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OCAL HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL UPDATE

Ralls County

See page 4A

Herald-Enterprise

“The County Paper” - An Area Tradition Since 1865 - Ralls County, Missouri

Thursday, February 6, 2014

USPS 454-720 Vol. 149, No. 6 • New London, Missouri 63459 • 24 Pages • 2 Sections • 50 Cents

FOR BREAKING NEWS AND INFORMATION, VISIT OUR WEBSITE!

“They tear up when they see it” Quilt represents thank you to Veterans

NECAC, MISSOURI STAFFING TO HOST JOB FAIR

The not-for-profit North East Community Action Corporation (NECAC) and Missouri Staffing are hosting a job application and screening fair on Feb. 14. The event will be from  9 a.m. to 1 p.m.  at the NECAC Ralls County Service Center at 411 Main, in New London. Applications will be accepted for factory, industrial, assembly, machine operations, warehouse, material handling and data entry positions. Full-time and shift work positions are available in the Curryville, Monroe City and Louisiana areas. Participants should plan to bring a state photo identification such as a driver’s license and a Social Security card or birth certificate. Applicants must be able to pass a drug screening and a nationwide background check.     More information is available by calling NECAC Ralls County Service Coordinator Wendy Ellison at  (573) 985-2411or Missouri Staffing at  (573) 581-9675.

STORMSPOTTER CLASS

Kim Martin is pictured with the quilt she made using patriotic flags.

Kim Martin, of Perry, made quite a statement with her first quilt. When she showed the king-sized quilt to her co-workers they, and others, were impressed with the size and the work making the quilt entailed. But the most striking feature was the seven large flags Martin chose to incorporate on a field of blue.

Martin used flags from the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force to flank the middle row. At the top of that row was the American Flag, with the POW/MIA flag in the center, and the Missouri state flag on the bottom. Martin cut the material into strips, sewed on the flags and then sewed the strips together.

What inspired Martin to take up this particular project now? It was her father, John Benedict, a Vietnam veteran who served in the Army. “And with everything that’s going on now, I just wanted to say thank you, I appreciate it, to all the veterans.” Martin makes it a point to shake the hand of any veteran she meets and to thank them

for their service. Some veterans have seen the quilt. “They tear up when they see it,” she said. “There’s more we can do, we’ve done some, but more can be done.” This quilt is Martin’s way of honoring her father and all those who have served their country. Martin dedicated her flag to “the past, present and future and to all the fallen.”

NECAC seeks applicants for Aspire Partnership Homes program

Monroe City Fire Dept. will be hosting a Stormspotter Class with Jim Kramper, on Thursday, Feb 13, at 6:30 p.m., at the Monroe City Middle School Auditorium. Your team is more than welcome to join them.

CHAMBER TO MEET

The annual Perry Area Chamber of Commerce Meeting will be held at Perry City Hall on Feb. 11, beginning at 5 p.m.  Everyone is invited to attend.  You do not have to own a business in Perry to be a member.  The purpose of the Chamber is to promote Perry as a whole.

CORRECTION

Correction to last week’s Ralls County Herald Enterprise: The advertisement for Ralls County Circuit Clerk Gina Jameson should have read: Gina Jameson, Ralls County Circuit Clerk. Paid for by Gina Jameson. We apologize for any problems that this may have caused.

The not-for-profit North East Community Action Corporation (NECAC) is seeking applications for a program in which federal and state prisoners will build affordable houses within penitentiary walls that will be sold to qualifying buyers. The program is called Aspire Partnership Homes, and is available throughout NECAC’s 12-county service area. Partnering in the program with NECAC are the Federal Bureau of Prisons and the Carpenters Union District Council of Greater St. Louis. “This is an innovative program that will have benefits

for everyone involved,” said NECAC Deputy Director for Housing Developments Carla Potts. “We encourage people to give us a call or make an appointment to see if they qualify.” Applicants must be able to qualify for a regular loan and have annual household incomes not exceeding $44,000 for a two-person family and $51,000 for a family of three or more people. They also must be able to pay for their foundations, utility hookups, flooring and carpet. The ranch-style homes feature two bedrooms and one bathroom. They will be about

1,008 square feet. The houses will be built one-at-a-time based upon customer demand by prisoners at a federal or state penitentiary. Carpenters union apprentices and instructional teams will provide instructional assistance. The homes will be transported to site locations by an experienced moving company and set on basements. General contractors will do plumbing and electrical installation. Start-up funding for the project comes from the Carpenters union. Home sales will help finance the program’s costs down the road.

The program is modeled after one in South Dakota. Potts said NECAC is working with Missouri lawmakers and the Department of Corrections to look at setting up a state program. The agency received approval for the program late last year from the Federal Bureau of Prisons. NECAC will work with participating families through homeownership classes and offer mortgage information. For more information, or to sign up for the program, call Potts or NECAC Homeownership Programs Director Debbie Smith at (573) 3246622.

K&K AUTOMOTIVE Rick Wilson and his mechanics, Matt and Bobby, have been providing quality automotive service at K&K Performance Automotive for 10 years. Located at 17055 Sundance Drive in New London, Wilson takes pride in providing that extra touch that sets his shop apart from the dozens of others in the surrounding area. K&K Automotive is a member of Certified Auto Repair and provides a nation-wide twoyear warranty for parts and labor on most services.

u Continued on Page 8A

Continuing The Tradition Of The Ralls County Record, The Center Herald, And The Perry Enterprise


2A

Thursday, February 6, 2014

The Ralls County Herald-Enterprise • rallshe.com

VIEWS & COMMENTS From the Editor by Editor Carolyn Trower

WAGERING I suggest that people look upon the minimum wage as they would service in a restaurant. What would influence the tip you would leave for the service you received? (Excluding the 18% tip automatically added to your plastic payment – plus the “swipe” charge.) A smile? What started the shift as clean apparel and good grooming? As much attention as the customer load would allow? (And though it’s not the server’s responsibility) was the meal to your satisfaction? All these variables being evaluated as positive, you pleasure the server with a monetary expression of your pleasure. Most servers, in turn, share with those who clean and set tables. The salad was crisp. The wine was chilled. The entrée was exactly prepared. Who emptied the bus cart, separated the refuse, and completed the wash/restock cycle? Which is more important, the smile or the clean fork? Translate this to the ER. Which is more important, the doc’s sterile gloves or the cleanup after the patient before you? The point is: each facet of our lives is important in itself. How much do you pay a school crossing guard to get them to protect the children? How much do you pay a Marine? How much do you pay a volunteer firefighter? How much should we pay a dishwasher for a clean fork? Though pride of service should most certainly be recognized, most who serve with pride would do so at any wage, and those without pride should be judged accordingly. Enter corporate business. Villain or part of the food chain? Enter the American consumer. Villain, victim, or just part of the food chain? Consider the thought process involved in the purchase of a big-screen

TV. (If it doesn’t cover more square footage on the wall than the distance from that wall to your couch times the length of the couch, you’ll be forced to brag about its clarity and features in explaining that size isn’t all that important.) Was the purchase by the fact that until the TV came out of its package it had been untouched by American hands? Of course, paying the manufacturer’s workers $0.28 per hour does allow you to get an 11% rebate and an 800 number for assistance. Ask yourself: exactly what do we export besides ag products, timber, and money we’ve borrowed from China? Not surprising, the countries that have people producing exports with no EPA oversight are now competing for the same fuel and food that we must also purchase. A law degree is not required to flip burgers or load TV’s at a Grinch store, and should return more than minimum wage, but once-in-a-while you need to bring home a pizza to share with your parents. And for those who score a bargain on a meal of crab legs and/or steak; will the fork be any cleaner at $10 per hour? (If we paid Congress $10 per hour for the 131 days they plan to show up for work this year we’d owe them only $10,480 each.) The problem is not the minimum wage for deadend jobs. The solution is not “Cash for Clunkers.” The “clunkers” fiasco basically just put a few more new cars on the personal property tax rolls. Just raising the minimum wage. Simply gleans more tax money for government. We need government policy that doesn’t trample our work force into poverty while globalizing campaign-contributor profits.

THRASHING DAY WATER GIRLS I was informed by a well-known civic leader in Oak Grove that girls also carried water to a thrashing crew.  She grew up on a farm near Bunceton and remembers filling the jugs by pumping water out of a well.  I also

received a letter from 83 year old Larna Mack from Columbia  who was a “water boy”: “Jack, I grew up on a farm about three miles southeast of  Alma  and also carried water to the thrashing crew.    My Dad

I recently received sheet music for “Hallelujah” by Leonard Cohen, a gift from my sister. The first LP I bought when I went to MU was by Cohen. I walked down the Strollway and found a record shop where I browsed happily for quite a while. I wasn’t familiar with the Canadian folk singer but the cover art and liner notes drew me in. I sat in the dorm room listening to the haunting lyrics of “Suzanne” and the cynical “Everybody Knows.” Cohen’s music seemed a perfect soundtrack for a freshman English major. Years later I heard “Hallelujah” covered by Jeff Buckley on episodes of “West Wing” and “Criminal Minds” and on other TV shows as

well. My LP’s have long since been replaced by stacks of CD’s. I remember my joy when I found a CD of that first Cohen LP. I put it in as soon as I got in the car and on the back roads home I let the music carry me back to campus and the freedom that came from being on my own for the first time. Music is a universal language, they say, like a smile or the peace sign. It can also serve as a time machine, transporting you back to the golden days of your life. A song can trigger memories of people and places long buried in the mundane trappings of the everyday mindset. Music eases stress and lessens the anguish of a bad situation. There’s truth in the lyr-

ics of “Give Me That Old Time Rock-n-Roll.” Our patriotism is stirred by the national anthem or maybe by Charlie Daniels, depending on your mood. Music has defined the Roaring 20’s, the Big Band Era, and the British Invasion. Hymns lift our hearts to God and Mozart soothes the soul. I can’t imagine a day without music. And I am one Boomer who loves my iPod. What a technological wonder, a thousand of my favorite songs and artists spanning genres and subject to my mood with a few clicks. I call it my “portable sanity.” Spend some time with your favorite music this week and let the memories and the good times roll.

Jamie Quick

O’REILLY VS. OBAMA I don’t know about anyone else, but I was more excited about Bill O’Reilly’s interview with President Obama than I was the Superbowl game. And Mr. O’Reilly didn’t disappoint me. He asked direct questions that didn’t leave any room for ducking and jiving. But duck and jive President Obama did - on every question asked. Unfortunately, I only got to see the live interview on Sunday before writing this, so at this time, I am completely blind on what took place in the taped interview after the live one. That being said, please remember all of my comments are only on the live interview before the game Sunday. O’Reilly started the interview out with a simple question about the healthcare rollout. The president never answered the question. He instead tried to put a positive spin on what has been by most accounts a disastrous rollout of the Affordable Care Act. He

followed that up with a simple enough question, why hasn’t Kathleen Sebilious been fired? President Obama probably gave his second most direct answer in the entire live interview to this question. Basically, he is more concerned with saving the ACA than with holding people accountable. Another topic covered was Benghazi, did Leon Panetta advise the President that the attacks taking place in real time were terrorists attacks? Of course, we never got a straight answer on that either. Let’s move on to the IRS, question asked - answer given was basically the same as the Benghazi answer - we have heard all of this testimony on the Hill with all of the hearings so why are you asking me these silly questions? Then the viewer question, which I really liked, again a dodge. What bothered me the most about the whole interview was that President Obama used every opportunity to blame Bill

O’Reilly and Fox News for all of his problems. According to his statements, he wouldn’t have any scandals if Fox News wouldn’t report the stories. Maybe he’s right, the lame stream media sure isn’t going to report it. Some things just aren’t going to change. And the President’s agenda is one of those things. The best we can hope for is that the Democrats lose the Senate in November and that those elected are good, upstanding citizens and not more sleazy politicians. Probably less of the first of more of the last, but we can hope. It appears I will be snowed in part of the week, so maybe I can do some catching up with the state politics and fill everyone in on them next week. Hope everyone has stayed warm and safe during these major winter storms we are predicted to get.

owned the thrasher and another man owned the tractor.  They thrashed for many neighbors and were paid, but the other men, for the most part, worked on a swapping help basis.    Our riding horse, Daisy, was very gentle, dependable and not spooked by the noise.    I was paid $1.00 per day.  Another job was to cut thistles out of the pasture.    I don’t know if Daddy just didn’t like them or if they were bad for the cows.    So armed with a hoe and bucket, I walked the pasture.    I was paid a penny apiece, so thrashing time was much more profitable for me.  Yes, I remember the

brown jugs hung from the horn by leather straps.   I picture the men hooking their thumb in the handle and throwing it up on their arm.    Everyone drank from the jug and I guess never thought that they might “catch” something.    I wonder now if any of them chewed tobacco.  I often went to the barn and climbed around on the thrasher and wondered how it did what it did.    Getting ready to move to another farm was time consuming and a big lumbering contraption going down the road.  My Dad was very particular about the straw stack and when finished it was

a piece of art, gently sloping and coming to peak at the top.  I look forward to your articles in the Concordian. Signed Larna Mack”      Larna, my dad also hated thistles.  He carried a corn knife in his pickup and would stop when he saw a thistle along side the road.  When the state nearly eradicated thistles with a weevil they released, he thought his lifetime effort was the reason there weren’t any more thistles on our farm.  Jack can be reached at PO Box 40, Oak Grove, Mo 64075 or jackremembers@aol.com. Visit www.jackremembers.com

Bill Mickels

Sheriff: Gerry Dinwiddie

Visit our website www.rallshe.com Ralls County

Herald-Enterprise An Independent Newspaper Continuing the Tradition Of:

The Ralls County Record (1865) The Perry Enterprise (1888) The Center Herald (1904)

Published Every Thursday at New London, Missouri rche@tds.net •rallshe.com

Publisher/Senior Editor - David Eales Editor - Carolyn Trower Advertising Manager - Nancy Pipkin Periodicals Postage Paid at New London, Mo. Send address changes to: Ralls County Herald Enterprise, P.O. Box 426, New London, MO 63459

Subscription Rates: $24 per year in Ralls and adjoining counties $28 per year elsewhere Phone: 573-985-3420 • Fax 660-327-4847 Member: Missouri Press Association National Newspaper Association

Letters To The Editor Policy: The RCHE encourages the public to write Letters to the Editor on topics of interest to the community. All letters must be signed by the author and include the author’s address and phone number for verification purposes. Published letters will include only the author’s name and the town in which he or she resides. Submissions which are deemed libelous or potentially libelous will not be published. Letters may be edited for length. Letters deemed to be “thank you” letters which may contain a list of contributors or supporters of an event or cause will not be published as Letters to the Editor. Edited versions giving only a general “thank you” but not having a list of specific names may be published. Persons wishing to publish a list of names or specific contributors should contact the RCHE advertising department for prices of publishing such material.


Thursday, February 6, 2014

The Ralls County Herald-Enterprise

3A

RALLS COUNTY RECOLLECTIONS

A View From the Past

“Yesteryears from the local papers” The Courier-Post Hannibal, Mo., Tuesday, July 6, 1954  

Recalls Events At Turn Of The Century

By MRS. OLIVER HOWARD, Staff Correspondent Crack-of-dawn weddings were stylish in Ralls made necessary by the need to catch the early morning train for the beginning of the honeymoon trip.  The passenger coach on the Shortline had a wedding bell wired over one of the seats when it arrived in Perry one fall morning in 1904.    This place was reserved for Mr. and Mrs. Steve Glascock, who were married at the home of the bride’s family in Perry in time to catch the 7:30 a.m. train. Stops on the Shortline (sic) Perry branch were Hannibal, Oakwood, Salt River Switch,  New London, Ralls Junction, Owendale, Briggs Station, Center, Orrwood and Perry.  (Of course it would stop anywhere, if flagged.) In the interest of better roads, the county purchased a rock crushed (sic) in 1901, and donated it to the Perry road district.  It was set up near Lick Creek on the M.T. Gill farm, a temporary location to show people how a rock crusher worked.    Rock made here was used for a demonstration rock road to convince the public of its desirability.  The crusher was to be moved by any man who would use it to gravel a public road and pay expense of running it. Ralls County had an oil boom, one brief summer – 1920.  It was marked by excitement, and a few lost some money.    Mostly, it was just another period in history. Ralls  County  stayed in the coal oil era longer than other areas, because there was no gas for the gas light years.  Natural gas was not run through the county until after electricity had been here some time. Farmers knew and remember more about the coal oil days than the town people.    This is because farmers had coal oil lamps, stoves and heaters until 1936, when REA came through.  One of my daily chores was the cleaning and filling of seven oil lamps and the oil stove tank. Know the difference between coal oil and kerosene?  Kerosene used to be made from coal – later it was produced from crude oil, but the old-timers continued to call it coal oil.  So there isn’t any difference. It’s no joke, those tales about people tasting oil in their drinking water, or seeing it on the surface of their land.    It could happen.  If oil is near a vein of water, it collects in springs

and on the surface of creeks. The Indians collected this oil, and rubbed it on themselves, believing that it made them stronger.   They burned small quantities of it in religious services. To early settlers drilling water wells in  Pennsylvania, oil was a nuisance instead of a bonanza.  No one had a use for it except a few medicine show men, who bottled it, calling it “rock oil.”    It was a cureall for just about anything that ailed men or beasts, according to their labels. Otherwise the oil was just something settlers had to get rid of.  If they struck oil when digging a well, they diverted the stream into the river to get it off their property.    Cumberland River was once set on fire to remove the oil from the surface. The first oil well was drilled in  Kentucky  in 1828, to obtain oil for a medical company. The real petroleum industry began in 1859, when it was found that “rock oil” could be used in whale oil lamps.  Crude oil had a terrible odor and smoke, but science was learning to refine it.    The first commercial oil well was drilled in  Pennsylvania  in 1859.    They found oil at 69 feet. They knew, now, how to refine the oil and obtain kerosene.    The gasoline, a useless product, was burned in the oil fields at night, to get it out of the way. Gasoline was in demand, however, by the time the oil boom reached  Ralls  County.    The Atlas Portland Cement Company drilled test wells in Ralls that year.  Their interest started rumors of vast oil deposits under the county, as a company was formed to drill wells for private investors.  Many Ralls countians bought stock – their money was used to drill the oil wells, there was no oil, and that was the end of their money, and of the oil One of the test wells was left open at the vein which contained mineral water, and thus Mineral Springs was formed south of New London. The cement company dug a test well in Miss Rolla Spalding’s hollow, just back of our house, at Spalding and we children spent the summer waiting to catch kerosene by the bucketful. There was some jealousy at first, because the drilling was to be done on Miss Rolla’s farm, and not on other farms.    The company hadn’t promised anything, or revealed any purpose other than a geological study of the earth at that point, but a great many felt that sudden wealth was going to spurt

out each time a new casing was sunk. First they built a shack in the woods, and erected a derrick above it, to use the old cable-tool or percussion method of drilling, by pounding with a bit. They worked day and night, using a steam engine with coal for fuel, and soon we became accustomed to the sound of the drilling, a sort of accompaniment for the whippoorwills, frogs and crickets. The oil boom meant a good extra income for the farmers – they hauled coal, pipes and supplies, by wagon.  The men – two bit sharpeners and two drillers – to a crew, stayed at the  Spalding  Hotel.    They were among the last of the commercial customers of the old resort, which was slowly going out of fashion. The bit sharpeners worked at a forge, and it was continuous work, with bits to be sharpened, and the dulled ones removed and replaced, day and night. The drillers ran the engine and added the casings as they were ordered.    To start the well, they put in a ten-inch pipe with drilling rubble, bored through that, and then began with pieces of eight-inch casing, 20 feet long.    These casings were screwed together.    As drilling progressed, the casing sank into the ground, and new lengths were screwed on from above. Water came up in the casing around the bit, and flowed out in a stream.    My most vivid mental picture of the oil well is of the men, wearing slickers, working to screw the new lengths of pipe on, and then walking around it in a circle, using a huge wrench to turn it.  To me they looked like characters in Mother’s illustrated Bible book, turning the stones of an olive press, walking round and round. As the new pipe was added, the water climbed this pipe into the air and spilled down from the height, making a glorious gushing splash.    This waterfall lessened as the pipe sank slowly and laboriously in the ground, with each thud of the drill. They drilled to a depth of 2100 feet, and if we missed seeing a single section inch its way down, in daylight, it wasn’t our fault. As soon as evening chores were done, older folks would go back in the hollow with us, and we supplemented the hotel diet of the men with offerings of pie and cake.  They enjoyed this sociability, and often we all joined in to fry fish and boil coffee in the forge.    Quite suitability, I believe, one of the men was named Cof-

fee.   The geologist, who was one run above the crew professionally, took a sample of rock and sand every eight or ten feet.    It seems that his name was Haines. After 500 feet of drilling, they hit salt water.  (This bore out William Muldrow’s records, of the year 1825, that he drilled through 500 feet of limestone to obtain the fine artesian well which many think is a natural spring in the Spalding Park.) Soon afterwards, the oil well spit up red water.    I was not old enough to go to school, but I had been told that the world was round, and that China was beneath us.  When we approached the well and saw the red water, Walter Roland yelled, “Gee!  Lookie there – they’ve drilled right into a Chinaman’s skull!”    I scooted home in terror.    The boys reenacted a colored cartoon we had saved from 1918 – with Kaiser Bill washing his feet in a tub of blood. The creeks ran red, ruining the water for stock, until they drilled past that part of the earth, going deeper and deeper. The best fun was when they brought up a bit for sharpening.    The water shot high up the derrick then, dousing unwary spectators with yellow mud – this was more fun than the custard pie throwing we saw in movies at the Star in Hannibal on rare trips to town. The steam engine ran, the drill pounded deep in the earth, screeching on its cable and pulley high in the derrick; the haulers shouted to their teams – the hollow rang with more excitement and suspense than (the) white man had known before. As autumn set in, and school started, the teacher had trouble keeping the boys from going on to climb the derrick, when she sent them to our spring to carry buckets of drinking water for the school. Then came the day when the engine stopped, and the bit came up for the last time.    They didn’t say why they stopped – maybe they found what they were looking for. Word got around they had found oil.    The crew sent to  Hannibal  and had a bomb made There was a parade of touring cars from Hannibal, people peering through the ising glass diamonds in the side curtains.  All were waiting to see the oil men bring in a gusher. Word drifted back through the crowd – the bomb was not to blast through to “black gold” – it was to loosen the bottom of the casing, almost half a mile down in the earth.  There would be no oil.

DAVID LEWELLEN Trucking & Excavating, L.L.C.

