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“I feel like Oasis in 1995/ Getting so wasted, saying what’s on my mind/ You should embrace it, fuck all that fake shit/ Telling everybody we’re the best to their faces.” IT’S FITTING THAT David Dallas debuted a new single ‘Feel Like Oasis’ last Wednesday as I was transcribing VOLUME’s interview with Noel Gallagher, the video fresh in from London. Dallas’ track was heard via an early morning Ustream session from his current base in Harlem, and came peppered with references to Damon Albarn, gin and tonic, and surly soundbites from Liam. The image of “Oasis in 1995” serves as a perfect snapshot of when they were kings, and the Manc swagger and selfbelief Oasis brought to their music. Oasis in 1998 saw the band play shows in Auckland and Wellington. I caught their Queens Wharf Events Centre show, a night cut short when, a half-hour into the set, Liam began complaining about the sound and goading his brother, before monkey-walking off stage, the rest of the band following closely behind. The crowd didn’t know whether to applaud the pissed-up theatre playing out on stage or demand a refund. Post-Oasis, the Gallagher’s wibbling rivalry continues to fill column inches in the British press, their quips making more noise than their records – Noel even managed to aim a parting jab at his younger brother and his new band, Beady Eye, in his conversation with VOLUME. Have a read of this week’s cover story and then head to nzherald.co.nz/volume to watch our audience with Noel. He’s a rock’n’roll star and a gentleman, innit.

EDITOR Sam Wicks sam.wicks@volumemagazine.co.nz WEB EDITOR Hugh Sundae hugh.sundae@nzherald.co.nz DEPARTMENT OF VOLUME SALES John Baker john.baker@volumemagazine.co.nz DESIGN Xanthe Williams WRITERS Dan Aux, John Baker, Gavin Bertram, David Dallas, Duncan Greive, Jessica Hansell, Joe Nunweek, P-Money, Charlotte Red, Hugh Sundae, Chris de Wit, Aaron Yap PHOTOGRAPHERS Roger Grauwmeijer, Milana Radojcic, Jenna Todd, Kit Walker AN APN PUBLICATION


STEPS AHEAD

Ethio-jazz pioneer Mulatu Astatke plays his first New Zealand show at The Powerstation with The Black Jesus Experience on Friday 25 November, and VOLUME wants to get you there. We’ve got one double-pass to give away to the compiler of the tastiest collection of East African sounds – send your mixtape on CD, cassette or USB stick to VOLUME,, PO Box 32, Auckland by Friday 21 October for your chance to see Astatke step ahead.

P-MONEY& DAN AUX How does it feel having The Disco 3 tunes ready in time for summer? Dan: It feels like summer already. I’ve been listening to these tunes on repeat in my Speedos and Le Tan sunblock. What are the musical foundations these tracks are built on? P-Money: Rare groove, disco and funk music. Sampled and reworked into a house style. Was there a ‘eureka’ moment when you decided to offer your own spin on a blueprint laid down by producers like Kenny ‘Dope’ Gonzales, Armand Van Helden and Daft Punk? P-Money: As a DJ, I’ve been playing these artists on and off for the past 16 years – even their back catalogue never gets old; they are the DNA of dance music. So taking inspiration from people like Van Helden and Daft Punk seems logical. Dan: The sound of Kenny Dope/ Masters at Work and especially Armand has always been suited to my taste – and I imagine their process of making tracks is very similar to our approach with The Disco 3. Even Daft Punk on the Discovery album, the way they flip samples is very hip hop. The Disco 3 is a tasting plate of what is a new collaboration – is there more to come? Dan: Yup, we just got back in the studio and picked out a couple more ideas to develop for the next instalment. It would be fun to keep dropping three tracks at a time and keep the theme going. P-Money and Dan Aux’s The Disco 3 EP is available from iTunes now.

SIMON BARKER – VJ

VJing involves the visual interpretation of music at a show, reinforcing the sounds and providing the atmosphere. A good VJ should have an ear for music and an eye for what compliments it – I got into VJing because I trained as a graphic designer and had a background as a DJ. When I curate events like Splore, I make sure the VJ’s aesthetic is always tied closely with the artist – if someone’s really into dubstep or really glitchy electronic music, you match that with a VJ who does glitchy, electronic video content. There’s over 200 VJs in the country, and none of their work looks the same as each other’s. Just like music, you can give musicians the same instruments but they’ll always come up with something different.


SEND ME A POSTCARD David Dallas returns home from New York next month – watch this space for more info on the live destination release of Dallas’ The Rose Tint.


MORE GRAVY

Make My Movie continues to truck along nicely. So far over 350 movie ideas and posters have been uploaded and entries don’t close till the end of the month. Of course there is bad with the good, and spending a couple of hours reading through the ideas over a bottle of wine with friends is the perfect entertainment the next night you’re at a loose end. If you want a soundtrack to go with that, why not listen to Lisa Crawley’s debut album, Everything That I Have Seen, streaming live at nzherald.co.nz/music till the end of the week.

If you ever find yourself working as a music journo, chances are you like music. If you happen to be one of those music journos who actually does like music, then sooner or later you’re likely to end up interviewing someone you really love. Poor bugger. I’M ALMOST VAGUELY positive that I’ve conducted some good interviews in my time, but they’re not the ones that spring to mind when thought-googling myself. It’s the shockers. You remember them so well that the mere mention of the band concerned brings that familiar feeling to the stomach. It’s that same feeling you get when you’ve done something really quite bad and you’re waiting to get found out. Like sending a shitty email from your work address, or taking a promo CD to the trades counter at Real Groovy. Rock star interview behaviour is notoriously hard to predict. You can reach John Campbell-esque levels of preparation and still be the author of your own public humiliation. With so many potential variables that can affect the success or otherwise of an interview, interviewing someone you’re a fan of can be one step too far. I immediately recall Radiohead’s 1998 concert. Earlier that day Jonny Greenwood came down to the hotel foyer with his entourage of touring crew and floppy hair, and experienced the worst 15 minutes of his life. What made it truly awful was that we were broadcasting live on bFM. So it was the worst 15 minutes of a few other people’s lives too. I don’t think I answered the phone for two days after that. Then there was King Loser. My 17-year-old self interviewed them for the

release of Caul of the Outlaw, and I made the mistake of asking Chris Heazlewood about the Pulp Fiction soundtrack. I think I managed to hold back the tears till I got home. Perhaps subconsciously that’s why I tend to try to focus on covering new music. Bands so recently formed that they see an advantage to giving a good interview, no matter how monotonous the questions. Crazier still, bands that are actually so new they enjoy doing interviews.

“I made the mistake of asking Chris Heazlewood about the Pulp Fiction soundtrack. I think I managed to hold back the tears till I got home.” Any particular reason for all this? Not really. Except to say that when Chris Tubbs’ interview with this week’s cover star arrived, it was great to see someone who has a million reasons not to give a shit about interviews – and who has probably given a million interviews – sit down and give a little New Zealand magazine half-an-hour of his time. The video is up now – nzherald.co.nz/volume.


NICK GAFFANEY

Cairo Knife Fight is back in New York City this week, kicking out the jams alongside Princess Chelsea, Pikachunes, Popstrangers, The Golden Awesome and Andrew Keoghan as part of the 2011 CMJ Music Marathon. For Talking Heads, Cairo Knife Fight’s Nick Gaffaney and Aaron Tokona talk about the dynamic that defines their two-man army. Photography Milana Radojcic NICK GAFFANEY: We were this bigger band, right, and we had this whole thing going – I saw this video footage the other day of this gig we did at the Dux in Christchurch and there were all these people onstage, and it was kind of like a big blues revue kind of weird thing. There’s two guitars, there’s drums, there’s singers at the back, there’s another bass player, and they’re all doing their buzz; and looking at it, there’s really no one else on stage even though there’s all those other people there. It was always about me and him. So when we got it down to it being just about the two of us, it got so much clearer, you know – it made sense immediately. I love you, bro. AARON TOKONA: Oh, kia ora, bro. I’m a drummer slut – I spend my whole time around music trying to find the meanest

drummers to play with. Nick’s style of drumming was so snappy and so up your arse and so fuckin’ on – the bro came from the opposite spectrum, and I quite liked that. Eh, bro. Yeah, that’s a fair analysis. To me, finding musical companionship with someone is [like finding] someone

“I’m a drummer slut – I spend my whole time around music trying to find the meanest drummers to play with.” – AARON TOKONA that I can step into the ring with, almost go to war with – actually have a fuckin’ good fight, excuse the pun. I like someone who can get up my arse and start shifting some atoms around me. So I guess that’s a large part of what Cairo Knife Fight does really. It’s quite intense like that, particularly live. We’re really up in each other’s faces and sometimes it can be relentless, and there’s always a point where it feels like it’s going to fall over. But actually, in our relationship with each other, we’re quite laidback. Would you agree with that?


