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ARCHITECT

APOSTOLOS BENEVAS


ARCHITECT

APOSTOLOS BENEVAS SUMMARY

Highly skilled and technically savvy Architect with a blend of experience and educational credentials. Proven track record of managing multiple projects ranging from renovations and consultancy on building permits to large- scale developments. Demonstrated expertise in the utilisation of architectural software. Capable of supervising construction works, managing resources, enhancing performance, and providing appropriate solutions. Possess consistent and precise project planning and execution that ensure efficiency and success with client’s value at the forefront.

Visuu1.3


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E01

M U N I C I PA L T H E AT R E A N T I G O N I VA L A KO U


R07 R07: staircase towards level +1 - main entrance E01: schematic representation of the architectural solution

OWNER: MUNICIPAL THEATRICAL COMPANY OF KAVALA TYPE: RECONSTRUCTION  Project leader The typologically peculiar municipal theatre of Kavala was originally build (1979) as a building with mixed uses. The first 4 levels where a cinema and the last two where apartments. During the 90s the cinema was bought by the municipal authorities of the city and was

R03 R03: detail of water and sculptures - under the main staircase

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MUNICIPAL THEATRE ANTIGONI VALAKOU

LOCATION: KAVALA, GREECE


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M U N I C I PA L T H E AT R E A N T I G O N I VA L A KO U


A THREE ACT PLAY OF A RITUALISTIC CATHARSIS

converted to a theatre. In many Hellenic prefectures there are local state companies with the sole purpose of promoting the arts and especially theatre. This building was given to them while the CEO of the company was appointed by the mayor of the city. Since the building was never renovated (except the main hall) the local authorities deemed it was

R02 R01: perspective view of the exterior

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R02: ticket counter and exposition panels - main entrance


M U N I C I PA L T H E AT R E A N T I G O N I VA L A KO U

important to authorize a major reconstruction for the entire building excluding the main hall. The following program of operations was approved: Reconstruction of levels 0, 1 and 2 and of the exterior in order to comply with modern standards • Accessibility for people with disabilities. Ramps creation and insertion of an elevator in compliance with EU regulations • Weight reduction of the total building tonnage and reduction of energy consumption through usage of specialized materials and filters • Creation of investment possibilities for the private sector • Promotion of culture • Urban development of the general area through spot interventions • Artificial lighting projects for the interior and exterior • Reconstruction of the main entrance at the road level and reconstruction of the ticket counter

R04

R04: ticket counter - main entrance D01: main entrance - level 0 PAGE

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D01

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M U N I C I PA L T H E AT R E A N T I G O N I VA L A KO U PAGE

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R05

AN UNFINISHED PROJECT THAT ACTS AS WHITE CANVAS

R05: signage behind the ticket counter - main entrance R06: wooden brise soleil and glazing system exterior level +1

R06


• •

• • •

Insertion of a showroom Insertion of specialized signage for the purpose of information and orientation Renovation of the lounge at level 1 and insertion of a cafe operated by the private sector Insertion of info points and sales stand at level 1 Reconstruction of the mechanical apparatus of the building. This includes everything from plumbing and air conditioning to ventilation Reconstruction of the waiting area at level 2 Creation of a wardrobe room for the spectators Renovation of the public toilets and accessibility for the disabled

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• •


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D02

M U N I C I PA L T H E AT R E A N T I G O N I VA L A KO U


JUSTIFICATION REPORT OF ARCHITECTURAL SOLUTIONS The importance of theatre throughout Greece is well known. It is a place where people meet and try to forget their daily problems through an art that it is considered, even today, sacred. The solution takes in consideration this fact and inserts a three act play that revolves around the theme of a ritualistic catharsis from the entrance to the main hall, from the responsibilities of daily life to a sought out oblivion that helps clear the mind before each play.

K08

The operation is simple: strip the outer shell of the building from the elements of the past, elements that are characteristic of the typology of the peculiar architectural version of the condominium. The entire building becomes an unfinished project that acts as white canvas where the new project is inserted. That is the point from where the three act play starts.

K08: space frame insertion - concept sketch D02: foyer - level +1 PAGE

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M U N I C I PA L T H E AT R E A N T I G O N I VA L A KO U

LEVEL 0 (ROAD LEVEL) Main entrance. At this level the following are placed: ticket counter, elevator, panels for exhibitions and signage. By inserting a space frame the entire level is redefined. This space frame is in contrast with the old solution since it’s transparent but well defined in order to define new limits of the area. Shapes and surfaces are recalculated and the architect gains direct control of the three dimensional space having the possibility to negate the previous entrance without hiding it. The frame acts as a base for everything, scaffolding for frames that can accommodate pictures, signage and lighting fixtures. By also

R09 PAGE

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R09: the cafe, on the left info point - level +1 S01: cross section - north

S01


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S02

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M U N I C I PA L T H E AT R E A N T I G O N I VA L A KO U


R08

R08: cafe and waiting area - level +1 S02: cross section - south PAGE

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M U N I C I PA L T H E AT R E A N T I G O N I VA L A KO U

dt02

DESIGNING SIGNAGE FOR INFORMATION AND ORIENTATION dt04

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dt04: space frame dimensioning and composition study dt02: signage study

dt01 dt01: signage study - LED background illumination


covering the exterior, it becomes a new base, a podium that marks the building from an urban point of view. It is a symbol of the notion that we can define and control our lives by placing limits, a notion that in the end is futile but comforting.

LEVEL 1 (+3,40M) The visitor encounters an info point that also sales books and a cafe. The space frame starts to mutate. It’s getting covered by white panels and it becomes thinner. Although it still defines space, the role that assumes is somehow less important. At the exterior it’s getting replaced by a wooden veil, a filter, of an undefined shape that transforms the entire volume. The veil continues beyond this level until it reaches the top. At this level the spectator takes a pause. He or she may relax, drink an aperitif and socialize while waiting. Life becomes slower and a state of isolation is reached.

dt03 19 PAGE

dt03: signage and panels composition study


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20 M U N I C I PA L T H E AT R E A N T I G O N I VA L A KO U


LEVEL 2 (DOUBLE LEVEL) This is the level of the main hall. The waiting area and wardrobe are placed at the lower part and the toilets, projection room etc. at the higher part. The final part of the catharsis is achieved here. The entire area is void of everything and covered with white paint. The extreme minimalistic design acts as purgatory. At the exterior the facades wooden veil is met by a glazing system covered by frosted glass panels that give spatial information of what happens behind. This glazed prism penetrates the space above the road and marks the position of the theatre at an urban level. Due to the economic crisis the project was halted and waits funding.

V02

V02: south view

21 PAGE

V01

V01: main facade - front view


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F03

HOTEL KAMARI BEACH


HOTEL KAMARI BEACH

LOCATION: THASOS, GREECE OWNER: KAMARI HOTEL ENTERPRISES S.A. TYPE: HOSPITALITY BUILDING Project leader This hotel is located at one of the most beautiful beaches of Thasos Island. It was built during the 80’s and follows the neo-byzantine architectural philosophy of Thessaloniki and it wasn’t renovated for more than twenty years.