Week #6 Ralls County Book “Ain’t saying it ain’t.” The boy’s expression changed then and his jaw drooped slightly and trembled. “Just saying I never heard of a dog like that.” Uncle Jesse jerked a splinter from one of the blazing logs and lit his pipe and the cabin was quiet. “Dogs like that been in Africa a long time. Back before our-Lord-and-Savior-Jesus-Christ. Before Moses, even. They can’t bark.” “How you know?” “Cash told me.” “How he know?” “Fellow from Mobile told him. Traveling man.” “I see.” The boy blinked his eyes rapidly and turned from his uncle and looked across the room at Lady, and then turned from her. Neither of them must see him, for he was too big to cry and so they mustn’t see him. “If it’s my dog and she belongs in Africa-well, what she doing here?” Uncle Jesse’s pipe tasted bitter and he put it on the mantel. “Somebody brought her over. Maybe them folks in the ad. Brought her over and she got lost. That’s about how it happened.” “Well, I found her.” The boy’s eyes were dry and he faced his uncle and the line of his mouth was straight. “I found her and the finder’s keepers.” “That’s the saying all right and some folks hold to that.” “How you hold?” “I ain’t holding. “You’re doing the holding.” “But what you think I ought to do, Uncle Jesse?” His jaw was trembling again. “I don’t know what to do. What you think I ought to do?” The old man pulled his chair close to the fire and sat down again and held his long gnarled hands out to the blaze and again the cabin was quiet, and evening gloom was creeping down from the ridges and over the cabin and into the swamp. “Well, now—I rightly don’t know. You can keep still about that dog and nothing mout never happen. Then again a heap of folks know about her and somebody mout put two and two together. There’s always that reward.” “Mister Cash?” “Never in this world. Cash Evans loves money as good as the next man, but not that good. So like I said, nothing mout never happen. But then again it mout. This one you got to settle for yourself.” “But I don’t know how.” “Me neither.

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But whichever way you jump, I’m jumping with you.” “If I keep her then that’s all right with you?” “If you think it’s right to lay low and keep her, then it’s you and me and the dog and ain’t nothing going to bother you. They can bring the high sheriff. The governor even. It don’t make no difference. Ain’t nobody going to bother you. Ain’t nobody going to take no dog away from nobody unless that’s how you want it.” “Then I’m going to keep her.” The old man got up from his chair and picked up his pipe and blew into it and got a broomstraw and cleaned it. “If that’s how it is, then let’s fix some supper. A big bowl of oatmeal sounds good to me. How ‘bout you?” “Maybe those folks forgot about her by now. That’s an old magazine and she been lost a long time.” “Some hot oatmeal and maybe some ham all chopped up in some eggs.” Uncle Jesse went over to the stove and lit some splinters. “Mor’n likely those folks have forgot all about her.” The boy reached for the oatmeal and a porringer and handed them to Uncle Jesse. “If we have oatmeal for supper, we better have mush for breakfast. Don’t want to over do the oatmeal.” The fire was burning good and the old man lifted an eye from the stove and put the porringer close to the blaze. “Nobody around here much reads magazines except Mister Cash and Gates. That travelling man may not be back for months. So I’m going to keep her.” “You said that once’t. Ain’t no use keep talking about it. Chop up the ham. Chop it into little bitty pieces so I can chew it.” The boy got the ham and sliced off a piece and cut it into little bitty pieces and then he got four eggs and broke them and mixed the ham with the eggs, but his eyes had filled again and he didn’t look up; and finally he said, “Uncle Jesse—“ “Uh huh?” “I ain’t hungry.” “You oughta eat.” “But I ain’t hungry.” He turned away from the stove and went over to the front door and stood there and Lady jumped off of the bed and joined him and they went out on the porch and then into the yard.

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4A Thursday, February 6, 2014 The Ralls County Herald-Enterprise

LOCAL SPORTS

Lady Tigers defeat Silex in Bowling Green Tourney The Mark Twain Lady Tigers defeated Silex in the first round of the Bowling Green Tournament with both Mackenzie Grossmann and Kyley Barnes hitting for double doubles. The Lady Tigers fell to host Bowling Green in the semi final and fell again to Elsberry in the third place game to finish fourth in the tourney. Silex The Lady Tigers bounced out to a quick 13-5 first quarter lead and extended their lead with a matching 13-5 second period score for a 26-10 lead at the half. The third quarter was all Lady Tigers with a 17-6 mark. Silex tried to make a run in the fourth period with a 20-13 quarter but solid Lady Tiger outside and free throw shooting (9 of 14 for 64%) sealed their 5636 victory. Mackenzie Grossmann led the Lady Tigers in scoring with 21 points and added 11 boards for her double double while Kyley Barnes hit for 10 points and 11 boards for her double double. Kaelee Ogle scored double-digit points with 12

but fell a rebound short of a double double with 9 boards. Alicia Cole led the Lady Tigers in assists with Grossmann team high in thefts and Epperson in blocks. Statistics Points: Chloe Majors 4, Alicia Cole 2, Kaelee Ogle 15, Michelle Epperson 4, Mackenzie Grossmann 21, Kyley Barnes 10. Three pointers: Grossmann 1. Rebounds: Majors 3, Cole 1, Ogle 9, Epperson 5, Grossmann 11, Brooklyn Hawkinson 1, Barnes 11. Assists: Cole 6, Epperson 2, Barnes 1. Steals: Majors 2, Cole 1, Ogle 1, Grossmann 4, Barnes 2. Blocks: Cole 1, Ogle 1, Epperson 3, Grossmann 1. Elsberry The Lady Tigers had a furious fourth quarter comeback but fell just short in their third place game versus Elsberry in the Bowling Green and fell 46-41 in the third place game. Mackenzie Grossmann added another double double with a team high 15 points and she cleaned

the glass for 12 boards. Kaelee Ogle and Michelle Epperson chipped in with 8 points apiece while Alicia Cole led the team in helpers with 7 and Chloe Majors led the team in thefts. Elsberry led 12-6 after the first quarter and led at the half 28-18. The low scoring third period saw Elsberry take the period 9-8 but Mark Twain mounted a 15-9 fourth quarter to fall just short 46-41. Statistics Points: Chloe Majors 4, Kaelee Ogle 8, Michelle Epperson 8, Mackenzie Grossmann 15, Kyley Barnes 6. Rebounds: Majors 2, Ogle 4, Epperson 7, Grossmann 12, Barnes 7. Assists: Majors 1, Cole 7, Ogle 1, Epperson 1, Grossmann 3, Barnes 1. Steals: Majors 3, Cole 2, Epperson 2, Grossmann 1. Barring the weather being uncooperative, the Tigers hosted Highland on Tuesday, Feb. 4 and travels to Louisiana on Friday, Feb. 7.

Lady Tigers participate in Bowling Green Tournament

(Top) Mark Twain Lady Tiger Michelle Epperson grabs an offensive rebound and slams it home for two Lady Tiger points over the outstretched arms of a defender. (Middle) Lady Tiger Coach Alex Brandenburg called an opportune time out and then goes over a play for his charges during an important time in the game. The team watches intently and then went out and executed the play perfectly for a Lady Tiger score. (Bottom) Kaelee Ogle shows off her athleticism as she jumps out of bounds, catches a loose ball and whips it back into a teammate to keep a Lady Tiger possession and the ability for second chance points. Versus Silex the Lady Tigers came a single rebound short of having three players post double doubles in a game. RCHE PHOTOS

Anderson, Tonkinson score double digit points versus Silex

The Mark Twain Tigers participated in the Bowling Green Tournament the week of Jan. 27-Feb. 1. The boys’ fell to Winfield in the first round of the tourney and in consolation action battled Silex in a tough game falling in a close contest 60-57. Silex The Tigers led Silex through three quarters before a fourth quarter barrage from Silex sealed the victory 60-57. Mark Twain led 15-14 after the first quarter and led at the half 36-29. The tigers increased their lead by four points with a 1410 third period, however,

a game lasts four quarters and Silex mounted a big comeback with a 21-7 final period for the 60-57 win. Ethan Anderson hit for double digit points with 17 as did Bradley Tonkinson with 12 points and he also led the team in boards and steals with 9 and 4 respectively. Bailey McMillen was team high in assists. Statistics Points: Parker Eddington 5, James Parker 6, Ethan Clark 4, Ethan Anderson 17, Loren Carlisle 2, Bailey McMillen 7, Brett Peters 4, Bradley Tonkinson 12.

Three pointers: Anderson 1, McMillen 1. Rebounds: Eddington 3, Parker 3, Anderson 4, Carlisle 1, McMillen 2, Peters 2, Tonkinson 9. Assists: Eddington 1, Ethan Mack 1, Clark 1, Anderson 2, Carlisle 1, McMillen 3, Tonkinson 1. Steals: Parker 1, Mack 2, Clark 1, Anderson 2, Carlisle 1, McMillen 2, Tonkinson 4. Barring the weather being uncooperative, the Lady Tigers hosted Highland on Tuesday, Feb. 4 and travels to Louisiana on Friday, Feb. 7.

MTHS JV Lady Tigers Round-up The Mark Twain JV Lady Tigers hosted the Van-Far Lady Indians and lost a close19-21 contest. McKenzie Johnston put up 6 points Kailee Calvin also added 3 goals for 6 points. Madeline Gilbert added 3 points and was 1 for 2 from the line. Brooklyn Hawkinson had 2 points. Katie Neff also added 2 points. On Jan. 15 the Lady Tigers faced Westran in the first round of the Paris JV

The family of Darrell Fuqua wants to take this opportunity to express our gratitude to the First Responders, Fire Department, and Law Enforcement officers of New London and Ralls County in our time of loss. Pastor Tom Day, Pallbearers and members of the First Christian Church for serving the delicious meal. All the cards, food, flowers, calls, memorials, and friendship from all the family and friends. The family of Darrell Fuqua

Invitational. Mark Twain lost 27-38. Madeline Gilbert led the scoring with 12 points. Kailee Calvin added 7 points and was 3 for 6 from the line. Brooklyn Hawkinson added 6 points and was 2 for 2 from the line. Maddy Ford added 2 points. In the Jan. 18 second round play at Paris the

Ruba’s

Lady Tigers lost 16-49 to the host Paris Lady Coyotes. Kailee Calvin led with 8 points and was 2 for 2 from the line. Brooklyn Hawkinson added 4 points. Maddy Ford added 2 points. McKenzie Johnston put up 2 points.

GENERAL STORE

403 W. First New London, Mo. 573-985-8531

Lunch & Dinner Entree and 2 Sides: $4.99

(573) 231-5919 New London Forget-Me-Not Senior Citizens Friday, Feb. 7

Meatloaf, mashed potatoes and gravy, green beans, carry in dishes and desserts, coffee and tea Carry outs are available Donations are accepted in the canisters on the tables! Everyone, regardless of age, is welcome to eat at Senior Citizens. If the Ralls County schools cancel school Friday, Feb. 7 Senior Citizens will not be open

THURSDAY, FEB. 6 - WEDNESDAY, FEB. 12

Thursday: Stuffed Peppers, Bacon Cheeseburger Friday: Fish w/ 2 sides $3.99, Steaks off the Grill Saturday/Sunday: 10 pc. All White Meat Tenders: $10 8 pc. Chicken with 2 Sides and Rolls $16.99 Monday: Meatloaf, Bacon Cheeseburgers Tuesday: Mexican Lasagna, Chinese, Taco Salad Wednesday: 50¢ Wings, Goulash 2 Piece Fried Chicken, 2 sides: $3.99 Everyday Hot Case Hours - Breakfast: 7 - 10:30 a.m. Lunch 11 a.m. - 7 p.m. Daily Deli Meat and Cheese Sliced until 9 p.m. Pizza made to order daily until 8:30 p.m.


Thursday, February 6, 2014 The Ralls County Herald-Enterprise

Obituaries ✝ William Robert “Bob” Dotson, Jr. 1924-2014

William Robert “Bob” Dotson, Jr., 89, of New London, went to be with his Lord at 9:50 a.m., Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014 at Hannibal Regional Hospital, in Hannibal. Mr. Dotson was born April 1, 1924, in Hannibal, to William Robert Dotson Sr. and Martha Gertrude Moyer Dotson.    He was married to Emily Sue Guttery on April 25, 1943 in the home of Rev. John Golden, in Hannibal. They enjoyed 60 wonderful years together.  She preceded him in death Dec. 13, 2003. Survivors include five children, Carolyn Sue Dietle (Richard), of New London, Charlotte Ann Maddox (Frank) of Hannibal, William R. “Bobby” Dotson III (Carol), of New London, Donald L. “Don” Dotson (Elizabeth), of Midwest City, Okla., James O. “Jim” Dotson (Hazel), of New London, one sister, Virginia Rebecca Blessing, one sister-inlaw, Alvina Dotson, 21 grandchildren, 35 greatgrandchildren, eight great-great-grandchildren and many nieces, nephews and cousins. He is preceded in death by his parents, one brother; Thomas L. “Duane” Dotson, one sister; Etta Lorraine Lake, two brothers-in-law; Steve Lake, Clarence W. Blessing, three sisters-in-law; Eleanor Speck, Clara Dryden, Teresa Harvey and one grandson.      Mr. Dotson graduated from New London High School and the University of Missouri in Columbia.   While studying agriculture engineering at Mizzou, Bob participated

in heavy weight boxing and loved sharing stories from his boxing days. Bob was a lifetime farmer, east of New London. He was also a member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local # 350 for over 60 years. He loved hunting, fishing and motorcycle riding with his wife, Sue. Bob also liked woodworking, hunting for mushrooms and rocks and liked camping and all outdoor activities. He mostly enjoyed family gatherings and spending time with his children and grandchildren.   Bob was also a very active member of Freedom Bible Church in Oakwood, where he served as an Elder. Funeral Services were at 4 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 4, at the James O’Donnell Funeral Home, in Hannibal.  Pastor Tom Day officiated.      Visitation was from 3-4 p.m., Tuesday, at the James O’Donnell Funeral Home.   Memorial contributions may be made to Freedom Bible Church or the American Heart Association in care of the James O’Donnell Funeral Home. Online condolences may be made and video tribute viewed at www.jamesodonnellfuneralhome.com.

NECAC offers help to avoid foreclosure

The not-for-profit North East Community Action Corporation (NECAC) is stepping up its efforts to help people avoid foreclosure on their homes. Foreclosure rates have dropped nationally in the last two years, but remain a problem in many areas. “Many people are just a missed paycheck away from losing their homes,” said NECAC Homeownership Programs Director Debbie Smith, who has 15 years of experience as a real estate agent. “NECAC can step in and help most clients before a foreclosure is finalized.” Last year, NECAC was awarded a $34,920 National Foreclosure Mitigation Counseling program grant and $10,400 in funding from the Making Home Affordable program, both through NeighborWorks America. NeighborWorks is a national leader in affordable housing and communityfocused programs and services that are delivered through non-profit organizations.NECAC has been a NeighborWorks partner since 2004. NECAC works oneon-one with people facing foreclosure. The agency negotiates with mortgage servers on behalf of clients. The program isn’t for everyone, and NECAC can’t help in every circumstance. However, the agency has a success rate of more than 70 percent in keeping people in their homes. More than 1.5 million families have been helped by the National

Foreclosure Mitigation Counseling program, and NeighborWorks estimated 193,000 families would receive assistance last year. The money pays for counseling that helps families through the process. A study by the Urban Institute showed that homeowners who receive counseling through the program were almost twice as likely to obtain a mortgage modification and two-thirds were more likely to remain current on the mortgages. The Making Home Affordable program began in 2009 and has helped more than one million families nationwide. The program helps clients with second liens and “underwater” mortgages. It also deals with those seeking a short sale or deed-in-lieu-of-foreclosure. There are no income guidelines for the programs. People who are interested should call Smith at 573-324-6622. Applications also are available at the following NECAC County Service Centers: • Marion County: 3518 Palmyra Road in Hannibal -- 573-2217166. • Monroe County: 314 N. Washington in Paris -- 660-327-4110. • Montgomery C• Pike County: 805 Bus. Hwy. 61 North in Bowling Green -- 573-3242207. • Ralls County: 411 Main in New London -- 573-985-2411.

5A

OBITUARIES AND CHURCH NEWS Shoemyers Celebrate 40 Obituaries ✝ Years of Marriage Ferrel Smith 1924-2014

Ferrel Smith, 89, of Hannibal, passed away at 2:32 a.m., Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014 at his home. Mr. Smith was born Oct. 23, 1924, in Faulkner County, Ark., to Charley William and Florence Laura Ross Smith. Survivors include three daughters, Ferrelene Smith of Hannibal, Margaret Zwilling (Dr. Tom) of Lincoln, Ill., Mary Kaye Cogdal (Stanley) of Monroe City, two brothers, Bernis Smith of Hannibal, Troy Smith of Kansas City, one sister, Ollie Mae Thrift of Greenbrier, Ark., four grandchildren, Amber Turner, Ivy Hayden, Eric Brinkley, and Shea Zwilling, three g re at - g r a n d c h i l d re n , Bricen Hayden, Archer and Addison Brinkley. He is preceded in death by his parents, five brothers; Cecil Smith, Doice Smith, Oather Smith, Lealon Smith and Chet Smith and one sister; Charlsie Smith Pearce. Mr. Ferrel was a United States Marine Corp. Veteran. He served during World War II.  Mr. Smith was the owner and operator of Ferrel Smith Roofing and Siding.   He liked living on the farm and taking care of it.   Ferrel enjoyed hunting. He was a member of Emmette J. Shields American Legion Post # 55, and he was also a Mason and a Shriner. Funeral Services with Full

Military Honors by Emmette J. Shields American Legion Post #55 will be at 10 a.m., Thursday, Feb. 6,  at the James O’Donnell Funeral Home in Hannibal.   Rev. Michael Miller will officiate. Visitation was from  5-7 p.m., Wednesday,  at the James O’Donnell Funeral Home. Burial will be at Grand View Burial Park, in Hannibal. Pallbearers will be Ivy Hayden, Stanley Cogdal, Jim Pearce, Sharon Pearce, Bob Sparks, and Scott Anderson. Honorary pallbearers will be Amber Turner, Bricen Hayden, Connie Wright, Ralph Keim, Archer Brinkley, and Addison Brinkley. Memorial contributions may be made to Shriner’s Children’s Hospital in care of the James O’Donnell Funeral home. Online condolences may be made and video tribute viewed at  www.jamesodonnellfuneralhome.com

First Baptist - New London The public is invited to spend Sunday evening, Feb. 9, at the First Baptist Church in New London. There will be a meal at 6 p.m., featuring roast beef as the main course. There is no charge for the meal but reservations are required. To make reservations call the church office at 573-985-7201 or 573985-3304. Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. with the exception of the noon hour. The deadline for making reservations is Thursday, Feb. 6. At 7 p.m., a concert

will be presented by the Hannibal-LaGrange University Chamber Choir. This choir is a team of men and women who present sacred a cappella music for the enjoyment of their audience. Jane Griffen is the choir director. There will be no admission charged for this part of the evening, but a freewill offering will be accepted for the HLGU ministry. Join us for this very special evening at the First Baptist Church in New London on Sunday, Feb. 9.

NL Second Christian In the way of righteousness is life. Sunday Feb. 2, worship service opened with congregational hymns.  Elder Paula J. Holliday welcomed everyone and read announcements.  Elder Elnora Perkins offered our call to worship and Sister Marsha Mayfield led responsive reading Promises Of God (Old Testament).  Celebration hymn We Have Come Into This House was followed by Elder Holliday offering morning prayer.  Hymn of thanks Sanctuary was followed scripture and youth sharing.  Sister Vicki Burton read Psalm 105:1-10; Sister Carrie Landon read Matthew  5:1-12; Amiion recited “Jesus Loves Me”; Messiah read Genesis 1:1 and Re’Nayjah read Psalm 37:1.  The choir rendered the morning music.  Offertory hymn “Shout to the Lord” was followed by Elder Perkins offering

Pastor Brian Ninedorf

Rev. M. Faye Vaughn

offertory prayer and the doxology was sung. Rev. M. Faye Vaughn offered the morning message, The Good News of God’s Great Love, scripture text from Romans 8:35-39.  The message, God so loved you that he gave his only begotten Son that if you believe in him, you will not perish.  He has made it possible  for you to have everlasting life.  Respond with full faith in the Christ who came and lived and died for your sins.  You can have eternal life through him today if you have not already received this precious gift from God. The morning message was followed by hymn of invitation, communion hymn, closing hymn “God Has Smiled On Me”  and the benediction. “In a time when there is so much bad news, we ought to preach the Good News about God!

Carla M. Northcutt CPA, LLC

John and Leota Shoemyer 1974

John and Leota Shoemyer 2014

John Howard Shoemyer and Leota May Deichman were married on Feb. 20, 1974, at 7 p.m., in a double ring ceremony at the home of Rev. C.D. Howell in Perry. The two attendants were Mrs. Geneva Moore of Rush Hill and Mr. J.C. Shoemyer of Monroe City. Howard is the son of the late John and Lena Shoemyer, of Monroe City. He is a 1955 graduate of Monroe City High School. Leota is the daughter of the late Melvin and Eloise Deichman, of Laddonia. She is a 1971 graduate of Mark Twain High School. The couple has spent their 40 years together on

the same farm, southeast of Monroe City, where Howard was born and raised. Together, they run a farm that produces livestock, row crops, and hay. They enjoy having a few cats and dogs on the farm, as well. When they are not busy with the animals or in the fields, they raise large gardens in the summer and enjoy sharing their fresh produce with friends and neighbors. On Sunday, Feb. 16, there will be a celebration in their honor from 2-4 p.m., at New Oakland Baptist Church. Friends and neighbors are welcome to stop by and congratulate them on their 40 years of marriage.

Area Business Guide AUTOMOTIVE AL’S TIRE SHOP (573) 221-3777

Brakes and Alignments, Oil Changes, CV Joints, Rack and Pinion, Struts and Shocks, Tires, Inspections, Interstate Batteries

1018 Mark Twain Ave., Hannibal, Mo. Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

EXCAVATING/CONSTRUCTION D & J CONSTRUCTION (573) 985-3208 For all your dirt work needs, dump truck and custom backhoe and trenching.

BEAUTICIAN

The EDGE SALON Full service hair salon men, women and children

101 West St, New London, Mo.

(573) 985-3343 EXCAVATING

28738 Highway 19, Perry

BUNN ENTERPRISES INC.

(Located North of the Junction Hotel)

Hauling & Excavation

(573) 565-2244 Accounting firm offering financial services including: tax planning and return preparation, financial statement preparation, bookkeeping and payroll services.

Ponds, Basements, Septic Systems & More 14008 Whitaker Lane, New London, Mo.

