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Friday 11th October 2019

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When Tonga came to town By PAUL WILLIAMS

A

team of rugby players that were the toast of Horowhenua after beating an international touring side 50 years ago have a reunion planned for tomorrow. The 1969 Horowhenua team beat a strong Tongan team 22-10 in front of a huge crowd at Levin Domain on August 20, 1969 - a Wednesday - and it remains one of the more memorable results for the Horowhenua Rugby Union. They weren’t expected to win, and some Horowhenua players remember being asked during the week by townsfolk “who’s going to bat first”. But they were quietly confident, with some players more than happy to take wagers on the result. The Rugby Almanac of that year stated: “Without doubt Horowhenua was seen at its best in the handsome victory over Tonga, when a vigorous and wellknit pack secured a preponderance of ball and decisive tackling nullified the cleverness of the Tongan backs.” The crowd that afternoon was estimated at 4000. While there won’t be nearly that many in attendance for tomorrow’s match with Wanganui at Levin Domain, a healthy following is expected. The Horowhenua game was part of a 11-match New Zealandwide tour for Tonga, their first of New Zealand, that started in Nelson Bays in early August and finished in Bay of Plenty a month later. They had been pressing for a ■ Continued Page 3

WE CAN CHECK YOUR ROOF, SPOUTING OR LEAKY TAPS ETC

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Back row: Sione Tavo, Siao Selupe II, Sio Motu’apuaka, Fetu’ulele Mailangi, Siaosi Selupe I, Foua Moala, Sione Mafi. Middle: Haueti Veatupu, Tali Kavapalu, Kei Iongi, Kimipu Inoke, Vainikolo Vanisi, Sione Sika, Viliami Pahulu, Supileo Fotu, Malakai Alatini. Sitting: Feleti Muller Fr. D.W.Mullins. Viliami Alipate (c), Prine Tu’ipelehake (patron), Panuve Fakaua (vc), Lupeti Inau (assistant manager), Inoke Lupina, Uhila Tai. Front: Molou Filimoehala, Vailala Fifita, Oleni Eke and Kala Hafoka.


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Horowhenua Chronicle

Friday, October 11, 2019

Lettuce a family affair in Manakau

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Tony and Lisa Dale-Low of Waikawa Fresh in Manakau.

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The Dale-Low family, Tony, Lisa, and the three children Charlie, Francesca and Zoe. By PAUL WILLIAMS A former Wellington couple who escaped the city with their three young children to grow lettuce in Manakau want to keep it a secret. Tony and Lisa Dale-Low were both working and living in Wellington a few years ago when they made a decision to sell up, buy a bus and tour New Zealand with their young children Francesca, Charlie and Zoe for a year. With the adventure over, they

decided it was time to park the bus up and after seeing most of the country they picked Manakau as the place to put down roots more than a year ago. Mr Dale-Low said the Manakau climate was brilliant for growing and the lifestyle was idyllic. “But we should maybe keep that a secret,” he said. Mrs Dale-Low said they purchased Waikawa Fresh as a going concern in July last year, growing lettuce and herbs for the

local environment. They both had green thumbs, but it was a leap of faith. “We knew we didn’t want to go back to our city jobs, but it took us a while to decide what to do next, and where,” she said. “In the end, a lifestyle business where we could work together, live on site, have flexibility with the kids and enjoy being outside looked like a great idea.” “Manakau is a beautiful part of the country with a fantastic

community and we haven’t looked back. They still live in the bus, but have laid the foundations for a new house not too far from the many greenhouses that grow lettuce that they raise from seed themselves. “We grow lettuce and herbs for local and regional customers. Our major product line is fancy lettuce which is picked and packed fresh to order six days a week and trucked into Wellington for the supermarket and food service markets,” she said. All the produced is grown hydroponically. Water is mixed with nutrients and circulated non-stop through hydroponic channels.

“The learning curve has been steep and we’ve been fortunate to be supported by a team of staff including two who have over two decades of experience on this site between them.” Waikawa Fresh has now signed up to the Horowhenua Taste Trail, an annual event in Horowhenua that takes ticket holders behind the scenes and gives them a chance to sample local produce and see how it is made. “We’re excited to be involved in the Taste Trail. There’s a great team organising and running the event and we’ve been really impressed with our contact so far,” she said. The Taste Trail will be held on November 23.