F01: west wing night lights - exterior F03: bathroom - junior suites

F23 F23: the beach in front of the hotel

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F01


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24 HOTEL KAMARI BEACH

DISR THE CAN CRO SEC

D01


SRUPTING E NONICAL OSS OSSCTION

D02 D01: typical floor - area of reconstruction

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D02: reconstructed room types - plan view


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26 HOTEL KAMARI BEACH


JUNIOR SUITES They are situated on the second and third level of the hotel and they have a balcony. •

Room surface:

16,45 m²

Bathroom surface:

4,68 m²

Overall surface:

21,13 m²

INSERTION OF TWO VOLUMES 27 PAGE

S01

S01: junior suites - cross section


HOTEL KAMARI BEACH

S02

POSTMODERN MINIMALISM

The reconstruction program dictated completed renovation of all the rooms and in much lesser extent of the exterior and supporting areas. The rooms had all the same dimensions and were like cells of a monastery. The new rooms were renovated by renouncing the Neo-byzantine School of architecture while adopting postmodern minimalism.

F19

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S02: junior suite - section

F19: construction phase F02: living area - junior suites

The vertical surfaces were finished with smooth stucco and frame-less glass panels in order to maintain a direct passage between light and dark areas. The majority of the rooms occupied the same surface as before but by replacing the walls of the bathroom with glass panels, it


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HOTEL KAMARI BEACH

seems and feels lighter and bigger. The austere canonical section was disrupted by the hanging ceiling that acts as a mirror to the plan view in a very discreet way. Hidden there was placed the custom made RGB lighting system of 9m long LED stripes. It can be controlled by a wall mounted switch system and gives the user the choice of a very wide range of light colours. The existence of extra storage rooms at the west wing allowed the creation of four new types of rooms ( junior suites) that are bigger than the standard ones. It was possible to experiment with a wider variety of materials like “rusted stone� finishings and plastic wall paint.

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F21: custom build transformer positioning


F05 F06: bathroom - junior suites

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F06

F05: living area - junior suites


HOTEL KAMARI BEACH

DOUBLE SUPERIOR

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They are situated on the first, second and third level of the hotel and they have a balcony or direct garden access. •

Room surface:

15,30 m²

Bathroom surface:

3,00 m²

Overall surface:

18,30 m²

S03: double superior rooms - cross section

S03


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HOTEL KAMARI BEACH PAGE

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DOUBLE SUPERIOR ROOMS

F07


Architecturally there’s a dialogue between two inserted volumes that are not tangent sectioning the room in three distinct spaces. The first volume defines the sleeping area, the middle the living area and the third the bathroom that in this case acts as part of the social life taking place in the room.

S04 F07: double superior room

35 PAGE

S04: double superior room - section


HOTEL KAMARI BEACH

AMBIANCE MUTATION

RGB LIGHTING SYSTEM

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Special attention was given to the choice of furniture in order to comply with the standards imposed by the National Tourist Organization. The exterior artificial lighting changes continuously according to the occupancy of the rooms in a random way. This not only creates a continuous mutation of the faรงades that has little chance to be repeated and predicted, but also lowers the costs of energy consumption.

F08 F08: double superior room entrance F13: artificial lights configuration examples

F09 F09: double superior room - bathroom

37 PAGE

F13

The use of natural materials is crowned with the insertion of a decked wooden surface at the swimming pool area made of 100% natural pine wood.


HOTEL KAMARI BEACH

F26

REFURNISHING PROJECT

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F26: room refurnishing project - detail F12: hot tub insertion - exterior

F12


F24 39 PAGE

F24: deck salon - exterior


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R01

GALLERIE DE CAFÉ


GALLERIE DE CAFÉ

LOCATION: KAVALA, GREECE OWNER: GEORGE KEHAGIAOGLOU TYPE: COFFEE HOUSE  Project leader This coffee shop has two levels. The first level gives to the main road and has an area of 27,63m2 and an internal height of 4m. The second level is the basement and has an area of 21,00m2 and an internal height of 2,60m.

R03

R02

R01: main facade - perspective view

R03: interior view - stair banister

41 PAGE

R02: interior view


GALLERIE DE CAFÉ

dt03

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dt03: bar counter configuration examples

A BAR COUNTER THAT MOVES


E02 Just by reading how little surface is available for construction one might feel immediately frustrated. The wish of the owner to be able to receive as many clients as possible and the fact of the small area dictate the architectural solution.

E01: layout options E02: key plan

43 PAGE

E01

Along the two long sides of the coffee house are created two pseudo-walls with build in storage areas and display spaces for presenting different coffee products. These shelves are enclosed in the wall as negative spaces and not extruded.


GALLERIE DE CAFÉ

D02

F03 PAGE

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D02: plan view - basement

F03: exterior view - western approach D01: plan view - road level


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D01

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GALLERIE DE CAFÉ

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S01: cross section


TWO PSEUDOWALLS WITH BUILD IN STORAGE AND DISPLAY SPACES

F08: construction works - west wall

F10 F10: understructure of the plasterboards

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F08

The pseudo-walls are made of plasterboard and they occupy a 20m2 surface. Although they extend horizontally to the two extremities of the store they don’t do the same vertically. They purposely stop at a height of 2,65m which is the golden ratio of the total internal height. The asymmetric embrace of these plasterboards define the appearance of the shop window that comprises a free formed


GALLERIE DE CAFÉ

Cartesian plane. The horizontal and vertical elements of the facade frame are made of aluminium hollow bars of a rectangular cross section of 5x15 cm painted white following the polydroqs method, while the glass is absorbent securit glass type, fully transparent for the most part while some panels are coloured following the new imprint laser dye method. The total area of the shop window is 16sm. Iron decorative elements based on the golden spiral are used as unifying factors while being actually the shops trademark. Because they have a circular cross section of 2cm in diameter they give a certain depth making them three dimensional but not invasive to the precious free space. The stair leading to the basement has a banister that follows the same design philosophy. The luminaires are hidden at the extremities of the walls and when not possible in specific openings. They have lamps of low energy consumption and they vary at the RGB spectrum. This way the user chooses the light colours and so the ambience that wants to impose.

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S05

S05: final detailed design - west wall


F02 49 PAGE

F02: interior view - west wall


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50 GALLERIE DE CAFÉ


FREEING SPACE The reconstruction, although extensive, leaves the maximum amount of free space for commercial reasons. This free space is still not satisfactory because does not take into account different needs that may arise through daily use of the shop. They can only be satisfied by creating a really mutating space. By constructing four electrical and plumbing stations in strategically placed points one may create a bar that actually moves allowing the desired space mutation. For these reasons the shops floor is comprised of raised prefabricated laminated tiles and occupies the entire area of the first floor. The custom made bar is made of 100% natural solid oak wood giving the appropriate weight aesthetics and stability required for such a mobile construction. It’s painted with a transparent white natural lacquer in order to leave the woods waves visible.