573-248-7975


6A Thursday, February 6, 2014 The Ralls County Herald-Enterprise

RALLS COUNTY FARM/RECORDS Ralls County Commission News Now on this day, Monday, Jan. 27, the Ralls County Presiding Commissioner, Robert L. See, called the adjourned meeting to order with the following members present: RC Harlow, Eastern District Commissioner, Steven H. Whitaker, Western District Commissioner and Ernest E. Duckworth, the Ralls County Clerk. Now on this day the Ralls County Commission read and approved the minutes of the Jan. 23, 2014 meeting. Now on this day the Ralls County Commission discussed general road maintenance. Now on this day the Ralls County Commission signed checks and warrants as listed in the warrant registry. Now on this day the Ralls County Commis-

sion reviewed and signed the additions and abatements from the Collector’s office. A copy was filed in the Clerk’s office. Now on this day the Ralls County Commission discussed the purchasing or leasing of a new road grader. RC Harlow made the motion to lease the caterpillar road grader from Altofer’s. Robert See seconded the motion. The vote went as follows: RC Harlow – yes; Robert See – yes; Steven Whitaker –yes. Now on this day the Ralls County Commission met with Chris Akright from Altofer’s to sign a lease on a road grader. Now on this day the Ralls County Commission adjourned to meet again on Jan. 30, unless convened by court.

Now on this day, Thursday, Jan, 30, the Ralls County Clerk, Ernest E. Duckworth designated Steven H. Whitaker as the acting Presiding Commissioner in the absence of Robert L. See in accordance with Missouri Revised Statutes 49.070. Now on this day the Ralls County Acting Presiding Commissioner, Steven H. Whitaker, called the adjourned meeting to order with the following members present: RC Harlow, Eastern District Commissioner, and Ernest E. Duckworth, the Ralls County Clerk. Now on this day the Ralls County Commission read and approved the minutes of the January 27, 2014 meeting. Now on this day the

Ralls County Commission discussed general road maintenance. Now on this day the Ralls County Commission signed checks and warrants as listed in the warrant registry. Now on this day the Ralls County Commission met with Michael Purol in regards to the Courthouse Repairs. Michael updated the Commission on the progress of the repairs. Now on this day the Ralls County Commission reviewed the cash balances on the County funds. Now on this day the Ralls County Commission adjourned to meet again on Monday, Feb. 3, unless convened by court.

Volunteer leaders a Vital Role to the 4-H Program Do you have a special skill or talent? Examples of ones might be woodworking, knitting, crochet or baking. The 4-H program relies on people like you to serve as project leaders in the 4-H clubs or on a countywide basis. Youth learn project skills from fellow members and adults in the community that are willing to spend at least eight hours a year with young people teaching them a skill. Your commitment could be done in a short period of time or you could spread it out over several months. Volunteers have the freedom of setting their schedule of meetings. You could start after you have completed your orientation or wait another month.

Vandalia Firestone Appliance & Furniture Shop where the price is right!

Downtown Vandalia Since 1946 Don & Donna Hoover, Owners

(573) 594-6624

Now, is the time to complete an enrollment form and receive your orientation information. We also have several guides on a variety of activities you can do with the youth during meetings. Your project members are willing to pay for the materials provided them by a leader. What do you gain from being a 4-H volunteer? You receive the satisfaction of helping a young person develop to their greatest potential. Not only are you sharing your talent you are sharing life skills with this young person. Your success as a volunteer can be measured by the growth of the member, not by the number of items made. If you are interested, contact your local University of Missouri Extension Office at the courthouse in New London, or calling 573-985-3911 or emailing Patty Fisher, Youth Specialist at fisherp@missouri.edu.

Ralls County Land Transfers Bradley A Keil, Lisa J Keil, Shawn Keil, Michele Keil, Kristy L Mitchell, and Kevin Mitchell to Larry D Keil; 13, 53N 7W Larry D Keil Trustee, Ruth Keil Revocable Trust to Larry D Keil; 13 53N 7W Larry D Keil, Trustee Ken Keil Trust to Linda Condon; 18 53N 6W, 13 53N 7W NE4 Larry D Keil, Trustee Ken Keil Trust to Larry D Keil; 18 53N 6W, 13 53N 7W Larry D Keil, Trustee Ruth Keil Revocable Trust to Linda Condon; 18 53N 6W, 13 53N 7W NE4 Larry D Keil, Trustee Ken Keil Trust to Bradley A Keil, Shawn Keil, Kristy Mitchell; 17 53N 6W N2SE4, 13 53N 7W NE4, 13 53N 7W SE4, 13 53N 7W W2 Larry D Keil, Trustee Ruth Keil Revocable Trust to Bradley A Keil, Shawn Keil, Kristy L Mitchell; 17 53N 6W N2SE4, 13 53N 7W NE4, 13 53N 7W SE4, 13 53N 7W W2 Barley LLC to William P Suminski and Kristen K Suminski; 34 55N 7W S2 Billy Jack E Jacobson and Sarah B Jacobson to Justin Robert Smoot; 04 55N 6W NW4 Timothy W Kleekamp and Sheila F Kleekamp

to Timothy W Kleekamp, Dennis G Kleekamp, Dale F Kleekamp, Jo Ann Kleekamp, Diane K Koirtyohann, Donna M Wessel, and Lisa M Buhr; Lot 2 Block 8 City of Perry, Lot 3 Block 8 City of Perry US Bank National Association Successor by Merger, US Bank National Association ND to George W Lee Jr and Toni L Lee; 20 55N 5W E2SE4 Wright Furniture Inc to Wright LLC; 11 56N 5W NE4, 12 56N 5W W2NW4, 11 56N 5W NW4NE4, 11 56N 5W NW4NE4 US Bank National Association Successor by Merger, US Bank National Association ND to Duane A Carlson; Lot 2 Block 10 City of Perry Charles A Kunkel and Sondra K Kunkel to 154 Marine LLC; 20 54N 7W SW4; 29 54N 7W NW4; 20 54N 7W SW4; 20 54N 7W SW4; 29 54N 7W NW4; 20 54N 7W SW4; Gary Eugene Stuart, Diane Marie Parrott and James V Parrott to Dean G Wilson and Susan L Wilson; Lot 7 Block 6 City of Perry Lafrances Addition; Lot 8 Block 6 City of Perry Lafrances Addition

Perry Police Report Jan. 17 an officer stopped a vehicle for speeding. The driver of the vehicle was issued a citation for exceeding the posted speed limit. Jan. 17 an officer stopped a vehicle for speeding. The driver of the vehicle was issued a citation for exceeding the posted speed limit. Jan. 17 an officer stopped a vehicle for speeding. The driver of the vehicle was issued a citation for exceeding the posted speed limit. Jan. 21 an officer was contacted by a citizen in reference to a possible arrest warrant. Jan. 21 an officer was requested to assist DFS with a hotline call. Drug paraphernalia was found in the home. The officer was assisted by the Ralls County Sheriff ’s Office. Jan 21 an officer was contacted by a citizen in reference to a possible phone scam. Jan. 21 an officer assisted EMS with a medical call. Jan. 21 an officer assisted the Ralls County Sheriff ’s Office with a domestic assault call. Jan. 22 an officer received a delayed report of a suspicious person. Jan. 23 an officer re-

ceived a delayed report of a suspicious person. On Jan. 24 an officer received a request for extra patrolling of two locations. On Jan. 28 an officer assisted the Ralls County Sheriff ’s Office with a 911 hang-up. On Jan. 28 an officer assisted the Missouri State Highway Patrol with a semi rollover. On Jan. 28 an officer responded to an animal at large complaint. On Jan. 28 an officer responded to an animal neglect call. The complaint was unfounded. On Jan. 30 an officer stopped a vehicle for speeding. The driver was issued a citation for exceeding the posted speed limit. On Jan. 30 an officer stopped a vehicle for speeding. The driver was issued a citation for exceeding the posted speed limit. On Jan. 30 an officer stopped a vehicle for speeding. The driver was issued a warning for exceeding the posted speed limit. On Jan. 30 an officer responded to a report of a suspicious person. The report was unfounded.

New London Police Report Jan. 1 --- Responded to ungovernable juvenile; item located and returned to owner. Jan. 4 --- Assisted Ralls County with suicidal Tom Hurley – Salt Riv- subject call. er Township Jan. 5 --- Open door “The Council thanks checked on business, evall of the candidates that erything was okay; asran on the ballot and sisted EMS on call; dog at the citizens that voted in large, ticket issued. the election,” says LauJan. 6 --- Attempted to rie Means, Ralls County locate subject, negative Extension Council chair- contact. man.  The new members Jan. 9 --- Two traffic will be officially inducted stops, warning for speed. on the council at the anJan. 10 --- Officers renual meeting scheduled sponded to disturbance for  February 27, 2014.  in progress; domestic They will begin their two disturbance reported; feyear term of service in male at N.L. Apartments March. reported her vehicle be-

Extension Council Announces Election Results The Ralls County University of Missouri Extension Council finalized its annual election at its monthly meeting, held on Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014. Candidates elected were: Allan Wideman -Saverton Township Mary Freiling -- Clay Township Leota Shoemyer -- Saline Township Lisa Peterson – Town of Center Joy Hoyt – Jasper Township

Missouri Land Values

Farm real estate values continue to rise in Missouri. We have all heard rumors at the local coffee shop about the latest farm sale and at what purchase price the land was bought. But what is fact and what is fiction? In Missouri, land sales prices need not be reported to any governmental or public agency. Therefore, to get reliable information about land prices, many people turn to the Extension Office. A source of information that I use is the Missouri Farm Land Values Survey. The Missouri Farm Land Values annual survey is conducted by Extension Economist Ron Plain. The survey respondents include lenders, rural appraisers, MU Extension Specialists, realtors, and other related occupations. Each year, respondents provided their opinions to questions concerning current farmland values and trends. They are asked to exclude from their answers tracts smaller than 40 acres or land being converted to development or commercial use. Below are the summarized answers to the main questions asked on the July 2013 survey. Respondents were asked to give their estimates of land values for three classes of cropland and pasture (good, average, and poor), timberland (with valuable trees), and hunting/recreation land. The survey breaks up Missouri into regions and gives averages for each region. In this ar-

ticle, I will give only the average for the state. Cropland Values per acre Missouri Average Good Cropland - $4510 Average Cropland - $3395 Poor Cropland -$2495 Pastureland Values per acre – Missouri Average Good Pastureland - $2492 Avg Pastureland - $2041 Poor Pastureland - $1646 Timber and Hunting Recreation Values per acre Timber Land - $1817 Recreation Land - $1724 This year’s survey showed cropland values increased in 18 of the 20 areas of the state, 17% above last year. Good pasture land increased by 12%, and non-crop/ non-pasture increased by 10%. The land values in the northwest and southeast regions of Missouri were higher than the state averages. High grain and livestock prices, low interest rates, low returns from other types of investments, and crop insurance were primary factors in the increase in Missouri cropland values in this survey. For the next 12 months, respondents expect the rate of increase in cropland values to slow to 2.6%, while pasture values increase about 1.3% and non-crop/non-pasture values increase 0.8%. To view the full survey, visit agEBB - http://agebb.missouri.edu/mgt/landsurv/. If you would like a printed copy, contact me at 660397-2179 or devlink@missouri.edu.

ing struck overnight, leaving a yellow paint transfer, leave the scene accident reported. Jan. 13 --- Male subject reporting Reese hitch stolen from the back of his truck located later that day; female subject requesting information on trespassing. Jan 14 --- Two traffic stops for speeding, summons issued for both, one being in a school zone; one traffic stop for speeding, verbal warning issued. Jan. 16 --- Report of a C&I driver on NECAC Apartments lot, driver contacted.

Ralls County Library News New Adult Books available now include: Your Life Calling by Jane Pauley Waiting to be Heard by Amanda Know Happy, Happy, Happy by Phil Robertson Duty by Robert M. Gates Bull River by Robert B Parker The First Phone Call from Heaven by Mitch Albom There are two cookbooks for sale at the library Center Centerettes for $15.00 and Center Elementary for $10.00. Federal and Missouri tax forms have not arrived yet. There are desk planners, wall and pocket calendars for 2014 available to the public free of charge. Book Review Long Walk to Freedom The Autobiography of Nelson Mandela As recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, president of the African National Congress, and head of the anti-apartheid movement, Nelson Mandela has been one of the world’s great moral and political leaders. The story of his life – from the early development of his political consciousness to his eventful quarter century behind

bars to his momentous victory in South Africa’s first-ever multiracial elections – is an epic account of struggle, setback, renewed hope, and ultimate triumph. “Riveting…Both a brilliant description of a diabolical system and a testament to the power of the spirit to transcend it … One of the most remarkable lives of the twentieth century.” Michael R. Winston, Washington Post Book World Excerpt from the Foreword by President Bill Clinton …Mandela’s story is really the story of those two things he never gave away: his brilliant mind and his great heart. Through his words we are able to see inside that mind, to share his strong sense of history and his boxer’s insight into the weaknesses of his powerful enemies. And the pages are full of his bottomless love for his family and his country, his admiration for his fellow freedom fighters, and his capacity to forgive even his captors. This remarkable book is the chronicle of how he first freed himself, then his fellow citizens, as he too them along on his long walk to freedom.

CENTER LOCKER The Home of Quality Local Meats & Custom Processing Dennis McMillen, Owner (573) 267-3343 • (800) 884-0737


Thursday, February 6, 2014 The Ralls County Herald-Enterprise

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COMMUNITY NEWS

SHINE A LIGHT ON AUTISM

Ralls County Circuit Court State of Missouri vs Regina L. Stull, St. James; speeding 78/60, $169.00 State of Missouri vs Danielle Sallee, Wildwood; operate motor vehicle owned by another knowing owner of vehicle has not maintained financial responsibility, $102.00 State of Missouri vs Chenwell Li, St. Louis; defective muffler, $414.50 State of Missouri vs Aaron Everett Miller, New London; defective muffler, $114.50 State of Missouri vs Jamie Lynne Benton, New London; defective muffler, $364.50 State of Missouri vs Robert Joseph McLeod, New London; no seat belt, $10.00 State of Missouri vs, James Dayton Cleary, Hannibal; no seat belt, $10.00 State of Missouri vs Jade Suzanne Lewis, Center; no seat belt, $10.00; failure to register motor vehicle/trailer annually with the DOR, $193.50 State of Missouri vs Howard D. Heather, Danville, Iowa; operate interstate motor fuel user without being licensed to

do so, $67.00 State of Missouri vs Marvin Leroy Green, Perry; no seat belt, $10.00 State of Missouri vs Jesse Douglas Hinton, Columbia; drove vehicle to left side of roadway within 100 feet of intersection or railroad grade crossing, $168.50 City of New London vs Clarence S. Williford, Fair Grove, Mo.; speeding 38/25, $200.00 City of New London vs Reed Tracy Jane, New London; disorderly conduct, $161.50 City of New London vs Kellie R. Toolate, New London; dog running at large, second offense, $136.50 City of Perry vs Karena Sue Woods, Mexico; speeding 30/20, $110.50 City of Perry vs Eric Andrew McCarty, Auxvasse; speeding 46/35, $136.50 City of Perry vs Heath Daniel Boone, Wayland, Iowa; speeding 45/35, $110.50 City of Perry vs Verda R. Haiducek, Perry; defective muffler, $300.00

Ralls County Civil Court Dennis R Higgins vs State of Missouri Department of Social Services; Judgment entered for Dennis Higgins on Jan. 28, 2014 Springleaf Financial Services vs Melissa S. Behrens; Judgment entered for Springleaf Financial Services on Jan. 28, 2014 World Acceptance Corporation of Missouri vs Robert K Williams; Judgment entered for World Acceptance Corporation of Missouri on Jan. 14, 2014 World Acceptance

Corporation of Missouri vs Christy Gordon; Judgment entered for World Acceptance Corporation of Missouri on Jan. 14, 2014 World Acceptance Corporation of Missouri vs Robin M. Charlton; Judgment entered for World Acceptance Corporation of Missouri on Jan. 14, 2014 Midland Funding LLC vs Peggy A Hardy; judgment entered for Midland Funding LLC on Jan. 14, 2014.

Election Filings

The filing period for the April 8 Municipal Election ended Jan. 25. The following people have filed but as of press time but have not been certified: Ralls County R-II Board of Education – Vicky Kuhlmann, Dan Clark and Lori Robinson; City of Perry – Dustin Wasson, Mayor; Kim Long, Ward 2; Travis Sharp, Ward 1; and a write in for Ward 2 as Matt Hawkins no longer lives in that ward; City of Center – Dennis McMillen, Mayor;

Shawn Couch, Ward 1; and Branten Ingram, Ward 2; City of New London – Marvin Miller, Mayor, Kenny O’Malley, Mayor; K. Allen Ballard, Ward 2; Mary Jane White, Ward 1; Ambulance District – Tom Flowerree and Edward J. (Ted) Hamill, Jr; Ralls County Health Department and Hannibal Rural Fire Department will have no election. March 8 is the last day to register to vote in the April 8 election.

Births A daughter, Emery Sage Mefford was born Jan. 19, 2014 at 7:35 p.m. She weighed 7 lbs 4 ozs and was 19 inches long. The parents are Amy and Kody Mefford, of New Salem, Ill. A son, Malachi Joseph Lee Nichols was born Jan. 20, 2014 at 7:54 a.m. He weighed 6 lbs 9 ozs and was 19.5 inches long. The parents are Alice and Robert Nichols, of Monroe City. A daughter, Arion Jane Flint was born Jan. 21, 2014 at 12:11 p.m. She

Pickett’s Excavating

weighed 7 lbs 12 ozs and was 18 inches long. The parents are Diamond and Paul Flint, of Hannibal. A daughter, Kindal Marie Watkins was born Jan. 22, 2014 at 5:23 p.m. She weighed 6 lbs 15 ozs and was 18.5 inches long. The parents are Stephanie Davis and Steven Watkins, of Center.

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Elementary Teacher Ashlee Abrnhill, right, receives a new iPad from Shine a Light on Autism representative Marlene Rodenbaugh. This is the fourth iPad donated to Ralls County Schools for use with special needs education. Shine a Light on Autism is committed to support local schools and special needs children and their families and this is made possible by local community support of their cause. SUBMITTED PHOTO

Missouri deer harvest follows regional trend The Conservation Department will hold public meetings in 2014 to gather input on deer management plans. Jefferson City, Jim Low -- Hunters checked 50,507 deer during Missouri’s archery season, bringing the state’s overall deer harvest to 250,787, down from the 10-year average of 293,056. The archery deer harvest was the second-largest in Missouri’s history, reflecting the continued growth in popularity of bow hunting. Top archery deer harvest counties were Jefferson, with 1205 deer checked; St. Louis, with 1230; and Franklin, with 1018. Resource Scientist Jason Sumners says the overall decrease is in line with deer harvest figures from other Midwestern states. “Illinois, Iowa, Michigan and Minnesota all reported decreases of 7 to 26 percent in their firearms deer harvest,” says Sumners. “The relative importance of the factors

responsible for those decreases differs from state to state, but the history behind them is similar.” The “history” Sumners mentioned relates to the challenges state agencies have faced in managing deer numbers over the past 10 to 20 years. As deer restoration programs that began in the 1930s and 1940s finally came to full fruition, agencies faced a different challenge – how to balance deer populations that provide excellent hunting without also causing unacceptable levels of human-deer conflict. Reversing the decadeslong emphasis on protecting female deer from harvest, biologists increasingly urged hunters to shoot does. This was aimed at shifting the sex ratio of deer herds from doe-heavy to a 50:50 mix of bucks and does. The goal was to reduce deer population growth in some areas that already were significantly above deer population targets.

“Over the course of about 15 years, we were able to apply the brakes to deer population growth,” said Sumners. “Then came a perfect storm of conditions we had no way of anticipating.” Those unanticipated conditions were driven by a severe drought that began in 2012 and carried over into 2013. It caused the worst outbreak of hemorrhagic diseases – blue tongue and epizootic hemorrhagic disease, collectively referred to as HD – in recorded history. Those losses were deepened when the drought caused the smallest acorn crop since the department started keeping records in 1960. The lack of acorns forced deer to move during the 2012 deer season, making it easier for hunters to find them and contributing to the secondlargest deer harvest in Missouri history. Hunter behavior changes slowly, so they continue to shoot the same number of deer they

have in recent years. Consequently, the harvests in the first and second years after a HD die-off remain relatively stable. By the time hunters adjust their harvest behavior, a significant loss has accumulated. The Department evaluates season information each year and last year reduced unlimited antlerless permits in some counties. The management of white-tailed deer has always been both a biologically and socially complex issue, but management today is more challenging due to interrelated factors such as land use, ownership, hunter density, and human population levels. Today’s research efforts allow the agency to forecast population changes and evaluate the impact of various options on the deer population. Research, management, and public input will help the Department make more informed management decisions.


8A Thursday,February 6, 2014

The Ralls County Herald-Enterprise • rallshe.com

COMMUNITY NEWS K&K Automotive Agricultural uses for drones endless u Continued from Page 1A The bulk of his daily work deals with general auto repair and maintenance, oil changes and selling tires and he offers an overnight drop service. K&K also deals in Jasper engines and transmissions. One service Wilson offers that’s not easily found in the area is the repair and maintenance of hybrid vehicles like the Toyota Prius. K&K has more machines and calibrating tools for specialized services than any shop around, including five scanning tools, a lab scope to check all the timing and signals, a fuel injector cleaning machine and tools for non-intrusive electrical testing. Specializing in electronics and diagnostics, Wilson uses the experience learned

repairing circuit boards while serving five years in the military. Transferring that training to the automotive side of things, Wilson and his mechanics stay current by participating in training sessions on a monthly/bi-monthly basis. Wilson’s approach to customer service is simple, “I like it when you’re taken care of. I want you to be happy. A happy customer is a repeat customer.” Wilson and his wife, Teresa, live in New London with their three daughters and are members of the New London First Baptist Church. The shop is open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday and by appointment on Saturday.

The Monroe City AgriLeaders will hold their annual banquet on Thursday, Feb. 6, at 6:30 p.m. in the High School Cafeteria. The speaker will be Lance Burditt. (see bio below). Following the speaker will be a power point slide show of school and community activities from the past. The cost of the meal is $7.00 per person. Please call Steve Yates at 573-248-7937 to reserve a meal. Lance Burditt is Director of Risk Management with Water Street Solutions, based out of Peoria, Illinois. He grew up on his family’s grain and livestock farm in northeast Missouri, where he developed his early passion for agriculture and his commitment to always work with farmers in some way. Having worked in the agriculture industry since 1997, Burditt has a rich background of experience in agribusiness and ag communications and marketing. He is a graduate of Monroe City R-1 High School where he was active in 4-H, FFA and basketball. He later earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Ag Economics and his master’s degree in Agribusiness Management, both from the University of Missouri – Columbia.

