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Horowhenua Chronicle

HOT Y R G L

Ready Meals made fresh daily

• Butter Chicken • Shepherd’s Pie • Sweet & Sour Chicken • Lasagne • Macaroni Cheese • Devilled Sausages • Potato Bake • Beef or Chicken Rissoles • Spaghetti Bolognese

THE GEORGE CAFÉ is OPEN DAILY from 8.30am – 3pm SATURDAYS open all day: 8.30am til late • ALL DAY BREAKFAST • LUNCH

Phone (06) 920 2055

Email: thegeorgecafenz@gmail.com

Bookings are Recommended!

(Cabinet + Ala Carte menu)

• DINNER from 5.30pm til late Thursday, Friday & Saturday

NOW FULLY LICENCED!

Speldhurst Country Estate

This photo provided by The Metropolitan Museum of Art shows a watercolour on vellum by Jacob Marrel titled Four Tulips: Boter man (Butter Man), Joncker (Nobleman), Grote geplumaceerde (The Great Plumed One), and Voorwint (With the Wind) circa 1635-45. AP Photo

70 Kimberley Road, Levin

Flower

Call to Pre-order; Bulk Buy 5 for $25 Priced from $4.99 to $6.99 AVAILABLE AT NEW WORLD LEVIN Cnr SH1 & Bath St, Levin Open: 7am - 10pm, 7 days Phone: (06) 366 0873

Weddings, Functions & Conferences Home of meals on wheels 6 days a week!

Levin

NOW OPEN FOR FRIDAY NIGHT DINING

Call to book now Mon-Fri 3.30-5.30pm

Phone: (06) 367 94 63 149 Tiro Tiro Road, Levin

western.house.ltd@gmail.com www.facebook.com/Western.house/

open 8.30am - 4.00pm daily

FULLY LICENSED

MON-FRIDAY:10AM & SAT - SUN FROM 9AM

4 Buller Road, Ohau, Levin OPEN ffor LUNCH CHRISTMAS DAY Book now 06 368 4212

Phone: 06 368 7270

hours may vary on public holidays

Menu is available at Poppies - Adults $55 pp - Children 11-15 $30 pp - Children 6-10 $15.00pp - Children under 5 $10 pp LUNCH: Tues-Sat 11am-2pm

BOOK YOUR CHRISTMAS FUNCTION NOW Phone: LARISSA on 06 368 4212

DINNER: Tues-Thurs 5pm-8pm

DATES ARE FILLING FAST SO GIVE US A RING

Fri & Sat 5pm-8.30pm

CLOSED SUNDAY & MONDAY

ARE YOU PLANNING YOUR WEDDING?

LEVIN COSMOPOLITAN CLUB

We can provide a one stop Venue We now have an in-house Marriage Celebrant Our venue is also available for special occasions, Conferences, Seminars and funerals

Oxford Street, Levin Phone: 06 368 2571

Members, Affiliated Members and Guests Welcome

For information phone 06 368 4212

Garage Sales

FOXTON

558 FXTN SHANNON RD Sat 12th October 8am. Furniture, plants, free stuff. TO VISIT VISITED

LEVIN

LEVIN

SHANNON

18 TASMAN ST Sat 9am. Bdrm drawers, sgle beds, clothes, shoes, tent, glass cabinet, exercise equip, weedeater. Cancelled if wet. TO VISIT VISITED

PLIMMER TCE Sat 12th 8:30am. Big sale next to Shannanigans Shopping Complex. Cancelled if wet. TO VISIT VISITED

LEVIN

LEVIN

56 RIMU ST BALLANCE ST 27 MAIN RD STH Saturday 12th 8am to 12pm. Assorted house- 8:30am start. All sorts, no 8am, factory clear out, all prices, fair offers. sorts. hold. TO VISIT VISITED TO VISIT VISITED TO VISIT VISITED

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Friday, October 11, 2019

Do you know where your nearest CIVIL DEFENCE sector post is? Ring your local council to find out.

T

Power

hink of botanical illustrators, and you might envision a world of medieval herbalists, tulip or orchid collectors, or affluent young women of the 17th and 18th centuries making detailed drawings and watercolours of garden plants. But there’s nothing oldfashioned about botanical illustrations. “Plants and flowers eternally speak to us, and there’s a great admiration now for realistic drawings and observing nature, and a renewed interest in handmade crafts,” says Femke Speelberg, associate curator in the department of drawings and prints at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. “As a source of inspiration, the relationship between decor and nature has always been very important,” she says. Today, as we lose biodiversity, botanical drawing is also an important way to examine and document plants that might not always be there, says Helen Bynum, who with her husband, William Bynum, compiled Botanical Sketchbooks (Princeton Architectural Press, 2017), a compendium of botanical illustrations by 80 artists from around the world. “Being a sketcher of whatever ability makes you really engage with what you are looking at it,” says Bynum. Botanical drawing dates back to at least to the times of the Pharaohs. It was particularly developed in the Middle Ages, when plants were often used for medicinal purposes and people needed to be able to tell safe from poisonous plants. A lot of plant families contain both. For instance, the nightshade family of plants includes belladonna, a poisonous plant, and also edibles like tomatoes, peppers and eggplants. Explorers often brought a botanical artist along to record the plants encountered. During “Tulip Mania” in 17th century Holland, when rare bulbs sold for the equivalent of an average person’s annual salary, it was

This photo provided by The Metropolitan Museum of Art shows a watercolour over graphite by Anonymous titled Decorative Design with Natural and Abstract Flowers, from the late 19th century. AP Photos

Botanical drawing dates back to at least to the times of the Pharaohs. crucial for collectors and breeders to record each flower’s unique patterns and contours. And botanical art can be about more than accuracy. Often, the story a botanical illustration tells is more mesmerising than the perfection of the drawing itself, says Bynum. “What I learned doing this book is that you don’t have to be a great artist to get things down on paper in a way that can communicate to other people.” Robin Jess runs the Botanical Art and Illustration programme at the New York Botanical Garden, the oldest certificate programme in the subject in the country. “We tend to be very accurate, and to pay attention to all the details. We require that students

take classes in plant morphology, so they understand what it is exactly that they are drawing. It requires a strong basis in botany,” she explains. The garden is also the headquarters of the American Society of Botanical Artists, with about 1800 members. “Contemporary botanical artists share a concern for the environment, particularly in light of climate change, as well as for drawing attention to plants,” Jess explains. Before photography was invented, botanical illustrations were essential to understanding plants. But today, too, drawings can illuminate aspects of plants in a way photos cannot. “An illustration can show various parts of a plant at the same time, something a photo really can’t. “It can show extra details of the fruit, for example, and what it looks like bisected.” And making botanical illustrations for a patron is alive and well, she points out. Florilegia — documentation of all the plants growing in a specific garden — is a big thing right now, she says. — AP


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