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V01

V01: front view


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52 GALLERIE DE CAFÉ

P C P

F01


PROMOTING COFFEE PHILOSOPHY

F07 53 PAGE

F07: display case - lighting detail F01: interior view


GALLERIE DE CAFÉ

dt01

DETAILING PAGE

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dt01: bar counter drawings S04: final detailed design - east wall section


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GALLERIE DE CAFÉ

L03

ARTIFICIAL ILLUMINATION DESIGN PAGE

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i01: Isometric view - SW

L02

i01: Isometric view - SW


i01: Isometric view - SW

L04 i01: Isometric view - SW

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L01


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R01

NEW ARCHITECTURE OFFICES


NEW ARCHITECTURE OFFICES

LOCATION: KAVALA. GREECE OWNER: NEW ARCHITECTURE TYPE: OFFICESÂ Project Leader The offices are located on the first floor of the oldest multi-storey building of the city (1959). The original configuration was a family 4 bedroom apartment with a kitchen and a bathroom. A labyrinthine central corridor leads to every room, while the kitchen acts as the nucleus with two doors. One by the entrance and the other by the final part of the corridor. The building is based on a reinforced concrete structure with a high number of bearing walls and standard concrete pillars and beams. The majority of rooms are stuck between bearing walls resulting in narrow spatial feeling albeit the generous surface area.

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R01:main office - PERSPECTIVE VIEW

The first operation undertaken was to demolish every non essential wall in order to create an open space environment to be treated as a white canvas. The creating procedure followed is the one of filling instead of removing elements. The resulting open space is a priori divided in three separate areas because of the many bearing walls that cannot be demolished. These areas are: the main office, secondary spaces like the entrance and the kitchen and


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60 NEW ARCHITECTURE OFFICES


AN OPEN SPACE ENVIRONMENT

F13 F13: passage to the main office F01: main office PAGE

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NEW ARCHITECTURE OFFICES

the bedroom and bathroom. The main area has to accommodate the main office, a waiting area, a reception, a meeting room, workstations, printing machines and a library. Just by the number of the facilities that must fit, the danger of doing a full circle resulting in a newly build labyrinthine space is very high. Admittedly architectural creation is a work that doesn’t need a lot of privacy. It’s a procedure based on dialogue and designers necessitate a work environment that forces high levels of communication.

E02

e02: key plan D01: plan view PAGE

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D01

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NEW ARCHITECTURE OFFICES

REINFORCED CONCRETE BASE STRUCTURE

S01 PAGE

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F04

F04: projection room S01: cross section PAGE

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NEW ARCHITECTURE OFFICES

F12 F12: background artifial lighting “polluted” by the city lighs - main office

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INTRODUCING “MONSTER & CO”

In order to transform such an inadequate space certain parameters must be posed ■■ Openness ■■ Admittance of inability to predict the technological needs of the future ■■ Plenty of artificial and natural light ■■ Ability to satisfy the needs of the users when long hours of work are needed

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AN IN ENVIR THAT OVER

68 NEW ARCHITECTURE OFFICES


INTRODICUING THE “MONSTER�

E01

By inserting a space frame the main area is divided in all the necessary sub-areas that can accommodate everything. This space frame is not regular in shape but changes according to the needs. Its final shape is the result of these mutations. By having a Y cross section the upper part can be used as a channel that connects everything creating an interconnected environment that changes over time with the minimum amount of effort. Every recess created has specific dimensions that can fit every appliance, every machine needed. It bends to create an opening, it

NTERCONNECTED RONMENT T CHANGES R TIME

F16: space frame skeleton construction E01: configuration analysis

F18 F18: panels insertion during construction

69 PAGE

F16


NEW ARCHITECTURE OFFICES

dt09

dt06 PAGE

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dt09: 1:1 scale projection drawing directly on the floor

dt06: circular opening for passing cables


angles to create a recess for a monitor, it opens to make space for cables and power points. It is a docile “monster� that tries to satisfy every need. It has a wooden skeleton of poplar so it is very light and easy to manipulate. The skin is semitransparent based on a smaller poplar frame dressed with beige burlap sheets, so light may travel easily to every corner. By strategically placing artificial lights the amount of transparency changes from almost fully transparent to opaque according which lights are on. These lights are placed on steel cables that travel from wall to wall so they can be moved whenever is necessary. At the very centre of the office, where there’s

dt03

dt05: joint of four panels dt03: space frame - plan view with shadows

dt07 dt07: panels positioning with angular rivets

71 PAGE

dt05


NEW ARCHITECTURE OFFICES

FROM TRAN TO OP

the minimum amount of natural light, all the electronic equipment is placed. Workstations, plotters, servers and telephone central are in one spot from where cables traveling through the “monster� reach every corner of the office. The main office acts as a meeting point and a workstation. Because of the distance of the server centre the main monitor can be placed away from the desk avoiding thus the effect of tunnel vision and the subsequent isolation that so often architects feel during work. The reception desk is placed in a position that offers an almost panoramic view of the interior, if the light conditions allow it. By sitting there the receptionist is able to oversee the server centre, the wiring room and the projection room. The last one is in direct contact with the main office because it is not intended to be used without the presence of an architect. The floor is made of floating laminated wood boards of two distinct colours in order to emphasize the division between common and private areas. They are joined by aluminium stripes in order to compensate the effect of thermal expansion and to create a more docile passage between the two materials. Finally a fully furnished bedroom and bathroom is deemed necessary because of the long hours that this line of work usually offers.

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F05


M NSPARENT PAQUE F03

F06

F07

F03: projection room - HDR photography PAGE

73 F05-06-07: projection room - artificial lights configurations


NEW ARCHITECTURE OFFICES

F15

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F15: bedroom F11: waiting area facing the server centre

F11


F10

F14

F10: waiting area

75 PAGE

F14: bathroom


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76 ARTIFICIAL ISLAND

ARTIFICIAL ISLAND


LOCATION: COAST OF MACARESE ROME, ITALY TYPE: COASTAL EXPANSION

The main theme tries to recreate and reinvent the coast of Macarese introducing spaces dedicated to living and leisure not only during summer but also during the rest of the year. The program demands the planning of an artificial island located about a hundred meters away from the coast that has the dimensions of a football field, that is a hundred to sixty meters more or less. A big bridge should unite this island with the mainland where a series of newly designed buildings should contain various types of activities.