Burditt has managed field sales, led training and development teams, and later served as operations product analyst and product manager for Monsanto Company. Next, he was an account manager at Learfield Communications/Brownfield Network. Burditt then left the business world for two years to pursue his master’s degree while teaching agricultural sales and new products marketing at the undergraduate level. More recently, he was Vice President and Managing Director of Osborn Barr (O+B), a marketing communications firm focused exclusively on clients in agriculture. Burditt joined familyowned and operated Water Street Solutions in 2012 to bring his knowledge and experience to help farmers develop the right risk management strategies for their operations. As Director of Risk Management, Burditt works alongside a team of ag risk advisors to ensure they are fully prepared to advise clients regarding risk management for their farms. He currently divides his time between Peoria, Illinois (home base of Water Street Solutions) and St. Louis, Missouri where his wife, Jodie, and their two daughters, Julia and Laurel, live.

Monroe City AgriLeaders to hold annual banquet

For centuries, farmers have braved the elements to walk their land to check for problems ranging from wind damage and calving cows to pests and predators. Unmanned aerial vehicles may save farmers time and money with bird’s-eye views of farmland, says Bill Wiebold, University of Missouri Extension agronomy specialist. It opens up endless possibilities for precision agriculture, he said. Wiebold’s recent talks on drones during MU Extension crop conferences have drawn attention from producers anxious to learn how to use them. Wiebold and other MU researchers have been studying how farmers can use the new technology. Drones suited for farm applications vary widely in cost and size. Entry-level aircraft cost $500-$1,500 and can fly for 10-20 minutes without recharging batteries. Most weigh less than 5 pounds, have a wingspan of less than 3 feet and travel under 30 mph. For about $300, farmers can install cameras in drones that can send clear still or video images to a smartphone. Drones can provide information to answer questions like “How bad was last night’s hail storm? Are all of my cows on the north 40? Does my corn need more nitrogen?” Entry-level systems can be guided by a handheld remote control. More sophisticated vehicles can be programmed to fly designated routes using GPS and GIS technology, but only skilled flyers should try this type of aircraft, Wiebold said. The uses are as varied as Missouri farmland, Wiebold said. Entomologists may find the devices especially helpful for directed scouting of pests. Drones can collect information on plants that have grown to heights that make it difficult to walk through narrow rows. Additionally, farmers can use the unmanned devices to document con-

ditions when applying for government programs such as crop insurance. While much of the recent media attention has centered on unmanned aircraft as a way to deliver packages, commercial agriculture likely will be the largest beneficiary of drone technology, Wiebold said. Drone technology has raised concerns about privacy issues, but drones

used in agriculture likely are less controversial than those used for commercial applications. Currently, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) does not allow drone use for commercial purposes. Farmers must follow FAA guidelines for hobbyists. Unmanned aircraft are restricted to airspace no higher than 400 feet. If flights occur within 3 miles of an airport, air-

port officials must be notified. Recent information suggests that producers are permitted to fly over areas they farm, Wiebold said. However, regulations may be updated, so farmers should follow FAA announcements. Flying near spectators is not recommended until operators become skilled. Populated areas should be avoided.

Perry Musique Club hears Jolson program The Perry Musique cub met at 2 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 25, at the home of Carol Billett. Patti Grimmett played “Alice Blue Gown” for the prelude and gave a short introduction to the song. The members and their guests said the Pledge of Allegiance, sang the “Star Spangled Banner,” and recited the Club Collect. Everyone then sang “Give My Regards to Broadway” from the Together We Sing book. Elizabeth Trower played “Staccato Strut” on piano for student recognition. She is a junior member of MFMC and one of Grimmett’s piano students. This piece is one of the memorized pieces that Elizabeth will play at the music festival to be held in Columbia, in March. Deb Carey then gave the Orientation on the ASCAP, American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers. The NFMC and the ASCAP have been associated with each other since 1951. The association provided an opportunity for young musicians and composers to be recognized for their work. The combined group was also instrumental in getting the Copyright Law and the Juke Box Bill passed. Carolyn Trower gave the secretary’s report and shared a letter from

former member JoAnne Bumgarner. Patti Grimmett gave the treasurer’s report. Grimmett reported that the music festival will be held on March 1, in Columbia. The Feb. 15 Musique Club meeting will be at 2:00 p.m. at Patti’s studio. The program will be on love songs. The Spring Recital for Grimmett’s students will take place at 4:00 p.m., Sunday, March 9, at the Paris Presbyterian Church. Club members are asked to bring refreshments and the March club meeting will follow. May 4 through May 11 is National Music Week. The theme is “Music – the Dance of Life.” Roll call was answered with a favorite Al Jolson song. Songs mentioned were “Swanee,” “Mammy,” “Rock-a-bye My Baby with a Dixie Melody,” “How you going to Keep Them Down on the

Farm,” and “Waiting for the Robert E. Lee.” Deb Carey gave an introduction on Al Jolson (1896-1950), who was one of the most famous and highest-paid entertainers of his time, noted for his “sentimental, melodramatic style.” He is usually remembered for his part in “The Jazz Singer,” the first talking movie. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, Jolson was the first entertainer to perform for the troops overseas. Carey gave each member a script for an oldtime minstrel show, complete with skits and jokes and the music for 16 songs made famous by Jolson. Members had a very good time playing the parts and singing along as Grimmett accompanied the musical interludes. At the conclusion of the program Clara Long played “Swanee.”

Perry Musique Club hears Jolson program

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Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014

The Ralls County Herald-Enterprise

No Hunting or Trespassing listings run one year for $20 paid in advance to: Ralls County Herald-Enterprise P.O. Box 426 New London, MO 63459

NO Hunting or Trespassing Notice is hereby given that hunting, fishing or trespassing of any kind either day or night on land owned or farmed by the undersigned is strictly forbidden. Any and all violator are subject to prosecution: James (Terry) See: 12/13 Leon C. Fessenden, Center: 7/14 Pete Harris Farms (John L. & Ruthie Day: 9/14 Trower Bros. Farm: 12/13 John & Peggy Hemeyer Farm: 7/14 Sandra Evans Farm: 9/19/14

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE SALE

For default in the payment of debt and performance of obligations secured by Deed of Trust executed by W. Dean Mosley and Donna S. Mosley, husband and wife, dated January 17, 2008, and recorded in the office of the Recorder of Deeds for the County of Ralls, State of Missouri, on January 24, 2008, in Book 2008, Page 42959, the undersigned Trustee will, on the 10th day of February, 2014, between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., at 1:30 p.m. at the West Door of the Ralls County Courthouse, 311 S. Main Street, in the city of New London, Ralls County, Missouri, sell at public venue to the highest bidder for cash, the following real estate described in said Deed of Trust and situated in the County of Ralls, State of Missouri to-wit: The West Half (W ½) of Lot Four (4) and all of Lot Five (5) and Six (6), all in BLOCK ELEVEN (11) OF LAFRANCES ADDITION to the City of Perry, Ralls County, Missouri. Subject to all restrictions, reservations, conditions, easements and exceptions whether of record or not. This sale is being accomplished to satisfy debts and costs associated with said Deed of Trust. Timothy T. Sigmund, Trustee Mariea, Sigmund, & Browning, LLC 305 E. McCarty Street, Suite 300 Jefferson City, MO 65101 Telephone (573) 635-7699 Facsimile (573) 635-7425 Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, 15 U.S.C. Section 1692c(b), no information concerning the collection of this debt may be given without the prior consent of the consumer given directly to the debt collector or the express permission of a court of competent jurisdiction. The debt collector is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Published on: January 16, 23, 30 and February 6, 2014 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF RALLS COUNTY, MISSOURI JUVENILE DIVISION Judge or Division: -8Case No.: 13RL-CV00275 Plaintiff/Petitioner: SHELIA MARIE BARLOW Defendant/Respondent: AARON MICHAEL BARLOW Nature of Suit: Dissolution of Marriage

NOTICE UPON ORDER FOR SERVICE BY PUBLICATION

The State of Missouri to: AARON MICHAEL BARLOW, 3617 BROOKVILLE DRIVE, ST. LOUIS, MO 63129 You are notified that an action has been commenced against in you in the Circuit Court of Ralls County, Missouri, the object and general nature of which is dissolution of marriage. The names of all parties in this action are stated in the caption above and the name and address of the attorney for the Petitioners is Shelia Marie Barlow, 56451 Meyer Trail, Hannibal, MO 63401. You are further notified that, unless you file an answer or other pleading or otherwise appear and defend against this action within 45 days of first publication, January 16, 2014, judgement by default will be entered against you. Gina Jameson, (signed) Circuit Clerk (seal) Rosanne Epperson, Deputy (signed) Published on: January 16, 23, 30 and February 6, 2014 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF RALLS COUNTY, MISSOURI PROBATE DIVISION AT NEW LONDON, MISSOURI Estate No. 12RL-PR00041 In the Estate of:

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CLASSIFIED ADS/LEGALS SERVICES

PUBLIC NOTICE

HELP WANTED

DRY DOCK: Winter Hours Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 4:30 - 9 p.m. For questions call (573) 560-0084. ..............................40-tfn

PUBLIC NOTICE

WESTVIEW NURSING HOME

DEADLINE for News and ads: Friday @ 4 p.m. DYAS L. KEITH, Deceased HELEN N. KEITH, Plaintiff vs. LEE ANN KELLY as Personal Representative and JODY BURTON, Respondents

NOTICE UPON ORDER FOR SERVICE BY PUBLICATION

The State of Missouri to: JODY BURTON - 1400 SW End Trailer 29, Cape Girardeau, MO 637017672 You are notified that an action has been commenced against in you in the Probate Division of the Circuit Court of Ralls County, Missouri, at New London, Missouri, the object and general nature of which is: discovery of assets. The names of all parties in this action are stated in the caption above and the name and address of the attorney for the Plaintiff is: RaNae A., Dunham Inghram, Inghram & Inghram, 529 Hampshire Street Suite 409, Quincy, IL 62301, (217) 222-7420. You are further notified that, unless you file an answer or other pleading or otherwise appear and defend against this action within 45 days of first publication, January 16, 2014, judgement by default will be entered against you. Dated: January 10, 2014 Gina Jameson, (signed) Circuit Clerk (seal) Published on: January 16, 23, 30 and February 6, 2014

TRUSTEE SALE

In Re: Larry K. Parks and Beth E. Parks, husband and wife: TRUSTEE`S SALE - For default in the payment of debt and performance of obligation described in and secured by Deed of Trust executed by Larry K. Parks and Beth E. Parks, husband and wife and dated September 14, 2005, and recorded on September 22, 2005, Document 2005-37138 , in the office of the Recorder of Deed for Ralls County, Missouri, the undersigned Successor Trustee, at the request of the legal holder of the debt, who has elected to declare the entire debt due and payable, will on February 14, 2014 at 12 p.m. at the West Front Door of the Ralls County Courthouse, 311 S. Main Street, New London, MO, sell at public venue to the highest bidder for cash, the realty described in said deed of trust, to wit: A TRACT OF LAND LYING IN THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 53 NORTH, RANGE 7 WEST OF THE FIFTH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, RALLS COUNTY, MISSOURI, AND BEING MORE FULLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS TO WIT: FROM AN IRON PIN MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 26; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES, 16 MINUTES AND 04 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF RALLS COUNTY ROAD #241, A DISTANCE OF 321.06 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES, 54 MINUTES AND 22 SECONDS WEST ALONG AN EXISTING FENCE LINE 198.43 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID EXISTING FENCE LINE, NORTH 41 DEGREES, 47 MINUTES AND 07 SECONDS EAST 125.21 FEET; THENCE NORTH 55 DEGREES, 03 MINUTES AND 40 SECONDS EAST 55.39 FEET; THENCE NORTH 64 DEGREES, 02 MINUTES AND 12 SECONDS EAST 119.65 FEET THENCE NORTH 79 DEGREES, 14 MINUTES AND 59 SECONDS EAST 168.97 FEET; THENCE NORTH 81 DEGREES, 27 MINUTES AND

The annual report of the Mary Frances Dunlop Scholarship Trust, HNB National Bank, Trustee is available at the address below for inspection during regular business hours, by any citizen who so requests within 180 days after publication of this notice of its availability. HNB NATIONAL BANK 2903 Palmyra Rd., Hannibal, MO 63401 Cindy Cowden, VP Trust Services

CLASSIFIED ADS: LINE ADS: 30¢/word $5/minimum CLASSIFIED DISPLAY: $4.50/Column Inch

Center, Mo.

Now taking applications for an evening LPN Charge/Med Nurse. We are a 60 bed geriatric/behavior facility. For more information call: (573) 267-3920 email mhanson@westview-llc.com. EOE

WANTED WANTED Responsible hunters looking to lease hunting rights to land in Ralls or Monroe County directly from landowner for 2014 and beyond. Primarily deer and turkey.

314-614-6511

LEGAL 06 SECONDS EAST 152.29 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES, 01 MINUTES AND 51 SECONDS EAST 859.45 FEET; THENCE NORTH 81 DEGREES, 00 MINUTES AND 39 SECONDS EAST 212.93 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 87 DEGREES, 28 MINUTES AND 17 SECONDS EAST 229.68 FEET; THENCE NORTH 03 DEGREES, 03 MINUTES AND 03 SECONDS EAST 172.02 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID EXISTING FENCE LINE, SOUTH 89 DEGREES, 06 MINUTES AND 26 SECONDS EAST 279.43 FEET TO THE TOP OF THE BANK OF EAST LICK CREEK; THENCE FOLLOWING THE CENTER OF SAID CREEK, NORTH 89 DEGREES, 09 MINUTES AND 50 SECONDS EAST 490.16 FEET; THENCE NORTH 61 DEGREES, 13 MINUTES AND 35 SECONDS EAST 281.20 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 22 DEGREES, 08 MINUTES AND 57 SECONDS EAST 221.39 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 22 DEGREES, 52 MINUTES AND 35 SECONDS WEST 168.93 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 43 DEGREES, 06 MINUTES AND 05 SECONDS WEST 596.29 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES, 06 MINUTES AND 18 SECONDS WEST 295.60 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 53 MINUTES AND 08 SECONDS EAST 641.95 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF THE BRIDGE OVER SAID EAST LICK CREEK AND THE CENTERLINE OF RALLS COUNTY ROAD #241; THENCE SOUTH 82 DEGREES, 38 MINUTES AND 18 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF SAID RALLS COUNTY ROAD #241, A DISTANCE OF 336.06 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF SAID COUNTY ROAD 87 DEGREES, 42 MINUTES AND 38 SECONDS WEST 1025.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 38.44 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, BEING SUBJECT TO THAT PORTION NOW BEING USED FOR COUNTY ROAD PURPOSES, AS PER SURVEY #100-614 OF ROBERT E. VOGLER, R.L.S. #LS- 1248 MISSOURI, COMPLETED IN APRIL, 1993. and more commonly known as: 43254 Hutchinson Ln, Laddonia, MO 63352 Subject to easements, restrictions, reservations, and covenants, if any, to satisfy said debt and cost. BY: The Boyd Law Group, L.C. Successor Trustee (636) 4478500 phone (636) 447-8505 fax BLG File #: 13-02042 This firm is a debt collector and any information we obtain from you will be used for that purpose. A-4437969 Published on Jan 23, 30, February 6 and 13, 2014

NOTICE OF FILING OF FINAL SETTLEMENT AND PETITION FOR DISTRIBUTION

To all persons interested in the ESTATE OF EDWARD G. BEHRENS, DECEASED: You are hereby notified that the undersigned Personal Representative of said estate will file Final Settlement and Petition for Distribution on the 24th day of February, 2014, in the Probate Division of the Ralls County Circuit Court, New London, Missouri, and that any objections or exceptions to such Settlement or Petition or any item thereof must be in writing and filed within twenty (20) days

from such date. JAMES RAYMOND BEHRENS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE BRISCOE, RODENBAUGH & BRANNON Attorneys at Law P. O. Box 446 New London, Missouri 63459 Telephone: (573) 985-3411 ATTORNEYS FOR ESTATE FIRST PUBLICATION: January 23, 2014 Published on: January 23, January 30, February 6, and February

13, 2014

NOTICE OF FILING OF FINAL SETTLEMENT AND PETITION FOR DISTRIBUTION

To all persons interested in the ESTATE OF GEORGE CLARK KEITHLY, DECEASED: You are hereby notified that the undersigned Personal Representative of said estate will file Final Settlement and Petition for Distribution on the 24th day of February, 2014, in the Probate Division of the Ralls County Circuit Court, New London, Missouri, and that any objections or exceptions to such Settlement or Petition or any item thereof must be in writing and filed within twenty (20) days from such date. FRANCES F. KEITHLY PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE BRISCOE, RODENBAUGH & BRANNON Attorneys at Law P. O. Box 446 New London, Missouri 63459 Telephone: (573) 985-3411 ATTORNEYS FOR ESTATE FIRST PUBLICATION: January 23, 2014. Published on: January 23, January 30, February 6, and 13, 2014

TRUSTEE’S SALE

IN RE: Jerry R. Keim, Trustee of the Jerry R. Keim Revocable Living Trust Dated September 12, 1997 Trustee’s Sale: For default in payment of debt and performance of obligation secured by Deed of Trust executed by Jerry R. Keim, Trustee of the Jerry R. Keim Revocable Living Trust Dated September 12, 1997 dated March 4, 2005 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Ralls County, Missouri as Document No.: 2005-35670 the undersigned Successor Trustee, at the request of the legal holder of said Note will on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., (at the specific time of 12:05 PM), at the West Front Door of the Court House, City of New London, County of Ralls, State of Missouri, sell at public vendue to the highest bidder for cash the following described real estate, described in said Deed of Trust, and situated in Ralls County, State of Missouri, to wit: LOT EIGHT (8) OF HAGAR’S ACRES, A SUBDIVISION LYING IN THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (SE-1/4) OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW-1/4) OF SECTION TEN (10), TOWNSHIP FIFTY-FIVE (55) NORTH, RANGE SEVEN (7) WEST, RALLS COUNTY, MISSOURI, AND AS SET FORTH ON PLAT FILED OF RECORD ON AUGUST 15, 1996, IN PLAT BOOK (SLIDE) A14A OF THE DEED RECORDS OF RALLS COUNTY, MISSOURI. SUBJECT TO EASEMENTS AS SET FORTH ON THE PLAT THEREOF, AND ALSO SUBJECT TO EASEMENTS AND RIGHTS-OF-WAY OF RECORD OR NOT OF RECORD. FURTHER SUBJECT TO RESTRICTIONS AND COVENANTS DATED AUGUST 16, 1996, AND FILED OF RECORD SEPTEMBER 12, 1996, IN BOOK 436 AT PAGES 250+

OF THE DEED RECORDS OF RALLS COUNTY, MISSOURI. to satisfy said debt and cost. MILLSAP & SINGER, P.C., Successor Trustee 612 Spirit Drive St. Louis, MO 63005 (636) 537-0110 File No: 150421.022514.320651 FC

NOTICE

Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, 15 U.S.C. §1692c(b), no information concerning the collection of this debt may be given without the prior consent of the consumer given directly to the debt collector or the express permission of a court of competent jurisdiction. The debt collector is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Published on: January 30, February 6, 13 and 20, 2014 IN THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COURT, RALLS COUNTY, MISSOURI Judge or Division: DAVID C. MOBLEY Case Number: 14RL-PR00006 In the Estate of BILLY R. CEARLEY, Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

(Small Estate) To All Persons Interested in the Estate of BILLY R. CEARLEY, Decedent. On January 30, 2014 a small estate affidavit was filed by the distributees for the decedent under Section 473.097, RSMo, with the Probate Division of the Circuit Court of Ralls County, Missouri. All creditors of the decedent. who died on May 9, 2013, are notified that Section 473.444, RSMo, sets a limitation period that would bar claims one year after the death of the decedent. A creditor may request that this estate be opened for administration. Receipt of this notice should not be construed by the recipient to indicate that the recipient may possibly have a beneficial interest in the estate. The nature and extent of any person’s interest, if any, may possibly be determined from the affidavit on this estate filed in the Probate Division of the Circuit Court of Ralls County, Missouri. Date of first publication is February 6, 2014. Gina Jameson, (seal) Circuit Clerk (signed) Karen A Huff, Deputy Clerk Published on: February 6 and 13, 2014

TRUSTEE’S SALE

IN RE: Emily D. Hirstein and David H. Edgington, both single persons Trustee’s Sale: For default in payment of debt and performance of obligation secured by Deed of Trust executed by Emily D. Hirstein and David H. Edgington, both single persons dated August 30, 2010 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Ralls County, Missouri as Document No. 2010-48440 and re-recorded September 29, 2010 as Document No. 2010-48627 the undersigned Successor Trustee, at the request of the legal holder of said Note will on Tuesday, March 4, 2014 between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., (at the specific time of 12:05 PM), at the West Front Door of the Court House, City of New London, County of Ralls, State of Missouri, sell at public vendue to the highest bidder for cash the following described real estate, described in said Deed of Trust, and situated in Ralls County, State of Missouri, to wit: A TRACT OF LAND LYING IN THE WEST ONE-HALF (W-1/2) OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW-1/4) OF SECTION TWENTY (20), TOWNSHIP FIFTY-SIX (56) NORTH, RANGE THREE (3) WEST, RALLS COUNTY, MISSOURI, AND BEING MORE FULLY DESCRIBED

AS FOLLOWS: FROM AN IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION TWENTY (20); THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES, 21 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 1938.09 FEET ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION TWENTY (20) (THE WEST LINE OF SECTION TWENTY (20) IS ASSUMED TO BE NORTH 00 DEGREES, 21 MINUTES AND 24 SECONDS WEST FOR THIS DESCRIPTION) TO A POINT ON THE SAID WEST LINE; THENCE NORTH 90 DEGREES AND 00 MINUTES EAST 755.77 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EAST LINE OF A PRIVATE ROADWAY, SAID POINT MARKS THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 05 DEGREES, 59 MINUTES AND 22 SECONDS WEST 106.63 FEET ALONG THE SAID EAST LINE OF THE PRIVATE ROADWAY TO A POINT ON THE SAID EAST LINE; THENCE NORTH 12 DEGREES, 08 MINUTES AND 47 SECONDS WEST 116.58 FEET ALONG THE SAID EAST LINE OF THE PRIVATE ROADWAY TO A POINT ON THE SAID EAST LINE; THENCE NORTH 14 DEGREES, 02 MINUTES AND 53 SECONDS WEST 42.56 FEET ALONG THE SAID EAST LINE OF THE PRIVATE ROADWAY TO A POINT ON THE SAID EAST LINE; THENCE NORTH 15 DEGREES, 43 MINUTES AND 24 SECONDS WEST 34.23 FEET ALONG THE SAID EAST LINE OF THE PRIVATE ROADWAY TO A POINT ON THE SAID EAST LINE; THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES AND 00 MINUTES EAST 634.62 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT ON THE EAST LINE OF SAID WEST HALF (W-1/2) OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW-1/4) OF SECTION TWENTY (20); THENCE SOUTHERLY 301.96 FEET, MORE OR LESS, ALONG THE EAST LINE OF THE SAID WEST HALF (W-1/2) OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW-1/4) OF SECTION TWENTY (20) TO A POINT ON THE SAID EAST LINE, SAID POINT IS NORTH 82 DEGREES AND 00 MINUTES EAST OF THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 82 DEGREES AND 00 MINUTES WEST 579.23 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 4.13 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. SUBJECT TO PUBLIC ROADS, PRIVATE ROADS, REGULATIONS, ORDINANCES AND EASEMENTS AS NOW OF RECORD, INCLUDING ANY UNRECORDED EASEMENTS. ALSO SUBJECT TO OTHER EASEMENTS AND RIGHTS-OF-WAY OF RECORD OR NOT OF RECORD, IF ANY. to satisfy said debt and cost. MILLSAP & SINGER, P.C., Successor Trustee 612 Spirit Drive St. Louis, MO 63005 (636) 537-0110 File No: 151716.030414.321685 FC

NOTICE

Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, 15 U.S.C. §1692c(b), no information concerning the collection of this debt may be given without the prior consent of the consumer given directly to the debt collector or the express permission of a court of competent jurisdiction. The debt collector is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Published on: February 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2014


10A Thursday, January 30, 2014

The Ralls County Herald-Enterprise • rallshe.com

COMMUNITY NEWS

MTHS Students Receive Academic Letters

An assembly was held in the MTHS gym Wednesday, Jan. 29, to hand out Academic letters and bars to students who had maintained a 3.5 GPA for three consecutive semesters at Mark Twain. A student receives a letter first and then a gold bar for every year they maintain the 3.5 GPA. The students receiving letters and bars were, in no particular order, Maggie Arnold, Kody Asquith, Marissa Boyd, Kailee Calvin, Ethan Dameron, Nathan Dameron, Payten Eddington, Michele Epperson, Angelique Failor, Madeline Gilbert, Brooklynn Hawkinson, Brian Howald, Jayme Hudson,

McKenzie Johnston, Destini Linderman, Emily McBride, Collin Prewitt, Clayton Robinson, Walker Sharp, Katelyn Stuart, Matthew Taylor, Jill Alexander, Krysta Armour, Joshua Ferry, Corey Gilmore, Erac Kaiser, Courtney Kunkel, Macy Liter, Brandon McCurdy, Brett Peters, Wyatt Sharp, Emma Smith, Victoria Thompson, Molly Williams, Ashley Woodrow, Andrew Borders, Senise Burton, Alicia Cole, Kelsey Dameron, Mandy Ellis, Chloe Flavell, MacKenzie Grossmann, Dugan Lipp, Derek Meranda, Kylie Spinner and Kaitlyn Young.