Horowhenua Chronicle 13 Bristol Street Levin • Ph 06 368 5109 Editor: Janine Baalbergen janine.baalbergen@nzme.co.nz Office: 06 366 0257 Mobile: 027 801 9545 Senior Reporter: Sadie Beckman sadie.beckman@nzme.co.nz Office: 06 366 0258 Mobile: 027 546 5732 Reporter: Paul Williams paul.williams@nzme.co.nz Office: 06 366 0254 Mobile: 027 250 4865 Media Co-ordinator: Tanya Wood tanya.wood@nzme.co.nz Office: 06 366 0259 www.facebook.com/TheHorowhenuaChronicle

Team Leader: Philippa Hakaraia philippa.hakaraia@nzme.co.nz Office: 06 366 0694 Mobile: 027 809 4201 Media Specialist: Richard Christie richard.christie@nzme.co.nz Office: 06 366 0695 Mobile: 021 818 411 Media Consultant: Calvin Paparoa calvin.paparoa@nzme.co.nz Office: 06 366 0251 Mobile: 027 274 8172 Classified Advertising: Pam Kearns levinclassads@chronicle.co.nz Office: 06 366 0252 www.horowhenuachronicle.co.nz

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Friday, October 11, 2019

Horowhenua Chronicle

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Rugby reunion to remember the day ’Nua beat Tonga

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There was a crowd of 4000 at Levin Domain in 1969 when Horowhenua beat Tonga 22-10.

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Back row: J Saulbrey, B Seymour, A Fairbairn, J Read, W Robinson, M Tattle, J Weale, M Gardiner, N Kunaiti. Middle row: S Sciascia (chairman), R Dennison, W Robinson, V Whiley, G Sue, L Wheeler (coach). Sitting: D Radanovich, A Hooper, J Sissons, A Hunt, J Palmer and C James. ■ From Page 1

tour for more than a decade. The Tongan team had arrived in Levin earlier in the week and attended a host of social engagements, including one in the Levin Memorial Hall attended by 500 people where they sang to the crowd, and they visited numerous rest homes and schools. The popular tourists were said to have been warmly received and were “superbly” behaved wherever they went with “flashing smiles”, and were musically talented and not averse to a hearty song. The match itself was said to be a thriller. In its match report, Horowhenua Chronicle said ”...Tonga had to create openings for themselves from positions which were continually being battered by a relentless tackling force”. “Two who were to give memorable displays in this regard were T. Hooper and M Hori Te Pa, with the new recruit buzzing around the field and putting real sting into his efforts.” “And it was woe betide a luckless Tongan player when the

arms of J Saulbrey, M Tattle or V Whiley came around him...T Hunt was another...he drove ahead with real strength, once taking two opponents ahead of him for over 18 yards.” “Hooper and James stirred the crowd and Hori Te Pa the imagination, the latter punching a hole before being buried out by the Tongan goal-line.” “The ball passed through the hands of Weale and back to Hori Te Pa and then Whiley, who crashed in for the try.” Horowhenua was awarded 10 penalties to Tonga’s six. “W Robinson had his kicking boots on. He has every reason to be proud of his personal tally of 13 points, points which coming into the vital stages of game seemed to hammer Tonga’s hopes further and further into the ground.” “Palmer had a go at a drop goal, the forwards drove through and from a loose melee Tonga were penalised. Robinson carefully lined it up and it sailed between the posts.” ”...a tight-head to Horowhenua, they wheeled the scrum, spun away and with sheer force both Tattle and

Halidone drove over the goalline, the try going to Tattle.” With 14 minutes to go Horowhenua was just six points in front of the ever-dangerous Tongans. Saulbrey toed the ball ahead “in a great run that took play upfield some 48 yards”. Prop forward Saulbrey scored a late try in the match, which was disallowed when referee J Reynish said he had “adjusted the ball”. “With time nearly up, Hori Te Pa, Whiley, Tattle and Saulbrey handled the ball to Seymour to gain final transfer and touch down well out.” “The crowd nearly surged the field as Robinson lined up, but the ball just went outside and as if for a signal loud cheers went up as homage for a great game and equally heart-stirring exhibition by Horowhenua.” The after-match function was held at the Oxford Hotel in Levin and organised by the NZRFU who issued the Horowhenua players with one beverage voucher each. Meanwhile, enough players from 1969 to form a team are expected at the reunion this weekend, including coach

