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A Defense of Leibniz’s Cosmological Argument from Contingency G By Luke Dickens od is a hot topic. Many people – theists, deists, atheists, and skeptics alike – can probably relate to that feeling of uncertainty and experience the onset of that all-important question: does God exist? Much of the debate about God’s existence focuses on the “teleological argument” – the argument from design. This argument suggests that God’s existence is the best explanation for the fine-tuning of the universe and the apparent design of things in the natural world. The teleological argument

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has unfortunately seized the focus from some of the more formidable philosophical arguments for theism – specifically the “cosmological argument.” Cosmological arguments attempt to demonstrate the existence of a deity based on the mere existence of the universe. Many variants of the cosmological argument have been developed over the years and they fall into three rough categories: Kalaam, Thomistic, and Leibnizian.i Both the Kalaam and Thomistic arguments invoke a causal principle, which asserts

Antennae Galaxies by NASA, 2006

Apologia Spring 2016  

Volume 10, Issue 2

Apologia Spring 2016  

Volume 10, Issue 2

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