AARON TOKONA Yeah, it’s a very mellow relationship between us. [Tokona’s] quite an outspoken, extravagant kind of person, but he’s actually got this whole other side that is quiet and doing his thing and hanging out, and that’s more like me, so when we’re not onstage that’s probably more the Aaron that I know. It feels quite comfortable in a lot of ways – even when [the music’s] full-on, it’s exciting. We don’t take it that seriously when we’re doing it, eh – it’s not like an exhaustive process of trying to find the right thing. We just follow instinct more than anything else. Yeah, that’s true – feels like an instinctive thing, eh. Yeah – even the complicated stuff, even the most complicated riffs on the EP, they just sort of came out. It wasn’t well thought-out and constructed and contrived – it just flowed out during a jam. We’re very different personalities, you know – that’s probably a reason why there’s chemistry. I think that stuff compensates for each other, because sometimes that side of me can get really crazy, and Nick’s really good at reining it in when it gets a little bit too out there. And it only feels like the start, as cheesy as it sounds. We’re on our second EP, and it feels like we’re promo-ing an album. When you’re listening to the music, it’s so dense and epic, it’s like a whole album’s worth that’s gone into four songs – it’s thick.

To listen to the full audio of Cairo Knife Fight’s Nick Gaffaney and Aaron Tokona in conversation, head to nzherald.co.nz/volume – live from 2pm Tuesday. To watch Cairo Knife Fight’s Sundae Session, head to nzherald.co.nz/ sundaesession. Cairo Knife Fight’s II EP is out now on Liberation – they play the NZ@CMJ Showcase at the 2011 CMJ Music Marathon this Tuesday in New York with Princess Chelsea, Pikachunes, Popstrangers, The Golden Awesome and Andrew Keoghan – look out for a review in next week’s VOLUME.


With an amazing ability to bring together different streams of music, vibraphone master Mulatu Astatke is now recognised as the orginator of his own invention: Ethio-jazz. Ahead of his first New Zealand show, VOLUME talked to the Godfather. Text Christiaan de Wit

“The vibraphone is an extension of the balaphone, an African instrument that’s also played with two stakes,” Astatke says. “As an African I like to stay close to my roots, which is part of the reason why I chose to play the vibraphone.” While Astatke has reached a legendary status in recent years, recognition hasn’t always come naturally for him: “I really struggled to get people to understand my music when I started more than 40 years ago. It’s probably because of these difficult times early on in my career that I really appreciate to see my music flourish now.” And flourish it does, with a busy touring schedule and two full lengths released since 2009. This is the sort of thing that makes a musician proud, and Astatke isn’t too keen on sharing the kudos: “This is Mulatu’s music, and no-one else’s. I play a multitude of rhythms and combine those with unorthodox tonalities you don’t hear in any other kind of music – all of this happens in perfect harmony. It’s only me who can play Ethio-jazz;

Ethio-jazz and the musical freedom fighters that are The Heliocentrics. Good on Astatke, therefore, for being offered the opportunity by German label Strut to record a new solo album, 2010’s Mulatu Steps Ahead. Although a few members of The Heliocentrics helped put the record together, there’s no sense of democracy on this album: Astatke is the chief and the band just rocks around his signature vibraphone sound. His newly recognised Godfather status led Astatke to head to Harvard University on a Radcliffe Institute fellowship. Back in the States, he worked on the modernisation of the krar, a traditional Ethiopian string instrument. “It hurt to see how much the krar became oblivious among young musicians from my country. More and more people decided to play guitar rather than krar because of its greater range. With a group of people at MIT we succeeded in extending the range of the instrument, and you can now actually play modern music with it. To demonstrate the results

“It’s only me who can play Ethio-jazz; there haven’t been any successful copycats so far.” THE ETHIOPIAN MUSIC scene has always stood out because of its incredible diversity. Spend a day listening to the many volumes of Buda Musique’s Ethiopiques series and you’ll end up not seeing the wood for the trees; from Latin influenced rhythms to exotic strings and a cappella sounds reminiscent of the Arabic peninsula, it’s all there. So don’t expect a taste of typical Ethiopian music when Mulatu Astatke’s grinning face appears on stage at The Powerstation next month; there isn’t any. What Astatke’s Ethio-jazz stands for is a blend of Latin jazz and Deep South swamp funk decorated with delightful, mysterious vibraphone melodies similar to those you used to hear whenever things got really scary during an episode of Twin Peaks.

there haven’t been any successful copycats so far.’’ After having spent decades in relative anonymity, around 2008 Astatke began to record again. As part of the Inspiration Information series, named after the seminal Shuggie Otis album, Astatke released an album with British band The Heliocentrics, an eclectic group that treads in the footsteps of jazz and funk visionaries like Sun Ra, David Axelrod and Funkadelic. Recording Inspiration Information Vol. 3 got Astatke started again: “The joint repetition started even before I had seen these guys play solo, but the period of recording and touring turned out to be dynamic and fun.” While Astatke was the central figure in the collaboration with The Heliocentrics, a great deal of their joint efforts feels like a struggle for power between the Godfather of

of my work, I got a student to play a number of jazz standards on the krar as part of my final presentation at MIT.’’ Of course, Astatke’s second Golden Age didn’t start at an academic level. Jim Jarmusch’s 2005 movie Broken Flowers featured seven of his songs and Astatke-samples can now be heard in songs by the likes of Damian Marley, Kanye West, Quantic and Madlib. And on the evening of Friday 25 November, the pioneer of these sounds will ask the audience if they’ve seen a certain movie, raise his drumsticks, and kick start a night of intoxicating Ethio-jazz. VOLUME presents Mulatu Astatke live at The Powerstation in Auckland on Friday 25 November – tickets from Ticketmaster and Real Groovy.


A column in which Duncan Greive scours the world’s charts in the hope of finding, if not the perfect beat, then something worth whistling at least. THE WORLD

With the US presidential election looming next year and Republican primaries mere months away, it’s inevitable that Mexico and its relationship to the US would start to intrude more heavily on the national conversation. Rick Perry, the Texas Governor famed for describing social security as a Ponzi scheme and climate science as a “contrived phony mess”, looks like his train might be derailed by, among other things, his support for allowing the children of illegal immigrants access to higher education at Texan universities. It’s a sad indictment on Republican politics that the only sensible thing Perry has ever said might end up being the end of his chances at election. Or maybe it’s not. The guy is a total prick. Over the border the US is in the nation’s thoughts; as Mexican President Felipe Calderon wryly noted in a recent interview, “We live in a building in which my neighbour is the largest consumer of drugs in the world, and everybody wants to sell him drugs through my window”. Their current chart is pleasantly varied, with cutesy pop from Paty Cantú, ludicrous acoustic warbling from Maná, the ubiquitous Pitbull and ‘Mr Saxobeat’ plus anguished hair metal from Moderatto. But the current no 1 single is by a group named Los Tigres Del Norte, whose entire career has been built on a series of dramatic ballads detailing the

lives and deaths of cross-border drug smugglers. While this is one of their straight love songs, it underscores just how clear and present the northern border remains to Mexican life.

THE LOCALS

A few years back 95bFM’s top 10 had become dominated by the overseas band-of-the-week. It felt like it had drifted away from its once-central role in breaking new local artists, but thankfully a 60% New Zealand component says that the pendulum has swung back the other way. Beach Pigs, despite having an au courant c. 09 coastal element to their name, are pretty fun, not letting the noise get in the way of the hook. They have an EP available for $10 via Bandcamp, the self-release medium of choice for our young bands (Evil Twins, X-Ray Fiends and O’Lovely have them too) – it’s a great way of getting non-shit local music without feeling like an arsehole afterwards.

