input from their communities. The bulk of the funding will be used for school-based needs, which include renovations and repairs at existing schools, followed by new construction and technology upgrades. The remainder will be spent on classroom additions and to pay off debt. In North Fulton, which has

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Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

benefited from the previous SPLOST campaigns with more than two dozen new schools over 15 years, the project list for SPLOST 4 includes only one elementary school and one middle school. Other projects include a rebuild of Esther Jackson Elementary in Roswell and additions for Creek View Elementary School in Alpharetta and Taylor Road Middle in Johns Creek. Katie Reeves, the school board member who represents the Alpharetta and Milton communities, said the board is considering the option of expanding a middle school if possible, as opposed to building a new school and having to redistrict kids. Coming off a contentious redistricting debate with the opening of Cambridge High School in Milton, Reeves acknowledges there may be better ways to serve the needs of kids rather than wholesale moves. The proposed middle school under SPLOST 4 would relieve numbers at Northwestern and Hopewell middle schools; however the project could be an expansion at those schools instead, depending on the community input.


2013 Edition

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2013 Edition

Milton theater continues to shine 2012 was a banner year for Milton High School’s theater department, racking up a bevy of awards for each of its performances, and cementing the school as one of the best in the country for its program. Amy Oliver practices for "Cirque Kuwa" using Silks. Photo by Jonathan Copsey/Staff

‘Spamalot,’ Cirque coming in 2013 By JONATHAN COPSEY jonathan@northfulton.com

MILTON, Ga. — A pair of one-act plays, a musical and a Cirque-style performance all claimed awards in Georgia. Milton High is the only public school in the country to offer a Cirque acrobatic class. For 2013, fans of both Milton High School and Monty Python now have cause to rejoice – the MHS Theatre Company will perform “Spamalot” beginning March 14. “It’s a hysterical romp through the world of Monty Python with music and dancing,” said Renee Denney, the director of the performance. “And also a lot of corny humor.” The rights to the Broadway show recently became available for high schools to perform, Denney said. She jumped at the chance to perform it. “We had the cast to do it this year,” she said. “It’s a predominantly male cast. We’re really blessed that we have enough talented boys in the program to do a show like this.” Many theater programs are predominantly female. “Spamalot” will feature 42 students and opens March 14. In conjunction with the comedy, Milton’s signature annual performance – the Cirque show – opens April 25 with “Cirque Dreyma.” “It’s an original performance about

dreams,” said Director Larry Smith. “Audiences can expect to be amazed.” The Milton Cirque shows are unique pieces of theater, and have proved popular with audiences. Milton is the only public high school in the entire country with a Cirque program. The “audition only” class of over 45 students attracts those with various athletic and specialized skills like tumbling and dance. Cast members also train on special apparatus including the Cyr Wheel and Silks, and often with some Cirque professionals that travel to the school to work with them on mastering specific skills. The Cyr Wheel – a large metal wheel similar to a hula hoop – was a new addition to last year’s Cirque performance. Smith said a lot of new acts will be seen this year in “Dreyma,” with 72 students performing. While many of the students who audition for the Cirque class have prior gymnastic experience, many do not. “A lot of the kids don’t have any type of Cirque experience,” Smith said. “We’re mainly looking for a willingness to work and a good attitude. We can train them for what we need as long as they are willing to learn it.” In 2012, the MHS theater group won every single competition it entered for its performances – “The Diviners,” “Wiley and the Hairy Man,” “Mother Hicks,” “The Drowsy Chaperone,” “Pippin” and “Cirque Kuwa.” Denney said, being a public school, Milton cannot recruit talented students – instead it trains up the ones it gets. “We’ve been so successful, people think the talent comes to us,” she said. “But we expect excellence and train really hard. That produces kids that are competitive.”

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Students practice a scene from their award winning production of "The Drowsy Chaperone."

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Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

2013 Performaces “Cirque Dreyma" April 25-27, May 2-4

Monty Python’s “Spamalot” March 14-16, 20-22 For tickets and information, visit www.miltontheatrecompany.com.

Milton’s theater program won awards in 2012 for several performances: “Pippin” – Winner, Georgia Theatre Festival “Cirque Kuwa” – the only Cirque program at a public high school in the country “Mother Hicks” – Winner, state one act performances, Best Actor, Best Actress “The Drowsy Chaperone” – Winner, Shuler Hensley Award for Best Show

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Milton Theatre Company's performance of "Pippin" was named state champion at the Georgia Theatre Festival.


2013 Edition

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{

2013 Edition

Behind every successful student is a great teacher (or a few such individuals) who inspires that student to achieve excellence in the classroom. Each year, the Fulton and Forsyth county school systems select the best of the best to represent their districts as the teacher of the year. The 2013 top teacher for Forsyth County is Nick Crowder and the 2012 top teacher for Fulton County is Pamela Haight.

}

Forsyth, Fulton honor top teachers of the year

Nick Crowder

Forsyth County Teacher of the Year South Forsyth High School By ALDO NAHED aldo@northfulton.com

Nick Crowder has his pulse on the future. At South Forsyth High School, Crowder serves as chair for the career/tech department, coach for the robotics team and advises the technology students association, which sponsors community events each year such as food and toy drives. Last year, his robotics team won the state championship for Georgia. Crowder is also the 2013 Forsyth County Teacher of the Year, which was announced at the 18th annual Celebration of Excellence Feb. 15. Crowder, who has a bachelor’s degree from Southern Illinois University and a master’s degree from the University of Georgia, said what makes him an outstanding teach is that he cares about students. “All of them,” Crowder said. “Every single one of them. No matter their circumstances. I care about them and the period of life they are in. With one foot in childhood and one foot in adulthood, students are looking to me for affirmation. “My message to students is, ‘You have what it takes. You can do it. I’m here for you.’” Crowder teaches students that failure is okay. “I want them to fail,” Crowder said. “I literally applaud and pat them on the back and tell them they are doing a great job when they fail.” Before he joined South Forsyth High

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School in 2008, Crowder taught at Forsyth Central High School and Vickery Creek Middle School. Crowder also teaches foundations of engineering, engineering concepts and design technology at South Forsyth. “I remember in my own educational experiences too many of my classes had only one acceptable solution to a problem,” Crowder said. “But, reality in our country is not that way at all. Edison, the Wright Brothers and Steve Jobs are examples demonstrating how it takes expecting, accepting and embracing the failure to succeed. “Failure is an excellent teacher,” Crowder said. The annual event also recognizes the county’s Partners in Education. There are 900 active partners working with 36 Forsyth County schools and various departments. Each school in the county selected their teacher of the year and the three finalists were chosen — Crowder, Liz Watterson from South Forsyth Middle and Courtney Stokes from Big Creek Elementary. Last school year, partners gave about $1.6 million in funding to schools as well as volunteer hours and in-kind services. “It is a pleasure of us to recognize and honor these outstanding community businesses, partners and volunteers,” said L.C. “Buster” Evans, superintendent of Forsyth County School district. “It is because of the commitment from each of you that our young people are afforded the best opportunities to succeed, not only as students, but as productive citizens.”

Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

SPECIAL

From left: Forsyth County School Superintendent L.C. “Buster Evans; Forsyth County Teacher of the Year Nick Crowder and South Forsyth High Principal Jeff Cheney.