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Weale and Hori Te Pa pounce on the loose ball for Horowhenua. Lindsay Wheeler. While not all the Horowhenua squad of 1969 were still alive, their deeds would no doubt be remembered through stories at the weekend. At the time, Tonga was just the second fully international team to play Horowhenua in Levin, after a loss to Australia 28-6 in 1962, although there had been numerous fixtures against touring provincial sides at the venue. There were numerous occasions where players formed part of a Manawatū-Horowhenua team that played touring teams like South Africa and British Isles, but those games were held in Palmerston North. The only occasions that Horowhenua had beaten a truly international representative side in Levin in their 127-year history was Tonga

in 1969, and Western Samoa (17-6) in 1976. Scoreboard: Horowhenua: 22 (V. L. Whiley, M. J. Tattle, B. M. Seymour tries; W. F Robinson 3 penalty goals, 2 conversions) v Tonga: 10 The starting teams were: Horowhenua: 1 J Saulbrey. 2 A Hunt. 3 V Whiley (c). 4 K Halidone. 5 M Tattle. 6 M Hori Te Pa. 7 J Weale. 8 M Gardiner. 9 R Dennison. 10 A Palmer. 11 A Hooper. 12 C James. 13 W Robinson. 14 B Seymour. 15 D Radovanovich. 16 J Sisson. 17 K Kerehoma. 18 D Wills. 19 J Flux. Tonga: 1 F Moala. 2 I Lupina. 3 S Mafi. 4 S Selupe. 5 F Mailangi. 6 K Inoke. 7 S Fotu (c). 8 S Selupe. 9 V Fifita. 10 O Eke. 11 H Veatupu. 12 T Kavapalu. 13 M Alatini. 14 K Hafoka. 15 S Sika. 16 U Tai. 17 K Longi. 18 M Filimoehala. 19 V Pahulu.


Captain to mix it with men POSTMODERN JUKEBOX

Wednesday 16 October 8:00pm To usher in the upcoming Twenty-Twenties, the famed time-twisting musical collective will circumnavigate the globe on their Welcome to the Twenties 2.0 Tour to prepare the world for a new decade - one that Postmodern Jukebox creator Scott Bradlee hopes will see a return to the style and craftsmanship that typified the music of past generations. Admission $79.90 - $259.90

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PACANZ: NATIONAL YOUNG PERFORMER AWARDS

18 - 20 October, times vary Dancers from all over New Zealand will battle it out in front of our panel of International judges to be named the National Troupe/Group for 2019. Saturday - Adult $40.00 Child $20.00 Sunday - Adult $30.00 Child $15.00 2 Day Pass - Adult $90.00 Child $50.00 3 Day Pass - Adult $110.00 Child $60.00 Troupe Day - Adult $30.00 Child $15.00 Session Pass - Adult $15.00 Child $10.00 Final Concert - Adult $40.00 Child $25.00 Concession $30.00 Family (2A+2C) $80.00 Plus Credit Card & Service Fees

THE CLEARING

Saturday 26 October 7:00pm Presented by Footnote New Zealand Dance. The Clearing is a dance-theatre work inspired by the mysterious energy that exists within forests, hollows and hills, and the supernatural stories we tell ourselves about these spaces. Like a beautifully shot, indie thriller film, The Clearing overflows with vivid imagery and mesmerising performances. Adult $39.00 Senior $29.00 Student $29.00 Plus Credit Card & Service Fees

COME TO THE BALL!