TOP - MTHS recipients of Academic Letters. ABOVE High School Principal Jake Moss hands an Academic Letter to a sophomore student during the assembly Wednesday, Jan. 29

MTHS NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY SPONSOR BLOOD DRIVE

Wiley Hibbard and Steve Whitaker chat while giving blood at the blood drive held at Olivet Christian Church in Center on Friday, Jan. 24, and sponsored by the Mark Twain High School National Honor Society.

For breaking news and photo galleries Visit our new website

rallshe.com


Watch for upcoming Valentine’s Day events here!

SENIOR CENTER HOSTS VALENTINE PARTY

A

The oldest continuous newspaper in Monroe County, Since 1867

Thursday, February 6, 2014

(USPS 359-260) Vol. 147, Number 6 Paris, MO 65275 • 24 Pages • 2 Sections • 75 cents

The Paris Senior Citizen’s Center will host a Valentine’s Party on Friday, Feb. 14, at the Senior Center. The evening will feature dinner from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. The band for the evening is North Ely Band, a bluegrass and country band. The band starts at 6. Dinner will feature “Surf & Turf.” Bring your valentines.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH VALENTINE BANQUET

First Baptist Church of Paris will be holding their annual Valentine Banquet on Feb. 8, at 6 p.m., in Carter Hall. This is an open event in which all donations will go toward the Youth trip to Super Summer. Please join us for a night of good food, fun fellowship, and an opportunity to help send the Youth on a life changing experience.

COWBOY CHURCH VALENTINE DINNER

Just As I Am Cowboy Church is sponsoring a Community Valentine Lasagna Dinner and Dance on Friday, Feb. 14, at 6 p.m., at the Paris Community Center. Old Fashioned Pie Auction with all proceeds benefiting Paris First Baptist Church Clothes Closet and Food Pantry. Come and enjoy a family oriented good time! No charge!

R-II YEARBOOKS NOW ON SALE

Yearbooks are now on sale!! From now until Feb. 7, yearbooks are $25 for non-name stamped and $30 for a name stamped one. After Feb. 7., the prices will go up so get yours now!! See Mrs. Mason or a member of the yearbook staff to purchase one!!

“9-12” COMMON CORE STANDARDS MEETING

“9-12 WE The People of Monroe County” are hosting Ann Gassel and Gretchen Logue of the Missouri Education Watchdog who will provide facts regarding Common Core Standards. The program will take place on Saturday, Feb. 8, at 1 p.m., at the Paris Community Center (note the location change). Direct Questions to 660-3271220

NECAC HOSTING INFORMATION MEETING

The not-for-profit North East Community Action Corporation (NECAC) and University Extension will host informational and educational meetings for Monroe County residents on the Affordable Care Act. Sessions are at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 6 at the Paris Public Library and at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 25 at the Monroe City Senior Nutrition Center. In addition to information about healthcare options that are available, people may sign up for a plan. NECAC also is enrolling for the program at its Monroe County Service Center, 314 N. Washington, in Paris. Appointments are available by calling (660) 327-4110. Funding for this project was provided by The Missouri Foundation for Health, a philanthropic organization whose vision is to improve the health of the people in the communities it serves.

Snow and Ice...

Storm after storm seems to be barrelling through Monroe County lately. The first storm brought a mix of ice and snow while the second storm, cancelling school and other events dropped approximately 8 inches in Monroe County and surrounding areas. (Top left) Second storm shrouds the Monroe County Courthouse in snow. (Top right) First ice storm left Cooper Street, in Paris able to host Olympic Speed Skating practice. APPEAL PHOTOS

Filings open for Monroe County Primary Election, Francis announces retirement Filing for Monroe County Elected Official Positions for the Aug. 5, 2014 Primary begins Tuesday, Feb. 25, at 8 a.m., in the office of Monroe County Clerk Sandra Francis. Last day for candidate filing will be 5 p.m Tuesday, March 25, 2014. Clerk Francis is announcing that she will not be filing for re-election and will be retiring her position as of Dec. 31, 2014. Sandra has been employed in the clerk’s office since January 2, 1987 and was elected County Clerk in 2006. Offices open for election this year

are as follows; Associate Circuit Judge, Presiding Commissioner of the County Commission, Clerk of the Circuit Court, County Clerk, Recorder of Deeds, County Treasurer, Prosecuting Attorney, Collector of Revenue and Township Committee People. Since becoming County Clerk, Ms. Francis has used the lottery system to determine ballot positions. She said when a candidate files on February 25 they will draw a number and whomever has the lowest digit at the close of first-day filings will be at the top of the

individual primary ballot followed by the next lowest number. After February 25, candidates will be listed on the ballot by order of filing. In order for candidates to file they must have proof of identity that includes either a Voter Identification Card, Missouri drivers license, birth certificate or other form of certified or photo identification and a $50.00 check made payable to the political party in which they are wanting to seek nominations. Candidates will also be required to fill

Story courtesy of 2nd Lt. Antonia Elena Pearse BAGRAM AIR FIELD, Afghanistan – While many siblings have deployed together over the course of this war on terrorism, there are not many that have deployed together on four separate occasions. The Wilkerson twins, Eric and Jason, both 88Ms, or Heavy Equipment Operators, from Forward Support Company 365th Engineer Battalion have. Staff Sgts. Wilkerson have deployed together three separate times to Iraq and once to Afghanistan. The first time, from 2004 to 2005 was to Taji, Iraq (Camp Cook) as gun truck drivers, the second and third, (2008 to 2009 and 2010 to 2011) to Kuwait with missions in Iraq. This first time to Afghanistan (2013 to 2014), they are both based at Bagram Air Base. During their second tour, Eric drove Line Hauls in Heavy Equipment Convoys and Jason drove gun trucks. During the third deployment both were convoy commanders conducting line hauls. They are originally from Paris, Missouri, a small town in the north east corner of the state. They are the sons of Gale and Cheryl Wilkerson. When asked how it felt to deploy together so many times, Jason replied: “It doesn’t bother us. We’ve been in the military with the same group of Soldiers for many years. We’ve stayed together

and learned many things together, so we like it.” They have both been in the Army for 14 years and plan on staying in for at least 20 years. They are cur-

rently assigned as M916s drivers. “You call, we haul,” said Eric. Back in the states, Jason works in

u See Election on page 3A

Local twins deploy together four times

Staff Sgts. Eric and Jason Wilkerson take time out of their busy day to take a photo and attend some classes at the 365th Engineer Battalion Tactical Operation Center at Bagram Air Field. (Photo by U.S. Army 2nd Lt. Antonia Pearse, 365th Engineer Battalion Unit Public Affairs Representative)

u See Twins on page 3A


2A Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014

Monroe County Appeal • www.monroecountyappeal.com

OPINION

JUST A THOUGHT

UST ASK DAVE...

BY LISA TALTON CONTRIBUTING WRITER

From the desk of the Editor

Life Would Be Dull Without Them

BY DAVID EALES EDITOR appeal@parismo.net

Behind the Scenes... Last week I extolled the benefits of Kevin and Marilyn O’Bannon’s Clean Line Energy meeting. Mrs. O’Bannon reminded me, as Monroe County Cancer Supporters President John Turner has many times before - it takes more than just a leader or couple to create great meetings. John of course has an army of dedicated volunteers behind him. As for the Clean Line Energy meeting in Madison, according to the O’Bannons, they were able to get the meeting organized with the help of their sons, daughters-in-law, brothers, sisters and mother, Betty O’Bannon. Also, their neighbors in the Amish community were well informed and transportation was provided by family members. “The Madison community is always supportive of their residents and the donated use of the community building was such a blessing,” said Marilyn O’Bannon. Lastly, the folks from

DAVID EALES

Northwest Missouri who have provided flyers, postcards, signs and kept local residents informed has been very helpful. See it does indeed take a village to hold a meeting or organize any sort of event or program. To all those people behind the scenes I say thank you for everything that you do! There is change this week for the Monroe County Appeal - due to rising costs including postage the single copy price of the Appeal has risen to .75 starting this week. Subscription prices have also increased as noted in a previous column. Have a great week!

Our children-even though they can drive us to our breaking point every now and then, we know we can’t imagine living our lives without them. How uneventful our lives would be without their stories, questions and their take on life. At times their comments and actions might not be ones we want to brag about and then other times we couldn’t be more proud. *One day I was sitting in the living room with my sweats on, no makeup on my face, and hadn’t even taken a shower when my six year old son walked by me and out of the blue said, “Mom, you’re very pretty.” *I sometimes feel like a broken record saying the same things over and over again day after day. I wonder if my children have become immune to my voice or if my pa-

As Time Goes By

A Look At Saving While We Spend my in general. The problem of low savings can also be confused with the growing income inequality. Some would call for closing that gap by increasing capital gains taxes or placing low limits on the size of tax advantaged retirement accounts as proposed in the current 2014 budget in Washington. Both discourage savings. Americans must either encourage saving or be prepared to accept a more comprehensive safety net to replace individual savings. Public policy can and should be to encourage saving through the tax code and reduce the code’s bars to saving. It can increase limits on tax advantaged IRA’s and make hardship withdrawals from them easier but at the same time limit the options to use them to buy real estate. We could also lower or eliminate capital gains and dividend taxes and reduce the deduction for home mortgages to increase liquidity and therefore savings. The results would be long term growth and stability and less need for an expanded government— provided safety net for an increasing number of Americans. It is also an opportunity for fiscal conservatives in Congress to encourage saving with action and not just keep complaining about those who don’t and the many who can’t save now.

RJF

Appeal deadline for News and Advertising is 4:00 p.m. Friday (except church news) Email news and ad to: appeal@parismo.net or appealads@parismo.net

tience is being tested. When I repeat myself for the fifth and sixth time I try to tell myself that God must be testing me. Either I am failing the test over and over again which is why the constant retests or this is just a characteristic of children and I have to learn to deal with it. I think it is a mixture of both. I am wondering if I should just get a tape recorder and tape myself saying, “Pick that up, brush your teeth, make your bed, stop hitting your brother, stop arguing, go to your room, be nice, put your clothes way, don’t burp at the table, say excuse me, what is that and so on and so on and so on. *Last week my son and

All yesteryears are reprinted in the exact text of the original issue 90 Years Feb. 22, 1924 Miss Annie Belle Howell, Cedar Bluff teacher, gave a Valentine party to her pupils last Thursday afternoon. Madge Shadwell received a prize for writing the word “heart” the greatest number of times in four minutes. Mrs. Anderson Blanton entertained two tables of bridge, Friday, for Misses Olivia Noel and Margaret Powers and their guests from the University. Baxter Overfelt has bought Harry Flory’s barber shop and moved the fixtures into his own. Mr. Flory is planning to move his shoe repair business to Santa Fe. A fine little son arrived in the home of Mr. and Mrs. D. White last week. Russell Jones rode his bicycle six miles down the railroad track from his home near Holliday in order to be with the band when it met the Hannibal basketball team at the Paris station, Saturday. John R. Jones, through the agency of Jackson & Hall, bought the Dave Noonan property, east of the courthouse, Saturday, for $1,500. It will be occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Russell Ball. Mr. Jones also bought Mrs. Fannie Grimes’ residence, at the west end of Locust Street for $1,800 and will move to it soon. John S. Pool, now of Des Moines, Iowa, purchased the Jefferson Hotel last Thursday possession to be given. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Pool of Louisiana, Mo. will move back to Paris to assist in the management. Olliver W. Nolen will be a candidate for re-

election as prosecuting attorney and it now looks as though he would have no opposition. At the Opera House in Paris, Friday and Saturday night, twenty-five pretty girls will demonstrate and display the new spring styles in hosiery and shoes. The shoes and hosiery being from the Lloyd Pelsue stock. J. David Arnold has bought a half interest in the Thornton Meat Market, taking possession last Friday. The new firm is planning a number of improvements in the way of enlarging the market and adding new equipment. 75 Years Feb. 9, 1939 Mr. and Mrs. Henry Vance have leased the apartment in the John Varney home, formerly occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Bob McNail. The farm house northwest of Paris owned by T.R. Krummell of California, and occupied by Joe West, was destroyed by fire about noon. Miss Nadine Albin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Albin, southwest of Paris, and Aubrey Donovan, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Donovan, also of near Paris, were married Wednesday evening at the home of Rev. R.T. Colborn in Paris, with Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bryan as attendants. A daughter whose name is Susan Lee was born to Mr. and Mrs. Everett (Red) Poage at their home in Paris. The boys of the Paris high school won third place last week in the First Annual Invitation Basketball Tournament held at Fulton. Members of the team were: Henry Mitchell, Post Shearer, Francis Kelly, George

MONROE COUNTY APPEAL Paris Mercury and Madison Times 230 North Main • Paris, MO 65275-0207

Published Every Thursday by Lewis County Press, LLC • 410 South 4th St., Canton, MO 63435 660-327-4192 • 660-327-4847 (fax) • www.monroecountyappeal.com STAFF: David Eales................................. Publisher/Editor Chelsea Luntsford.........Graphic Design Services Lisa Crider.......................... Advertising Manager Periodicals Postage Paid at Paris, MO 65275

use it. My son said, “Okay mom but we aren’t using the right word.” *We were driving home from grandmas house one day and my children were asking me question after question and then two of them were arguing about something. I decided to turn up the radio and try to tune them out. Then I heard one of my sons calling my name from the back of the van. I thought he was going to tattle on his brother about something and even considered acting like I couldn’t hear him over the music. But in a faint precious voice I heard “I love you mom.” I then turned down the radio to confirm it. I asked him what he said again and he said, “I really love you a lot mom.” *In the morning when we are praying in the car together this is what I hear: “God, let mommy and daddy have a great day at work. Please bless the children who do not have food or houses and give them homes and food. Please heal the sick people in the hospital and help the people in the nursing home. Amen”

MONROE COUNTY HISTORY

MY TURN

It is plainly clear that Americans don’t save enough. In 1960 the share of people’s after tax income saved was 11 percent. By 2007 it fell to under 3 percent. In August of 2013 it was 4.6 percent after the recent recession. A low saving economy is less stable and shows less growth. In the long run if we don’t save enough for retirement, we will consume less when we stop working. Since 1989 housing value has become a larger share of household assets at the expense of liquid financial assets. And we now carry more debt. Boomers, who are at peak wealth as they retire, have more debt than any previous generation. In 2008, the median debt for those about to retire was more than $28,000. Real take home pay has not grown since the 1980’s and returns on bonds, deposits and CDs have been in decline while credit is cheap. The social safety net, unemployment insurance, Medicaid and Social Security give households fewer incentives to save. Low interest rates are in place to boost consumption but harm savers. While low rates help reduce debt by lowering interest payments, it remains to be seen how effective they will be in increasing consumption and boosting the econo-

LISA TALTON

I were in the car when we had an interesting discussion. We started talking about the word butt. Now I know it might seem odd to some of you but I do not like my children to use this word. My mom didn’t like it when we used it and I guess I kept the tradition going. I just don’t think it sounds nice when a child uses this word or an adult for that matter. “Get your behind over here” sounds much better to me than “Get your butt over here”. Every family I’m sure has their own words they do and do not like and butt just so happens to be one of them I do not like. So back to my story-My son told me he does not understand why he can not say butt. He said that it doesn’t make sense to call it a behind when it is not a behind but in fact a butt. He then went on to tell me butt was the right name for it and why can’t he call it that if that’s what it is. I told him I did not think butt was the proper name for his behind, seat, rump etc. and then went on to explain that it just didn’t sound like a nice word so I’d rather he not

SUBSCRIPTION RATES Monroe County................................................ $27 Elsewhere in Missouri...................................... $35 Out of State........................................................ $35 Counter Copy................................................... 75¢

Nevins, John Lee Hickey, Gene Noonan, Coach E.L. Patison, Edward Nevins, Bobbie Patrick and Russell Mitchell. Mrs. Robert Sproul entertained four tables at bridge at her home on Cooper Avenue. F.W. Stephens is now in active charge of the Farm Bureau Service Co. at Paris and plans to move here within a short time. Jim Dry, who recently left the employee of the Noel Motor Co. to enter the used car business at the Curtright Garage, has gone to the B & M Chevrolet Co. at Paris as one of its salesmen. Earl Chestnut is the other salesman. 50 Years Feb. 2, 1964 At Paris in the County Clerk’s office Saturday, H.W. Semones of Madison filed as a candidate for the Democratic nomination for Sheriff. A new concrete floor to replace the rotted old wooden floor is being put into the rear part of the Paris Department Store. Mr. and Mrs. A.D. Spurling of Mexico announce the engagement and approaching marriage of their eldest daughter, Martha Maxine Spurling, Carl Gene Ensor, son of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Ensor of northwest of Paris. Barbara Cupp, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jim Cupp received the Betty Crocker Homemaker of Tomorrow award for the Paris High School. Paris beauticians will go to the Pleasant View Rest Home in observance of national beauty week, and will give treatments and hairdos to those living there. At the annual meeting of the Monroe County

Field and Stream Club, at the Legion Home, Leo Emmert was elected president for the new year, Raxter Hill the secretary and Louie Williams the treasurer. Mr. and Mrs. Rob Wood and Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Wood are each making plans to build new homes this spring. Both are located in southwest Paris. Robert F. Jurgensmeyer, 28 was promoted from first lieutenant to captain in the Army Reserve. Jurgensmeyer, who is married and the father of two children, is with the University of Missouri extension service at Paris where he is Balanced Farming Agent. 30 Years Feb. 9, 1984 The Board of Advisors of the Outstanding Young Women of America awards program announced this week Sarah Bates has been selected for inclusion in the 1983 edition of the annual awards volume. Monroe County Clerk Cloyce Menefee conducted a swearing in ceremony for three of four officers that will the county’s Extension program during 1984. They include: treasurer Jeanne Mitchell, president Anne Arends and secretary Karen Conley. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Harris of Laddonia announce the engagement of their daughter, Leana Kim, to John Robert Bergthold of Jefferson City, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Bergthold of Perry. Sara Mitchell and Allen Houchins were married on Jan, 28 at Las Vegas, Nev., by Rev. Domenick Tamietti. Rodney Coffman attended an Allis Chalmers service school at Great Bend, Kan.

Postmaster: Please send address changes to: Monroe County Appeal • 230 North Main • P.O. Box 207 • Paris, MO 65275 We are not responsible for return of unsolicited communications. We reserve the right to edit, rewrite or change any news item in this newspaper. All items must be signed by the person submitting same.

The Appeal will not be held responsible for errors that may appear in advertisements received over the telephone.

LETTERS POLICY: All letters to the editor will be considered for publication and printed at the sole discretion of the publisher. Letters must be no longer than two typed (double spaced) letter sized pages. It must be signed and a daytime telephone number included. No personal attacks or libellous information will be printed. No form letters. Names of the writer will not be withheld. No personal thank you notes permitted. The publisher reserves the right to limit the number of times a single individual’s views are printed.


Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014

Monroe County Appeal • www.monroecountyappeal.com

Election Qualifications...

Continued from front

out Missouri Department of Revenue Form 5120 “Candidate’s Affidavit of Tax Payments” which states the candidate is not delinquent in the filing or payment of any state income taxes, personal property taxes, real property taxes on the place of residence, as stated on the declaration of candidacy, or is not a past or present corporate officer of any fee office that owes any taxes to the state, other than those taxes which may be in dispute. Ms. Francis stated that these forms will be available in her office for candidates to use and a notary public available to certify the documents. In addition, new bonding requirements

have been established for the positions of Treasurer and Collector of Revenue. Please refer to Missouri Revised Statute, RSMo. 54.040(1), which sets out new bonding requirements that must be met for each candidate who is filing for the office of County Treasurer and Missouri Revised Statute, RSMo. 52.010 (3), which sets out new bonding requirements that must be met for each candidate who is filing for the office of Collector of Revenue. Anyone with questions about filing procedures may contact Sandra at the County Clerk’s Office 660-327-5106 or email at monroecountyclk@centurytel.net.

Twin Deployments...

Continued from front

maintenance at the Missouri Department of Transportation and part time at a family quarry. He is also going to school for an Associate’s Degree in Industrial Maintenance from Moberly Area Community College in Moberly, MO. His hobbies include going to church, Ford Mustangs, trucks and running. Eric has an internship at the 3M Factory in maintenance and is also taking

night classes at MACC in Industrial Maintenance for his Associate’s Degree. His hobbies include building, Mustangs, and pickups. Eric and Jason would like to give a shout out to their friends and family back home, “Thank you for your support. It has been a great help to the both of us. We look forward to getting home and seeing everyone again.”