2013 Edition

Pamela Haight

Fulton County Teacher of the Year Alpharetta Elementary School By Candy Waylock candy@northsidewoman. com

A fifth-grade teacher at Alpharetta Elementary for four years, Pamela Haight knew she wanted to be a teacher from an early age. “When I was in fifth grade, I spent every morning reading with kindergartners,” said Haight, a product of Fulton County Schools from elementary through high school. “I loved every second of it. At Christmastime, the teacher gave me my first ‘teaching ornament,’ which I still have to this day.” A graduate of Milton High School, Haight went to the University of Georgia, graduating summa cum laude in early childhood education, followed by a master’s degree from Kennesaw State University. She infuses her classroom with constant activity, with the sounds of children singing and laughing coming through loud and clear.

“Maybe you’ll see my fifth-graders standing on chairs, acting out ‘Hamlet,’ or dressed all in black with berets reciting original poetry,” she laughed. “We are different, but we like it.” Haight does not have a drama background – something most people assume she does – but traces her love of performance to her childhood. “My parents took me to see ‘Annie’ one time, and [after that] I would stand up in public places and sing ‘Tomorrow’ at the top of my lungs,” Haight said, laughing at the memory. Haight believes students are motivated when learning is fun. She was frustrated by how students struggled to learn material in her class, yet could recite all the words from a Justin Bieber song just a day after it was released. She began mixing popular music with her class material and students quickly began learning the parts of speech through tunes such as “The Lazy

Adjective Song,” a tribute to a Bruno Mars song, or “Adverbs Modify Verbs,” a parody to a Willow Smith song. While many teachers are focused on a future that includes a climb up

the administration ladder, Haight, whose mother still works as a third-grade teacher, is completely content in the classroom. “[In five or 10 years], I’ll probably be doing the same thing I’m doing right now:

teaching in a classroom during the day and sitting in a classroom taking professional development classes at night,” said Haight. “It’s hard for me to imagine not working directly with kids.”

FSA:

and administration to student advancement and continuous school Continued from Page 14 improvement is unrivaled and the value is immeasurable. educational enhancements, However, the single many enrichment opportunities are offered, most important factor to our including free after-school success is the partnership communication clubs, band, orchestra, and and parents, teachers, top performing academic that teams to develop student and administration have developed to benefit our social skills. Through this These, as well as, several students. other factors contribute partnership, an extended to FSAPS’s successful family has been created to innovative educational nurture and provide every model. We limit class size opportunity for our students to a maximum of 15 students to reach their greatest for Pre-K through 5th grade potential and their personal and 20 students for 6th goals. Fulton Science Academy through 8th grades allowing for focused individualized has engineered a school student attention. Our small for today’s students and and structured environment, tomorrow’s needs. fultonscienceacademy.org. along with uniforms, keeps our students focused —Content supplied by on their studies. Also, Fulton Science Academy. the commitment and dedication of our faculty Appen Media | 2013 Edition | Education Answer Book™

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Autrey Mill Principal: Jimmy Zoll 770 521-7622 4110 Old Alabama Road Alpharetta 30022 Crabapple Principal: Nathan Buhl 770-552-4520 10700 Crabapple Road Roswell 30075 Elkins Pointe Principal: Melinda Springman 770-667-2892 11290 Elkins Road Roswell 30076 Haynes Bridge Principal: Lauren Seidman

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770-740-7030 10665 Haynes Bridge Road Alpharetta 30022 Holcomb Bridge Principal: Joy Schroerlucke 770-594-5280 2700 Holcomb Bridge Road Alpharetta 30022 Hopewell Principal: Lenora Patterson 678-297-3240 13060 Cogburn Road Milton 30004 Lakeside Principal: Kathy Carpenter 678-455-7311 610 James Burgess Road

Suwanee 30024 Liberty Principal: Connie Stovall 770-781-4889 7465 Wallace Tatum Road Cumming 30028 Little Mill Principal: Connie McCrary 770-887-2461 1120 Dahlonega Highway Cumming 30040 North Forsyth Principal: Jeff Hunt 770-889-0743 3645 Coal Mountain Drive Cumming 30028

Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

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Northwestern Principal: Jasmine Kullar 770-667-2870 12805 Birmingham Highway Milton 30004

Hopewell Northwestern Elkins Pointe Crabapple Webb Bridge Taylor Road River Trail Autrey Mill Haynes Bridge Holcomb Bridge

Otwell Principal: Steve Miller 770-887-5248 605 Tribble Gap Road Cumming 30040

South Forsyth Principal: Sandy Tinsley 770-888-3170 4670 Windermere Parkway Cumming 30041

River Trail Principal: Dawn Melin 770-497-3860 10795 Rogers Circle Duluth 30097

Taylor Road Principal: Ed Williamson 770-740-7090 5150 Taylor Road Alpharetta 30022

River Watch Principal: Kathy Carpenter 678-455-7311 610 James Burgess Road Suwanee 30024

Vickery Creek Principal: Kathy Rohacek 770-667-2580 6240 Post Road Cumming 30040

Piney Grove Principal: Terri North 678-965-5010 8135 Majors Road Cumming 30041

Webb Bridge Principal: Susan Opferman 770-667-2940 4455 Webb Bridge Road Alpharetta 30005


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Alpharetta High School Principal: Shannon Kersey 770-521-7640 3595 Webb Bridge Rd. Alpharetta 30005 Cambridge Principal: Ed Spurka 770-667-2883 2845 Bethany Bend Road Milton 30004 Centennial Principal: Kibbey Crumbley (interim) 770-650-4230 9310 Scott Road Roswell 30076 www.centptsa.com

Chattahoochee Principal: Timothy Duncan 770-521-7600 5230 Taylor Road Alpharetta 30022 www.chattcougar.com Forsyth Central Principal: Rudy Hampton 770-887-8151 520 Tribble Gap Road Cumming 30040 http://www.forsyth.k12. ga.us/Domain/1901 Independence Principal: Tabatha Taylor 770-521-7611 86 School Drive

Alpharetta 30004 www.fulton.k12.ga.us/ independencehs Johns Creek Principal: Buck Greene 770-623-2138 5575 State Bridge Road Johns Creek 30022 www.johnscreekhs.net Lambert Principal: Gary Davison 678-965-5050 805 Nichols Road Suwanee 30024 http://www.forsyth.k12. ga.us/Domain/2283

Milton Principal: Clifford Jones 770-740-7000 13025 Birmingham Highway Alpharetta 30004 www.miltonhighschool.com

Roswell Principal: Jerome Huff 770-552-4500 11595 King Road Roswell 30075 www.roswellhigh.com

North Forsyth Principal: Elizabeth Hebert 770-781-6637 3635 Coal Mountain Road Cumming 30028 http://www.forsyth.k12. ga.us/Domain/1938

South Forsyth Principal: Jeff Cheney 770-781-2264 585 Peachtree Parkway Cumming 30041 http://www.forsyth.k12. ga.us/Domain/2002

Northview Principal: Paul Brannon 770-497-3828 10625 Parsons Road Duluth 30097 www.northviewhigh.com

West Forsyth Principal: Betty Pope 770-888-3470 4155 Drew Road Cumming 30040 http://www.forsyth.k12. ga.us/Domain/2060

Appen Media | 2013 Edition | Education Answer Book™

37


2013 Edition

Education 101

Terms to know in your search for the right educational experience for your child

CHARTER SCHOOL A taxsupported public school that is independently run, allowing for greater educational choice for a school community.

developed by Dr. Maria Montessori focusing on the unique individuality, selfreliance and independence of the children.

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING An educational approach using applied hands-on methods of learning.

SPECIAL NEEDS A school or program for children who have mild-to-moderate learning differences. It usually features smaller class sizes, individualized attention and multi-sensory learning methods.

INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE (IB) A specifically designed comprehensive academic program emphasizing traditional disciplines while encouraging international perspective. MAGNET SCHOOL A public school that offers a specific or enhanced curriculum designed for students of special interest or ability. MONTESSORI A school following the principles

ACCREDITATION Official certification that guarantees a school provides an education of a reasonably high quality. Schools must prove levels of quality and maintain continuous standards of improvement. ACT An alternative to the SAT, this national college admissions examination consists of subject area tests

in English, Mathematics, Reading and Science, with an optional 30-minute writing test. ADEQUATE YEARLY PROGRESS (AYP) A measure of year-to-year student achievement on statewide assessments as required by the No Child Left Behind Act. CRITERION-REFERENCED COMPETENCY TESTS (CRCT) Tests designed to measure how well students in grades one through eight acquire the skills and knowledge described in the Georgia Performance Standards. EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION Education that applies to children from birth to age eight, focusing specifically on their development, including physical, emotional, sensory,

(

Did You Know: More than 1.5 million HOPE scholarships have been awarded totaling more than $6.6 billion.

GEORGIA HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION TESTS (GHSGT) All students seeking a Georgia high school diploma must pass four content areas as well as the Georgia High School Writing Assessment. GEORGIA PERFORMANCE STANDARDS Statewide standards of academic content for all subjects K-12, to which every school must adhere and on which students are annually tested. HOPE SCHOLARSHIP (Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally) A scholarship in Georgia, funded by the Georgia Lottery, that rewards academically achieving students with financial Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

MISSION/PHILOSOPHY A statement outlining the guidelines a school follows to achieve its goals or maintain performance standards. NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND ACT A federal law passed in 2001 designed to ensure that all children have a fair and equal opportunity to obtain a highquality education and meet state academic standards of proficiency. NOTIFICATION DEADLINE The date by which an independent school notifies families of the acceptance of a child for enrollment to the school. OPEN HOUSE An event held at a school, at which parents can learn more about the school and its offerings.

(

communicative, cognitive and social needs.

38

assistance to attend eligible public and private Georgia colleges and universities.

PSAT A standardized test that offers students practice for the SAT Reasoning Test and allows them to qualify for the National Merit Scholarship Program. REPLY DEADLINE The date by which parents must notify an accepting school of their commitment to enroll their child.

SAT This standardized test measures the critical thinking, mathematical reasoning, and writing skills of students planning to attend college. SECONDARY SCHOOL ADMISSIONS TEST (SSAT) The admissions test that many independent schools require students to take in order to be considered for enrollment. SUMMER CAMP A common destination for children and teenagers during the summer, at which they can participate in a variety of activities or classes.


2013 Edition

collegeguide from Appen Media

Education Answer Book

pages 39-52

Tech schools

preparation for the workforce

growth spurt

area colleges merge, expand

Finding

FUND$

Appen Media | 2013 Edition | Education Answer Book™

39


2013 Edition collegeguide

Navigating the college financial aid process By RUSSELL SCHAFFER Kaplan Test Prep Representative

For two million-plus college applicants and millions of current college students, how to

afford tuition is always top-of-mind, particularly in an economy where many household incomes have remained stagnant. Competition for muchcoveted financial aid remains as fierce as the admissions process itself. Below are three key

How typical families pay for college 2011-2012

tips in the race for money – which unofficially kicked off January 1 with the opening of FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) – with advice on how to successfully navigate the financial aid frenzy: • Tip No. 1: Apply for FAFSA, and apply early. Many students neglect to apply for FAFSA money because they assume their parents earn too much. Wrong approach. Billions of dollars from FAFSA – which includes everything from Pell Grants, to work-study opportunities, to Federal Stafford Loans, and more – are awarded to millions of students of all economic backgrounds.

See AID, Page 41 Student  Borrowing   Parent  Borrowing  

9,000  

Parent  Income  and  Savings  

8,000  

Grants  and  Scholarships  

7,000  

Rela@ves  and  Friends  

Average amount borrowed for college 2011-2012

*Information courtesy of Sallie Mae, 2012.

6,000  

Student  Income  and  Savings  

AY  2007-­‐2008  

5,000  

AY  2008-­‐2009   AY  2009-­‐2010  

4,000  

AY  2010-­‐2011   AY  2011-­‐2012  

3,000  

2,000  

1,000  

*Information courtesy of Sallie Mae, 2012.

0  

AY  2007-­‐2008  

AY  2008-­‐2009  

AY  2009-­‐2010  

AY  2010-­‐2011  

AY  2011-­‐2012  

Local Women...  National Awards northside woman’s 2012 awards from the Association of Free Community Papers 1st Place Best Cover Design 2nd Place Best Color Ad for Fashion, Hair Design & Cosmetics 2nd Place Most Improved Publication Honorable Mention General Excellence

Since we first published Northside Woman more than four years ago, we’ve kept our commitment to use only local women as our cover models and main story subjects. We thank our readers and advertisers for their continued support.

northsidewoman.com 40

Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

◄ Our award-winning cover from December 2011 featured Roswell, Ga. ballerina Caroline Stroud. Photo by Devon Morgan/ Photosynthesis Studio


Aid:

with the surname Gatlin; women who are over 5’10”; anybody under 4’10”; and Continued from Page 40 duck callers - they all go to college too! Visit your school’s guidance office While it is needs-based and lower income students may and sites like www.finaid. benefit the most, students com to see what’s out there. from varying financial You can even start banking situations can receive aid. scholarship money as early FAFSA can be completed as freshman year. The more online at http://www.fafsa. money you have by the time ed.gov. Submitting a FAFSA acceptance letters come, doesn’t guarantee that the more options you’ll have you’ll get college financial since your ability to pay will aid, but not submitting one be less of an issue. guarantees you won’t. You • Tip No. 3: Don’t view have nothing to lose and the potential to gain. And since a financial aid offer as a FAFSA is a first come, first final offer. If your dream serve source, the sooner school offers you a financial aid package but it’s not you apply, the better. enough, negotiate. Unlike • Tip No. 2: Treat the FAFSA offers, which are financial hunt for scholarship money non-negotiable, packages awarded like a part-time job. Many aid students miss out on directly by colleges can be scholarship opportunities considered first offers, not because they simply don’t final offers. Since they’ve apply or invest enough already accepted you, they quality time looking for more than likely will work available money. You don’t with you. Respectfully tell necessarily have to be a 4.0 the college why you are student or have achieved a “must have” student or a perfect 2400 on the SAT how your family’s financial or 36 on the ACT – though situation may have changed that certainly helps! College to warrant more aid. The and scholarship help site worst they can say is no. “You cannot think about Cappex.com estimates that today without there is $11 billion in merit college aid from colleges. And thinking about how to pay according to the National for it. With college tuition Association for College continuing to rise, it’s more Admission Counseling, important than ever for students’ scores on the SAT students and their parents and ACT are leading factors to be savvy consumers in securing merit aid. There and act strategically to are also thousands of niche increase their chances of scholarships available securing strong financial for those who aren’t aid packages,” said Jieun necessarily at the head Choe, executive director of the class: left-handed of college admissions and students; individuals K-12 programs, Kaplan Test

Average amount paid for college 2007-2012

Prep. “While many students may find it necessary to take out loans to pay for college, it’s always preferable to secure scholarships instead, which unlike loans, do not have to be paid back. It will be enormously more beneficial for students to graduate college owing as little money as possible, especially when loans carrying interest add to the full cost of tuition.” Visit Kaplan Test Prep for more information at www. kaptest.com.

Facts about college costs: • In 2012-13, average published tuition and fees for public four-year colleges and universities for in-state students is $8,655 – up from $8,256 in 2011-2012. For fulltime out-of-state students, the cost is $21,706, up from $20,823 the previous academic year. • At private, nonprofit four-year colleges and universities, average published tuition and fees for 2012-2013 stand at $29,056, up from $27,883 the previous academic year. • For the current academic year, full time undergraduates at public four year institutions receive an estimated average of $5,750 in financial aid. At private, nonprofit institutions, the average is $15,680.