1 - 2 November, times vary Presented by Dean Mckerras School of Dance. Just like Cinderella, you can come to the ball! From the Genie’s Ball to Annie’s Ball to Lambert’s Ball - even a Christmas Ball - fun for the whole family as our stars shine. Be there! Adult $19.50 Child $9.50 Concession $15.00 Family (2A+2C) $54.00 Plus Credit Card & Service Fees

SWAN LAKE

Saturday 9 November 7:30pm Presented by the Imperial Russian Ballet Company, Swan Lake crosses the world of magic and mystical creatures with that of the real world. It is a story where the virtues of love and forgiveness in the end conquer evil and betrayal. Adult $69.00 - $89.00 Child $39.00 - $59.00 Concession/Group (10+) $59.00 - $79.00 Plus Credit Card & Service Fees

HANSEL & GRETEL

Wednesday 13 November 7:30pm Presented by the Royal New Zealand Ballet. Faint starlight peeps through the dark forest canopy. It is midnight: the witching hour. Alone and lost, two hungry children stumble towards a glowing vision of warmth and comfort, heaven for any child with an empty belly and an aching heart. But all is not as it seems... Adult $50.00 - $99.00 Child $25.00 - $50.00 Concession $45.00 - $89.10 Plus Credit Card & Service Fees

THE FRONTM3N

Saturday 16 November 7:30pm Unplugged, hear the greatest hits of The Hollies, 10CC & The Sweet. Three great friends perform the classic hits with three guitars and three amazing voices in an intimate atmosphere filled with music, stories and humour. Admission $79.00 - $99.00 Plus Credit Card & Service Fees

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By PAUL WILLIAMS New Zealand inline hockey captain Tara Fox is capping off a busy week at the national competition in Levin this week by playing in the men’s grade. Fox, 35, had no qualms about mixing it with some of the best male inline hockey players in the country. “I’m quite a physical player anyway,” she said. Fox was not out of place among the men either, showing her class as a defender in what was an extremely facepaced game at senior level. It was a busy time at the tournament for the recently married Fox. As well as playing for the Hamilton Devils women’s side, of which she was also the coach, and she also coached the club’s under 19 and under 16 teams. It was raining gold for the Devils as the U16, U19, and women’s teams had all won gold medals, with the men’s campaign kicking off tonight. Fox originally began figure skating as a 5-year-old on ice, which led to a passion for ice hockey where she had also represented New Zealand, retiring in 2014. But she made a choice to continue playing inline hockey, although hinted that retirement was not far off after a lifetime on skates. “I’ve travelled the world with hockey. This could possibly be my last year,” she said, although she would love the opportunity to coach national teams in the future. As a dual New Zealand inline hockey and ice hockey representative, she had travelled the world with both sports, and said New Zealand’s inline results stacked up well in the international arena. The NZ women’s team, ranked 11th in the world, was placed third at the 2013 world championship, while they finished seventh in Italy last year. Away from the rink, in recent years Fox had established the inline hockey coaching company Hockeywise. She was formerly Tara Tissink, before marrying teammate Courtney Fox earlier this year. Meanwhile, Levin Thunder was

New Zealand women’s inline hockey captain Tara Fox. praised for their organisation of the event. President Arden Phillips said the club had waited for 26 years to stage the national competition, as their 65m x 40m wooden playing surface was rated one of the best in the country. The rink was larger than the standard

size of 50m by 25m. There were more than 650 players from 65 teams competing this week, in grades ranging from under-10s to Premier and Masters divisions. Games were starting at 8am and were played well into the night.

Swimmers evacuated over gas fears By PAUL WILLIAMS Poisonous gas leak fears meant earlybird swimmers were evacuated from the pool at Levin Aquatic Centre yesterday morning for a major emergency callout. There were 12 people swimming in different pools at the complex when an alarm rang shortly after 6.30am. They were evacuated immediately, wearing just their swim suits. Jed Thomas was one of those early morning swimmers and was draped in a towel. He was assessed at the nearby Levin Fire Station as a precaution before being sent home. Fire crews from Levin were immediately on the scene, while another crew from nearby Shannon arrived shortly after 7am. At one stage, there were five fire engines and crews, police and ambulance at the scene. At 7.30am, the Hazardous Substance and New Organisms unit from Palmerston North arrived to determine the exact nature of the leak, originally believed to be chlorine. But after assessing the scene they found no poisonous particles and declared the site safe for entry. The pool would remained closed though, as now tests would be made do determine whether the alarm system was faulty. Just days earlier staff at the pool had participated in a training exercise for such an event and were well briefed on emergency procedure. The pool is run by Horowhenua District Council, and group manager customer & regulatory services Ian McLachlan said an alarm at the pool sounded when it detected a gas leak. McLachlan, who was on the scene immediately along with acting chief executive Mark Lester, said he was pleased to learn that staff had followed