ABEL’S

QUIK SHOP

Hunt’s Bros. Pizza with 2 Liter Coke Product: $9.99

St. James Winery Velvet Wines Reg: $7.39 Sale: $5.89

COMMUNITY NEWS

Paris United Methodist Youth Group attends 2014 WOW Conference

The Paris United Methodist Youth Group, ages 6-12, gathered with 2,400 of Missouri’s United Methodist Youth at the 2014 WOW – Connect conference, January 25 and 26, held at the Springfield Expo Center. This year’s musical entertainment was Wayne Kerr and Rend Collective. There was also a comedy duo, Team Wordplay; a stunt team, The Extreme Team; an Illusionist, Danny Ray; Hula girls from Independence and several speakers. There were also seminars to attend with several of the entertainment groups and an inflatable activities park. Kody Crider was Co-Chairman, and Co-MC for the event, through CCYM (Christian Council of Youth Ministries) whom organized, and executed the event. CCYM member Chrisee Wheeler also worked the event, and was WOW attendees, left to right, Kole Berrey, Kody Crider, August Hayhurst, Brody the host for the Hula Girls. 2014 Lehenbauer, Briar Hancock, Hannah Bartels,Dakota Van Winkle, Chrisee Wheeler The Paris Youth have at- and Autumn Taylor. SUBMITTED PHOTO tended WOW for several years and always return newed faith and inspira- Youth Group were Lloyd Lisa Crider. to their church with re- tions. Accompanying the Miller and Youth director,

Give blood and help save lives Like a hospital emergency room, the American Red Cross must be prepared to provide blood for patients 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and 365 days a year. It’s the blood already on the shelves and readily available that can be lifesaving for people like Chris Salinas. Chris was a horse trainer who was seriously injured in an accident when a horse pinned him to the pavement. He and his family said they credit the multiple blood transfusions he received with helping him recover.

Type O negative blood is especially needed right now. O negative is the universal blood type and can potentially be transfused to patients with any type. To make an appointment to donate blood and help ensure the shelves are stocked for patients in need, please visit redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS. Upcoming blood donation opportunities: Monroe County Feb. 27 from 1-6 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 106 N. Main in Paris, Mo. Randolph County Feb. 24 from 2-6 p.m. at Higbee Lions, 502

Grand Ave. in Higbee, Mo. Feb. 25 from 2-7 p.m. at Central Christian College of the Bible, 911 E. Urbandale Drive in Moberly, Mo. Feb. 27 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at New Hope United Methodist Church, 1046 Highway P in Clark, Mo. Feb. 28 from 2-6 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 301 S. Main in Huntsville, Mo. How to donate blood Simply call 1-800RED CROSS (1-800733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org to make an appointment or for more information. All

blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age (16 with parental consent in some states), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements. Contact us at APPEAL@ PARISMO.NET

Melody’s Quality Jewelry

Coors Light 24 Pack Cans: $18.09 Good Thru: 2/11

Good Thru: 3/3/14

Free box of chocolates with purchase

Off Road Agriculture Diesel Available.

(Feb. 10 - Feb. 14)

Open 7 Days a Week • 5 a.m. - Midnight

103 S. Washington, Mexico, Mo. 573-581-7725

719 S Main St., Paris

(660) 327-5821 209 N. Main St., Paris, MO 65275

660-327-5193

www.adams-realty.com

The

224 W. Hickory, Paris 3bd/2ba - $78,000

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332 W. Locust St., Paris 4bd/2.5ba - $76,000

Nathan & Kerrie Heinecke

Flower Shoppe, LLC

Valentine’s Day Sweetheart Dinner Choices:

Flowers & Gifts

REMEMBER VALENTINE’S DAY IS FRIDAY, FEB. 14!

Cornish Hen, Pork Loin, Wild Rice, Roasted Potatoes, Asparagus, Homemade Pies or choose from our 50+ items on the regular menu.

CALL (660) 327-1129 FOR SPECIALS

Hours: Monday - Friday 11 a.m. - 9 p.m.

124 W. Caldwell St. • Paris, Mo. (660) 327-1129

Flowers • Gifts • Greenhouse

Proceeds will be donated to Jacquie’s Barn Fund! Come out and support a great cause and meet your LOCAL agents!

Cupid Shops at Trav’s!

Contact your local agent!

VERLE HUGENOT 660-676-4620 Broker Associate BRANDIE KINNAMAN 573-933-0612 Sales Associate DARREN ADAMS 573-819-1518 Broker/Owner RICHARD FREDRICK 660-327-4465 Broker Associate

Saturday and Sunday 7 a.m. - 9 p.m. 202 N. Main Paris, MO 65275

660-327-JACS

Trav’s

Adams Realty will be raffling off a 31 UTILITY TOTE WITH HOME SUPPLIES at the next four Paris High School Varsity Basketball Games.

If you are unable to attend the game but would like to support the cause please stop by our office or contact Brandie Kinnaman at 573-933-0612.

3A

Fresh Cut Roses and Floral Arrangements • Blooming Flowers & Plants • Balloons Plush Animals • Scarves • Boxed Chocolates • Chocolate Dipped Strawberries Cookies Cupcakes Cheesecakes • Purses • Jewelry

$5 off purchase of $25 or more (Expires: 2/12/14) 503 N. Main, Monroe City, Mo.• 573-735-4772 • 1-800-flowers.com


4A Thursday, Feb. 6 2014

Monroe County Appeal • www.monroecountyappeal.com

MADISON TIMES/COMMUNITY NEWS Holliday Second Quarter Honor Roll

Holliday C-2 Second Quarter A Honor Roll, left to right: First row - Lilly Mann, Thomas Sanner. Second row - Abby Hendren, Nicole Mann, Regan Ragsdale, Maariko Williams. SUBMITTED PHOTO

Madison C-3 Preschool

Madison C-3 Preschool receives recognition of excellence The Madison C-3 Preschool achieved recognition of excellence this school year through the Missouri Accreditation. This honor distinguishes the preschool program as an exemplary childhood care center offering high quality education to preschool age children of

Missouri. Students in the Madison C-3 Preschool experience an environment of learning where they can grow intellectually, emotionally, socially, and physically. The Madison C-3 Preschool will be listed in the “Directory of Accredited Programs” located on the Missouri Accreditation

website for parents seeking a high quality program for their children. The Madison C-3 School is proud to announce this high accomplishment and encourages anyone interested in enrolling their students in the preschool program to contact the main office at 660-291-4515.

Friday, January 31, marked the 100th day of school at Madison C-3 School District. Many activities were used throughout the classrooms. Kindergarten made hats stating they were 100 days smarter. First graders created bar graphs showing the number of each topping on a pizza covered with 100 items. Fourth grade made a “My 100 Book” filled with 100 pages of illustrations and writings such as: “If I had 100 Dollars...”, “If I was 100 years old...”, and “If I had 100 mosquito bites...”. In music class students sang a Teresa Jennings’ song called 100 Days, that celebrates what Continued to page 7

Madison third graders are counting out 100 of their food items to add to the 100th Day of School Trail Mix they created. Once it was all combined they got to enjoy their snack. SUBMITTED PHOTO

Madison C-3 celebrates 100 Days

Holliday C-2 Second Quarter B Honor Roll, left to right: First row - Sierra

Robey

Court, Dillion Crutchfield, Malana Pence, Morghan Crain, Lilly Skaggs, Makayla Hayes, Kevin Lair. Second row Zack Ensor, Emily Havens, Kelsie Wilson, Brie Ensor, Andrea Unterbrink, Molly McGee, Ryan Ragsdale, Brandon Hendren. SUBMITTED PHOTO

Building Supply, Inc.

• Certainteed Vinyl Siding • Tamko Shingles • Lumber • Doors • Plumbing Supplies • Glass Repair WIDE SELECTION OF • tools and electrical supplies • replacement windows • much more!!

For breaking news and photo galleries Visit our website

monroecountyappeal.com and like us on FaceBook

573-735-4635 573-735-4630

IT’S CALLED

‘Monroe County Appeal’ The complete Monroe

107 N. Vine Monroe City, MO

County Appeal can be found on our website

Farm and Heavy Duty Sale! Sales Ends: 2/25/14

Rotella T Oil $12.99/gal (Limit 12)

Peak Blue DEF

BUY FOUR SELECT TIRES, get up to a mail-in rebate* when you pay with the ford service credit card. On these name brands:

$13.99 for 2.5 gal jug

*$40 rebate on Firestone tires. $50 rebate on General Tires. $60 rebate on Goodyear, Dunlop, Bridgestone and Yokohama tires. $80 rebate on Pirelli tires. Dealer-installed, retail purchases only. Limit one redemption per customer. Rebate by prepaid debit card or apply to an active Owner Advantage Rewards® account. $50 credit card rebate by prepaid debit card Subject to credit approval. Complete purchase must be made on the Ford Service Credit Card. Offer valid between 2/1/14 and 3/31/14. Submit rebates by 4/30/14. Cannot be combined with any other tire manufacturer-sponsored or Ford Service Credit Card rebate/offer. See Service Advisor for vehicle applications, rebate and account details. Retail purchases only.

Buy 4

tires, get a mail-in rebate.

7000

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The Works Fuel Saver Package

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after $10 mail in rebate

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•Synthetic blend oil and filter change •Multi-Point Inspection •Rotate and inspect tires •Inspect brake system •Test battery •Check belts and hoses •Check air and cabin air filters •Top off all fluids Retail purchases only. Up to five quarts of Motorcraft® oil and oil filter. Taxes, diesel vehicles and disposal fees extra. Hybrid battery test excluded. Offer valid between 2/1/14 and 3/31/14. Submit rebate by 4/30/14. Rebate by prepaid debit card or apply to an active Owner Advantage Rewards® account. See Service Advisor for exclusions, rebate and account details through 3/31/14.

Motorcraft® Brake Service

50

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00

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Dealer-installed brake pads or shoes. Per axle price on most vehicles. Exclusions apply. Taxes extra. Limit one redemption per axle. Offer valid between 2/1/14 and 3/31/14. Submit rebate by 4/30/14. Rebate by prepaid debit card or apply to an active Owner Advantage Rewards® account. See Service Advisor for rebate and account details.

Get a 25 mail-in rebate $

00

WHEN YOU USE THE FORD SERVICE CREDIT CARD ON A QUALIFYING PURCHASE OF $250 OR MORE (BEFORE TAX). Subject to credit approval. Rebate valid on qualifying purchase before tax; not valid on prior purchases. Complete purchase must be made on the Ford Service Credit Card. Offer valid through 3/31/14. Submit rebate by 4/30/14. Limit one $25 mail-in rebate per visit. Rebate by prepaid debit card. Cannot be combined with other Ford Service Credit Card offers. Valid at participating Ford dealerships. Motorcrat® is a registered trademark of Ford Motor Company.


Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014

Monroe County Appeal • www.monroecountyappeal.com

5A

SENIOR NEWS

MADISON C-3 SCHOOL MENU Monday, Feb. 10 - Friday, Feb. 14

SENIOR CENTER NEWS WEEKLY MENU

Monday, Feb. 10--Friday, Feb. 14 Lunch Served Monday-Friday -11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Monday - Catfish Fillet, Fried Potatoes, Fried Cabbage, Peach Cobbler, Wheat Bread Tuesday - Chili, Peanut Butter Sandwich, Lettuce Salad, Apple Crisp Wednesday - Hamburger or Sausage Pizza, Lettuce Salad, Caramel Apples Thursday -Cranberry Glazed Pork Loin, Mashed Potatoes, Green Bean Casserole, Pineapple Upside Down Cake, Wheat Roll Friday - Fried Chicken, Potato Wedges, Spinach Salad, Fruit Cocktail, Cinnamon Roll, Wheat Biscuit

Breakfast Menu Monday - French Toast Sticks, Sausage, Juice, Milk Tuesday - Hot Ham & Cheese, Grapes, Milk Wednesday - Bagel with Cream Cheese or Jelly, Strawberries, Milk Thursday - Scrambled Eggs, Toast, Orange, Milk Friday - Biscuit with Sausage Gravy, Juice & Milk

Lunch Menu Monday -Turkey & Cheese Wrap, Sun Chips, Broccoli with Ranch, Apple, Milk Tuesday - Breakfast for Lunch, Pancakes, Sausage, TriTater, Tomatoes, Orange, Milk Wednesday - Chili with Crackers, Peanut Butter Sandwich, Baby Carrots, Fruit Mix, Milk Thursday - BBQ Hamburger, French Fries, Pinto Beans, Strawberries, Milk Friday - Panther Special, Corn, Peaches, Rocky Road Pudding, Milk

***Salad is served as an alternate choice for lunch

Hand & Foot • Bingo

•The Hand & Foot Club met on Thursday, Jan. 30, at the Paris Senior Center with 12 people participating. The winners of a meal ticket were Ruby Miller and Harold Klingaman •Bingo was held on Monday, Feb. 3, with 14 people participating. The winners of a meal ticket were Judy Hollingsworth and Carole Hartel. •The Paris Senior Citizen’s Center will host a Valentine’s Party on Friday, Feb. 14, at the Senior Center. The evening will feature dinner from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. The band for the evening is North Ely Band, a bluegrass and country band. The band starts at 6 p.m. Dinner will feature “Surf & Turf.” Bring your valentines!

PARIS R-II SCHOOL MENU Monday, Feb. 10 - Friday, Feb. 14

Breakfast Menu

Monday - Waffles or Sausage Biscuit, Cinnamon Apple Slices Tuesday - Breakfast Pizza, Oranges or Fruit & Yogurt Parfait, Fruit Streusel Muffin, Oranges Wednesday - Sausage Pancake on Stick or Cinnamon Roll, Fruit Mix Thursday - Scrambled Eggs, Fruit Streusel Muffin, Roasted Sweet Potato Bites, Juice or Mini Pancakes, Fruit Streusel Muffin, Juice Friday - Biscuits & Gravy, Strawberries and Cream Yogurt Partait, Fruit Streusel Muffin, Pears

***Cereal or Oatmeal are served as alternate choices for breakfast

HOLLIDAY C-2 SCHOOL MENU Monday, Feb. 10 - Friday, Feb. 14

Breakfast Menu Monday - Cereal, Toast, Juice Tuesday - Sausage Egg Cheese Biscuit, Yogurt Wednesday - Chocolate Chip Muffin, Sausage, Mandarin Oranges Thursday - Pancake, Bacon, Juice Friday - No School

Lunch Menu Monday - Popcorn Chicken, Broccoli & Cheese, Carrots, Applesauce Tuesday - Beef Taco, Shredded Lettuce, Fruit Cocktail Wednesday - Tenderloin, Limas, Tater Tots, Peaches Thursday - Country Fried Steak, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Green Beans, Mandarin Oranges Friday - No School

***Salad is served as an alternate choice for lunch

Lunch Menu

Monday - Hot Dog on Bun w/ Pasta Salad or BBQ Rib w/ Pasta Salad, Broccoli, Sweet Potato Fries, Oranges, Fruit Tuesday - Taco w/ Tortilla Chips or Chili w/ Cinnamon Roll, Garden Salad, Easy Bean Bake, Orange Pineapple Mix, Fruit Wednesday - Chicken Patty/Grilled Chicken or Homestyle Meatloaf, Mashed Potatoes w/ Gravy, Green Beans, Glazed Carrots, Pears, Fruit, Opaa! Hot Roll Thursday - Spaghetti & Meatballs w/ Italian Bread or Ham & Cheese Sub, Green Beans, Garden Salad, Tropical Fruit, Fruit Friday - Philly Cheesesteak Pizza or Popcorn Chicken Wrap w/ Pasta Salad, Corn, Garden Veggies, Banana, Fruit

***Salad is served as an alternate choice for lunch

Contact Lisa Crider o t D E @ 660-327-4192 NE ? E S I RT or email: appeal@parismo.net ADVE

Paris Senior Center SWEETHEART SUPPER

FRIDAY, FEB. 14 Surf & Turf Dinner: 4:30 - 6:30 p.m. 12 oz. KC Strip, Butterfly Fantail Shrimp, Baked Potato, Salad, Roll, Dessert Dinner cooked by Cattleman’s Association

North Ely Band • 6 p.m. Advanced Tickets: $11/person (want either steak or shrimp) $13/person (both) Advance tickets are sold at the Paris Senior Center. Please call (660) 327-5824

MEXICO CINEMA Feb. 7 - Feb. 13 The Lego Movie (PG) FRI.-SAT. 3D 2:00 7:00 2D 4:30 9:00 SUN.-THUR. 3D 2:00 7:00 2D 4:30

Ride Along (PG-13) FRI.-SAT. 2:00 4:30 7:00 9:00 SUN.-THUR. 2:00 4:30 7:00

That Awkward Moment (R) FRI.-SAT. 2:00 4:30 7:00 9:00 SUN.-THUR. 2:00 4:30 7:00

www.midmoweb.com/mexcin.htm

MOVIE LINE 573-581-8383

Advertising sells... To advertise your business, articles for sale or other items - please contact Lisa Crider at 660-327-4192

Bring your valentine! 112 E. Marion, Paris • 660-327-5824

Is It To Late To Save For Retirement? By Nancy Baca, State Farm® Agent

If you’re like many Americans, you haven’t saved as much as you’d like for retirement. But you can take steps now to boost your retirement savings. These seven tips may help you get back on solid footing with your savings plan. Automate your savings. Have money taken out of your paycheck before you receive it. You’ll learn to live on the smaller net amount as your savings continue to grow. Spend less. It sounds simple, but it’s a challenge for most people. Create a budget that prioritizes retirement and emergency fund savings. Pay off all high-interest installment debts such as credit cards. Then look at discretionary expenses you could eliminate or reduce, such as expensive coffee drinks, frequent dinners out or a pricey TV plan. Increase your savings. If you have a few years before retirement, strive to save 10 percent of your income each year, then increase it annually by 1 to 2 percent, or even more if you receive a pay increase. If you can’t contribute 10 percent, don’t worry. Save as much as you can; every little bit helps. And as you near retirement, you can make catch-up contributions to your retirement savings to jump-start a stalled plan. Don’t overlook matching funds. Contribute enough to your retirement plan to earn matching funds from your employer, if they’re available. Not taking advantage of this opportunity is like leaving money on the table. Review your investments. If your mix of investments is too conservative or lacks enough diversification, your savings may be stalled. Contact a financial professional to discuss reallocating funds so your retirement savings may continue to grow. Work a few years longer. If your health and circumstances allow, consider working a year or so beyond traditional retirement age, even if it’s a part-time job. The income may allow you to meet expenses while keeping your savings intact and growing. Another benefit: You may be able to stay on your employer’s heath care plan. Downsize. If your current expenses and lifestyle are too great for you to save regularly, think about moving to a smaller home, reducing the number of vehicles your family uses or other measures. Pour the savings directly into your retirement account. If you need additional guidance reworking your retirement savings plan, consult a financial or tax professional. And review these pointers from State Farm® if you’re trying to decide when it’s time to retire. - See more at: http://learningcenter.statefarm.com/finances-1/retirement/ is-it-too-late-to-save-for-retirement/#sthash.gx42MPwT. dpuf

Whirlpool • GE • Fisher Paykel Appliances Sales & Service

Arnie and Susan L. Neely

201 Fairground Road • Shelbina, Mo. 573-588-4188

For breaking news and photo galleries Visit our new -website

monroecountyappeal.com and like us on FaceBook ‘Monroe County Appeal’


6A Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014

Monroe County Appeal • www.monroecountyappeal.com

CHURCH NEWS

Due to weather there was no Sunday school or worship service this week. Prayers for Bonnie Sudsberry, David Kendrick, Greg Huffman, Lloyd Huffman, Dallas Baker’s family, Hazel Shatzer’s family, Leona Pence, family in Kentucky that lost large number of family members in house fire, those couples signed up for marriage event, those working out in winter weather. Baby shower for John Kauffman and Sara Hunt Feb. 8 at Santa Fe Christian Church, Annual church meeting on Feb. 9, right after service, Salt Saturday will be Feb. 22. Monroe county cancer supporters annual meal and auction is March 1st at the Knights of Columbus Hall in Monroe city. Santa Fe Christian Church will host a hymn sing in April. Bible study is every Wednesday night, carry in meal at 6 p.m., and study at 6:30 p.m. Sunday school is at 9:30 a.m., and worship service at 10:30 a.m.

The Paris First Christian Church held worship on Sunday, Feb. 2, with Reverend Donna Scott officiating. The morning message “HappyTudes,” on the Beatitudes was based on Matthew 5:3-11. Special Music, “Just As I Am,” was provided by the Chancel Choir. Those who participated in morning worship were: Worship Leader Jim Scott; Elders Mary Beth Mitchell and Larry Castleman; Diaconate Debbie Boulware, Roseann Raines, Jane Callis, and Tammy Mason; Acolyte Logan Bross; Choir Director Vanessa Forrest; Song Leader Mary Beth Mitchell; Organist Mary Jo Wilson; and Junior Church Leader Anita Ness. Announcements are: Wednesday, Feb. 5 - Wednesday Nite Live 5:30 p.m., and Choir 6:30 p.m.; Sunday, Feb. 9 - Christian Education Committee meeting after worship; Wednesday, February 12 - Wednesday Nite Live 5:30 p.m., Choir 6:30 p.m., Stewardship Committee meeting 7 p.m., and Board Meeting 7:30 p.m.; and Monday, Feb. 17 - Office closed. Everyone is invited to attend Wednesday Nite Live and reminded that it will not be held if school is canceled or released early due to weather. Nancy Bierly, Bob Swartz, Erin Gruber, Kelly Williams, and Sue Yeager celebrate birthdays this week. February Elder’s Helping Hands are Nancy Bierly and Clint Chandler. Pastor Donna Scott’s contact numbers are (660)327-1355 or (573) 933-0593. The church may be contacted at (660) 327-4440 or fc418@centurytel.net. We extend the Good News of God’s Love through our worship, education, and service to each other, our family, friends, and community. Everyone is welcome to attend Adult Sunday School at 9:30 a.m., Junior Church at 10:30 a.m., and worship at 10:45 a.m. The thought for the week from C. S. Lewis is: The Christian does not think God will love us because we are good, but that God will make us good because He loves us.