Total  families  

$35,000    

Low-­‐income  families   Middle-­‐income  families  

$30,000    

High-­‐income  families  

$25,000   $35,000    

$20,000   $30,000    

Total  families   Low-­‐income  families   Middle-­‐income  families  

$15,000   $25,000    

High-­‐income  families  

AY   2009-­‐2010   $10,000   $20,000    

AY  2010-­‐2011  

AY  2011-­‐2012  

Total  families   Low-­‐income  families   Middle-­‐income  families  

$5,000     $15,000  

High-­‐income  families  

\\

AY  2008-­‐2009  

collegeguide 2013 Edition

$0     $10,000  

AY  2007-­‐2008  

AY  2008-­‐2009  

AY  2009-­‐2010  

AY  2010-­‐2011  

AY  2011-­‐2012  

*Information courtesy of Sallie Mae, 2012. $5,000    

Appen Media | 2013 Edition | Education Answer Book™ $0    

AY  2007-­‐2008  

AY  2008-­‐2009  

AY  2009-­‐2010  

AY  2010-­‐2011  

AY  2011-­‐2012  

41


2013 Edition collegeguide

Milton tops state in graduation rates among large high schools MILTON, Ga.--Despite a new formula that significantly lowered high school graduation rates across the state, Milton High School posted the state’s highest graduation rate among large schools with enrollment above 1,500 students. Milton’s graduation rate in 2011 was 96.48 percent – among the top in the state and nearly 30 percent higher

than the state average. Taking into account all 195 public high schools in Georgia, Milton came in fifth place, behind only Lambert High (Forsyth) with 97.49, Columbus High with 97.48, Lee High (Gordon) with 97.44 and Trion City Schools at 96.88. Milton High Principal Clifford Jones said the high graduation rate at the

school is achieved through a partnership of the school, the students and the community. “Milton’s graduation rate is a reflection of the Fulton County School Board’s, the community’s and staff’s commitment to provide a high level of secondary education to prepare our students for post-secondary educational opportunities,” said Jones, who is in his second year as

High School

Graduates Percentage

Milton

96.48

96.5

Chattahoochee

89.96

96.2

Northview

89.38

98.5

Johns Creek

88.71

NA

Fulton Science Academy

86.4

74.5

Alpharetta

85.76

93.6

Centennial

74.7

87.2

Roswell

68.55

88.2

principal at Milton. The majority of high schools in North Fulton had graduation rates well above the state average of 67.44 percent, as well as the

Fulton County average of just over 70 percent. The lone exception was Roswell High, which posted a four-year graduation rate of 68.55.

Forsyth County Schools pleased with CRCT scores By ALLISON GOLDSTEIN news@northfulton.com

FORSYTH COUNTY, Ga. — Students in Forsyth County continue to excel on the statewide CriterionReferenced Competency Test, as shown by their scores this year and in years past. High ranges of students received scores that placed them in the “meets and exceeds” category on the subject tests. “When comparing Forsyth County Schools to similarly-sized systems across the state and metro area, Forsyth County’s meets and exceeds percentages are well above the others,” said Chief Accountability Officer Cindy Salloum.

Forsyth County Schools Superintendent Buster Evans said he was pleased with the students’ success, especially after calculating how the district performed in regard to both test scores and the percentage of students exceeding standards.  “In a number of grade level areas, Forsyth County Schools ranks if not first in the state, then among the top scores for all 180 districts,” Evans said. “Our personnel, students and parents should be ecstatic once again at these levels of excellence.” Beyond the high percentage of those who met and exceeded on the

See CRCT, Page 43

Subject

Forsyth County Range of M&E

Reading

98-99 percent

Georgia’s State Range of M&E 90-96 percent

ELA

98-99 percent

91-95 percent

Math

94-99 percent

77-91 percent

Science

92-97 percent

73-85 percent

Social Studies

92-96 percent

73-81 percent

The chart above compares the range of the percentage of Forsyth County students in grades three through eight who scored in the meets and exceeds category.

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Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media


collegeguide 2013 Edition

Gwinnett Tech to build satellite campus in Alpharetta By BETSY RHAME-MINOR news@northfulton.com

Students interested in technical education or an associate’s degree in the North Fulton area will soon have more options available thanks to Gwinnett Technical College’s

a growing network of employers who are eager to hire Gwinnett Tech grads.” After expanding Gwinnett Tech’s service area to include North Fulton, the state of Georgia voted in fall 2012 to allocate $25 million to help expand Gwinnett Technical

Gwinnett Technical College already has strong relationships with business and industry in [the Gwinnett and North Fulton] service areas. Sharon Bartels President of Gwinnett Tech

expansion into North Fulton County. “Many major employers, from high tech firms to healthcare systems, operate in both Gwinnett and North Fulton, and Gwinnett Technical College already has strong relationships with business and industry in both service areas,” explained Sharon Bartels, the president of Gwinnett Tech. “For our students, these relationships translate into benefits that include new and emerging programs of study, increased internship opportunities and clinical sites, and

College into North Fulton by creating a satellite campus. The city of Alpharetta contributed $4 million to entice Gwinnett Tech to choose a 25-acre plot on the southwestern corner of Ga. 400 and Old Milton Parkway. At full capacity, this space could hold up to 10,000 students in four three-story buildings. “The leadership and staff at Gwinnett Tech have been working with the relevant partners and counterparts in North Fulton for over two years now, establishing productive relationships with the

Greater North Fulton Chamber of Commerce, Fulton County Schools and a range of leading business partners from key sectors,” said Bartels. “We were the largest population in the state that didn’t have a technical college within its reach,” said Al Nash, executive director of Progress Partners of North Fulton, noting also that North Fulton is one of the largest concentrated areas of employment in the Southeast. The programs that will be offered at the Alpharetta campus will be designed to train the future employees of some North Fulton businesses, namely healthcare and technology. “The cities [of North Fulton] have to be thinking down the road that we’ll meet the [needs of] the education workforce,” Nash explained. “We’ve attracted all these technology companies here.” “The mix of business in North Fulton is almost identical to that of Gwinnett,” said Bartels. “These companies want training in health and life sciences, business and finance, computer informational systems, early childhood education, logistics, hospitality and green/

sustainable technologies. These programs are among Gwinnett Tech’s largest and strongest.” Gwinnett Tech’s main campus is in Lawrenceville. It is the third largest technical college in Georgia and offers over 40 degree programs, as well as continuing education, workshops and diploma and certificate programs. Construction is set to begin on the North Fulton campus in late fall this year.

CRCT:

Continued from Page 42 CRCT subject tests, students in Forsyth County also did well in the exceeds category, which consists of scores of 850 or above. Compared to last year, Forsyth County students increased in the number of exceeds scores in every subject. “I am thrilled and express deep gratitude to our educators who once again demonstrated that the work of the district is helping students achieve at higher levels,” Evans said.