R01 77 PAGE

R01: panoramic view


ARTIFICIAL ISLAND

REINVENTING THE COAST LINE

T01 PAGE

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T02

T02: model of the area T01: site view PAGE

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ARTIFICIAL ISLAND

V01

V02

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V01: west view V02: north view

DEDICATED TO LIVING AND LEISURE


PLANNING PROGRAM The planning program dictates the design of adequate spaces that can be used for the following activities: Artificial Island: 1. Dance Club 2. Restaurant 3. Spa 4. Artificial beaches 5. Supporting spaces for the beaches 6. Observatory 7. Cafeteria 8. Pub Mainland Structures: 1. Main entrance 2. Secondary entrances 3. A main plaza 4. Supporting structures for swimmers 5. Cafeterias 6. A multifunctional hall 7. A restaurant 8. Cocktail Bar 9. Pub 10. Apartments 11. Offices 12. Stores

K01 81 PAGE

K01: preliminary sketch


ARTIFICIAL ISLAND

THE ISLAND

D01

Starting the description of the main plan of the Island we introduce the first important volume that is called “Stoà”, that is a classical architectural element that has a long rectangular shape (like a long tunnel) that can be two or three stories high. This tunnel-stoà is located to the north so that with its big overall dimensions and volume can protect the centre of the island from bad weather, especially during winter. This building contains a dance club and a restaurant in two levels of approximately three meters each. Between the disco-club, located towards the western end of the stoà there’s a restaurant. To the eastern end, a number of obligatory supporting rooms, like bathrooms,

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D01: plan view - intermediate level R02: panoramic view of the island


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ARTIFICIAL ISLAND

EMBRASING THE MEDITERRANEAN SEA

R04 PAGE

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R04: distribution tower and artificial beaches


warehouses etc. are inserted so that there’s no need for them to be created two times, that is one time for the disco and one time for the restaurant.

R06

The main level of the club is dedicated to the dance floor and to the bar while the second level, that can be reached from two staircases, that has the shape of a relatively narrow balcony oriented towards the interior, allows full view of the club and its surroundings. This architectural solution allows the creation of a two level space that is unified, not only from an architectural point of view but also from an optical point of view. On the opposite side, the restaurant that covers a smaller surface than the disco, it’s developed in two floors

K03

R06: the stoà

85 PAGE

K03: sketch of the stoà - exterior


ARTIFICIAL ISLAND

S02

R05

R07 PAGE

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R05: main entrance - distribution tower S02: Island section - north

R07: the marina


that have the same psychological importance and meaning. It’s worth mentioning that even though the southern long wall of the stoà is as much transparent as possible, composed of a curtain wall that offers the nicest possible view, the opposite northern wall is made of concrete so that it’s able to protect as much as possible from the heavy northern weather. Finally the ceiling of the stoà is considered as the conclusion of the bridge, which at some point is united with the distribution tower. Proceeding straight ahead you end up at the observatory. The distribution tower (a 3 level building) that has the main role of the vertical distribution of the visitors. On the inside, except for the elevators and the main stairs, there’s also a

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ARTIFICIAL ISLAND

UNIFY THE IN WITH T R08 cafe on the second floor and it’s the first activity that the visitor encounters leaving the bridge. This fact may facilitate the entrance of those who don’t know exactly in which direction to go. After all, a cafe is always inviting. The main characteristic of this three level building is the fact that there aren’t clear limits due to the existence of many balconies that allow, except for a plain observation of the surroundings, for a total confusion between the sense of interior and exterior spaces. One does not really know whether he’s on the inside or the outside. On the first level there are two entrances. The first leads directly at the club and the second leads to a bridge which ends up to the spa, after making its way through a hanging plaza. Afterwards, at the ground floor, we’re already

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R03 I01: Isometric view - SW R01: Exterior view - SE


YING NTERIOR THE EXTERIOR

on the outside of the building, even though covered from the slab of the first floor and the bridges previously mentioned. This means that we are into a semi-open square that on the west side leads us to the first artificial beach of the island and on the other side (towards east) it leads us to the main path (or passarella) of the island where a small pier, capable of accepting three to four small boats, yachts or cruising sloops, is situated.

I01: Isometric view - SW

89 PAGE

R11

At the background of this square is located the spa building, which is developed in two floors. The main entrance is on the first floor. There’s a staircase that leads to the first floor and then to a comfortable balcony where the main step of the stairs intersects with the bridges that originate from the tower building. Once inside the spa, we find the reception area and the locker rooms for men and women with the administration offices right next to it. On the opposite side there’s another staircase which leads into a new area characterised by its height and the two stories high curtain wall system very similar to a glass gazebo.


ARTIFICIAL ISLAND

V04 From there, a corridor without large openings leads to sequential rooms where the spa treatments are placed while the other end leads to a small artificial private beach.

R10 PAGE

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R10: the pub V04: east view - island

Alongside the corridor mentioned above, an open path, which is the continuation of the path in parallel to the stoà , brings us to the third sector of the island where another series of buildings are planned. These buildings are meant to be constructed on an elevated continuing slab based on a pilotis made of bearing walls, where someone encounters a pub and changing rooms for the swimmers. Below there’s a second complex of artificial beaches that are partially covered from the pub and the supporting rooms of the swimmers.


R09 91 PAGE

R09: cafĂŠ at the intermediate plaza


ARTIFICIAL ISLAND

FUN STRAIGHT COA

R13 PAGE

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R13: panoramic view of the village D02: plan view - ground level


HAVING WITH THE ASTAL LINE THE VILLAGE On the part of the mainland, which is characterised by the straight coastal line of Macarese, things are more linear. The basic principle of planning is the introduction of buildings completely parallel to one side, the side of the main road which is east of the beach and a non linear evolution on the other side. The goal is to establish a creation of a seaside complex that is in contrast with the formal simplicity of the main road. At the southern part of the area one finds himself with the dilemma of what road should choose. The first path leads to the main balneal structure where one may rent a private cabin with a bathroom and a locker room and can accommodate more than one user. At the front

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ARTIFICIAL ISLAND

R19 PAGE

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R19: Beach bar - exterior view


R14 there’s a plaza with two exits. One, to the west leads to the beach and the other towards north leads to the continuation of the meander path of the main road.

R21: entrance - north propylon

R14: main entrance - south propylon

95 PAGE

R21

There, is situated the first coffee house of the project that faces to the main plaza. This coffee house has only one level but is equipped


ARTIFICIAL ISLAND

R15 with a roof garden that offers an outstanding view. This coffee house faces the main plaza. The plaza is an open distributional space that accommodates to the west - the first end of the bridge - that leads as to the artificial island and to the east the main propylon which acts as a filtered entrance. Between the plaza and the balneal structure there’s a multifunctional

R16

R15: store-front

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R16: balneal structure D03: plan view - first level

D03


R23 97 PAGE

R23: housing - exterior


ARTIFICIAL ISLAND

S06

R18

LIBERATING SPACE AND USES

R22 hall. This building is one story high and at the interior there are a reception, a foyer and a main hall that can be used on various events. Towards north there’s a series of buildings that are two stories high but with a total height that varies constantly. This effect allows the optical deterioration of the linear aspect of this path.

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R18: having fun at the beach

R22: stores and offices S06: east section


BUILDINGS AND MATERIALS These buildings, which are made mainly of concrete and limestone bearing walls, have at their first floor, a cocktail bar, a restaurant and a pub. The typology of these building is the classic Roman houses where on the first floor there’s a commercial activity and on the upper level is the area where the family lives. In this case at the upper level we have apartments for students. These apartments have one or two rooms, a kitchen/living room and a bathroom. On the main road we have a series of buildings that can be used either as commercial stores (supermarkets etc.) or as offices.