Fire crews from Levin, Shannon and Palmerston North attended the callout. correct procedure and was full of praise for their efforts. “Life first,” he said. McLachlan said the pool would remain closed until they could find out why the alarm had sounded. They simply couldn’t open and have a repeat siren, prompting emergency services into action again. “It potentially could be closed for the rest of the day. It’s a precautionary measure to ensure that the public are safe,” he said at the time of the incident.

Jed Thomas was evacuated from the pool during his early morning swim.


SCREENING THIS WEEK

Dilly dallying costs region The Kapiti Expressway has been a huge success. Great progress is also being made on building the next section to Otaki and Transmission Gully. All of these four lane motorways costing close to $2 billion were contracted under National and will help to transform the lower North Island. It’s a shame Labour have mucked the Horowhenua community around with constant expressway funding delays over the last two years. This dilly dallying around will see all the bulldozers and workforce disappear from Kapiti when they should be just moving up the corridor and start construction between Otaki and Levin next year. That’s what would have happened under a National government. The announcement by Labour last week about commencing the consenting paperwork for the Horowhenua Expressway is all about taking this issue off the front page — but it won’t. Buried in the fine print of the announcement was it’s still only a two lane road and no commitment has been made when funding might be available. In reality it looks and feels like no construction will occur for at least a decade which is a massive wasted opportunity. Had Labour been committed to Horowhenua they would have got the

consent done and been ready to start building it next year. The problem is they’ve raided $5b from the roading budget for other transport priorities. I acknowledge families in the 300 metre pathway will begin to get on with their lives — but that is still likely to take a couple of years to work through the whole process of final route design and property purchases. This is one of the most dangerous sections of state highway in the country and a couple of roundabouts and rumble strips will do little to reduce the carnage on our SH1. What’s needed most is a new 4 lane expressway ASAP — not in 2028 or beyond. Levin’s congestion will be diabolical next year when the Otaki Expressway and Transmission Gully open. Another headache will be heavy trucks using the new bridge at Foxton and thundering into Levin’s Main St. What a shambles Labour have created for Horowhenua.

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DOWNTON ABBEY

(PG) 122 mins Drama (Contains coarse language)

GEMINI MAN

(M) 117 mins Action/Drama/Sci-fi (Contains violence & offensive language) An over-the-hill hitman faces off against a younger clone of himself.

Fri 1pm 3.30pm 6pm, Sat 1pm 3.30pm 6pm, Sun 1pm 3.30pm 6pm, Mon 1pm 3.30pm 6pm, Tues 1pm 3.30pm 6pm, Wed 1pm 3.30pm 6pm

JOKER

(R16) 123 mins Crime/Drama/Thriller (Contains violence, cruelty & offensive language) A gritty character study of Arthur Fleck, a man disregarded by society.

Proof of age photo ID must be provided on request. Fri 3.20pm 8.30pm Sat 3.20pm 8.30pm Sun 3.20pm 8.30pm Mon 12.50pm 3.20pm 8.30pm Tues 12.50pm 3.20pm 8.30pm Wed 12.50pm 3.20pm 8.30pm

AD ASTRA

(M) 123 mins Adventure/Drama/Mystery (Contains violence, offensive language & content that may disturb)

Final Sessions Sat 8.10pm, Sun 8.10pm Wed 8.10pm

Fight ‘far from over’ for Build Our Road group Now that the dust has settled on the surprise announcement by NZTA last week and people have had time to assess the value of the “crumbs” being thrown at the community, it is clear the fight is far from over for Build Our Road, spokesperson Antony Young said. “While we will welcome the announcement last Friday, we also understand that the O2NL Expressway is not a certainty,” he said. “The designation is critical to progressing its development, but the reduced funding proposed by the current coalition Government hurts any meaningful progress for at least 10 years. We need the Government to release the necessary budget for NZTA to commence roadwork development and consent planning.” With Transmission Gully and the Ōtaki Expressway officially opening in 2020, he fears there will be dire consequences for Horowhenua. “We are going to see SH1 become even more dangerous and present higher risks for residents’ and road users’ safety,” he