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NORTH FULTON Jenni Bonura, SVP & Managing Broker 7855 N Point Pkwy, Ste 100 Alpharetta, GA 30022 678-461-8700

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2013 Edition collegeguide

Shaping Lives – Building Futures: Reinhardt University What does Reinhardt University have for you or your family member? Let’s start with small classes, a welcoming atmosphere, high expectations for growth and success, and caring professors with real-world knowledge and expertise in their fields. “With 40 challenging programs, talented faculty and staff, a supportive environment, and a proud history, Reinhardt University provides life-changing educational experiences for students of all ages,” said Reinhardt president Dr. J. Thomas Isherwood. “That said, we aren’t for everyone. If you want to hide in class , Reinhardt isn’t for you. We get to know our students, and we partner with them to help

them reach their goals.” For Adults: Degree Completion Programs at Reinhardt’s North Fulton Center For students juggling work, family or volunteer commitments, Reinhardt’s evening programs offer convenient locations and class times. The degree completion programs in business, public safety, criminal justice, healthcare administration and education provide knowledge that’s immediately applicable in the workplace. Reinhardt’s North Fulton Center on Old Milton Parkway draws students who work or live in or around Alpharetta and GA 400. Locations in Marietta and Cartersville also offer evening classes

in business or public safety. Healthcare administration and criminal justice are taught online, so students across Georgia can enroll in these dynamic programs. Police Academy: Reinhardt University at Reinhardt’s North Fulton Center Reinhardt’s Police Academy is certified by the Georgia Peace Officer Standards and Training Council to deliver the Basic Law Enforcement Training Course. Graduates earn P.O.S.T. Basic Peace Officer Certification and receive 15 semester hours of credit towards an associate degree in criminal justice. “This program gives qualified applicants a jump start on a law enforcement

career,” said Lester W. Drawdy, Police Academy director. “This certification enhances applicant marketability, expands career opportunities, and increases chances for employment.” For Graduate Students: Reinhardt’s graduate programs in business, education, and music appeal to students seeking thoughtprovoking coursework that is also career-focused and convenient. The MBA, M.Ed., M.Ed in Special Education, MAT, Reading Endorsement and Master of Music programs also offer remarkable value. Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies Margaret M. Morlier, Ph.D. describes Reinhardt’s programs as “designed so

that theory meets practice. All our graduate programs provide the updated theory and real world experiences that professionals need.“ For Traditional Students: Main Campus in Waleska, Ga. With 17 athletic teams, 40+ clubs and organizations, campus ministry, a full event calendar and on campus living options, Reinhardt’s main campus appeals to students seeking a more traditional college experience. The Waleska campus, nestled in the rolling hills of northwestern Cherokee County, is also known for its year round scenic beauty, but it is less than an hour from Atlanta.

See REINHARDT, Page 52

Steady preparation recommended for SAT, ACT test takers By BETSY RHAME-MINOR news@northfulton.com

Standardized testing plays a large role in the college admissions process. Colleges are looking for students who have scored well on the SAT or ACT, and those schools will take good scores from either test. Colleges weigh the scores of the SAT and ACT heavily, seeing these as an equalizing, standard way to measure student achievement across different schools and demographics. Students will score higher on one standardized test over the other.

vocabulary. Being able to read and digest information quickly, particularly words that are on a high reading level, helps test-taking students save time, enabling students to move through questions quickly but efficiently. “If you can’t read well, you’ll hurt yourself because time is everything on these tests,” said Don Wardle, owner and director of Chyten Educational Services in Milton and Johns Creek. Start preparing early. Wardle recommends choosing a test date and starting to study 14 weeks ahead of the test date. SAT and ACT test-taking should happen during a student’s

If you can’t read well, you’ll hurt yourself because time is everything on these tests.

Don Wardle Owner and director of Chyten Educational Services

According to the Princeton Review, the SAT is better for students who have a strong vocabulary and feel comfortable with several different sections (English, math, reading and science) and may feel comfortable with the optional writing test. The ACT is good for students who are strong in science and math, who want to give a college a more comprehensive overall score rather than one focused on sections and answer straightforward questions best. The ACT also has an optional writing test, which some schools require their applicants take. Here are four tips for improving SAT or ACT scores for college admissions: Improve reading skills and

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junior year of high school. Don’t take a break. Keep studying and reviewing the material until the day before the standardized test. It keeps the content fresh and students are less likely to feel unfamiliar with the material on test day. Take old tests. Students can get old SAT and ACT questions in review books or by studying with a tutoring service. By answering questions from past tests, students get comfortable with the format of the tests, which will ensure greater success when it’s time to take the real one. By taking old tests, Wardle said, “You’re going to get familiar with how the questions are asked always the same.”

Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

Three-year trends in SAT among North Fulton high schools* ( ) indicates number of tests taken

School Alpharetta Centennial Chattahoochee Johns Creek Milton Northview Roswell North Fulton Fulton County Georgia National

2010

2011

2012

1,717 (439) 1,598 (355) 1,687 (509)

1,679 (509) 1,591 (360) 1,694 (402) 1,595 (167) 1,659 (579) 1,751 (576) 1,645 (480) 1,659 (3,073) 1,560 (4,801) 1,445 (72.5K) 1,500 (1.65M)

1,660 (484) 1,582 (359) 1,674 (360) 1,729 (408) 1,681 (599) 1,769 (496) 1,677 (448) 1,682 (3,154) 1,580 (4,777) 1,452 (73.1K) 1,498 (1.67M)

n/a 1,654 (518) 1,732 (626) 1,636 (474) 1,671 (2,921) 1,567 (4,484) 1,451 (70K) 1,506 (1.6M)

One Year Change -19 -9 -20 +134 +22 +18 +32 +23 +20 +7 -2

*schools with more than 100 test takers


collegeguide 2013 Edition

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2013 Edition collegeguide

Enroll Now at Gwinnett Tech!

Earn College Credit While Still in High School with Dual Enrollment

Still in high school, but have your mind on college? You can earn college credit before you graduate from high school! The dual enrollment program at Gwinnett Tech is an easy, affordable way to start college early – and ultimately save time and money. The program provides exceptional opportunities for Georgia high school juniors and seniors to take college level courses at Gwinnett Tech and earn credit toward a high school diploma and a college degree at the same time. Dual enrollment is a collaborative effort between the Technical College System of Georgia, the Georgia Department of Education (DOE) and the HOPE Program. The program enables high school students to take one or more courses from Gwinnett Tech using a number of financial aid options including the HOPE Grant or HOPE Scholarship. Under dual enrollment, students receive simultaneous course credits that count toward high school graduation and future postsecondary education. GTC’s dual enrollment program offers three distinct benefits: Choose Gwinnett Tech for your education and job training, and you’ll be on the road to a great career! Gwinnett Tech offers hundreds of degree, diploma and certificate programs you can finish in two years or less. From culinary arts to paramedicine, computer science to nursing, we have a program to fit any personality, skill set or interest. Students do better in college – and ultimately on the job – when they are focused on a field of study they love. That’s what makes technical education so great – you’ll be immersed in the field you chose almost from day one. Each and every course you take is relevant to your future

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• Priority Application Deadline: March 8 • Registration for New Students: April 12 - 30 • Late Application Deadline: April 5 • Late Registration: May 10 - 15 • Classes Begin: May 20

career, and in many cases you’ll be working with the exact technology and equipment you’ll find on the job. Flexible scheduling, online classes, affordable tuition and high job placement rates for grads are just a few more reasons Gwinnett Tech should be on your radar. Plus, many Gwinnett Tech courses transfer to other colleges in our area – including four-year institutions. If you already have some college credits, you may already be on your way to completing a degree in a short time. Ready to start? Call 770-962-7580 or visit www.GwinnettTech.edu/apply.

Apply for Fall Semester!