R25: student housing - seafront

99 PAGE

R25

The choice of the materials to be used is not casual. These simple materials, like not painted reinforced concrete, limestone and simple white painting with the collaboration of the simplistic structural approach, that is simple structural grid with rectangular columns and bearing walls, give a very light urban style to the project that is quite adequate for the people that tries to invite (the target group is young people that feel very comfortable in such areas).


ARTIFICIAL ISLAND

dt03 This project tries to modernise and rationalise a small part of the coast of Macarese. The formal and structural simplicity of the architectural elements that constitute the entire plan give a crystalline outcome that does not “pollutes� from an aesthetic point of view the natural beauties of the area.

PAGE

100

dt03: typical house - cross section

R01 R24: housing - interior


LOW COST STUDENT HOUSING

dt02 101 PAGE

dt02: typical house plan view - first level


PAGE

102 S T. G E R M A I N C A F É

ST CA

F01

F01: main hall


T. GERMAIN CAFÉ

F03 LOCATION: KAVALA, GREECE OWNER: EPISITISTIKES EPIX. S.A TYPE: COFFEE HOUSE 

Project leader

F04 F04: during peak hours F03: staircase

103 PAGE

The owner wanted to invest in a cafe and had a dream of creating the first French coffee house in Kavala. He especially liked the philosophy of cafés found at the St. Germain district in Paris. The shop has a rectangular shape and faces two pedestrian streets.


S T. G E R M A I N C A F Ăˆ

PLAYING WITH VICTOR HORTA D02 EVALUATING ART NOUVEAU Because of the high cost of construction, art nouveau architecture never made it in Greece and there isn’t a single example of such architecture anywhere in the Hellenic area. It was a great opportunity to actually test the modern technological advances and see, if the workforce and machinery was up to the task at a reasonable cost. The concept is to create a north European train station of the art nouveau era inspired by the work of Victor Horta. A web of iron (in this case alloy metals) that is supported by columns, is inserted creating a cover that starts from the

PAGE

104

K05 K05: shop corner study - plan view D02 : transparent plan view - level 2


A

D01 105 PAGE

D01: plan view - level 1


S T. G E R M A I N C A F È

A STRUCTURE IN A STRUCTURE THAT DIVIDES THE AREA

dt09 PAGE

106

dt09: joint between columns and the parabolic ceiling - section detail

K10 K10: Joint sketch study

dt01 dt01: column components - exploded isometric view


AN IRON WEB interior and ends at the exterior. This structure in a structure defines the actual sitting area of the cafe and it’s well visible from all sides, interior and exterior. The side view is parabolic and uses metallic elements that have obsolete cross sections like inverted Πand inverted T, typical of the era. It is mainly supported by three columns that are made of more than 50 parts screwed together and not welded and covered with frosted plexi-glass panels. The RGB lighting system, air conditioning and ventilation ducts are placed in the gap between the panels and the concrete ceiling. The variable height allows a more accurate air recycling and variable light intensity with the minimum number of transformers.

dt05

dt06: perspective drawing of the interior

107 PAGE

dt06

dt05: column base and shaft - plan view


S T. G E R M A I N C A F È

E01

E01: colours study - plan view

PAGE

108

COLOUR CODING THE INTERIOR


E02

F18: the floor during polishing operation

K17

K17: floor design study E02: types of marble used 109 PAGE

F18


PAGE

110 S T. G E R M A I N C A F È


COMPLEMENTARY PLAN & SECTION The plan view acts in a complementary way by tracing the placement of all vertical elements and shows to the public the different uses assigned to different areas. This is achieved by the use of coloured marbles in an elaborate but somehow logical way. Each drawing trace defines a marble piece and acts as a shaded map. The sitting area is elaborate and uses grey shades, the bar area is orthogonal and uses shades of beige and the staff and material entrances that lead to the main stair, use brown shades.

F23 S01: section

111 PAGE

S01

F23: final stages of construction


S T. G E R M A I N C A F È

S02 PARABOLIC CROSSSECTION

PAGE

112

S02: section K04: parabolic web study

K04


ALWAYS CHANGING The exterior glazing is made of wood and dialogues with the penetrating metal cover by having a shape that tries to support it, but it doesn’t succeed. The front and side views don’t coincide with the metallic interior, but complement it. Instead of paint, the walls are finished with wall papers that have art nouveau designs heavily influenced or copied by the Hotel Tassel. The project was meant to mutate through time by placing elements that negate this particular historical era. By de-constructing all the decorative elements and by using furniture and

PAGE

113


S T. G E R M A I N C A F È

A LINK BETWEEN INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR

PAGE

114


V01 V01: East faรงade

PAGE

115


S T. G E R M A I N C A F È

FINAL LOW OF CONS

F02 PAGE

116

F02: main hall


L COST

STRUCTION

R02

STEAM PUNK? objects of modern design, the entire operation was supposed to enter in a dialogue with public and make them part of a debate about aesthetics and the future of art. Unfortunately the owner was so happy with this stage that stopped all works and maintained the cafe at an unfinished state. The final result has a semi steam punk aesthetic that, although impressive, is very romantic and not so well inserted in the urban environment of the city of Kavala.

E04 E04: wallpaper design - staircase

117 PAGE

R02: perspective view - interior


S T. G E R M A I N C A F Ăˆ

THE CONCLUSION In conclusion to the initial question, the cost was relatively low and the work force proved that still has knowledge and a certain level of sensitivity of the craft. Technologically speaking, it is proven that certain operations are not possible to automatically reproduce. Extrusions are easy to construct but elements that require a variable cross section have proven to be impossible to be built at a low cost and in a serial manner.

R01

R01: perspective view - exterior

PAGE

118


V02

V02: south faรงade

PAGE

119


PAGE

120

R01

A PA R T M E N T B U I L D I N G


APARTMENT BUILDING LOCATION: THESSALONIKI, GREECE TYPE: HIGH RISE BUILDING A multi-storey apartment building that takes in serious consideration the privacy of the tenants. Psychologically an apartment is not considered an ideal choice for someone that wants to live in solitude with the maximum amount of privacy. Because it’s not always possible to live outside the city this solution offers exactly that both psychologically and practically. The building is an island in an urban environment, a fact underlined with the use of water on the ground floor. This mirror acts as a buffer from where the pilotis starts towards the sky and from where a ramp takes the opposite direction and ultimately leads to an underground garage.