THE ’NET

While other dance genres come and go, the enduring power of the 4/4 beat has kept house high in the world’s hearts for over a quarter-century. It’s evident in today’s pop charts, but also at a more specialist site like Beatport, whose top five songs right now are classified as, respectively, ‘Progressive House’; ‘Deep House’; ‘Tech House’; ‘Electro House’, and ‘House’. They’re all pretty great too.

MEXICO TOP 10 SINGLES CHART 1 Los Tigres del Norte con Paulina Rubio – ‘Golpes En El Corazón (MTV Unplugged)’ 2 Gloria Trevi – ‘Vestida De Azúcar’ 3 Shakira con El Cata ft. Pitbull – ‘Rabiosa’ 4 Martin Solveig con Dragonette – ‘Hello’ 5 Reik – ‘Peligro’ 6 Maná – ‘Amor Clandestino’ 7 Alexandra Stan – ‘Mr. Saxobeat’ 8 Paty Cantú – ‘Goma De Mascar’ 9 Luis Fonsi – ‘Gritar’ 10 Alejandra Guzmán con Moderatto – ‘Un Grito En La Noche’

THE 95bFM TOP 10 1 Beach Pigs – ‘No Work’ 2 The Checks – ‘Ready To Die’ 3 Evil Twins – ‘Buddy’ 4 O’Lovely – ‘Blind Minded’ 5 The Big Pink – ‘Stay Gold (Moulder Remix)’ 6 Wooden Shjips – ‘Phonograph’ 7 The Drab Doo-Riffs – ‘Lunatic Fringe’ 8 Best Coast – ‘How They Want Me To Be’ 9 X-Ray Fiends – ‘Tsunami’ 10 Atlas Sound – ‘Terra Ingognita’

THE BEATPORT TOP 10 1 Eric Prydz – ‘2Night (Original Mix)’ 2 Miguel Campbell – ‘Something Special (Original Mix)’ 3 Stefano Noferini – ‘Fact (Original Mix)’ 4 Zedd – ‘Shave It (Original Mix)’ 5 Fedde Le Grand – ‘So Much Love (Original Club Mix)’ 6 Gregor Salto ft. Chuckie – ‘What Happens In Vegas’ 7 Maceo Plex – ‘Can’t Leave You (Original Mix)’ 8 TJR – ‘One Love (Original Mix)’ 9 Sander Van Doorn – ‘Drink To Get Drunk (Extended Version)’ 10 Basto – ‘Again And Again (Extended Mix)’


TOP FIVES REAL GROOVY RECORDS CHRIS HART’S TOP FIVE REASONS VINYL IS ON THE RISE

Biophilia (One Little Indian) ON HER EXPECTEDLY experimental new album Biophilia,, Björk ventures into the world of harp and organ music. With Björk’s unique voice – she wouldn’t even be able to hide behind a vocoder – it’s a hard departure from her earlier work, even when it comes to the general mood of her music. With a title that translates as “love of life or living systems”, Biophilia turns out to be Björk’s darkest effort to date. Many songs would do well on a movie set in an abandoned wooden villa, as if Lars von Trier’s morbid soul had never left Björk after her appearance in his film Dancer in the Dark. During Biophilia’s many highpoints, Björk’s voice is

ANDREW FAGAN Admiral of the Narrow Seas (Aeroplane Music) Can’t stand The Mockers, sorry – but Fagan’s new full-band album is a fine amiable mature-bro album. Now sounding more downcast than the tunes you’ll hear in Countdown, the album’s rangy variety is an asset. Highlights: ‘Enjoy the Show’, the droning shanty of ‘1813’. SONS OF THE EASTER RISING Parihaka (Independent) Admirably furious political sentiment delivered in a form that any right-thinking person (jamband-aggro-rap) will be unable to endure. The lyric sheet itself is more enjoyable than the music, unfortunately, if only to get your head around the inscrutable phrase “pussy tastes better in a heart space”. HOUSE OF CAPRICORN In The Devil’s Days (Swamps of One Tree Hill) Caterwauling, rambling stoner rock. You have to appreciate the scope of the album and the sense of space (letting up for a canto midway,

accompanied by rich instrumentation. Take the crisp synths and beats on brilliant songs like ‘Thunderbolt’ and ‘Crystalline’, which recall Björk’s collaborations with British IDM duo Plaid. It is here that she gets closest to earlier landmarks such as ‘Hunter’ and ‘Jóga’. Elsewhere, the occasional rebellious and slightly outdated jungle breaks are a little out of place, but don’t ultimately detract from this otherwise deep, dark record that meets the high standard set by Björk in earlier years. Review Christiaan de Wit

then resuming the onslaught) although the slower, doomier stuff is so much better than the faster material it’s not even funny. More of the former please. UPPER HUTT POSSE Declaration of Resistance (Kia Kaha) They were the Ground Zero for New Zealand hip hop: what a lot of people would be surprised to discover is that, over the past 15 years, UHP have metamorphised into a deep and dubby roots reggae band with touches of rap. This live band album can never capture the same extraordinary moment as Against The Flow, but it’s a thoughtful, sometimes contrarian work. RIA HALL Ria Hall EP (Independent) If Ria Hall’s opening stint at the Rugby World Cup opening ceremony is used to get her a little extra attention for this album, so much the better. It’s an inspired mixture of forward-thinking r’n’b production and Te Reo – Maori-futurism? ‘Ko Au Ko La’ is the standout, with arcing synths and stomping percussion recalling latter-day Erykah Badu.

1: Hi-fidelity reproduction and good lookin’ album covers – viva la vinyl! 2: Music lovers in their teens and 20s buying classic rock. 3: Digital music consumers discovering the thrill of the chase in a record store. 4: Guys of a certain age discarding their vinyl in second-hand bins. 5: The blurring of the generation gap between Boomers and Gen X and Y-ers = three generations of vinyl lovers. HIT IT AND QUIT IT – GEORGE FM RECLOOSE’S TOP FIVE SEMISECRET AUCKLAND EATERIES 1: Mexican Specialities, Ellerslie – try the prawn tacos. 2: Shubh, Sandringham – homecooking, Indian style. 3: Cinta, Dominion Road – they put love into their mee goreng. 4: Jungle Flavour, behind KFC on Dominion Road – cut-above Thai. 5: New Flavour, Dominion Road – vegetarian dumplings, and tofu and cucumber salad.

THE UNFAITHFUL WAYS Free Rein (Aeroplane Music) A disarmingly straightforward country record from one New Zealand band with a lot to be genuinely blue about right now (they’re from Lyttelton). Marlon Williams sings with a power beyond his age which sells slightly inauthentic (though memorable) lyrics – the evocative ‘Katie My Darling’ (“I ain’t had a steady job since the ships stopped comin’ in”) hits harder than when this stuff comes out of Ponsonby. TIMOTHY BLACKMAN Everybody Needs Something To Hold On (Home Alone Music) Blackman’s music recalls the sort of period when Daniel Johnston’s dalliance with major labels saw well-mannered strings and layered production pad out his sound, or even a less croaky Bill Callahan. Plenty of stunning moments in here – he’s certainly not the first person in the past 10 years to call a song on a singersongwritery album ‘Wolves’, but his is one of the stranger ones, with an eerie command of acoustics that needs to be heard to be believed.