• Priority Application Deadline: June 3 • Registration for New Students: June 18 – July 19 • Financial Aid Deadline: June 21 • Late Application Deadline: July 12 • Late Registration: July 29 – August 8 • Classes Begin: August 14

1. Under the HOPE Program, dual enrollment coursework is covered at a 90 percent rate. 2. All hours paid by HOPE under a dual enrollment program do not count toward the total HOPE Scholarship or Grant hours that Georgia students can use after high school for their undergraduate studies. 3. Dual enrollment coursework is excluded from HOPE GPA calculations. Gwinnett Tech also doesn’t require a set GPA for entry into dual enrollment courses. However SAT, ACT and COMPASS scores must meet college admission standards. Depending on the program, students can choose to enroll in one college course or become a fulltime Gwinnett Tech student. Either way, the credits earned will transfer to many colleges and universities throughout Georgia and the nation. Students are able to take classes both online and on the GTC campus in Lawrenceville. Call 678-226-6259 or email khowell@ GwinnettTech.edu for more information. —Content supplied by Gwinnett Tech.

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collegeguide 2013 Edition

Career Fear?

Don’t freak. Take a deep breath. Relax! While finding a career that you’ll love may seem like a daunting task, it doesn’t have to be. Gwinnett Tech prepares you for the job market with hundreds of program options you can complete in two years or less. Even if you’re not sure what field you want to study, our Recruitment Center has the resources available, like the Myers-Briggs personality assessment, to help you decide on a career path that fits your skill set and interests. At Gwinnett Tech, you’ll learn using the exact technology and equipment you’ll find on the job. It’s tangible real-world experience you won’t get from a book! Come on – let’s get started today! Visit www.GwinnettTech.edu or call 770-962-7580

5150 Sugarloaf Parkway, Lawrenceville, GA 30043

|

770.962.7580

|

www.GwinnettTech.edu

A unit of the Technical College System of Georgia. An Equal Opportunity Institution.

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2013 Edition collegeguide

University of North Georgia Students say they’re thrilled with change By ALDO NAHED aldo@northfulton.com

CUMMING, Ga. – This semester, Tori Bruns was among the inaugural nursing class students at the University Center in Cumming. She’s now part of the campus’ history as the University of North Georgia received final approval for consolidation last week. The consolidation of North Georgia College and State University and Gainesville State College has been anticipated since 2011 and on Jan. 8, the University System of Georgia Board of Regents approved the merger along with three other campuses. The board also approved consolidations for Augusta State University and Georgia Health Sciences University; Waycross College and South Georgia College; and Macon State College and Middle Georgia College. The plan reduces the number of state institutions from 35 to 31. On Jan. 10, city of Cumming, Forsyth County and University of North Georgia officials celebrated the new name, new mascot and new logo of the learning institution, comprised of four campuses – in Cumming, Dahlonega, Gainesville and Oconee County. “I’m so thrilled about it,” Bruns said at the celebration. “I originally wanted to do my nursing at North Georgia [College and State University] and now it’s so much easier that we are part of the same college.” For Bruns the name change will also be a better way to present herself to employers after she graduates. “It seems so much more professional,” Bruns said. “I’m proud to be here.” Cumming Mayor H. Ford Gravitt, who established two annual $1,000 scholarships, said he was excited about the campus and its future growth, including a campus expansion. The city of Cumming leaders lobbied state legislators, leased the land to the regents and put up about $4 million to help build the campus near the Aquatic Center. The money will be paid back to the city in the next decade. “We’ve been wanting a campus here for a long time,” Gravitt said. Gravitt and Forsyth County Commission Chairman Pete Amos each presented the university with a proclamation to mark the ceremony. Bonita Jacobs, who the regents appointed as president of the University of North Georgia, said there are more than 100 degrees of study

ALDO NAHED/Staff

being offered in the four different campuses and a military college and leadership institution. UNG is designated by the University System of Georgia as a state leadership institution and is designated by the Georgia Legislature as the Military College of Georgia. It is one of only six senior military colleges in the United States and its Corps of Cadets numbers more than 750 students. “We are a very unique institution and we are proud of being University of North Georgia and being so unique,” Jacobs said. “We are proud of what we do with leadership.” On Jan. 11, UNG faculty and staff had its first business meeting to approve the university’s statutes and bylaws for its Faculty Senate and Staff Council organizations. Other operational components, such as the university’s academic schedule, curriculum and budgets will be consolidated over the next few months. “UNG will be one of the few universities in the country, if not the only one, to offer such a broad range of degrees and educational opportunities,” Jacobs said. Sherman Day, executive director of the Cumming campus, said about 500 students are currently attending the campus, 300 Aquatic Circle in Cumming. Combined with the other three campuses, University of North Georgia has a 16,000 student population, making it the seventh-

largest public university in the state. “The sky is the limit for what we are doing here,” Day said. “The merger is going to offer many more opportunities for degrees and programs and educational opportunities.”

ALDO NAHED/Staff

ALDO NAHED/Staff

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Cumming Mayor H. Ford Gravitt, center, presents the University of North Georgia leaders, Sherman Day, executive director of the Cumming campus, left, and Bonita Jacobs, president of the institution, with a proclamation.

Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

ALDO NAHED/Staff

Tori Bruns, a nursing student at the newly named University of North Georgia’s Cumming campus, holds a T-shirt announcing the institution’s mascot — Nighthawks.


collegeguide 2013 Edition

Finding funding for rising college costs By BETSY RHAME-MINOR news@northfulton.com

As college costs have risen and some family incomes have dropped, it’s more important than ever to know how to balance the cost of college with a family’s budget. Many college-bound students and their parents are familiar with Georgia’s HOPE Scholarship, but there are many other options out there that can defray college expenses. “It’s a huge sacrifice parents are making,” said financial consultant Chris Perez. “Wanting to pay for college and being able to pay for college are two different things.” Here are a few tips on how to navigate the funding and financial aid process, and cut costs for parents and families: Don’t use retirement funds. Perez recommends families use what they’ve saved up front, then borrowing money for the last year or two of school if they need to. “I am not a proponent of tapping into retirement to pay for college,” he said. Have a family conversation about the cost of college. “It’s important for a student to know the cost of college,” said Chris Holzwarth, an independent college admissions consultant. She recommends that college students know exactly how much each credit hour and each course costs so they’re more mindful of performing well. Setting a budget ahead of time for food, entertainment

and other expenses can save money in the end. Budget for extra spending money, but talk about how much. Meet application deadlines. Scholarship opportunities can easily be missed if applicants don’t keep up with their deadlines. In addition, they should read a scholarship’s requirements early to make sure they have all the paperwork they will need to apply. “There is a lot of assistance available, and we have skilled counselors ready and willing to assist students, but the students must provide all necessary documentation and submit completed applications before the deadline,” explained Dana Nichols, dean of academic affairs at Lanier Technical College’s Oakwood campus. It helps if students spend time in their financial aid office. “The best person you can talk to is a savvy financial aid person on campus,” said Holzwarth. Get creative. Students should find out if they can do a work/study program to earn extra money at an oncampus job. Also, financial offices may let them pay the cost over the course of the semester. “Lanier Tech…offers a payment plan through Nelnet, which permits students to pay tuition and fees through a non-interest accruing monthly payment plan,” said Nichols. “This way, students are not forced to come up with a lump sum at the beginning of the semester.”

Just because a student is not the valedictorian doesn’t mean there’s no money out there for them. When applying for scholarships, students should consider how they can fit. Lowrie McCown, associate headmaster at King’s Ridge Christian School, says that leadership, service and creativity are

important. “How diverse is your experience?” he said. “[Ask yourself] what have I done to create leadership opportunities? What else can [I] bring?” McCown also suggests that students find the teachers they know best and ask them to write recommendations.

Scholarships are out there, promises Holzwarth. “There is tons of money for scholarships if kids know how to find them and apply,” she said. And, she says some scholarships are looking for unique students, not necessarily the ones with the highest grade point average.

Meeting space. Advanced technology. Academic programs and degrees. Georgia State University is in North Fulton.