Fri 5.40pm, Sat 5.40pm, Sun 5.40pm Mon 10.10am 12.40pm 5.40pm Tues 10.10am 12.40pm 5.40pm Wed 10.10am 12.40pm 5.40pm

GOOD BOYS

(R13) 90 mins Adventure/Comedy (Contains frequent offensive language, sexual material & drug use)

Proof of age photo ID must be provided on request. Final Sessions Fri 8.10pm, Sat 3.10pm Sun 3.10pm, Mon 8.10pm

RAMBO: LAST BLOOD

HUSTLERS

(R16) 110 mins Comedy/Crime/Drama (Contains drug use, sexual references & offensive language) Inspired by the viral New York Magazine article, Hustlers follows a crew of savvy former strip club employees who band together to turn the tables on their Wall Street clients.

Proof of age photo ID must be provided on request. Fri 5.50pm 8.20pm, Sat 5.50pm 8.20pm, Sun 5.50pm 8.20pm, Mon 10.30am 5.50pm 8.20pm, Tues 10.30am 5.50pm 8.20pm, Wed 10.30am 5.50pm

(R18) 100 mins Action/Adventure/Thriller (Contains graphic violence, drug use & offensive language)

Proof of age photo ID must be provided on request. Final Sessions Fri 3.10pm, Tues 8.10pm

DORA AND THE LOST CITY OF GOLD (PG) 102 mins Adventure/Family

Fri 12.40pm, Sat 12.40pm Sun 12.40pm, Mon 3.30pm, Wed 3.30pm

LADIES NIGHT

ABOMINABLE

(G) 97 mins Animation/Adventure/Comedy

Fri 10.10am 12.50pm Sat 10.10am 12.50pm Sun 10.10am 12.50pm, Tues 3.30pm

THE ANGRY BIRDS MOVIE 2

said. The campaigners will continue their quest, he said. “We would like to see a firm plan for a time scale on the expressway.”

(PG) 97 mins Animation/Adventure/Comedy (Contains coarse language)

Fri 10.40am, Sat 10.40am Sun 10.40am

MOSLEY

(PG) 97 mins Animation/NZ (Contains violence & scary scenes) A species of creatures known as “thoriphants” rebel against their life of servitude and embark on a treacherous journey to find the fabled city of Uprights.

Fri 10.30am, Sat 10.30am Sun 10.30am, Mon 10.40am Tues 10.40am, Wed 10.40am

Saturday 12th October CASH Y ONL

Plants

SENIORS MORNINGS (Mon/Tues) & BRING BABY TOO (Wed) *free morning tea with movie

9—11am

87 Oxford St, Levin

CASH ONL Y

Next to the Adventure Park Fresh Local Honey Morning Tea Fresh Veges Fresh Home Baking Fresh Fruit

Mon

10.10am Downton Abbey (PG), 10.30am Hustlers (R16), 10.40am Mosley (PG)

Tues

10.10am Downton Abbey (PG), 10.30am Hustlers (R16), 10.40am Mosley (PG)

RIDE LIKE A GIRL

Starting Thursday 24 October (PG) 98 mins Biography/Drama/Sport (Contains coarse language) The story of Michelle Payne, the first female jockey to win the Melbourne Cup.

Ladies Night Advance Screening - Wednesday 16 October. Arrive 7.30pm for a drink & nibbles, movie 8.20pm. Tickets $28, pre-purchased tickets essential, no door sales.

