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Baker Tower by Josh Renaud D’17, c. 2015

and betrayal of the traditions we were founded on overlooks the ways secularization served Dartmouth’s growth. Understanding both sides of the debate surrounding secularization offers both the promise of granting historical perspective and potential aid in contemplating the future of Dartmouth going forward. Realizing all we gained and lost through secularization could help us imagine possibilities for maintaining the benefits of “modernization” and of a recognition of the diversity of worldviews that secularization brought, while restoring some of the focus on the significance and value of instilling intentional moral, if not specifically Christian, education to the mission and commitment of the College. For example, is there benefit to be gained from striving for a restoration of the integrated cohesion of different subjects that existed under the presidents from Wheelock to Bartlett? Is there benefit to restoring moral education as an important aim of a broader Dartmouth education going forward? If so, can an understanding of what Christianity specifically offered historically in terms of moral education at Dartmouth help inform attempts to create a new framework for moral education in the 21st century and beyond? Regardless of the answers to these questions, we can be most confident in the decisions we make about our future if we ground it in a comprehensive understanding of our history and place today.

James Tunstead Burtchaell, The Dying of the Light: The Disengagement of Colleges and Universities from their Christian Churches (Grand Rapids, Michigan: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1998), 21. ii. Richard Hofstadter and Walter P. Metzger, The Development of Academic Freedom (New York: Columbia University Press, 1955), 369. iii. Hofstadter and Metzger, 367. iv. Stephanie Litizzette Mixon, Larry Lyon, and Michael D. Beaty, “Secularization and National Universities: the Effect of Religious Identity on American Reputation,” The Journal of Higher Education 74 no. 4 (July/August 2004): 401. v. Hofstadter and Metzger, 318. vi. Burtchaell, 21. vii. Samuel C. Bartlett, “Inaugural Address” (speech given at Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, June 1877). viii. Burtchaell, 23. ix. Leon Burr Richardson, History of Dartmouth College, Volume II (Dartmouth College, 1932), 629. x. Burtchaell, 26. xi. Richardson, 609. xii. For further reading on the writings and impact of William Jewett Tucker, see “A Radical Unity: Reflections on the Writings of William Jewett Tucker” in Volume 9, Issue 1 of the Dartmouth Apologia. xiii. Burtchaell, 33. xiv. “Course Catalogues, 1822-1909” (Dartmouth College Archives, Rauner Library, Hanover, New Hampshire). xv. George M. Marsden and Bradley J. Longfield, The Secularization of the Academy (New York: Oxford University Press, 1992), 76-77. xvi. Marsden and Longfield, 75. xvii. Marsden and Longfield, 76. xviii. Marsden and Longfield, 76. xix. Burtchaell, 33. xx. Marsden and Longfield, 77. xxi. Marsden and Longfield, 77. xxii. Marsden and Longfield, 74. xxiii. Hofstadter and Metzger, 318. xxiv. Warren A Nord and Charles C. Haynes, Taking Religion Seriously Across the Curriculum (ASCD, 1998), 183. xxv. Character Education Manifesto (Boston University, MA. Center for the Advancement of Ethics and Character, February 1996). xxvi. Nord and Haynes, 186. xxvii. Nord and Haynes, 191-192. xxviii. Nord and Haynes, 184. i.

Sara Holston ’17 is from Wayne, Pennsylvania. She is an English major.

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Spring 2016 • The Dartmouth Apologia •

33

Apologia Spring 2016  

Volume 10, Issue 2

Apologia Spring 2016  

Volume 10, Issue 2

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