KASABIAN Velociraptor! (RCA/Columbia) I am yet to encounter a single human being who actively listens to Kasabian. THE DEAD LEAVES Cities On The Sea (Liberation Music) If you’ve ever heard The National, track one on this album will have you have double-checking the disc – this is shameless pilfering, bordering on mimicry. Think what Jet did to ‘Lust For Life’, or Calvin Harris did to LCD Soundsystem. There’s nothing new to the mix, save for a glaring tameness. Even though I do really like The National’s older stuff, and this captures it, it can’t be condoned. THE MONSTERS Pop Up Yours (Voodoo Rhythm) Swiss garage-punk. Nowhere near as exciting as it sounds. They’re not pulling any Nation of Ulysses retro-revolutionary moves like The Hives did to liven things up, or burying themselves under enough grit and static to sound truly lethal. Handy, loud production, but this is best enjoyed live rather than endured for half-an-hour on CD. Reviews Joe Nunweek


“It’s with some sadness and great relief to tell you that I quit Oasis tonight. People will write and say what they like, but I simply could not go on working with Liam a day longer.” With these words, Noel Gallagher announced his departure from the British rock institution he and his brother founded and fought over. While Liam Gallagher was quick to form Beady Eye with Oasis’ Gem Archer and Andy Bell, Noel exited the media spotlight, but he returns this week with his solo debut, Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds. Ex-pat broadcaster Chris Tubbs got an audience with Gallagher Senior in London. CHRIS TUBBS: You strike me as someone who – you know where the soul of your music lies; you don’t feel like you have to make these great evolutions every album. NOEL GALLAGHER: No, well I get asked a lot about songwriting, and to be honest I don’t really know a great deal about songwriting. I pick up the guitar and sit there – six days out of seven when I’m just fannying about playing ‘House of the Rising Sun’,

nothing happens and I’m just playing for me or just watching TV with the sound down. And then, for whatever reason, one day you play the same chords you’ve played a million times before and something happens, and a line will pop into your head or a melody, and I’ve never lost the sense of wonder when that happens and songs start to form, and I love that. So you’ve never felt that moment of pressure when there’s been a

certain lapse between albums, and you’re like, “My God – I’ve got to write songs!” No, because I always write. So I’ve never really sat down and had to write an album from scratch – I’ve always got the basis of something before I go into the studio. I made the mistake a while back of, if I wasn’t writing, I would force myself to write songs and those songs are never any good, so I just let it find me now. If I


woke up tomorrow and never wrote another song, I’d be more than happy with what I did. Your new album definitely has a… thanks to [Dave Sardy’s] production and your songwriting – it’s a no-brainer that it has a certain follow-on sound-wise to Oasis. Well, Oasis was in my soul – I directed that band from the start. What you hear is what I do – that’s it. I’m not a great musician, believe it or not. I can play every instrument a little bit, but when I put them all together it makes what I do. I’m not like Damon Albarn who can turn his hand to anything seemingly – the music that I make, it doesn’t come from the brain; it comes from the heart. Sometimes that’s not enough for people – let’s call them journalists – but sometimes you connect with people in a very simple and emotional way, and that’s it. What I did in Oasis was the same, and I always start from the same point. How does it feel, the whole process, without the gang? In the studio, I didn’t mind it – it’s easier. If you’re in a group, you have to accept a compromise of sorts. It’s like you’re attempting to paint a picture, five of you, with one paintbrush, so you’ve got to let

everybody have their go. You can well imagine that painting a picture by yourself with one paintbrush is going to be easier and more representative of whatever it is you’ve got. It’s the live side where I’m going to miss everybody because I played with Gem [Archer] and Andy [Bell] for like 10, 15 – I don’t know how long it was, but it was a long time – there’s kind

“You want me to read any poetry or be funny or do any moves or magic tricks, go to the circus or something.” of musical telepathy going on there. I found it very difficult first day being in a room with four other dudes and saying, ‘This is how it goes’. So how do you feel about it? You’re just about to launch a solo tour; you’re front of stage… Well, I can do it. I’ve got over the hurdle of being in the middle so I can’t see what anybody else is doing. It’ll be interesting to see what people expect because I really haven’t got

anything to offer them apart from the tunes, and that’s it. You know, I’ve got nothing to say. You’re not one for engaging the crowd? Fuck the crowd. We’re all there to listen to music, right? I’m there to play it; they’re there to listen to it. You want me to read any poetry or be funny or do any moves or magic tricks, go to the circus or something – all I’ve got is the music. It’s an ongoing thing, and I’ll have to learn to do it in front of a crowd and try to make it work. But half the battle’s won because I think the songs are great and I’ve got an incredible back catalogue to fall back on. Most times you go and see a band, and it’s, ‘Wow, the singer! Well, the fucking music’s shit’, so I’ve got the front end of it all right. And people are going to compare it to Oasis and me to Liam and all that, but I’m going to do my best to stand stiller than Liam ever did. We’re going to have an on-tour still-off. To watch VOLUME’s exclusive interview with Noel Gallagher, head to nzherald.co.nz/volume. Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds is out now on Sour Mash/ Universal .


MIDNIGHT IN PARIS Director Woody Allen Starring Owen Wilson, Rachel McAdams, Marion Cotillard A MINOR GEM in a late-career period too often stifled by creative stagnancy, Midnight in Paris sees Woody Allen at his most relaxed and engaging, concocting a deeply romantic fantasy that doubles as a passionate reverie on Paris, nostalgia and art. Owen Wilson, coming off the Farrellys’ underrated Hall Pass, makes for one of the more likeable Allen surrogates in a

long while. His laidback performance as Gil, a Hollywood screenwriter visiting Paris with his fiancée, Inez (Rachel McAdams), is a genial, heartfelt delight, a true “Golden Age” dreamer whose naiveté we can all recognise. In a reality-bending twist reminiscent of Allen’s 1985 The Purple Rose of Cairo, Gil finds himself, whilst strolling the city at midnight, shuttled off into the Roaring ’20s where he’s able to interact with his writing heroes (Fitzgerald, Hemingway) and art luminaries (Picasso, Dali) while seizing an opportunity for romance with a fetching model named Adriana (Marion Cotillard). Wisely, Allen doesn’t belabour the time-travel element, leaving it to the audience to interpret it as they wish. And it’s a testament to his prickly-yetelegant writing that all the in-jokey stuff (see Gil suggesting the premise of what will later become The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie to a confused Luis Bunuel), doesn’t irritate, but remains charming and, at best, witty. Midnight in Paris may not rise to the heights of Manhattan, but it’s a lovely, wistful dream of a movie that left me as stupidly bewitched as its protagonist. Review Aaron Yap

SHORT REEL A biopic of recently departed Apple co-founder Steve Jobs is in the works. Sony Pictures has picked up the rights to produce the film, which will be based on Walter Isaacson’s upcoming official biography called Steve Jobs. Martin Scorsese screened his incomplete 3D animated kids flick Hugo at the New York Film Festival last week – the first for the festival since 1991’s Beauty and the Beast. Michigan resident Sarah Deming is suing distributor FilmDistrict and theatre chain Emagine for promoting Drive to be like Fast and the Furious. She said it “bore very little similarity to a chase... having very little driving in the motion picture.” Drive opens here 3 November.


A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET COLLECTION INSIDIOUS Director James Wan Starring Patrick Wilson, Rose Byrne, Ty Simpkins, Barbara Hershey, Lin Shaye, Andrew Astor, Leigh Whannell HALLOWEEN IS JUST around the corner so time to load up on horror films. Conveniently, the second-highest grossing horror franchise has just released a box set. Wes Craven’s A Nightmare On Elm Street, featuring the iconic Freddy Krueger, made its debut back in 1984. Since then it has spawned six sequels and a remake of the first film.

This eight-disc collection features the seven original films plus a disc containing a newly-made featurette titled ‘Fear Himself: The Life and Crimes of Freddy Krueger’ along with a handful of other previously-released bonus goodies. The original 1984 film is particularly interesting. Not only was it a trailblazer, along with the Friday the 13 th and Halloween franchises, but it introduced filmgoers to a new actor – an almost unrecognisably-young Johnny Depp. While the first film offered up plenty of frights, the subsequent sequels became more camp featuring

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“special appearances” by the likes of Dick Cavett and Zsa Zsa Gabor. Craven brought the franchise back to its senses with his 1994 film, Wes Craven’s New Nightmare, blurring reality and fantasy by bringing the original actors back from the first film to play themselves. Hardcore Freddy fans will still want to shell out additional bucks for the four-hour documentary Never Sleep Again: The Elm Street Legacy. For more frights, check out Insidious, which happens to feature actress Lin Shayes who appeared in the first Elm Street film. Director James Wan, the man behind the Saw films, puts together a pretty spooky story about a typical suburban American family that seems to have moved into a haunted house. Turns out it’s not the house that’s haunted. I won’t spoil the fun, but will say that there are plenty of genuine spine-tingling moments during the first half of this suspenseful thriller. Unfortunately, things get kind of silly as the plot progresses. But there are still more treats than tricks. Review Marty Duda


HISTORY MADE...