S01 R01: Perspective frontal view

121 PAGE

S01: Section


PAGE

122

R02

A PA R T M E N T B U I L D I N G


AUTONOMUS UNITS Each apartment is an autonomous unit that touches its surroundings the least possible amount. This choice guarantees a high acoustical insulation because eliminates the vibrations and noise from the other tenants with the minimum amount of soundproofing. Like cottages the apartments have two levels. The lower level has an open space that may accommodate a salon, an open kitchen and a dining space. A walk in closet and a wc are also present. The upper floor is dedicated to the night quarters where two bedrooms plus a master bedroom are to be found. The master

D01 R02: main view

123 PAGE

D01: Typical floor plan - apartment unit, level 1


A PA R T M E N T B U I L D I N G

R04 PAGE

124

R04: Perspective interior view - level 1 S02: Section


PRIVACY AND AUTONOMY PAGE

S02

125


A PA R T M E N T B U I L D I N G

LIMITING THE LOS bedroom has a fully furnished bathroom that can be transformed to a wardrobe if needed. Balconies and openings are mostly oriented in a way that limits the line of sight towards the other apartments but not towards the horizon while protection from the sun is guaranteed by wooden brise soleil. Every two floors there’s an open communal space (plateau) that gives access to the main entrance of the apartments. The main elevator and staircase connect these plateaus and give access to the roof top that is designed as a roof garden. The optical result is a complex interconnection between volumes that although balanced and unified, transmits all the necessary information already from the exterior view.

D02 PAGE

126

D02: Typical floor plan - apartment unit, level 2 R03: Perspective exterior view


PAGE

R03

127


A PA R T M E N T B U I L D I N G PAGE

128

INTERCONNECTION BETWEEN VOLUMES

V01 V01: FRONT VIEW


PAGE

129


BACHELORS HOUSE

BACHELORS HOUSE

T01

PAGE

130

T01: site plan

R01


LOCATION: PALAIO TSIFLIKI, GREECE OWNER: PANTELIS CHATZIANTONIOU TYPE: AFFORDABLE HOUSING  Never passed the phase of preliminary design Facing the subject of affordable housing the owner wanted a home that does not cost more than a medium car. Being celibate and a young professional, the question is sound: Is the process of building a house comparable to that of buying a car both in time and money?

R02

R01: Exterior view - SE

131 PAGE

R02: interior view - living area


PAGE

132

D01

BACHELORS HOUSE


V01: east perspective view D01: plan view - level 1

A HOME THAT DOES NOT COST MORE THAN A MEDIUM CAR

133 PAGE

V01


PAGE

134 BACHELORS HOUSE


CONSTRUCTION WORKS MUST NOT LAST MORE THAN 6 MONTHS.

S02 135 PAGE

S02: perspective cross section facing south


BACHELORS HOUSE

R04

R04: interior view - night area S01: perspective cross section facing north PAGE

136


S01 PAGE

137


BACHELORS HOUSE PAGE

138

Assuming that the cost of land is excluded the total cost must not exceed the amount of 50000â‚Ź to 100000â‚Ź and the construction works must not be longer than 6 months. Above all, the final result should not look like a prefabricated house; it should be unique and elegant. The key aspects are the materials used. Steel, prefabricated concrete and concrete blocks are the only viable materials to be used because they diminish construction time and cost; assuming the higher cost is manpower.


SHOULD BE UNIQUE & ELEGANT

R02 R02: exterior view - NW v02: south perspective view

V02 PAGE

139


PAGE

140

T01

ISLAND HOUSE


ISLAND HOUSE

LOCATION: AMMOLOFOI, KAVALA TYPE: SUMMER HOUSE This project is the result of prohibitive laws of the Hellenic Archaeological Society valid at the Greek islands and coasts. These laws try to discourage the construction of newly build houses and if that’s not possible try to maintain the general aesthetics with rules like wooden framing, natural stucco finishings etc. Inspired by the volumetric synthesis of a typical Cycladic village, this project considers a house as a micro-village. The entrance of the

i01 T01: site view

141 PAGE

i01: isometric view


ISLAND HOUSE PAGE

142

VOLUMES INTERCONNECTING LIKE A TRADITIONAL CYCLADIC VILLAGE


■■ Level drop ■■ Autonomous living units ■■ Separation of uses ■■ Negation of panoramic views when necessary ■■ Panoramic view only at communal areas ■■ Direct access to the beach

s01: cross section - living quarters

143 PAGE

S01


ISLAND HOUSE

village leads to a plateau and it’s heavily fortified. One or two roads cross the entire construction. The first road acts as the main village road and the second one is being used by the locals the most. The plaza, where all the public buildings are situated, gives to a fountain and scattered houses that blend with the environment.

THROUGH A GATE Starting by the parking lot, one enters through a gate to an exterior staircase that ends to the living quarters which are communal. From there, one may go to the swimming pool or continue through the secondary road to the bedrooms that are treated like autonomous living units with gardens and bathrooms.

R03

R03: the water temple - perspective view D01: composite plan view PAGE

144

There’s a great antithesis on the offered view between the bedrooms and the communal areas. The first are introvert while the second offer great panoramic views. This way the users are invited to diminish the amount of time spent in their rooms and try to spend the majority of time socializing. The entire construction ends to a temple, dedicated to water and of course at the beach via direct access.


PAGE

D01

145


ISLAND HOUSE

R02

R01: living quarters - exterior perspective view R02: swimming pool area - perspective view PAGE

146


PAGE

R01

147


PAGE

HOUS MICR

148 ISLAND HOUSE


SE AS A RO-VILLAGE

V02

v01: south view 149 PAGE

V01

v02: east view


ACROPOLIS OF SEGNI

ARCHITE CONSER AND UR EXPANS

PAGE

150

E01


ECTURAL RVATION RBAN SION

PROJECT: A NEW ACROPOLIS FOR SEGNI LOCATION: SEGNI (LZ), ITALYÂ A 3 STAGES PROJECT

The main purpose is to revitalise the acropolis at an urban level. For that to happen, a three steps construction program is proposed. These steps may materialise independently the one from the other achieving high flexibility in terms of investment. Conservation At this stage it is proposed to restore the architectural quality of the existing buildings by conserving the church of Saint Peter, the roman cistern and the surrounding buildings. The following studies must take place, In accordance with Italian practices of architectural conservation:

T01

e01: territorial framework - map

151 PAGE

T01: the proposed final project of the acropolis - site plan


S01: metric survey – cross section

ACROPOLIS OF SEGNI

D01: metric survey – floor plan

S01 1 Territorial Framework 2.1 Historical Framework 3.1 Metric Survey – Floor plan, Level I, sc1:50 3.2 Metric Survey – Floor plan, Level II&III, sc1:50 3.3 Metric Survey – Cross sections, sc1:50 3.4 Metric Survey – Views, South&North, sc1:50 3.5 Metric Survey – Views, East&West, sc1:50 3.6 Architectural Survey – Floor plan, Level I, sc1:50 3.7 Architectural Survey – Cross sections, sc1:50 3.8 Architectural Survey – Views, South&North, sc1:50