SUZANNE GRIFFITH

Opening the service following the prelude, Mark Dowell gave the invocation. Prior to the observance of The Lord’s Supper, Reverend Wesley Hammond’s message was from 1 Corinthians 11:23-32, entitled “In Remembrance”. Christ initiated the Supper in an intimate setting though with Judas’s presence, all were not true believers. The same circumstances exist today but God wants us to experience eternal life through his son, Jesus. The body of Christ was broken as a sacrifice for all sin to be forgiven - for those who believe in Jesus as the son of God. The blood of Christ represents new life. When we try to live our life in the flesh we fail and sometimes allow anger and wickedness to prevail. However, our spiritual life can redeem us if we allow a mature life in Christ to prevail as we seek forgiveness, thus doing we are not condemned and we do not have to give in to sin. The choir sang “Remember Me” directed by Cheryl Gholson. Floyd Lawson gave the prayer for the bread and David Charlick gave the prayer for the cup. Steve Ensor sang “Jesus Messiah” for the Communion meditation. Regina Ensor led children’s church. Announcements: (All events p.m. unless otherwise indicated: Tuesday, Feb. 4, 6:, Creation/Evolution debate will be streamed live at the church weather permitting. If unable to attend it will be on DebateLive.org. Thursday, Feb. 6, 7 Deacon’s meeting; Saturday, Feb. 8, 6 Valentine’s Banquet; Brenda Ensor announced Disaster Relief Organizational meeting at the Biker church on Tuesday, Feb. 18, and also at the Central Baptist Church in Eureka, Friday and Saturday, Feb. 21 and 22. Sign up on line at mobaptist.org and click Ministries, then Disaster Relief, then DR Training. Saturday, Feb. 20, 1, is the Crossroads Baptist Association Evangelism Rally at Centralia First Baptist Church.

an Church hristi C e ill Granv Pastor Fran Schnarre The Granville young adults have begun a study of a book about happy families who have reduced stress and we will tie in related scripture and continue it the first, third and fifth Sundays (next session, Feb. 16). Topics include how to have a family dinner when you can’t be all together; sharing your family story with your kids; how to fight and resolve fights; children and money; having difficult conversations; talking to kids about sex; care and feeding of grandparents, family vacations; how to be a good fan of your kids’ sports; how to have good family reunions. They have also planned a skating party for the church and family and friends to be held Feb. 15 from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., at the Macon Rink. They will meet at 10 a.m., at the church to carpool. The cost will be $4 per person. The Sweetheart Banquet will be held at 6:30 p.m., Feb. 15. The men are in charge of cooking for the women. We have only a few Granville cookbooks left. They are priced at $20, with profits to benefit Relay for Life. We are planning to put in an order for more. Call Dale Ann Magruder to purchase. Our schedule: Sunday, Feb. 9: Sunday School and communion Saturday, Feb. 15: Skating party at Macon; Sweetheart Banquet that evening. Sunday, Feb. 16: Worship services and Sunday School. We are still sending care packages to servicemen and women in the combat zones. Please contact Brenda Coffman with names and addresses. Come spend an hour in worship with the One who made you, saved you and loves you, on the first, third and fifth Sundays, Feb. 6, March 2, 16 and 30. Sunday School is held at 10 a.m., each Sunday and communion follows on the Sundays when we do not have church.

With the icy conditions, the congregation of Holliday Christian Church was few in numbers in attendance on Sunday, Feb. 2. The group held services in the basement. Jane Akers opened services with the piano prelude. Everyone was welcomed by Reverend David Holmes. The monthly congregational meeting will be held following services on Feb. 9. Madison Christian Church’s ham and bean dinner has been rescheduled for Sunday, Feb. 9. The Sweetheart Banquet is scheduled for Sunday evening, Feb. 16, at the Madison Community Center. Happy birthday wishes were for Duane Blakemore. The opening hymn, “I Will Sing the Wondrous Story”, was followed by pastoral prayer and Gloria Patri. Prayer concerns were expressed for: Mary McMorris, Margaret Olney’s sister, Velma Lou, Priscilla Havens, Charlie Hayhurst, Vic Sirna, Leona Pence, Jimmie Hultz, Beverly Wandrey and Marvin Hultz. Sympathy was extended to the family of Hazel Shatzer. Mike and Julann shared the joy of first and second placings (on two different horses) in the non-professional working cow horse competition at the Fort Worth Stock show. Mendy Blades expressed pleasure at her daughter, Rachel, passing her driver’s test. Reverend Holmes shared the joy of his son, Drew’s engagement to girlfriend, Monica. The prayer hymn, “Into My Heart” was sung; prayer and unison recital of the Lord’s Prayer followed. Serving as elders were Sandy Callison and Diane Wilson, who went forward at the conclusion of singing the prayer hymn, “Amazing Grace”. Mendy Blades served as deaconess. The doxology was sung to close the communion service. Scripture from 1st Thessalonians 1:1-10 was read to illustrate Reverend Holmes’ morning message, “The Boss” Chose Me – God chose each of us, no matter how unworthy or how capable we may NOT be, to do His will. The closing hymn, “Onward Christian Solders” was sung. Pastoral prayer and singing of the “Spirit Song” closed morning worship. Following refreshments a time to enjoy refreshments, “The Other Ten Commandments”, a reading provided by Sandy Callison was read by Diane Wilson. Phil Blakemore then shared three humorous readings for the enjoyment of the group. Stories of teachers, 4-H leaders and experiences related to these topics were shared. Services are held each Sunday with worship at 9:30 a.m. and Bible Study at 10:30 a.m. Everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend.

The Madison Grace United Methodist Church held worship Sunday, Feb. 2, which was 4th Sunday After Epiphany and Communion. The Childrens’s Little Sermon was, “A Girl Names Elizabeth,” given by Judi Kramer. The scripture, Micah 6:1-8 was read by Shelby Arnold and Psalm 15 was read by Sammi Painter. Pastor Bonnie Sudsberry’s message was “Just “Be” based on the scripture, Matthew 5: 1-12. Monday, Feb. 10 , is Adult Bible Study at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 5., is Administrative Council Meeting 7 p.m., has been moved to Sunday, Feb. 9, after church. Sunday, Feb. 9, is our Fellowship Dinner 11:45 a.m.,has been changed to Feb. 16, because that will be FFA Sunday and they will be our guests. Sunday, Feb. 23, will be Pocket Change Sunday, Worship at Wildwood at 1:30 p.m., and Youth Bible Study at 4 p.m.

BUSINESS DIRECTORY Monroe County Farmers Mutual Insurance Co. Since 1892

Dane Kendrick

Insurance for Farm, Home, Business 125. W. Monroe P.O. Box 267 Paris, MO 65275

Phone: 660-327-5203 Fax: 660-327-6303 Home: 573-685-2355 209 N. Main St., Paris, MO 65275

660-327-5193 www.adams-realty.com Darren D. Adams - Owner/Broker CONTACT YOUR LOCAL AGENTS

Verle Hugenot, Broker Sales Associate Loretta Willingham, Broker Sales Associate

Jason C. Fleenor Attorney At Law

FLEENOR LAW FIRM, LLC Law@JFleenor.com Phone: (660) 327-5208 Fax: (660) 327-1062

105 West Caldwell Paris, MO 65275

CROSS & TA X S E R V I C E

ASSOCIATES, l.l.c.

Sherry Cross • Pamela Fuemmeler Joyce Arnett - Preparer 113 W. Monroe • Paris, Mo. • 660-327-4601 BARBARA FREELS Salesperson (660) 263-4400 Office (877) 651-3934 Toll Free Fax (660) 651-7421 Cell (660) 263-7608 Home barb@barbarafreels.com coldwellbanker.com

www.CBNorthCentral.com

Interested in adverting in the Business Directory? 13181 Hwy. 22 • Centralia, MO 65240 573-682-5575 • Fax # 573-682-5574 www.economymetals.com

Please contact Lisa Crider (573) 473-7720


Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014

Monroe County Appeal • www.monroecountyappeal.com

100th Day of C-3 School...

Continued from page A4

students have learned so far in the 100 days of school. Other activities around the school included counting by 10s, working on math word problems (all with the answer of 100), and writing about what they would want if they could have 100 of any item and why. Several other students set goals for what they wanted to accomplish in the remaining 74 days of school.

Holliday Horizons 4-H Club News

COMMUNITY NEWS

by Club Reporter Molly McGee The Holliday Horizons 4-H club met on Jan. 19, 2014 at the Holliday C-2 School. Roll call “Something you have done to help someone else” was answered by the 21 members present. Minutes were read by Rachel Blades and Treasurer’s report was read by Taylor Young. Both were approved as read. Fair book and fair book ads were discussed. They are looking for a new design for the cover of the Fair book. Project meetings were reported on. There have been archery, meats and horse judging meetings since our last monthly meeting. Rachel Blades is currently enrolled in the Photo Corps that has monthly photo challenges for enrolled 4-H members. Health tips were given by Kelsay Wilson and Morghan Crain. Wash your hands before handling food and always wear a seatbelt. The next meeting is scheduled for February 8, 2014 at the Macon Skate Center from 1-3. Pizza will be provided by the club and concession stand will be open. Meeting was adjourned. Carol Schoonover, Mendy Blades and Nancy Wilkerson were there to show the club about Achievement Day demonstrations and what to expect that day. Acheivement Day is scheduled for April 5, 2014 at the Paris Elementary School. All members are encouraged to attend.

Caring Community Enrollment Event Expanding Coverage through Community Partnership

Madison third graders are counting out 100 of their food items to add to the 100th Day of School Trail Mix they created. Once it was all combined they got to enjoy their snack. SUBMITTED PHOTOS The

one to see:

573-588-4565 Mike Fohey, Agent Shelbina, Mo 63468

State Farm Insurance Companies

statefarm.com

7A

What: Enroll individuals or families in the Marketplace for Health Care Insurance Where: Paris Public Library, 101 N. Main St. Paris, When: Every Thursday from 1-4 p.m. Why: So that Americans can make informative decisions about health care Whitney Doubrava and Patty Hendren, Certified Application Counselors will be on hand to help enroll individuals. For more information call 660-263-7173, ext. 3041

Clayton named Marion County Prosecutor

Gov. Jay Nixon recently appointed David N. Clayton, of Hannibal, as the new Prosecuting Attorney for Marion County. He will fill the vacancy created by the appointment of former Prosecuting Attorney Thomas P. Redington as Associate Circuit Judge for Knox County. Clayton, a Democrat, has been an Assistant Defender with the Missouri State Public Defender System since 2004. During that time, he has handled approximately 2,700 criminal cases, and conducted 20 felony trials as first chair. Clayton has practiced before judges in 16 counties in central and northeast Missouri, and has

experience in working with numerous law enforcement agencies, victim advocacy services, and treatment providers. Clayton obtained his undergraduate degree from Westminster College in Fulton, and his law degree from the University of Missouri – Kansas City. In Hannibal, he has been active in numerous civic and charitable organizations. “David Clayton has great experience in the courtroom and with working with law enforcement and other agencies,” Gov. Nixon said. “I am pleased to appoint him to this vital position to serve the people of Marion County.”

BUCK’S

20382 Highway 24 Holliday, Mo. 660-651-7286 or 660-266-3008 (shop)

Auto Body

AAA & All Major Road Service Providers

24 HOUR TOWING SERVICE

Small remodel, cabinets, doors, trim, window treatments, decks, pole barns, garages and more...


8A

Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014

Monroe County Appeal • www.monroecountyappeal.com

AREA SPORTS

Pink Out Game - Through the Lens 230 N. Main • Paris 660-327-4192

Thomas Motors

Paris Veterinary Clinic

1125 W. Outer Road • Moberly, Mo. 660-263-4560 • Toll Free: 800-586-4560 www.thomasmtrs.com

Paris • 660-327-5121

926 Hwy. 24-36 E. • Monroe City Bus.: 573-735-4546 Home: 573-735-4314

Monroe County Farmers Mutual Company

Paris Health Clinic

125 W. Monroe Paris, Mo. 660-327-5203 660-327-6303 (Fax) 573-685-2355 (Home)

Joe T. Beahan, D.O. • Beth Sweeney, FNP, BC

221 N. Main • 660-327-4000

Monroe County Us For Service Co. UsSeeFor Come SeeCome

660-327-4173s Day Come See UsVFor Valentine’ alentine’s Day Gift Ideas Valentine’s Day Gift Ideas Gift Ideas Russell Stover Russell Stover Chocolates Chocolates Come See•Candle UsParis For Co. Candles 230 N.Candle Main South Fork South Fork Co. Candles Russell Stover Chocolates V alentine’s Day 660-327-4192 South Fork Candle Co. CandlesGift Ideas Russell Stover Chocolates South Fork Candle Co. Candles

223 North Main Paris,•Missouri • 660.327.4514 223Street North Main• Street Paris, Missouri • 660.327.4514

Paris, Missouri

Contact Lisa Crider or email

Jason Dodge, Pharm.D.

Jason Dodge, JasonPharm.D. Dodge, Pharm.D.

223 North Main Street

NEED to ADVERTISE? @ 660-327-4192

223 North Main Street • Paris, Missouri • 660.327.4514

Jason Dodge, Pharm.D.

202 N. Main, Paris 660-327-JACS

• 660.327.4514

appealads@parismo.net

Crop Production Services Lonnie Wolfe, Manager

660-327-5181

620 S. Main • Paris, MO 65275 660-327-4900

M iller's &

Main Street Salon

Bar

Open Monday - Saturday Walk-Ins Welcome

Grill

220 N. Main • Paris, Mo. 660-327-4305

204 N. Main Street • Paris, Mo. 660-327-4317

Thomas Auto Parts KENT & TRACIE THOMAS

409 S. Main - Paris 660-327-4165

230 N. Main • Paris 660-327-4192

Paris Family Medical Clinic

18345 Hwy. 15, Paris 660-327-1500

Dr. Mary J. Crawford 102 E. Marion St. • Paris 660-327-4911

PARIS HARDWARE & SUPPLY

230 N. Main • Paris 660-327-4192

206 N. Main St., Paris, Mo. • 660-327-4858

Kinkead Pharmacy

Paris Mo Truck & Auto

• Downtown Centralia •

200 E. Madison St., Paris

(573) 682-2714

573) 473-0776

Jonesy’s Cafe,LLC

MONROE MANOR

216 N. Main, Paris 660-327-5707

200 South Street - Paris 660-327-4125

Russ Thomas

Paris • 660-327-4147 Madison • 660-291-5795

230 N. Main • Paris 660-327-4192

Monroe County Commissioners

Mike Whelan Mike Minor Glenn E. Turner Eastern Presiding Western

101 E. Broadway • Madison 660-291-3041 Fax: 660-291-8772 Info Line: 660-291-3041

City of PARIS

Miller Resident Care 210 Rock Road • Paris, Mo.

(660) 327-4334

660-327-5680

JIM HANSEN

The Paris National Bank

40th District

Member FDIC

Paris, Mo. • 660-327-4181 www.parisnational.com

PARIS HARDWARE & SUPPLY

209 N. Main St.,

660-327-5193

www.adams-realty.com

Where is this blast from the past? Dedication of Mark Twain State Shrine, June 5, 1960. Print from Monroe County Historical Society. SUBMITTED PHOTO

206 N. Main St., Paris, Mo. 660-327-4858


Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014

Monroe County Appeal • www.monroecountyappeal.com

AREA SPORTS

40th District Rep. Jim Hansen Capitol Report Last week my “Right to Hunt and Fish” bill (HJR59) was heard by the Agriculture Policy Committee. The National Rifle Association (NRA), Missouri Farm Bureau, Missouri Federation of Animal Owners, and many other groups showed up to testify in support. I still remember the first gun my father gave me on my 12th birthday. I have enjoyed hunting and fishing in Pike County and all across the state and country for many years now. The reality is that there are many liberal activist groups out there hoping to take these rights away. PETA, HSUS, and others have launched campaigns in several states working to slowly erode our rights to harvest wildlife. These are proud traditions that our families have enjoyed for years. They are part of our heritage and I will continue the fight to see that these rights our guaranteed for us in our state constitution. Already 17 states have secured these rights in their constitution and there are 21 other pieces of legislation across the

Callaway Livestock Center, Inc. Kingdom City 573-642-7486 Feeder Cattle Sale Every Monday at 12:30 p.m. Slaughter Steers & Heifers Monday 10 a.m. REGULAR FEEDER CATTLE SALE Feb. 3, 2014 Receipts: 717 Hd. COMPUTER AVE - TOP 456 Steers: Medium & Large Frame Hd. 5-300 & Down..............213.00-231.00 15-300-400 lbs..................207.00-224.00 39-400-500 lbs................204.00-221.00 54-500-600 lbs................185.00-202.00 124-600-700 lbs.................181.00-190.00 5-700-800 lbs................145.00-154.00 214-800-900 lbs.................159.00-161.00

country currently working to do the same. Hunting in our state is a billion dollar industry and we must protect it from these outof-state activist and their Hollywood funding. The Veterans Committee I serve on recently heard two bills. The first will allow female veterans to have a personal designation on their license plate if they so desire. The second would create a special veterans lottery ticket and the funding from sales will be used to support veterans homes across the state. It is important that we, as a state, are doing everything we can to take care of our veterans. They have sacrificed so much for our country and it is important to give them the respect and assistance owed to them for their service. Too often I hear of Veterans struggling to get their benefits promised. My office will continue to provide assistance to these veterans; helping them navigate the bureaucracy of federal government. Recently our office sent notification to more than 250 constituents of the 40th district notifying them that they have at least $50 of unclaimed property currently being held by the state. If you receive notice or would like to check for yourself if you are owed any amount of unclaimed property please feel free to go to treasurer.mo.gov where you can search by last name on the home page to see if you have any unclaimed property being held by the state. In total, our district has more than $1 million in unclaimed property currently being held by the state.

204 Heifers: Medium & Large Frame Hd.

4-300 & Down..............176.00-188.00 11-300-400 lbs.................175.00-185.00 27-400-500 lbs.................166.00-181.00 50-500-600 lbs...............163.00-172.50 48-600-700 lbs.................152.00-162.50 56-700-800 lbs...................152.00-155.00 Bred Cows: Absent 93 Slaughter Cows: High Dressing: 90.00-100.00; Bulk: 75.00-85.00; Low: 65.00-75.00; Thin: 60.00 & Down 12 Slaughter Bulls: 95.00-101.00; Thin: 89.00-93.00 All Slaughter Steers & Heifers sold on Monday at 10 a.m. Receipts: Absent. Cow sale - Thursday, Feb. 6, at 6 p.m. 600 cows, cow calf and bulls bred heifers - lots of quality Toll Free 1-573-522-9244 for 24-hour USDA Market Report recording. We appreciate your business, both buyers and sellers. Please visit our web site at

9A

McWilliams receives VICTORY award

20 Years and Counting... Paris National Bank Employee Mary McGee was celebrated with a 20 year anniversary party on Monday, Feb. 3, at the bank. (Top) Mary McGee, left, with former TPNB CEO and President Chuck Brazeale. (Bottom) McGee with new TPNB Officers Mary Dickey, left, and Dan Putrah. APPEAL PHOTOS

Mathew McWilliams, son of Scott and Lisa McWilliams of Parkville, was honored by the Harvest Ball Society, a philanthropic charitable organization in Kansas City, as one of the 11 young men and women to receive the VICTORY Award. The award is based on volunteerism in their communities, their community service, their leadership, and their scholarship. The dinner, dance and award ceremony was held in the Grand Ballroom in Bartle Hall in downtown Kansas City. Mathew is a graduate of Park Hill South High School and a 2012 graduate of the University of Missouri with a degree in Business Administration. He served on the Homecoming Steering Committee and was chairman

of the record breaking Student Blood Drive collecting more than 5,200 unit of blood. Mathew was a member of Pi Kappa Psi Fraternity and served as its president. He was a volunteer for Granny’s House, where he set up safe events for inner city children, and was a volunteer driver for STRIPES, providing safe rides home. Mathew was an Eagle Scout from Boy Scout Troop 314 from Platte Woods United Methodist Church. Mathew is employed as a grain merchandiser by Consolidated Grain and Barge (CGB) in Minneapolis, Minn. He also volunteers as first mate during sail boat races in the summer. Mathew is the grandson of Linden and Becky Vanlandingham of Paris.

2003 FORD EXPLORER XLS 4.0L 4WD V6 AUTO, LOADED, LOCAL TRADE, NEW TIRES, ALLOY WHEELS, $4,900, 142,000 MILES 2001 FORD ESCAPE XLS 4WD V6 AUTO, LOADED, FRESH TUNE-UP, ONE-OWNER NICE SUV!, 162,000 MILES, $3,950 2005 FORD F150 4X4 FLARESIDE 4WD V8 AUTO (5.4) LOADED UP, ALLOY WHEELS, SLICK TRUCK, HARD TO FIND, AND CLEAN FOR THE MILES! 218,000 MILES, $7,900 2002 FORD WINDSTAR SE V6 AUTO, LOADED, EXCELLENT TIRES, LOCAL ONE-OWNER, X-TRA CLEAN, $3,900, 125,000 MILES

www.callawaylivestock.com

www.CBNorthCentral.com

TERIC J. ROLAND

302 E. Main, Perry, Mo. Office: (573) 565-2069 Cell: (573) 819-2242

KENT THOMAS

(660) 263-4400 Office (877) 651-3934 Toll Free Fax (573) 473-4931 Cell kentthomas@centurytel.net

www.CBNorthCentral.com

m m e m e m n n o o s s MM

Crider’s TAXIDERMY 17284 Monroe Rd 857 • Paris. Mo.

660-327-5812

Full Time Taxidermist Quality Work Over 35 Years Experience Fast Service Shoulder Mount $400 Skull Mount $100 Rack Mount $75 www.criderstaxidermy.com

Russ Thomas Paris, MO 660-327-4147 Hwy. 15 & Bus. 24 Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.- 5 p.m. Madison, MO 660-291-5795 Wed. 12 - 5 p.m.

m e ns m o M

Mexico, Mo.

1320Rd. Paris573-581-7970 Rd. 573-581-7970 1320 Paris 573-581-7970 Mexico, MO Mexico, MO Visit our website www.mommenshavac.com 1320 Paris Rd. www.mommenshavac.com 573-581-7970 www.mommenshavac.com Mexico, MO www.mommenshavac.com


10A Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014

Monroe County Appeal • www.monroecountyappeal.com

R-II HOMECOMING

Courtwarming 2014

The 2014 Paris Courtwarming Court, left to right: Princesses Heaven Day, Betsy Embree and Brooke Carr. King Bryce Ensor, Queens Rae Graupman, DeDe Bounds, Kaylee Callison and Josey Ball, Kings Zane Lockhart and Nathan Hancock, Princes Matthew Unterbrink, Jacob Pease and Brant Francis.

The 2014 Paris Courtwarming Kings and Queens, left to right: King Bryce Ensor, Queens Rae Graupman, DeDe Bounds, Kaylee Callison and Josey Ball, Kings Zane Lockhart and Nathan Hancock.

Jonesy’s C afe, LLC

GREAT CENTRAL LUMBER CO.

660-327-5707 -Paris-

Good Luck Coyotes!

Go! Fight! Win! Coyotes!