YEAH YEAH YEAHS W/ MINT CHICKS

ST JAMES, AUCKLAND WEDNESDAY 12 JULY 2006 James Lowe was hit by falling plaster when Mint Chicks and Yeah Yeah Yeahs played the St James in Auckland on 12 July 2006. Photography Milana Radojcic I WAS FIRST year at Elam studying Fine Arts and I was taking a few photos for Cheese On Toast and regularly going to gigs. Yeah Yeah Yeahs were coming to town and I really wanted to see them. I wasn’t actually of age at the time, but I got in anyway because I got a fake ID for the show – that’s how much I wanted to go. Lots of people showed up and everyone I knew was out. I was with a bunch of other people who were also underage, so we were all pretty nervous on our way in. We got in and went down to the front on the lefthand-side, watching Mint Chicks and waiting for Yeah Yeah Yeahs. I saw maybe three or four songs from Mint Chicks, and then I felt like I had been bottled – it was while they were playing ‘Crazy? Yes! Dumb? No!’.

I had no idea what happened – I touched my forehead and I was covered in blood. I found myself on the ground, and I think a security guard picked me up and carried me outside. I was sitting outside in the

“I had no idea what happened – I touched my forehead and I was covered in blood.” foyer for a while, and then I was taken to the hospital by ambulance and stitched up there. I had no idea what happened – it was only when I was at the hospital that I found out part of the ceiling had come loose and hit me.

The promoter came and visited me a couple of days later – he reimbursed me for my ticket and he also had a signed poster from Yeah Yeah Yeahs and a couple of stickers and things like that, which was really cool. The story made it to the newspapers and then, later on, I got an email from Mint Chicks, which was cool – it was just saying ‘sorry you got hit on the head!’. It was a crazy, crazy night.


...AND IN THE MAKING

THE GUNSLINGERS BALL

W/ HEART ATTACK ALLEY, THE VIETNAM WAR, THE BROADSIDES, BERNIE GRIFFEN AND THE GRIFTERS, GUNDRY BLUES, GREAT NORTH WHAMMY BAr, AUCKLAND FRIDAY 14 OCTOBER Review Charlotte Red Photography Jenna Todd

LIKE ALL WELL-ORGANISED formal occasions, it’s a good idea to arrive at the Gunslingers Ball at the time it says on the ticket or, in this case, the beautiful, dusky poster. I arrived to find myself barricaded at the back door. I stood pressed up against some stranger at the back of the Wine Cellar as Great North played to an intimate audience. The kids who

“their cover of ‘I Put a Spell on You’ might’ve encouraged any couple going steady to actually finally do it.” got there first sat sprawled across the couches, racing their parents inside so that they hovered awkwardly around the periphery, making conversation with other parents, hoping to remember their kid’s date’s names. Gundry Blues were up next, and turned up the energy dial with their cover of ‘Jolene’, compelling the punters to shed all shyness. The monster of a crowd moved between the Whammy and Wine Cellar as a pack; I listened to Bernie Griffen and the Grifters in the hallway between the

m War

a The Vietn

two venues with a bottleneck of people who arrived late, then squeezed in and read over the Grifters’ lyrics sheet over someone’s shoulder so I could sing along. This was reluctantly given to me at the end, like the last nip of whisky at the bottom of the flask. During their Gunslingers debut, The Vietnam War’s Lubin Rains told us all that he’d written the songs we were romantically slow-dancing to for a competition out of Nashville, but upon realising there was a $35 entry fee, he couldn’t justify gambling his smokes against the potential to become a Nashville star. Cheers, everyone. Heart Attack Alley played at the point in the night where their cover of ‘I Put a Spell on You’ might’ve

encouraged any couple going steady to actually finally do it, as a middleaged French woman waved her lighter in the air; an unsuitable supervisor amongst the mayhem. The Broadsides summed up the show like it was the bus ride back to the Greenlane McDonald’s, everyone running on adrenaline, a ‘Sinnerman’ sing-along kind of happy. Now in its fifth year, the Gunslingers Ball is still the most smokin’ ticket in town.


AUCKLAND

TUESDAY 18

The Riff Raff – Kings Arms, Newton, 7pm, $5 Auckland Jazz & Blues Club – Marsala – Pt Chevalier RSA, Pt Chevalier, 7:30pm, $0-$5 Pop Panic ft. Ricky Rile – Cassette Number Nine, Auckland CBD, 9pm, Free Taye Williams – Sale St, Freemans Bay, 8pm, Free Date Night w/ Ino Pio – Chapel Bar & Bistro, Ponsonby, 6pm, Free Pink Floyd – Double Feature – Stardome Observatory & Planetarium, Royal Oak, 8pm, $35

WEDNESDAY 19

Naughty By Nature – Studio, Newton, 7pm, $60-$75 Teenage Kicks – Cassette Number Nine, Auckland CBD, 9pm, Free The Crimson Vendetta, Fire At Will, Old Kingdom & More – Kings Arms, Newton, 8pm, $5 David Lynch – California Bluegrusion – Ponsonby Cruising Club, Westhaven, 8pm, $15 GC Band Night – Grand Central, Ponsonby, 9pm, Free Jason Eli – Sale St, Freemans Bay, 7:30pm, Free Hitch w/ DJ09 – Hitch, Auckland CBD, 8pm, Free Rekkit Presents Jupiter Project’s It’s a Celebration – Bar Tabac, Auckland CBD, 8:30pm, Free Rewind – Ginger Minx, Mt Eden, 7pm, Free Your Vibe – Woody’s Bar, Manurewa, 9pm, Free Ben Fernandez & Maria O’Flaherty – C.A.C. Bar & Restaurant, Mt Eden, 6:30pm Chicane – Sugar Bar, Newmarket, 7pm, Free Creative Jazz Club – Brian Smith Quartet – 1885 Britomart, Auckland CBD, 8pm, $5-$10 Joel Vinsen – Spencer on Byron Hotel, Takapuna, 6pm, Free Student Jazz Ensemble Concerts: Large Ensemble Concert – Kenneth Myers Centre, Auckland CBD, 6:30pm, Free Tyra Hammond & The Circling Sun Band – Ponsonby Social Club, Ponsonby, 9pm, Free Live Latin and Brazilian Music – The Mexican Cafe, Auckland CBD, 8:30pm, Free Salsa Night – The Kingslander, Kingsland, 8pm, Free Jesse Sheehan and Graham Candy – CrossRoads Bar & de Ville Cajun Restaurant, Ponsonby, 8pm, Free Hipstamatics – Grand Central, Ponsonby, 9pm, Free Wednesday R&B Jam Night – Flo Bar & Cafe, Newmarket, 9pm, Free Live at The Cloud – The Adults – Queens Wharf, Auckland CBD, 8:30pm, Free

THURSDAY 20

French for Rabbits w/ Simon Comber & Silke – Wine Cellar, Newton, 8:30pm, $5-$10

Bloody Souls + Dirtbags + Thieves – Whammy Bar, Newton, 10:30pm, $10 Cassette Allstars ft. Aza Pony, Dirty Uncool, MTron & More – Cassette Number Nine, Auckland CBD, 10pm, Free Dean Wareham plays Galaxie 500 + The Stereo Bus & DeSotos – Kings Arms, Newton, 8pm, $45 New Zealand Indie Music & Twisted Country – Bar Tabac, Auckland CBD, 8pm Intrusion – Dubstep Night – The Carpark Bar, Auckland CBD, 10pm, Free Almost Famous: Evolp and guests – The Crib, Ponsonby, 8pm, Free Hitch w/ DJ09 – Hitch, Auckland CBD, 8pm, Free Your Vibe – Woody’s Bar, Manurewa, 9pm, Free Student Jazz Ensemble Concerts: Large Ensemble Concert – Kenneth Myers Centre, Auckland CBD, 6:30pm, Free Live at The Cloud – NZ Songbirds – Queens Wharf, Auckland CBD, 8:30pm, Free The Sky’s The Limit Showcase – Vocalist Edition – Woody’s Bar, Manurewa, 9pm, Free Hipstamatics – Shadows Bar, Auckland CBD, 8pm, $10 Hypnotism By Cosh – Cosh Bar, Ponsonby, 8pm, $15-$20 Just Us – Papatoetoe RSA, Papatoetoe, 6:30pm, $2 Peter Wood – One 2 One Cafe (121), Ponsonby, 8pm, Free