PAGE

152

3.9 Architectural Survey – Views, East&West, sc1:50 3.10 Masonries Survey – Views, South&North, sc1:100 3.11 Masonries Survey – Cross sections & Views, East&West 1:100 4 Analysis of construction 5 Structural Analysis 6.1 Materials Analysis – Views, South&North, sc1:100 6.2 Materials Analysis – Views, East&West 1:100 6.3 Materials Analysis – Floor plan, Level I, sc1:100 7 Degradation Analysis 8.1 Conservation Proposal 8.2 Repainting Proposal

D01


E02 153 PAGE

E02: analysis of the stages of construction


ACROPOLIS OF SEGNI

E07

E07: degradation analysis

e06: materials analysis s02: metric survey – cross section

PAGE

154

E06


PAGE

S02

155


ACROPOLIS OF SEGNI

R01

D02

S03

PAGE

156

V01

R01: stoa - perspective view

D02: stoa - plan view

s03: stoa - lateral cross section

v01: stoa - front view


ARCHITECTURAL PROJECT Crossing and parking This stage will include a series of measures to regularize the pedestrian and vehicular traffic in the area in order to transform it to a privileged stopping point without denying its importance as a passage towards other destinations. Towards this end a complete remake of Via Pianillo is assumed, aiming to reduce the average speed of passing vehicles through the removal of any vehicular signage and placing a strategically discontinued pavement on the roadway. This way the new road will become a mainly pedestrian road that vehicles may still use. Doing that, a reversal of roles happens, where the pedestrian is more important than the motorist. The road profile consists of a series of modular concrete tiles alternating with speed bumps that incorporate a punctiform illumination system that guarantees an adequate traffic illumination. Via Pianillo will therefore have the appearance of an ancient road while using modern shapes and modern technology, through an intervention of minimal environmental impact on a site of such archaeological value. This phase also includes a proper repair of the

PAGE

157


ACROPOLIS OF SEGNI

TAKING MEASU TO REG LOCAL TRAFFIC

R02 PAGE

158


C

dt01 dt01: pavement layout types R02: side road of the church - perspective view

Cultural entertainment This phase involves the creation of a multipurpose space for outdoors entertainment on the western edge of the Acropolis. The odeon will be managed by a local committee and will produce and host theatrical plays, concerts and other compatible activities. Designed to accommodate about 400 spectators, it will be built in wooden framing following the natural contours of the hill in order to minimise the environmental impact and enhance the landscape.

dt02 dt02: pavement detail - cross section

159 PAGE

G URES GULATE

Roman Cistern, ideally restored to its former function as well as the opening to the public of the area to the east of the Church that it is now a private property. The construction of a system of Stoès made of wood, open to the public and managed by the private sector, may transform the place to an area of economical growth.


I L L U M I N AT I N G V I A A P P I A A N T I C A

ILLUMINATING VIA APPIA LOCATION: ROME, ITALY

R02

TYPE: ILLUMINATION PROJECTÂ Project Architect The project artificially illuminates the 3rd mile of via Appia where the mausoleum of Cecilia Metella is located.

Κ01

PAGE

160

R02: mausoleum B and restaurant K01: mausoleum A - preliminary sketch

This particular part of the road is famous because of the existence of many illegal private villas build during the second part of the 19th century. Antonio Cederna tried to save this historical road by creating a statute of conservation and by declaring the entire via Appia a national park. The intention was to conserve not only buildings but also other aspects of antiquities like infrastructures and in this case a road.


R01 161 PAGE

R01: mausoleum A


PAGE

162 I L L U M I N AT I N G V I A A P P I A A N T I C A

I

S01

S01: the two mausoleums - section


INSPIRING PEOPLE TO CONTINUE WALKING

The way most commonly used by tourists is towards the outskirts of the city. Theoretically one starts from the tomb of Cecilia Metella and that is the first stopping spot of the itinerary. The challenge is to inspire people to continue walking beyond this point. To achieve this, points of interest along the path, highlighted by enhanced lighting, must be created. The majority of them are situated between the intersection of via del Pago Triopio and via Appia and the intersection of via di Cecilia Metella and Appia. The main characteristic of the route is the almost constant presence of high boundary walls, occasionally interrupted by entrances to private property or from the faรงades of the few buildings present. The existence of ancient monuments, and of course the Roman road, is reduced to two recently restored mausoleums. Other points of interest consist of a building that houses a restaurant, a bar placed between Via Appia Antica and Via Cecilia Metella, and after that a residential building. Everything else is hidden behind the high walls of private estates.

L03 L03: restaurant and mausoleum B - luminance study i01: lighting fixtures - technical data

163 PAGE

i01

The lighting project is characterized on the one hand by the desire to restore the philological representation of its original aesthetic and formal characteristics and on the other, to enhance the reasons to visit the place for cultural, social and gastronomic purposes.


I L L U M I N AT I N G V I A A P P I A A N T I C A

S02

D01 PAGE

164

S02: mausoleums - section

D01: part of via Appia - plan view


PAGE

165


I L L U M I N AT I N G V I A A P P I A A N T I C A

R07 For these reasons, the project is divided in four distinct phases, each one taking in consideration the environmental conditions, the will for historical restoration and the need to obtain a valid result in aesthetic terms, avoiding thus, and excessive role of the light at the expense of architecture that, in this place deserves to retain a dominant position.

PAGE

166

R07: mausoleums and restaurant

k03

K03: mausoleum B - preliminary sketch


D02 167 PAGE

D02: Roman College - plan view


I L L U M I N AT I N G V I A A P P I A A N T I C A PAGE

168

SUNSET LIGHTS •

Road - Fixed warm lighting

Monuments - Very light white lighting

Trattoria and Bar - Accentuation lights

Other - No lighting

V02


SUNSET In this phase the artificial light begins to substitute the natural one. Such passage needs to be gradual and, therefore, the fixtures will not start to emit light immediately, but in a 30 minutes span. During this time visit to the monuments usually comes to an end, so the goal is to make them last longer. Thus the artificial illumination turns on with a discreet but accentuating light white colour.

R06

The restaurant will start its daily business and the bar-cafĂŠ will try to maintain its own. Artificial lighting will be immediate.

GRADUAL ACCENTUATION K02

V02: mausoleum A - front view

R06: via Appia antica - typical view

169 PAGE

K02: intersection arrival - preliminary sketch


I L L U M I N AT I N G V I A A P P I A A N T I C A

EVENING LIGHTS •

Road - warm mutating lighting

Monuments - white lighting

Trattoria and Bar - accentuation lights + washing lighting

Other - very light warm white lighting

NIGHT LIGHTS

PAGE

170

Road - warm mutating lighting

Monuments - warm white lighting

Trattoria and Bar - no illumination

Other - No lighting

R03 R03: Roman College


EVENING (20-21 TO 2) During this period the lighting has to convince visitors that there’s an opportunity to continue the walk, or even initiate it. All the lights are on and try to emphasise the fact that there’re monuments on the background and natural elements worth visiting. The illumination of the road is starting to look like what was to be in ancient times: LEDs are activated so as to create a constantly changing light, representing the light of torches, which draws mutating shadows along the way.