Wed

www.focalpointcinema.co.nz 14-16 Salisbury Street, Levin. Ph 366 0330

www.focalpointcinema.co.nz 14-16 Salisbury Street, Levin. Ph 366 0330

Bring Baby Too

Sorry no session this week


6

Horowhenua Chronicle

Friday, October 11, 2019

Punting trio went from 40c to $32720 By PAUL WILLIAMS Three friends rode a punting rollercoaster to win the New Zealand Punter of the Year title at Hastings at the weekend. Shane Coey, Tony Moynihan and Sam Jorgenson of Wellington came back from a balance of just forty cents to end the day with $12,720 — an incredible turn of luck — and banked an extra $20,000 for winning first prize. There were tense moments for the trio though, who erupted with “man love” when announced as the winners, highfiving as the news sank in. Coey said just a few races earlier they were resigned to leaving the course with little more than memories, as a run of bad luck and a lost ticket almost saw them bow out. “We are stoked. It was pretty nerve-racking though. I was shaking,” he said. “We’re just mates who love our banter and a bet — definitely not professional punters though. These were huge bets for us, hence the shakes.” The annual competition, now in its 32nd year, saw punters start with a pot of $1500, of which they had to spend a minimum of $150 per race. The syndicate with the most money at the end of the day claimed the $20,000 first prize to go with their winnings, a trophy, and the distinction of being crowned New Zealand Punter of the Year. Coey had entered the competition once before, as had Moynihan, while Jorgenson was

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Wellington friends Shane Coey, Tony Moynihan and Sam Jorgensen, crowned New Zealand Punters of the Year 2019. making his debut. Their syndicate name was “We’ve Got a Fair Bit On”, a cry used often throughout the afternoon among the men. Despite enjoying the hospitality of the day in a room with 140 like-minded punting syndicates from around the country, they weren’t having much luck. But that all changed at Race Seven. They were all bullish

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about the chances of a horse called Aim Smart. A rush of blood saw them place $236 to win and $500 a place on the horse. After placing the bet their balance was just 40 cents. But Aim Smart duly won, paying $5.50 and $2.10, and they were back in the game with a balance of $2348. And 40 cents. But there was a problem. Each syndicate was issued with a voucher, to be presented before

each bet, and another voucher was issued at the completion of the bet. Their voucher, which had a grand total of 40 cents, was nowhere to be found. “We looked everywhere. We looked at the rubbish bins and thought . . . na na na. Can’t do that,” he said. They approached race control who he said were “fantastic” in sorting out their problem. “I thought we were gone, but

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they were fantastic in sorting it out. But we only got our next bet on just in time. They were about to jump,” he said. Their next bet was a small one. With Melody Belle the raging hot favourite in the main race of the day, they couldn’t see value in backing her at $1.30 win odds, so backed another runner to place. With two races to go and the competition leaders well ahead, they received some sage advice from another punter, who suggested they were still in a position to win. “He said ‘lads, do you want to win this or what?’ It was next level for us, but we were on a roll.” So they made a decision to go home with roughly what they came with and wager the rest. A healthy slice of the next quinella saw their balance balloon to $5500 with just one race left. Sticking to the plan in the last, they put $2000 to win on Hartley and had a $350 boxed quinella of Cutting Up Rough, Toms, Hartley and Sir Nate. Cutting Up Rough and Hartley dead-heated with the quinella paying $22.80, and Hartley’s win dividend was $1.70. That left them with $12,720 and a nervous wait to see if that was enough to take the title. It was, by more than $1000. “We thought . . . we may have won this, but were trying not to get too excited,” he said. They planned to share the trophy around and have it engraved and return it next year. “It’s a great day out. We’re definitely going back next year,” he said.

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Friday, October 11, 2019

Horowhenua Chronicle

7

Setting a slower pace for the future A

fter dispensing medicines to Levinites for more than 50 years John and Beth Berry have handed over the reins of their two pharmacies to son Philip Berry and Neville Gimblett. As newlyweds John and Beth Berry had just 200 pounds in their pockets in 1956. The 23-year-olds set off from Tauranga to Wairoa in the Hawke’s Bay where they bought a pharmacy. Nine years later and with three children in tow they bought the late William Donnelly’s pharmacy on the east side of Oxford Street, Levin. Donnelly had been dispensing meds to the local community since 1920. In November 1971 the new Levin Mall opened and the Berrys moved their business there. They were the mall’s first business tenants and initially had 220sq m to fill, a space which eventually grew to 330sq m. They started a photographic service and by 1988 it had its own shop. Berry Photo Centre had a Kodak minilab film processor and was also located in the Levin Mall. In 1972 they bought a house on the corner of Winchester and Queen Streets as accommodation for family and staff, and just in case something happened to the brick building in Oxford Street. In late 1996 the house became a pharmacy operated by the Berry’s business partner Diane Welch, who had been working the mall pharmacy since 1981. The mall pharmacy was sold in 2000 and in 2006 they sold the

John and Beth Berry.