FRIDAY 21

Canadia Anniversary Day 4 – Wine Cellar, Newton, 7pm Glass Vaults – Into Clear EP Release Show – St Kevin’s Arcade, Newton, 7pm End of Daze Festival – AUSA Quad, Auckland University, Auckland CBD, 12pm, $15-$20 Shotgun Alley – Kings Arms, Newton, 8pm, $20 Hammocks & Honey (Aus) – Bar Tabac, Auckland CBD, 9pm, $5-$10 Paquin EP Release Show – Cassette Number Nine, Auckland CBD, 10pm, $5 Tall Order – Birkenhead RSA, Birkenhead, 7pm, Free Greg Churchill, Angela Fisken, Page 3 & Scott Mach – InkCoherent, Newton, 10pm, $10 Hitch w/ DJ09 – Hitch, Auckland CBD, 8pm, Free Acapella: The Club Night – The Supper Club, Newton, 9pm, Free Be Free Fridays – Be Club, Auckland CBD, 10pm, Free Be Thursdays – Be Club, Auckland CBD, 10pm, Free Free Thinking: Benwah, Zayn Kemp & Frank Booker – InkCoherent, Newton, 10pm, $10 Sam Hill, Wade Marriner & Guests – Trench Bar, Auckland CBD, 9pm, Free Llovisna – Auckland Fish Market, Auckland CBD, 5pm, Free Neville Chamberlain – Spencer on Byron Hotel, Takapuna, 6pm, Free Chico con Tumbao – Besos Latinos Restaurant, Auckland CBD, 7:30pm, Free

DJ King Salsa – The Mexican Cafe, Auckland CBD, 11pm, Free Friday Night Salsa – Latin Dance Studios Ltd (Latinissimo), Glenfield, 8:30pm, $5-$10 Habana Noches presents Cuban Accent – CrossRoads Bar & de Ville Cajun Restaurant, Ponsonby, 10pm, Free Latin Live Music – Besos Latinos Restaurant, Auckland CBD, 7:30pm, Free Eddie Gaiger – Brooklyn Bar, Auckland CBD, 9:30pm, Free The Mafia – The Crib, Ponsonby, 10:30pm, Free Tom Rodwell & Storehouse – Grey Lynn Returned Services Club, Grey Lynn, 5pm, Free Hollow Chambers, Mason Clinic & Black Palm – Masonic Tavern, Devonport, 8pm, $5 Peter Wood – One 2 One Cafe (121), Ponsonby, 8pm, Free Split Second – Edinburgh Street, Pukekohe, 9pm, Free Charlie Brown’s Bond Street Boys – East Coast Bays RSA, Browns Bay, 7:30pm, Free

SATURDAY 22

Rhombus in Dub – RWC Finals Show – Sawmill Cafe, Leigh, 9pm, $22 Jazz meets Bach and Chopin (Classics With a Twist) – Artworks Community Theatre, Waiheke Island, 5pm, $25 Waiheke Island Jazz in the Vines Festival – Goldie Vineyard and Stefanos Pizzeria, 12pm, $10-$60 Waiheke Jazz Club Dinner In the Vines – Goldie Room, Waiheke Island, 6:30pm, $25-$65 Shotgun Alley – Zeal, Henderson, 8pm, $15 Plum Green Music Video Release – The Lucha Lounge, Newmarket, 9pm, $10 Storehouse Blues Rent Party – Wine Cellar, Newton, 9pm, $10-$15 Bad Penny – Edinburgh Street, Pukekohe, 9pm, Free Al Dawson – Birkenhead RSA, Birkenhead, 7pm, Free Slinky – The Next Generation – 519 Club, Mt Wellington, 10pm, $29.90-$59.90 Hitch w/ DJ09 – Hitch, Auckland CBD, 8pm, Free Pure Trench Bar – Trench Bar, Auckland CBD, 9pm, Free Sandy Lynch – Spencer on Byron Hotel, Takapuna, 6pm, Free Guns of Metal – Kings Arms, Newton, 9:30pm, $15-$20 Aotea Live 2011 – Claris Sports & Social Club, Great Barrier Island, 7pm Mark Armstrong Acoustic – De Fontein, Mission Bay, 8:30pm, Free Vankan Bros – The Crib, Ponsonby, 10:00pm, Free Rebel Without Applause – Grey Lynn Returned Services Club, Grey Lynn, 8pm, Free CostumE Themed Evening – Letter G – Papatoetoe RSA, Papatoetoe, 6:30pm, $2 Rhythm Express – Manurewa Cosmopolitan Club, Manurewa, 8pm, Free Thirty Years Late, Jackal and Atomic Butterfly – Masonic Tavern, Devonport, 8pm, $5


powered by eventfinder.co.nz SUNDAY 23

Waiheke Island Jazz in the Vines Festival – Goldie Vineyard and Stefanos Pizzeria, 12pm, $10-$60 Waiheke Jazz Club Dinner In the Vines – Goldie Room, Waiheke Island, 6:30pm, $25-$65 RWC Final Party – Kings Arms, Newton, 5pm, $10 The Final Throwdown – The Thirsty Dog, Newton, 10pm, $10 Francis Jakeman – Glen Eden RSA, Glen Eden, 6pm, Free Sandpaper Tango – Corellis Cafe, Devonport, 6pm, Free Déjà Vu – Deluxe Club, Newton, 10pm, $10-$15 DJ PP, Greg Churchill, Soane, Aaron Pony & Chaos in the CBD – InkCoherent, Newton, 11pm, $10 Get Party ft. DJ PP (Uruguay) – InkCoherent, Newton, 10pm, $10 Lazy’s 4th Birthday – Groove Outdoors In the Sun – Shooters Saloon, Kingsland, 12pm, Free The New York Sunday Series – The Third and Social, Auckland CBD, 9pm Tiger & Woods (Running Back/ Italy) Live – Cassette Number Nine, Auckland CBD, 9pm, $15-$20 Chicane – Bill Fish Cafe, St Marys Bay, 1pm, Free Neville Chamberlain – Spencer on Byron Hotel, Takapuna, 6pm, Free Chico con Tumbao – Buenos Aires Restaurant, Herne Bay, 7pm, Free Contagious – Cock & Bull, Botany Downs, 9pm, $3 The Sick Sundays – The Crib, Ponsonby, 11pm, Free Nevermind Punkfest – The Basement, Auckland CBD, 6:30pm, $10 Sunday Sessions hosted by Club Groove – Flo Bar & Cafe, Newmarket, 4pm, Free Rugby World Cup Final Party – Kings Arms, Newton, 6pm, $5-$10

MONDAY 24

Waiheke Island Jazz in the Vines Festival – Goldie Vineyard and Stefanos Pizzeria, 12pm, $10-$60 Traditional Irish Music Session – The Clare Inn, Mt Eden, 7pm, Free VIVA Jazz Quartet – The Windsor Castle, Parnell, 6pm, Free

NORTHLAND TUESDAY 18

About Time Jazz Trio – Butter Factory Wine Bar, Whangarei, Free

SATURDAY 22

Tempist Fugit – Mangawhai Tavern, Mangawhai, 9pm, $0-$5

SUNDAY 23

Maoli, Young Sid, Pieter T & DJ Taktix – Heaven Bar, Whangarei, 9pm, $32-$35 Lazy Sundays – Art at Wharepuke, Kerikeri, 12pm, Free