ALPHARETTA CENTER 3775 Brookside Parkway Alpharetta, GA 30022 404.413.2200

robinson.gsu.edu/alpharetta SPECIAL

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2013 Edition collegeguide

Hoping in HOPE By WILL HOUP news@northfulton.com

NORTH FULTON, Ga. — While HOPE (Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally) has been a cornerstone in Georgia’s higher education for about two decades, the merit-based scholarship has fallen into financial strain and undergone some significant changes. Nationwide, rising college tuition costs have caused more students to dip into government-provided financial aid programs, but those financial aid budgets have stayed flat leaving students less money for the mounting costs, according to a recent College Board report. Georgia lawmakers refurbished the lottery-funded HOPE scholarship about two years ago to keep it afloat. The Georgia Lottery funds the scholarship and has since HOPE’s inception

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in 1993. But despite the lottery being one of the largest and most successful in the nation, it has been unable to keep up with the demand. So there were several new stipulations developed for HOPE that cut back the potential money available for students. The most important one, according to the Georgia Student Finance Commission, is that HOPE is no longer tied to the annual rate of tuition charged by the colleges. HOPE will receive its money based upon the available revenues from the lottery. The Georgia Student Finance Commission oversees the HOPE scholarship. Another involves how a student qualifies. Any student who earned a 3.0 grade point average (GPA) in high school and

maintained that mark at a state university was once eligible for a full-tuition scholarship. Under the new rules, a student who keeps a 3.0 GPA in high school and maintains it in college will receive about 90 percent off their tuition. Now the only students receiving a full-tuition scholarship are ones who qualify for the new Zell Miller Scholarship. They must graduate with a 3.7 GPA in high school as well as score a 1,200 on the reading and math sections of the SAT or make a 26 on the ACT to qualify. Zell Miller scholars must keep a 3.3 GPA in college to maintain the scholarship. Students who attend private in-state colleges with the Zell Miller scholarship will receive $2,000 per semester, and students who receive HOPE at a private college will receive $1,800 per semester. HOPE will no longer

Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

cover any mandatory fees or textbooks. In the past, a student could lose and regain the scholarship several times. Now, a student can only lose and regain the scholarship once. Overall, only about 30 percent of students keep their HOPE scholarship all four years, according to news reports in the Atlanta-Journal Constitution. In addition, HOPE does not cover remedial courses anymore, unless it is at a Georgia technical college. These new rules apply to all students. No one will be grandfathered in under the old rules. The number of students who received the scholarship this academic term slipped to about 170,000, about 23,000 fewer from last year. This term also had the lowest number of recipients since 1999-2000. HOPE awarded about $335 million to their scholars this year. The future of HOPE is uncertain as Georgia lawmakers’ opinions are split. State Democrats say they want to keep college

affordable for lower-income students and families. They suggested new legislation such as re-establishing a cap on family income for students eligible for HOPE. This cap existed at the start of HOPE, but was lifted when the lottery started to thrive. Gov. Nathan Deal and other Republicans have said the new changes to HOPE will work and need more time to come into effect. Former Gov. Zell Miller created HOPE to keep Georgia’s smartest minds from leaving the state for college. It has become one of the nation’s most giving state-directed academic scholarships with more than $5.8 billion given to about 1.4 million students, according to the Georgia Student Finance Commission. Before HOPE, fewer than 25 percent of students with at least a score of 1,400 on the math and verbal SAT stayed in Georgia for college. After HOPE, about 75 percent have stayed in state, according to university system data. For more information on HOPE, visit www. gacollege411.org.


collegeguide 2013 Edition To receive HOPE Scholarship, students must meet one of the following academic requirements: 1. Graduate from a HOPE-eligible high school with a 3.0 grade point average. 2. Complete a HOPE eligible home study program with a 3.0 grade point average. 3. Graduate from an ineligible high school, complete an ineligible home study program, or earn a GED, and score in the national composite 85th percentile or higher on the SAT or ACT tests. 4. Graduate from an ineligible high school or complete an ineligible home study program, and then earn a 3.0 grade point average on 30 semester hours or 45 quarter hours of college degree-level coursework. This option allows for payment of the first 30 semester hours or 45 quarter hours after they are taken. 5. Earn a 3.0 grade point average at the college level on degree coursework after attempting 30, 60, or 90 semesters hours or 45, 90, or 135 quarter hours, regardless of high school graduation status. 6. Meet HOPE’s U.S. citizenship or eligible noncitizen requirements. 7. Meet HOPE’s Georgia residency requirements. 8. Be enrolled as a degree-seeking student at an eligible public or private college or university or technical college in Georgia. View a list of HOPE eligible colleges and universities . 9. Be in compliance with Selective Service registration requirements. 10. Maintain satisfactory academic progress as defined by the college. 11. Not be in default or owe a refund on a student financial aid program. 12. Be in compliance with the Georgia Drug-Free Postsecondary Education Act of 1990. A student may be ineligible for HOPE payment if he or she has been convicted for committing certain felony

offenses involving marijuana, controlled substances, or dangerous drugs. 13. Meet additional rigor requirements, beginning with students graduating from high school on or after May 1, 2015. Award Amounts The money provided to HOPE Scholars varies and depends on the type of institution you are attending and your specific enrollment. Public Institutions For Fall 2013, students attending public colleges or universities receive a HOPE Award Amount based upon a per hour rate at the institution he or she is attending. Private Institutions For Fall 2013, Winter 2013, and Spring 2014, students attending private colleges or universities receive the following: Full-time students: $1,800 per semester, $1,200 per quarter Half-time students: $900 per semester, $600 per quarter

funds were received while earning the degree, or reached the seven year expiration of eligibility date. Application Procedure Applying for the HOPE Scholarship is easy, but you should always check with the college you are going to attend to make sure you are completing the applications they require. Students have three options for applying for the HOPE Scholarship. Application Deadline While you have until the last day of classes or exams to submit your application in order to receive HOPE funds for that semester or quarter, we highly recommend submitting your HOPE application as early as possible. The earlier you apply, the earlier the funds are disbursed to your school and credited to your account.

Where to Go for Help If you need help filling out an application or have other questions relating to the HOPE Scholarship, we suggest contacting the financial aid office at the school you plan to attend, talking with your high Award Limits school counselor, or contacting the Georgia Student A college degree-seeking student is ineligible for the Finance Commission. HOPE Scholarship if the student has: To find contact details for the financial aid office Received payment from any combination of HOPE at the school you plan to attend, find your school Scholarship, Zell Miller Scholarship, HOPE Grant, through the search engine via the list of Georgia coland Accel Program funds (through Spring term leges and universities. 2011) totaling 127 semester (190 quarter) hours of You can contact the Georgia Student Finance Comcredit; or mission by: 1. Attempted 127 semester (190 quarter) hours of E-mail: gacollege411@gsfc.org college degree credit, regardless of whether or Call: 1-800-505-4732 (GSFC) not HOPE funds were received while attempting In Metro Atlanta: 770-724-9000 the hours; or A representative is available from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 2. Earned a baccalaureate (four-year) college Monday through Friday. degree, regardless of whether or not HOPE

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2013 Edition collegeguide

Lanier Tech, Gwinnett Tech offer many options to students By BETSY RHAME-MINOR news@northfulton.com

With the expansion of Gwinnett Tech into North Fulton later this year, in an area where Lanier Tech already has a strong presence, students have more opportunities to benefit from a technical education. “The technical college

system is a great kept secret in this state,” explained David Parrish, director of marketing at Lanier Technical College. “Very few people seem to understand the technical college system in Georgia.” Gwinnett Tech and Lanier Tech are two of the 25 technical colleges across Georgia, which are all accredited by the Southern