103 S. Madison St. Perry, Mo. 573-565-2242

Coyotes rule the court! Paris 660-327-5121

Good Luck Coyotes!

JIM HANSEN

Paris Family Medical Clinic

Dr. Mary J. Crawford GOOD LUCK Coyotes!

102 E. Marion St. • Paris, Mo. 660-327-4911

Thomas Motors GOOD LUCK Coyotes!!! 1125 W. Outer Road Moberly, Mo. 660-263-4560 Toll Free: 800-586-4560 www.thomasmtrs.com

926 Hwy. 24-36 E. Monroe City, Mo. Bus.: 573-735-4546 Home: 573-735-4314

GOOD LUCK Coyotes!

Kinkead Pharmacy Downtown Centralia • 573-682-1391 •

GO Coyotes!

Paris Veterinary Clinic

Paris Health Clinic Good luck to the Paris Coyotes! 202 N. Main Paris, Mo. 660-327-JACS

Kent & Tracie Thomas Go Coyotes!

Paris, Mo. 660-327-4165

Go Coyotes!

Perry, Mo. 573-565-3388

Good luck to the Paris Coyotes!

230 N. Main, Paris, MO 65275 660-327-4192

221 N. Main 660-327-4000

Thomas Auto Parts

40th District jhansen@rallstech.com

Joe T. Beahan, D.O.

Good Luck Coyotes! 18345 Hwy. 15 Paris, Mo. 15diner.com 660-327-1500

Monroe County Commissioners

Mike Whelan Mike Minor Glenn E. Turner Eastern Presiding Western

Best of luck to the Coyotes!

BEST OF LUCK, COYOTES! from the Council and Employees of the

CITY OF PARIS

Monroe County Farmers Mutual Go, Fight, Win! 125 W. Monroe Paris, Mo. 660-327-5203 660-327-6303 (Fax) 573-685-2355 (Home)

Good Luck Coyotes!

The Paris National Bank Paris, Mo. Member FDIC

660-327-4181

www.parisnational.com

Miller Resident Care Go Coyotes!

210 Rock Road • Paris, MO 660-327-5680


Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014

Monroe County Appeal • www.monroecountyappeal.com

11A

R-II HOMECOMING

Paris High School

Courtwarming King Candidates, left to right: Bryce Ensor, Zane Lockhart and Nathan Hancock.

Courtwarming Prince Candidates, left to right: Brant Francis, Jacob Pease and Matthew Unterbrink. Courtwarming Good Luck 2014 Coyotes!

Courtwarming Queen Candidates, left to right: Rae Graupman, DeDe Bounds, Kaylee Callison and Josey Ball.

Courtwarming Princess Candidates, left to right: Brooke Carr, Heaven Day and Betsy Embree

Good Luck Coyotes!

Declaw the Tigers!

Main Street

Marceline Co vs urt , wa y a rm d i 2 ing r 0 . 1 F .m Paris 4 6p Go BIG

BLUE!!!

Crop Production Services

GOOD LUCK Coyotes!

HAYHURST REAL ESTATE

Lonnie Wolfe,

660-327-1507

Russ Thomas

Paris • 660-327-4147 Madison • 660-291-5795

PARIS MO TRUCK AND AUTO (660) 327-1371

Come See Us For Valentine’s Day Come See Us For

manager 26411 Monroe Rd. 720 Paris, MO 65275 660-327-5181 Toll Free 877-327-3500

Valentine’s Day Gift Ideas

Courtwarming 2014

Salon

Walk-Ins Welcome Open Monday - Saturday

204 N. Main Street • Paris, Mo. 660-327-4317 Good Luck to the Coyotes!

PARIS HARDWARE & SUPPLY Declaw the Marceline Tigers! 206 N. Main St., Paris, Mo. 660-327-4858

Best wishes to the Paris Coyotes! 101 E. Broadway • Madison 660-291-3041 Fax: 660-291-8772 Info Line: 660-291-3041

Russell Stover Chocolates South Fork Candle Co. Candles

Gift Ideas

Good Luck Coyotes!

Russell Stover andChocolates SouthNortheast Fork CandleRegion Co. Candles

Good Luck Coyotes!

Jason Dodge, Pharm.D.

223 North Main Street • Paris, Missouri • 660.327.4514

Medical Equipment, LLC

Monroe County Service Co. 660-327-4173

Go Coyotes! 620 S. Main Paris, MO 65275 660-327-4900

Best of luck to the Paris Coyotes! Jason Dodge, Pharm.D.

223 North Main Street • Paris, Missouri • 660.327.4514

GO COYOTES!

from the staff at

MONROE MANOR 200 South Street

209 N. Main St., Paris, MO 65275

660-327-5193

www.adams-realty.com

Paris, Mo. 660-327-4125

M iller's & Bar

Grill

220 N. Main Paris, Mo. 660-327-4305

Good Luck to the Coyotes!


12A Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014

Monroe County Appeal • www.monroecountyappeal.com

CLASSIFIED ADS/LEGALS REAL ESTATE

FOR SALE

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

NOW CARRYING BIRDSEED: CO-OP Agri-Service, Hwy. 24 W., Paris. .........................................47-tfn GLOVES!!! Stop by and see our new selection of gloves. Monroe County CO-OP ..........................................46-tfn FOR SALE: 60 plus big bales of mixed grass hay with clover. Call Barb Shumard at (573) 248-6626.............................5-2t FOR SALE: 1987 Shasta Roadmaster. Needs work. (660) 327-1035. .............................................5-2t

All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex,handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

r

HAYHURST REAL ESTATE 23815 Hwy 24 West • Paris, MO www.hayhurstrealestate.com

Monroe County Road 233, Shelbina, Mo. - Very private 45m/l acres. 3 bed 1 bath Metal building cabin. Rural water and electric! Wood burning stove. Home sits just off the lake. 45 acres is all woods and butts up against crooked creek on the south and West sides. Great place to hunt, fish and ride four wheelers on the trails! Very Motivated Seller, reduced price $215,000.00 625 Bryan Ave., Paris, Mo. - Brick front home, 4 beds 2.5 bathrooms with attached 2 car garage. Home features nice size living room, Updated kitchen in 2011 with stainless steel appliances, cabinets and granite tile countertops. 2 bathrooms have been updated with new tile, fixtures, and sink vanities with granite countertops. Half bath was put in with a deep sink in the laundry room. This home sits on about an acre and also comes with a 30x50 shop with concrete floors. Half of the shop has been finished into a recreation room and the other half is being used as a two car garage. Price reduced $149,500.00 119 Ruby St., Paris, Mo. - Historic home sits on 4 lots, and has been well taken care of over the years. Home offers 3 bedrooms with 2 bathrooms. Large eat in kitchen. Dining room with an office area off to the side. Living room that features a gas fireplace. All appliances stay with home including washer and dryer. $53,500.00 126 Bodine St., Paris, MO - Very Clean 3 bedroom home on unfinished basement. Basement could be finished. One car attached garage. Big back deck for entertaining! Should qualify for USDA 0 down or FHA loan. $94,500.00

Mark Twain Lake Area • Farms • Residental • Hunting

660-327-1507(Bus.) 573-473-0776 (Cell) Daniel Miller: 573-808-2676 (Cell) e-mail: john@hayhurstrealestate.com

Aluminum Cans (In 13 Gal. Bags or Larger) 50¢ Per lb.

100# = 55¢ Per lb. 250# = 60¢ Per lb.

(Prices Subject to Change) ALSO BUYING Copper • Brass Aluminum • Scrap Iron Stainless Steel • Auto Batteries

Fusselman’s Salvage Co. Hwy. 24 West • Moberly

660-263-6811• 800-337-6811

www.fusselmetals.com

Little Rick’s Plumbing Plumbing • Heating Cooling • Electrical Work Call Little Rick Heitmeyer

•660-327-4726• •573-473-6494•

Now Excepting All Major Credit Cards

INSURANCE Losing you health care coverage? Confused about your health care options? I CAN HELP!

Call Barb Forrest at Forrest and Associates, 660-327-1103 225 N. Main, Paris, Mo.

POSTED

The land owned or rented by the following are posted against trespassing for the 2012-13 hunting season. The charge is $1.00 per line each week for the season and is to be PAID IN ADVANCE.

Jane Miller Farm (6/6/14) Carl & Roger Ball (11/21/14) Ronald R. Krigbaum (6/6/14) Jerry Bogle Farms (10/31/14)

WANTED WANTED Responsible hunters looking to lease hunting rights to land in Ralls or Monroe County directly from landowner for 2014 and beyond. Primarily deer and turkey.

314-614-6511

EVENTS ANNUAL MEETING MONROE COUNTY GUN CLUB Friday, Feb. 7 7 p.m. • 15 Diner

PUBLIC NOTICE BID NOTICE Sealed Bids are being accepted in the office of the Monroe County Commission until 11 a.m. Friday, Feb. 21, for the purchase of the following: 6 - Desktop Computers 3 - Lap Top Computers 1 - Server( there will be 15 machines accessing the server with no more that 6 to 8 accessing it at one time) Software and licenses for each Mark Sealed Bid – “Computer Bid” For Specifications please contact Chief Deputy Sheriff Joe Colston at 660-327-4060 The Commission reserves the right to refuse any or all bids. By Order of the Monroe County Commission By: Sandra Francis, Monroe County Clerk

HELP WANTED DRIVERS: Want a Professional Career? Haul Flatbed for Trinity Logistics Group! Earn $.425$.525cpm! CDL-A w/2yrs Exp. EEO/AA Call: 800-5337862 www.trinitytrucking. com.....................................3-4t HELP WANTED: Dietary for 32 hours/week, primarily 3 11 p.m. Apply at Miller’s Resident Care. 210 Rock Road, Paris, Mo. (660) 327-5680. EOE....................................5-2t

FOR RENT

HELP WANTED

APARTMENT FOR RENT: R&R Apartments, 1006 E. Martin, Perry. 1 2- bedroom, water, sewer, trash, lawn care, snow removal. Call Frank or Shelly (573) 565-3392........................tfn

MONROE MANOR NURSING HOME

AUCTION COL. JAMES L. JOHNSTON Auctioneer, Realtor, Appraiser Hwy. 24, Madison, MO 660-291-5921 • 800-404-3400

SERVICES DRY DOCK: Winter Hours Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 4:30 - 9 p.m. For questions call (573) 560-0084. ..............................................40-tfn Looking for a Ford? Chevy? Honda? Toyota? GMC? Dodge? Or any other car, truck, or SUV? Before you buy anything anywhere else, check with us. www.beforeyoubuyanythinganywhere. com......................................6-1t

LEGAL

IN THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COURT, MONROE COUNTY, MISSOURI Judge or Division: PROBATE Case Number: 13MN-PR00056 In the Estate of EDWARD LEE BARTON, Deceased.

NOTICE OF LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION GRANTED

(Supervised Administration) To All Persons Interested in the Estate of EDWARD LEE BARTON, Decedent: On 12-26-2013, the following individual was appointed the personal representative of the estate of EDWARD LEE BARTON, decedent, by the Probate Division of the Circuit Court of Monroe County, Missouri. The personal representative’s business address and phone number is: CHRISTY L. BARTON, 410 W. CALDWELL, P.O. BOX 35, PARIS, MO 65275. The personal representative’s attorney’s name, business address and phone number is: SIDNEY E. WHEELAN, 110 NORTH FIFTH ST., MOBERLY, MO 65270, PHONE: 660263-3100 All creditors of said decedent are notified to file claims in court within six months from the date of the first publication of this notice or if a copy of this notice was mailed to, or served upon, such creditor by the personal representative, then within two months from the date it was mailed or served, whichever is later, or be forever barred to the fullest extent permissible by law. Such six-month period and such two-month period do not extend the limitation period that would bar claims one year after the decedent’s death, as provided in Section 473.444, RSMo, or any other applicable limitation periods. Nothing in Section 473.033, RSMo, shall be construed to bar any action against a decedent’s liability insurance carrier through a defendant ad litem pursuant to Section 537.021, RSMo. Date of the decedent’s death: Nov. 17, 2013 Date of first publication: Jan. 16, 2014 Receipt of this notice by mail should not be construed by the recipient to indicate that the recipient necessarily has a beneficial interest in the estate. The nature and extent of any person’s interest, if any, can be determined from the files and records of this estate in the Probate Division of the above referenced Circuit Court. Heather D. Wheeler, Circuit Clerk Published on: January 16, 23, 30 and February 6, 2014 IN THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COURT, MONROE COUNTY, MISSOURI Judge or Division: MICHAEL P WILSON Case Number: 14MN-PR00003 In the Estate of STELONA BELL ASHER, Deceased

NOTICE OF LETTERS TESTAMENTARY GRANTED

(Supervised Administration) To All Persons Interested in the Estate of STELONA BELL ASHER, Decedent: On 01-10-2014, the last will of the decedent having been admitted to probate, the following individuals were appointed personal representatives of the estate of STELONA BELL ASHER, decedent by the Probate

Division of the Circuit Court of Monroe County, Missouri. The names, business addresses, and phone numbers of the personal representative is: GAVIN L. ASHER, 15 SCHWARTZ DR., OTTOMWA, IA 52501 The personal representatives’ attorney’s name, business address and phone number is: RICHARD J. FREDRICK, 304 N. WASHINGTON ST., P.O. BOX 208, PARIS, MO 65275 -0208, 660-327-4465 All creditors of said decedent are notified to file claims in court within six months from the date of the first publication of this notice or if a copy of this notice was mailed to, or served upon, such creditor by the personal representative, then within two months from the date it was mailed or served, whichever is later, or be forever barred to the fullest extent permissible by law. Such six month period and such two-month period do not extend the limitation period that would bar claims one year after the decedent’s death, as provided in Section 473.444, RSMo, or any other applicable limitation periods. Nothing in Section 473.033, RSMo, shall be construed to bar any action against a decedent’s liability insurance carrier through a defendant ad litem pursuant to Section 537.021, RSMo. Date of the decedent’s death: Nov. 24, 2013 Date of first publication: Jan. 23, 2014 Heather D. Wheeler, Circuit Clerk (signed) Receipt of this notice by mail should not be construed by the recipient to indicate that the recipient necessarily has a beneficial interest in the estate. The nature and extent of any person’s interest, if any, can be determined from the files and records of this estate in the Probate Division of the above referenced Circuit Court. Published on: January 23, 30, February 6 and 13, 2014

TRUSTEE’S SALE

IN RE: Alfredo Edwards and Alberta Edwards, Husband and Wife Trustee’s Sale: For default in payment of debt and performance of obligation secured by Deed of Trust executed by Alfredo Edwards and Alberta Edwards, Husband and Wife dated October 7, 2003 and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Monroe County, Missouri in Book 303, Page 1443 the undersigned Successor Trustee, at the request of the legal holder of said Note will on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5p.m., (at the specific time of 1:35 PM), at the West Front Door of the Court House, City of Paris, County of Monroe, State of Missouri, sell at public vendue to the highest bidder for cash the following described real estate, described in said Deed of Trust, and situated in Monroe County, State of Missouri, to wit: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LOTS, TRACTS OR PARCELS OF LAND, LYING, BEING AND SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF MONROE AND STATE OF MISSOURI, TO-WIT: ALL THAT PART OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED REAL ESTATE WHICH LIES EAST OF MISSOURI STATE HIGHWAY ROUTE Z, TO-WIT: THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW-1/4)

is looking for hard working, dependable, long term employees. If interested in working with a team of professional healthcare providers, Monroe Manor is interested in you!

We have the following positions available: Full Time CNA Shower Aide- Day Shift 6 a.m. - 2:30 p.m., Every other weekend Requirements: CNA Certification

Employee benefits include: Insurance*Sick Pay*Vacation*Personal Days* 457 Retirement Program Apply at Monroe Manor 200 South Street • Paris, MO 65275 (660) 327-4125

SERVICES

Fresh Ground • Made in Missouri

Now available at Miller’s Bar & Grill, Paris and Becky’s Restaurant, Madison Traditional White Apricot • Cranberry (Available in 8 oz. jars)

We ship worldwide, offer larger sizes and sell wholesale!

(417) 428-3625

B

Accounting & N Business Services

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“Lightening Your Paperwork Load”

✓ Income Tax Preparation ✓ Payroll Processing ✓ Notary Services ✓ Sales/Use Tax SMALL BUSINESS ACCOUNTING FOR: Individuals • S Corps Partnerships • C Corps

Monday - Saturday 201 S. Main, Paris (660) 327-1040

Ben Franklin Wavering’s

@Wavering’s Ben Franklin

benfranklinshop.com

Senior Discount Every Monday • Ben Franklin Gift Cards Make a Perfect Gift

CUSTOMER APPRECIATION DAYS! Fri. & Sat. FEB. 7 & 8

20% SAVE

off entire purhase!

Free Food Samples From

Mama Jane Creations

Come join us in sampling Samples available a wide variety of sweet 10am-2pm and savory treats Friday at Macon with Mama Jane herself. Saturday at Monroe City current ads items, pink-ticketed Macon, MO Monroe City, MO Excludes merch., antiques, furniture, custom floral arrangements & special orders. Discount 103 N. Rollins 100 S. Main St. may not be combined with any other 660-385-5751 573-735-4369 promotion. No gift wrapping on these days.

LEGAL OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW-1/4) OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW-1/4) AND THE SOUTH HALF (S-1/2) OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (NW-1/4) OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW-1/4), OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW-1/4); ALL IN SECTION TWENTY-SIX (26), IN TOWNSHIP FIFTYTHREE (53) NORTH, RANGE NINE (9) WEST OF THE FIFTH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN; EXCEPTING THEREFROM, LAND HERETOFORE CONVEYED TO THE STATE OF MISSOURI FOR HIGHWAY PURPOSES. SUBJECT TO ALL PUBLIC AND PRIVATE ROADS AND EASE-

MENTS. to satisfy said debt and cost. MILLSAP & SINGER, P.C., Successor Trustee 612 Spirit Drive St. Louis, MO 63005 (636) 537-0110 File No: 131151.022514.319698 FC

NOTICE

Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, 15 U.S.C. §1692c(b), no information concerning the collection of this debt may be given without the prior consent of the consumer given directly to the debt collector or the express permission of a court of competent jurisdiction. The debt collector is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Published on: January 30, February 6, 13 and 20, 2014


Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014

Monroe County Appeal • www.monroecountyappeal.com

13A

AREA VITALS

Kora Lynn Berrey

EARL DAVID DAWSON 1945-2014

Earl David Dawson, 68 of Monroe City passed away Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014 at his home. Mr. Dawson was born on March 30, 1945 in Mexico the son of Earl Tivis and Bessie Imogen Chappel. Dave was a 1963 graduate of Paris High School, Paris. He then graduated from Mueller Barber College, Kansas City. He served his country in the National Guard. Dave worked as a barber for 49 years until his retirement. He owned and operated Dave’s Barber Shop in Monroe City. He was a member of the St. Stephens Catholic Church, Indian Creek. Dave was past National Turkey Calling Champion in 1979. He was a member of the National Turkey Federation, Northeast Missouri Anglers. He enjoyed spending time with his family and teaching his grandchildren to fish and shoot guns. He also enjoyed hunting, fishing and hunting rocks. He married Mary Louise Wolf, Oct. 7, 1967, she survives of the home. Also surviving is one son, Brian Dawson and wife Mary Joy of Canton; one daughter, Di-

anne Williams and husband Paul, Moscow Mills. Three grandchildren survive, Rick Williams, Danille Williams and Allison Dawson. Mr. Dawson was also survived by numerous nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 10 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 6 at the St. Stephens Catholic Church, Indian Creek. Rev. Mike Quinn will officiate the burial from St. Stephen’s Cemetery. Visitation will be held from 5-7 p.m. on Wednesday with a scripture service beginning at 7 p.m. at the Garner Funeral Home, Monroe City. Active pallbearers are Bill Smith, Matt Spalding, Jim Yates, John Yates, Anthony Yates, Del Buckman and Denny Volroth. Honorary pallbearers will be Jim McMurdo, Gilbert Moss and Dan Ess. Memorials have been suggested to the St. Stephens Church. Garner Funeral Home and Chapel, Monroe City is in charge of the arrangements. Online condolences can be made at garnerfuneralchapel.com.

Brecken Thomas Pansegrau

Scott and Nikki Pansegrau of Toledo, Iowa are proud to announce the birth of their third child, a son, born on Dec. 31 at 12:03 p.m. He has been named Brecken Thomas Pansegrau. Brecken was

welcomed home by his big brother, Jake and sister, Layla. Grandparents are Tom and Melanie Kemper, Montour, Iowa. Great grandparents are Judy Hollingsworth, Paris and Rob Wood, Madison.

HAZEL MAY SHATZER 1919-2014

Hazel May Shatzer, 94, passed away at the Audrain Medical Center in Mexico, on Thursday, Jan. 30. Mrs. Shatzer was born on April 6, 1919, near Woodlawn, the daughter of Roger Raymond and Bertha Lee (White) Key. She married Charles W. Shatzer on April 17, 1938 at 403 W. Locust St., Paris, where she lived all of her married life. Hazel worked at various places in Paris and retired from Pugh’s Jewelry Store in 1988. She enjoyed playing bridge, working in her flower bed, going to the Country Club, and entertaining family and friends in her home. Mrs. Shatzer is survived by three sons and their wives, Roger and Karlena, Kent, and Phillip and Cheryl Shatzer, all of Paris, seven grandchildren, Brad Shatzer of Paris, Debora (Mark) Stone of Paris, Jolena Shatzer of St. Louis, Jason Shatzer of Columbia, Garrett Shatzer of Perry, Lindsey (Carson)

Hazel May Shatzer

Rockhill of Springfield and Lauren Shatzer of Columbia, six great grandchildren, one great great grandson, a niece, Charlotte Foster, of Shelbina, a nephew, Roger Byars of San Rafael, Calif., and great nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her husband, Charles, on Nov. 22, 2005. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 1, at the Agnew Funeral Home in Paris. Visitation was held from 12 noon until time of service. Burial was in Walnut Grove Cemetery at Paris. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to American Legion Post 221, Monroe Manor Nursing Home, or donor’s choice.

Kody Berrey and Courtney Bean of Paris are proud to announce the birth of their daughter, Kora Lynn Berrey. Kora was born on Dec. 31, 2013 at 11:11 a.m. at Boone Hospital. She weighed six pounds eight ounces and was twenty inches long. Kora Lynn’s very proud grandparents

are Larry and Bobbie Jo Berrey of Paris and Kathy Bean of Salisbury. Great grandparents are Roy and Kay Nickerson of Madison, Virginia Berrey Justice of Paris, and also very excited about Kora’s arrival are Uncles Kole and Kaison and Aunt Kimber Berrey.


14A Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014

Monroe County Appeal • monroecountyappeal.com

COMMUNITY NEWS

Ralls County Herald Enterprise, Feb. 6, 2014 • Week 6 (regional)  
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