THE COROMANDEL SATURDAY 22

The Nowhere Effect – Go Vino, Cooks Beach, 9pm, Free Tahuna Breaks & David Dallas Live – Coroglen Tavern, Coroglen, 7pm, $48 NZ Corporate Battle of the Bands – Thames War Memorial Civic Centre, Thames, 2pm, $35

SUNDAY 23

Soul Sax Plus – Tairua Landing, Tairua, 12pm, Free NZ Corporate Battle of the Bands – Thames War Memorial Civic Centre, Thames, 1pm, $35

WAIKATO

THURSDAY 20

Maoli, Pieter T, Young Sid feat Halo, Aio, Dj Huta – Sweet 3 – Altitude Bar, Hamilton, 8pm, $48-$70

FRIDAY 21

Ardijah, Tomorrow People, Code VII, Dj Huta – Sweet 3 – Altitude Bar, Hamilton, 8pm, $48-$70

SATURDAY 22

J.Williams, K.One, Tyson Tyler, Aaradhna, Adeaze – Sweet 3 – Altitude Bar, Hamilton, 8pm, $48-$70

SUNDAY 23

Kora – Taupo Fanzone, Taupo, 2pm, Free

HAWKE’S BAY / GISBORNE SATURDAY 22

Invader Cain, Ninja Monkey, Alec Withers and SKAper – The Cabana, Napier, 9pm, $10

BAY OF PLENTY TUESDAY 18

Ukulele World Cup – The Nukes Vs Big Muffin Serious Band – Blue Baths, Rotorua, 7pm, $25

WEDNESDAY 19

Swamp Thing ft. Michael Barker & Grant Haua – The Pheasant Plucker, Rotorua, 8:30pm, Free

THURSDAY 20

Bay Salsa – Buddha Lounge, Tauranga, 8pm, $2 LA Mitchell – Pacific Crystal Palace, Tauranga, 8:30pm, $32-$40 LSG Group – The Pheasant Plucker, Rotorua, 9pm, Free

SATURDAY 22

Jazz Showcase – Bureta Park Motor Inn, Tauranga, 6pm, Free Half Wild – NZ Carnivalesque Tour ’11 – Buddha Lounge, Tauranga, 10pm, $5

SUNDAY 23

Tama Waipara – Pacific Crystal Palace, Tauranga, 7pm, $32-$40

MONDAY 24

Julia Deans & Anna Coddington – Pacific Crystal Palace, Tauranga, 8:30pm, $32-$40

TARANAKI

SATURDAY 22

Invitation to Abby’s CD Launch – South Taranaki Club, Hawera, 7pm, Free

MANAWATU / WHANGANUI THURSDAY 20

Timothy Blackman – Album Release Show – Space Monster, Whanganui, 8pm

FRIDAY 21

Henpicked take Palmy – The Celtic Inn, Palmerston North, 8pm The Blue Grizzly Band and Friends – The Royal, Palmerston North, 9pm, $5

SATURDAY 22

dDub – Schnapps, National Park, 9pm, $25 Glass Vaults – Into Clear EP Release Show – Space Monster, Wanganui, 8pm, $5

WELLINGTON REGION

TUESDAY 18

Tuesday Night Speakeasy – Bodega, 7:30pm, Free Live Music and Two for One Desserts – The Library, 5pm, Free

WEDNESDAY 19

Sean Kirkwood, Emily Fairlight & Roland Brown – Mighty Mighty, 9:30pm, Free Chris Bryant – Cambridge Hotel, 8pm, Free Carlos Navae Sol Sessions – The Flying Burrito Brothers, 6:30pm, Free Captain Sergeant Major and Hollywoodfun Downstairs – San Francisco Bath House, 9pm, Free

THURSDAY 20

Dear Frontier – Post Capitalist EP Release with Fraser Ross – Mighty Mighty, 9pm Shotgun Alley – Bodega, 8pm, $20 The Blue Moon, The Flying Sorcerers, The Pickups & Spacecake – Happy, 9:30pm, $5 The John O’Connor Experiment – Hotel Bristol, 8:30pm, Free In Like Flynn – Molly Malones, 9pm Mara and the Bushkas Album Release – San Francisco Bath House, 8pm, $15

FRIDAY 21

Dick Dynamite & the Dopplegangers, Bikini Roulette, 66 Dynam – Mighty Mighty, 10pm More More Party: Orchestra of Spheres, Eversons & More – Bodega, 7:45pm Wellington Folk Festival – Brookfield Outdoor Education Centre, Lower Hutt, 7pm, $135 Live Music Friday – Pleasure Point – Mojo Bond St, 6pm, Free Salsadrome & Tango Milonga – Fortnightly Tango & Salsa Dance – Whitireia Performance Centre, 7:30pm, $10 FIIN – Angus Inn, Lower Hutt, 10pm, Free Invader Cain, Kobosh and Ninja Monkey live at Medusa – Bar Medusa, 8pm, $5

SATURDAY 22

Chow Down – Chow Tory, 10pm T54 and The Eversons – Mighty Mighty, 10pm, $5 Underwire CD Release Party – Meow, 8:30pm, $10 The Nudge – San Francisco Bath House, 9pm Wellington Folk Festival – Brookfield Outdoor Education Centre, Lower Hutt, 9am, $135 Upper Hutt Posse – Declaration Of Resistance Album Launch – Freds, 7pm Olmecha the Relic – Bodega, 8pm

SUNDAY 23

In Like Flynn with Ainslie Allen – D4 on Featherston, 7pm, Free Wellington Folk Festival – Brookfield Outdoor Education Centre, Lower Hutt, 9am, $135 Sunday Live Music – The Library, 8pm, Free The Sunday Jazz Club – Public Bar & Eatery, 7:30pm, Free

MONDAY 24

Wellington Folk Festival – Brookfield Outdoor Education Centre, Lower Hutt, 9am, $135

NELSON / TASMAN WEDNESDAY 19

Antonio Forcione With Adriano Adewale (Italy And Brazil) – Founders Heritage Park, Nelson, 8:30pm, $26-$42

THURSDAY 20

Katrina Kallil – Nelson Arts Festival – The Granary, Nelson, 6:30pm, Free

FRIDAY 21

Rhythmus – Nelson Arts Festival – The Granary, Nelson, 6:30pm, Free

SUNDAY 23

Pauline Scanlon (Ireland) – Nelson Arts Festival – Founders Heritage Park, Nelson, 6:30pm, $34-$42 John Rowles – The Final Bow Farewell Tour – Theatre Royal, Nelson, 3pm, $55-$65

MARLBOROUGH SATURDAY 22

John Rowles – The Final Bow Farewell Tour – Marlborough Civic Theatre, Blenheim, 7:30pm, $55-$65

CANTERBURY

WEDNESDAY 19

The Eastern Family – The Brewery, 8:30pm, Free

THURSDAY 20

Carlos Navae – Latin Beats – The Brewery, 8:30pm, Free John Rowles – The Final Bow Farewell Tour – Ashburton Trust Event Centre, Ashburton, 7:30pm, $55-$65 Kardia, Salt and Secondi – The Venue-Musicbar, 8pm, $5

FRIDAY 21

Pauline Scanlon – Irish Society Hall, 8pm, $20-$25 Carlos Navae – Latin Beats – Alvarado’s Mexican Cantina/Bar, 8pm, Free John Rowles – The Final Bow Farewell Tour – Aurora Centre for the Performing Arts, 7:30pm, $55-$65

SATURDAY 22

The Unfaithful Ways – CD Release Show – The Brewery, 10pm, Free D n D Showband – Becks Southern Alehouse, 9pm, Free Crossroads – Oak n Ferry, 9pm, Free

MONDAY 24

Big Band Monday – Rodger Fox & The Wellington Jazz Orchestra – Middleton Grange School, 6pm, $15-$25

OTAGO

FRIDAY 21

Queenstown JazzFest – Fat Freddy’s Drop – Queenstown Memorial Hall, Queenstown, 8:30pm, $70-$95

SATURDAY 22

The Chicks Tour – ReFuel Bar, Dunedin, 6:30pm, Free

SOUTHLAND TUESDAY 18

John Rowles – The Final Bow Farewell Tour – Civic Theatre, Invercargill, 7:30pm, $55-$65

FRIDAY 21

The Kposs Krackdown Hip Hop Night – Saints and Sinners, Invercargill, 10pm, Free

has teamed with Eventfinder for gig listings. To get your gig considered, go to eventfinder.co.nz and submit your show for publication. Due to space constraints, we can’t guarantee that every show will be listed.