Association of Colleges and Schools. Technical colleges provide students with skills they need to enter the workforce while taking freshman- and sophomorelevel courses to complete an associate’s degree or get a head start on a bachelor’s degree that will be completed later. Through an agreement with the University System of

Georgia, technical college students can easily transfer to universities in the system. “We now have a seamless education system,” Parrish said. There are plenty of advantages to taking part in what the Technical College System of Georgia has to offer. When students enroll, they have three choices: finishing their high school credits to receive a diploma, obtaining a technical certificate of credit or earning an associate’s degree. The last two options can be combined, and both of these together or separately are attractive to employers. “Many of the key employers in North Fulton want their technical employees to hold associates degrees, so increased availability of higher education will significantly benefit the workforce and residents of North Fulton,” explained Sharon Bartels, president of Gwinnett Technical College. For example, Lanier Tech offers a program in solar energy technology. Parrish says a student can take classes in solar energy panel installation while receiving an associate’s degree in

Reinhardt:

applied science at the same time. After completion or later, that student could transfer to a four-year school to complete a bachelor’s degree or just simply join the workforce. “North Fulton has a very healthy balance between business development and population growth and a very strong need for the workforce training,” said Bartels. Technical schools also offer the advantage of dual enrollment for high school students in North Fulton. Obtaining a technical education or an associate’s degree is an affordable alternative to funding an education at a four-year institution. Though tuition and fees for Georgia’s technical college students will rise 13 percent this year, it’s still substantially more affordable than a four-year institution. In many cases, scholarships and grants are available to Georgia college students no matter if they’ve chosen to attend a four-year, two-year or technical school. “[Technical colleges give] employers what they need,” said Parrish. “It’s a very good partnership. Georgia wins.”

degree completion or online programs applicants who turn in all completed application materials by May Continued from Page 44 1. “Different programs have See if Reinhardt is Right different entry points, so we for You encourage students to apply “We encourage all early,” Fleming said. “If you prospective students to visit let us know you’re interested, and see first-hand if Reinhardt we’ll be glad to help you get is a good fit,” said Director of to know Reinhardt and how it Admission Julie Fleming. can help ‘shape’ your life and Prospective students ‘build’ your future.” and their families can attend MBA class caption a special Saturday preview MBA students discuss day or a weekday tour on the their next assignment main campus in Waleska, Ga. with Assistant Professor See Reinhardt.edu/visit for of Economics Dr. John details. Yelvington (standing). Information sessions – All Reinhardt programs offered this spring during offer small classes, a April – spotlight the North welcoming atmosphere, Fulton, graduate and degree high expectations for growth completion programs. See and success, and caring Reinhardt.edu/infosession professors with real-world for specifics. Students can knowledge and expertise in also meet individually with their fields. To learn more, an admissions counselor. As visit Reinhardt.edu. an incentive to apply early, application fees will be waived —Content supplied by this spring for graduate, Reinhardt University

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Appen Media | 2013 Edition | Education Answer Book™

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2013 Edition

Returning to hometown after college Working where you grew up By WILL HOUP news@northfulton.com

NORTH FULTON, Ga. — For recent college graduates, moving to their hometown after college can come with some grievances. For those local communities, graduates returning can mean a social and economic boost. In North Fulton, bringing young minds back after grad school has been a challenge. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, in 2011 Roswell had the highest rate of young adults ages 20 to 24 in North Fulton. It was 5 percent of the city’s population. Johns Creek and Milton sat at 4 percent, and Alpharetta was 3 percent. “If you really think about it, [this area] as a community is more of a family-focused community,” said James Drinkard, Alpharetta’s assistant city administrator. “Generally speaking, it’s not that appealing of a location for your 20- and 30-year-olds until they start having kids. Typically, it’s when the first child gets close to school age.” Peyton Jamison, 30, graduated from Roswell High School then went on to Auburn University. He married soon after college and spent some time in Marietta and Buckhead before moving to Milton two years ago to raise his family. “It has everything,” Jamison said. “The schools are phenomenal. The community is great. I can drive a mile down the road, and I’m at a horse farm. But I can jump off Ga. 400 in five minutes and get to Buckhead. “When I graduated college, I was in Buckhead,” he said. “When I got married and wanted to raise a family, where else do you go? This place is No. 1.” Alpharetta’s Avalon and City Center are two projects that have high potential to attract a younger crowd of unmarried young adults or

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couples without children to the area, but the city doesn’t have any targeted approach in its near future. “We focus more on the employer side, trying to attract certain types of employers to the area,” Drinkard said. “We have not focused very much on our recent college graduates. It’s just not something we’ve done.” However, North Fulton’s economic growth has attracted back some of those high school students it sent off years ago. Charles Smith, 25, also went to Roswell High School but stayed in-state for college, attending Georgia Southern University. He works for Piedmont Group Atlanta doing financial planning and saw his hometown as a good place to start his career. “I see Roswell as a good area for economic growth,” he said. “I knew a lot of people here, and I could stay at home and save money.” Smith stayed in college a couple extra years to earn his master’s degree in business administration. Now that he’s back, he said that he has a decent number of friends who came back home as well. For North Fulton’s economic community, sending off students like Smith to be highly educated and then bringing them back is ideal. “The graduates coming out of our universities are the next generation’s workforce,” said Peter Tokar, Alpharetta’s economic development director. “We want to send out a youth population, and we are definitely trying to strengthen the community so that we do get those residents that return.” But for any real marketing campaign that targets recent graduates to materialize in Alpharetta, it would take the effort from the city’s current main concern — its employers. According to Drinkard, the tipping point will be when the employers start to say that they have a niche for recent graduates and are having a hard time filling it. Right now, the Alpharetta community is content attracting the young

families. “To date, it’s a fantastic community,” Drinkard said.

Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media

“It’s just our mix and lifestyle tends to be more attractive to the young families rather

than singles married.”

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2013 Edition

Board of Education contacts North Fulton County

Forsyth County

Dr. Robert Avossa Superintendent Robert Avossa became superintendent of the Fulton County School System in June 2011. As superintendent, Avossa is responsible for the leadership, administration and management of more than 93,000 students, 100 schools, 13,500+ employees and an $819 million general fund budget.

Dr. L.C. (Buster) Evans Superintendent Forsyth County Schools is a growing district. In 1995 there were approximately 10,000 students. Today, we are home to over 39,000 students in 36 schools.

Linda Schultz Board President District 1 Email: schultzl@fultonschools.org  Board member since January 2005 Current term expires Dec. 31, 2016

Ann Crow District 1 Email: acrow@forsyth.k12.ga.us  Began third term Jan. 1, 2011

Katie Reeves District 2 Email: reevesk@fultonschools.org  Board member since 1999 Current term expires Dec. 31, 2014

Kristin Morrissey District 2 Email: kmorrissey@forsyth.k12.ga.us  Began term Jan. 1, 2011

Linda McCain Vice President District 5 Email: mccainl@fultonschools.org  Board member since 2011 Current term expires Dec. 31, 2014

Tom Cleveland District 3 Email: tcleveland@forsyth.k12.ga.us  Began third term Jan. 1, 2013

Julia Bernath District 7 Email: bernath@fulton schools.org  Board member since 2000 Current term expires Dec. 31, 2014

Darla light Chairperson District 4 Email: dlight@forsyth.k12.ga.us  Began second term Jan. 1, 2013

Nancy Roche Vice Chairperson District 5 Email: nroche@forsyth.k12.ga.us  Began fourth term Jan. 1, 2013

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Education Answer Book™ | 2013 Edition | Appen Media


Education Answer Book 2013