NIGHT (2 TO 5-6) At this stage we decided to restore Via Appia Antica to its original configuration: that of a consular road with an open profile to nature on both sides, only occasionally interspersed with monuments (mainly funeral) and artwork. Therefore, not only the road recreates the effect of lighting by means of torches, but also the two mausoleums undergo a targeted interpretation of what was the formal and aesthetic intent of their builders.

K04 K04: Roman College - preliminary sketch

171 PAGE

Every other modern construct, from fences to buildings, almost disappears and can only use indirect lighting.


I L L U M I N AT I N G V I A A P P I A A N T I C A

DUSK LIGHTS •

Road - Fixed warm lighting

Monuments - white lighting

Trattoria and Bar - very light white lighting

Other - very light white lighting

V01 DUSK (5-6 TO 5.306.30) In this phase lighting returns to”normality”. The volumes are illuminated not by following a philological discourse, but only a perceptive one. However, the two mausoleums enter to a sort interpretation of the concept of death.

R04 PAGE

172

V01: Roman College - front view R04: via di Cecilia Metella - bar


SUNRISE LIGHTS

S04

Road - Fixed warm lighting

Monuments - very light blue illumination

Trattoria and Bar - accentuation lights

Other - No lighting

SUNRISE (6 TO 7) The sun at this stage has just risen, and the artificial lighting is about to give way to the natural one. Traders will begin their own business, and this is highlighted by the reappearance of an accentuation lighting that can indicate their wake. The two mausoleums, before leaving the road to life, assert their role as guardians of the remains of the dead through a light blue illumination which communicates with the uncertain light of dawn. It also accentuates the perception of life with respect to the background set up by other building and the surrounding vegetation.

L04

L04: bar - luminance study

173 PAGE

S04: mausoleum B and restaurant - section


P L AT O N M A S O N I C LO D G E

PLATON MASONIC LODGE

LOCATION: KAVALA, GREECE OWNER: FREEMASONS OF KAVALA TYPE: PRIVATE CLUB  It is a rare occurrence for an architect to be able to work on a project based purely on symbolism and “landmarks”. The Masonic lodge of Kavala decided to renovate and dedicate the lobby of their lodge in honour of the Great Master Christos Maneas. The entire project is based on the initiatic principles of freemasonry which are a series of allegories. In order to successfully design such a hall one must study this system.

D02

PAGE

174

D02: ceiling plan

D01 D01: perspective plan view of the Hall


S01 175 PAGE

S01: north section


P L AT O N M A S O N I C LO D G E

K02 PAGE

176

K01

K02: column sketch - isometric view detail K01: column sketch - side and plan view


FROM AN UNCUT STONE TO A PERFECTLY SHAPED CUT STONE

INITIATION PROCESS “...Freemasonry describes itself as a “’beautiful system of morality, veiled in allegory and illustrated by symbols”. The symbolism is mainly, but not exclusively, drawn from the manual tools of stonemasons – the square and the compass, the level and plumb rule, the trowel, among others. A moral lesson is attached to each of these tools, although the assignment is by no means consistent. The meaning of the symbolism is taught and explored through ritual. All Freemasons begin their journey in the “craft” by being progressively initiated, passed and raised into the three degrees of Craft. The initiations are part allegory and part lecture, and revolve around the construction of the Temple of Solomon, and the artistry and death of his chief architect, Hiram Abiff. The degrees are those of Entered apprentice, Fellow-craft and Master Mason...” After extensive research some patterns begin to emerge. The three stages of initiation, architecture and drawing tools, the four points of the horizon etc. It all comes down to a linear “journey” from an uncut stone to a perfectly shaped cut stone.

R02 R02: column - materials and finishings study

dt01 dt01: column - side views

177 PAGE

The hall must have a library, where books and the entire archive are kept, televisions and above all must be able to be used for feasts. The last use is part of the initiatic process and it is deemed very important. This creates


PAGE

178

S03

P L AT O N M A S O N I C LO D G E


SYMBOLS AND PATTERNS

MUST BE ABLE TO BE USED FOR FEASTS

certain compositional problems because the two major uses of the lobby are contradictory. It must serve as a salon where masons meet and socialize but at the same time it must be able to be used as a restaurant for more the 30 persons. The rectangular hall acts as a mirror to the actual lodge, the place where Freemasons officially work. The four walls are named by the four cardinal points with special attention to the south wall because it represents the light. It is the logical spot to place the library and the monitors.

i01 i01: mirror that transforms to a table - isometric view detail S03: east section

179 PAGE

The rest of the hall must be subdivided using every antique trick in order to comply with the needs. By creating a symbolic station it’s possible to do just that. Each station is comprised by a mirror that lowers and becomes a table transforming the salon into a restaurant. In each side a special column is placed in order to pin point the symbolic use of both the feasting process and the dialogues taking place there. Special attention is given to the dimensions, because the furniture is


P L AT O N M A S O N I C LO D G E

A MIRROR TO THE ACTUAL LODGE not being chosen by the architect but by the owners. All the furniture in stock are chesterfield styled. When the mirror lowers and becomes a table it must stop at a relatively comfortable height so that the sofas can act as seating for the table etc. The table itself must have dimensions that can cover the coffee tables and give sufficient space for the legs. The column has only allegorical use. It represents the linear journey of initiation by moulding together the actual symbols of all the three grades plus special symbols of freemasonry in general. The base is an uncut stone which symbolizes the newcomer member. From the base a pomegranate tree takes root and starts to ascend and grow. It revolves around the shafts of the three ancient column orders: Doric, ionic and Corinthian. The shafts end to a three headed capital comprised of all the three capitals. There the pomegranate tree starts to grow branches that revolve around three perfectly cut stones. These represent the evolution of the uncut stoned base and the three degrees of a Freemason. The journey ends at the capital, where the

PAGE

180

R01 R01: the Hall “Christos Maneas�


PAGE

181


P L AT O N M A S O N I C LO D G E

AN EVO SYM ARC

T01 PAGE

182

T01: perspective drawing of the Hall


OLVED MBOLIC CHITECTURE

THE RESULT branches create a wide umbrella and a single pomegranate fruit is placed. The ceiling interconnects these stations creating a “global” network allegory. A major concern for such a column is the total weight. If the individual parts are made from actual stones and metals, then the weight creates static problems and therefore wood is a more appropriate material. Masonic lodges usually operate during night and this one is no exception. That means that openings to the exterior do not exist and they shouldn’t. After an interview with Freemasons it was established that the only light needed was the one generated from within so a series of pseudo-windows is created between the stations.

T02: proposed direction

183 PAGE

T02

The final result, although impressive, is a mere exercise of mannerisms. They comply with the will and needs of the Freemasons of the lodge but the architect was not satisfied. It misses a great opportunity to create an evolved symbolic architecture by using contemporary means and solutions. For these reasons the project was put to a halt and a new and yet incomplete direction was given.


Portfolio apostolos benevas issuu  

Architecture & Design

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