TVNZ7’s live pub politics show Back Benches is coming to town – Wallace Chapman and Damian Christie will bring the Auckland Central candidates edition of the show to Britomart Country Club on Wednesday 2 November at 9pm sharp – entry is free… Beach Pigs just shot new video for ‘Edie’ and the song is no 1 on bFM… Greg Hammerdown was disappointed with Heart playing so many covers… Zip tight! Cottage alert! Shaft is filming a video for ‘Nik’s Skin’ in Auckland’s older public toilets… Shihad had a massive response from fans for suggestions of tracks to be included on their best of due for release next year… Unknown Mortal Orchestra’s US tour van is DEAD…

surfaced… Funhouse has covered Las Tetas’ ‘You’re Not Invited’ already… the New Zealand @ CMJ 2011 sampler is looking and sounding very good – look out for a review of the NZ@CMJ showcase review in next week’s VOLUME… Andrew Fagan’s show at Lucha was off the hook – complete with a figurine of Michael Hutchence kept in a small aluminium foil-covered box.

Bodega continues to hold a swing dance night every Tuesday – the theme is a Prohibition speakeasy, kind of like Boardwalk Empire but in real life… Adi Dick of Fly My Pretties and Pet Johnson continue their The Flash Fullas DJ residency on Friday nights at Foxglove on the waterfront… On Saturday 22 October, local blues rockers and pie lovers The Nudge return to San Francisco

Isaac Aesili

Super City’s Pasha Patel

Madelaine Sami’s Super City has been nominated for a swag of awards at the forthcoming Aotearoa Film and Television Awards… Wednesdays at Ponsonby Social Club have been going off… The Checks are preparing for their national tour with a performace at the RWC party on the waterfront – ‘Candyman’ video will be ready soon and the band is about to shoot a video for ‘Ready To Die’… Rackets’ new video is wrong… Bootlegs of the Heart Attack Alley live album have

Bath House after a well-received national tour… Bobby Brazuka, Isaac Aesili and Jennifer Zea bring their Latin Aotearoa Night from Auckland to the Matterhorn on 28 October – Brazilian DJ Tamenpi comes along for the ride… Leftbank Mexican food institution Viva Mexico’s co-owner Antonio González will soon be making regular morning DJ appearances on Don Luchito’s morning Amplifier show on Radio Active 88.6 FM – as expected, the theme will be Mexican… Thistle Hall’s smart arts workshops continue until 18 October… Hannah Simpson’s Hide and Seek photo exhibition is currently running at Saint Vincent’s art workshop.

The Venue has had problems with capacity… Bachelorette sold out Archive with people queued down the street… Dux Live! is gearing up for Nunvember… Ticket just got announced as openers for the forthcoming Hello Sailor and Dragon show… Al Park is looking to set up a Lyttelton Christmas Party at the Yacht Club… Anthesiac heading to Auckland for a 4:20 show on Friday 11 November… Transistors look like they will be busy in the next few months preparing for the release of the powerpop album they have been promising for some time – expect an opening for Guitar Wolf when the Japanese trio touch down in the quaky town.

Bachelorette


DEAN WAREHAM PLAYS GALAXIE 500 Thursday 20 October – Kings Arms, Auckland

FRENZAL RHOMB

Friday 28 October – Bodega, Wellington Saturday 29 October – Kings Arms, Auckland

BEAST WARS

Friday 28 October – The Royal, Palmerston North Saturday 29 October – Space Monster, Whanganui Friday 4 November – Biddy Mulligan’s, Hamilton Saturday 5 November – 4:20, Auckland Saturday 12 November – Bodega, Wellington

TINY RUINS

Wednesday 2 November – Hopetoun Alpha, Auckland Friday 4 November – Sawmill Cafe, Leigh Tuesday 8 November – Space Monster, Whanganui (entry by donation) Wednesday 9 November – Mighty Mighty, Wellington Thursday 10 November – The Playhouse Cafe, Nelson Friday 11 November – Archive, Christchurch (free show) Saturday 12 November – Chick’s Hotel, Dunedin

PORTISHEAD Thursday 10 November – Vector Arena, Auckland

MULATU ASTATKE & THE BLACK JESUS EXPERIENCE Friday 25 November – The Powerstation, Auckland

KURT VILE AND THE VIOLATORS W/ ALASTAIR GALBRAITH

Thursday 1 December – Kings Arms, Auckland

BLACK JOE LEWIS AND THE HONEYBEARS Wednesday 7 December – The Powerstation, Auckland

EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY

Thursday 15 December – San Francisco Bath House, Wellington Friday 16 December – Kings Arms, Auckland

THE CHECKS

FAT FREDDY’S DROP’S ONE DROP Monday 2 January – Ascension Wine Estate, Matakana w/ TrinityRoots & Cornerstone Roots Saturday 7 January – Black Barn, Havelock North w/ The Nudge

DEERHOOF

Saturday 7 January – Whammy Bar, Auckland Sunday 8 January – Bodega, Wellington

TUNEYARDS

Thursday 12 January – Kings Arms, Auckland

Friday 11 November – Zeal, Wellington Friday 11 November – Bodega, Wellington Saturday 12 November – The Royal, Palmerston North Thursday 17 November – Cabana, Napier Friday 18 November – Butlers Reef, New Plymouth Saturday 19 November – The Shed, Rotorua Friday 25 November – Flow Bar, Hamilton Saturday 26 November – The Powerstation, Auckland Thursday 1 December – PBC, Gisborne Friday 2 December – Illuminati, Tauranga Saturday 3 December – Onewhero Rugby Club, Onewhero Saturday 10 December – Yot Club, Raglan

UNKNOWN MORTAL ORCHESTRA Friday 16 December – San Francisco Bath House, Wellington Saturday 17 December – Kings Arms, Auckland

HORACE ANDY & SHAPESHIFTER

Thursday 29 December – Ascension Vineyard, Matakana Monday 2 January – Riwaka Hotel, Riwaka Friday 6 January – Brewers Field, Mt Maunganui Saturday 7 January – Waihi Beach Hotel, Waihi Beach

BIG DAY OUT 2012 Soundgarden, Kanye West, Odd Future, Kasabian, Royksopp, Mariachi el Bronx, Battles, Beastwars, Best Coast, My Chemical Romance and more Friday 20 January – Mt Smart Stadium, Auckland

FLEET FOXES

Friday 13 January – Hunter Lounge, Wellington Saturday 14 January – Town Hall, Auckland

BEIRUT

Saturday 14 January – San Francisco Bath House, Wellington Monday 16 January – The Powerstation, Auckland

ST JEROME’S LANEWAY FESTIVAL

Anna Calvi, Feist, The Horrors, Gotye, Laura Marling, Pajama Club, SBTRKT Live, Shayne P. Carter, Washed Out, Twin Shadow, M83, Cults, Girls, EMA, Yuck, Toro Y Moi, Wu Lyf, Glasser, Opossom, The Pains of Being Pure at Heart, Austra, Transistors and more Monday 30 January – Silo Park, Wynyard Quarter, Auckland

NICK LOWE

March 31 – The Powerstation, Auckland


DISASTERADIO W/ MANTHYNG

Dunedin Musician’s Club SATURDAY 15 OCTOBER Photography Roger Grauwmeijer

Manthyng

Disasteradio

MONKEY KILLER RECORDS THIRD BIRTHDAY Bennu, Dunedin Sunday 16 OCTOBER Photography Roger Grauwmeijer

Kilmog Mountaineater


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JORDAN LUCK’S 5OTH BIRTHDAY

KINGS Arms, Auckland SATURDAY 15 OCTOBER Photography Kit Walker

ents

The Expon

Karyn H ay Jordan with Luck

W/ Don McGlashan

l and Yoh from W/ Michael O’Neil Mee Mees ng mi rea Sc e Th

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W/ Dave McArtney Ray Columbus

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Volume #007