Through the years. Levin Photo Centre to long-time manager Stephen Feldon. They also briefly owned the Mall Lotto business in the mid 1990s. Between 2000 and 2003 they were unable to have a pharmacy business in Levin because of a

non-competitive clause. In 2005 they formed a partnership with Diane Welch and obtained a licence to operate a pharmacy in the new Health Centre in 2007 and in 2009 they bought Queen Street Pharmacy

when owner Brian Eastham retired. Their son Philip purchased Diane Welch’s 51 per cent shareholding when she retired in 2013 and he has since been responsible for all operational

aspects of the company. John was still registered as a non-practising pharmacist and did a great deal of the pharmacies’ administration. But the time has come to rest on their laurels business-wise, though they will remain active in the community and the list of their activities over the past 50 years is impressive. “In 60 years a lot has changed in the business of pharmaceuticals,” said Berry. “We used to do as lot of mixtures and prepared 90 per cent of medicines. “The 50s started a therapeutic revolution. The discovery of penicillin and other medicines led to pharmaceuticals manufacturing, so that now 90 per cent of medicines arrive ready for use. “Pharmacies only make some ointments and creams now.” Other changes include the packaging. “They had to count by hand and handwrite labels and stick them to bottles manually. Three years ago the Berrys acquired a robot that, hooked up to a computer containing info about the medication each patient needed, automatically selected what was needed and packed them in blister packs. “Those robots handle 200 medicines and can do in four to five minutes what used to take us 20. Out come the sachets with the patients’ names, the medication and how and when to take them. “Keeping up with new trends is very important and you must keep reinvesting to stay current.”

Economic To achieve the other 3 pillars of sustainability – environment, social, and cultural, Horizons needs to ensure it is a region driving economic stimulus, creating policies that create clear pathways for a diverse range of industries.

Social We need to ensure we are creating a region that embraces sustainable housing and transport solutions – ensuring public facilities are catering for all age groups, from our youngest to our oldest residents.

Environmental Water and soil quality are key drivers to ensuring generations to come are able to enjoy our lakes and rivers for recreational and kai gathering activities. They are also essential to ensuring our vibrant primary industries are able to remain profitable. Primary producers across the region need to be focusing on farm based and major catchment mitigations that the whole community can engage in. Horizons need to work with all stake holders to achieve mutually beneficial solutions to make much needed environmental improvements as well as facilitating our all important domestic food production.

Cultural Ensuring the Treaty of Waitangi is respected in all policy making decisions. Along with Iwi engagement to help create solutions for ensuring policies are forward thinking and holistic in their creation and implementation. I feel it is important too for the Horizons Region to embrace our rapidly expanding culturally diverse communities. Authorised by Emma Clarke, 44 Joblins Road Levin

Economic Social Environmental Cultural

EMMA CLARKE For a sustainable Horizons Authorised by Emma Clarke, 44 Joblins Road Levin


8

Horowhenua Chronicle

Friday, October 11, 2019

Free seminar on macular degeneration Macular Degeneration NZ (MDNZ) is a charitable trust which aims to reduce the incidence and impact of MD in New Zealand, increase awareness and promote early detection to the 1.5 million atrisk New Zealanders. On Saturday November 2 MDNZ will host a free seminar in Waikanae’s Baptist Church, 286 Te Moana Road, from 10am, where ophthalmologist Dr Andrew Thompson will share the latest information on treatments and the management of this chronic disease. Information packs will be available on the day. Macular Degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in NZ with one in seven people over 50 years of age having some evidence of MD, and the incidence increases with age. Many people dismiss the early warning signs of MD, accepting vision loss as a normal part of the ageing process. Macular degeneration affects the central vision, affecting the ability to drive, read, watch television, undertake many hobbies and recognise faces. Loss of vision affects lifestyle and independent ageing associated with the risks of falls

and fracturing hips, developing depression, inability to access health services and earlier admission to nursing homes. By 2030, one in four people will be over 65. This group will also be living for longer than previous generations and 41 per cent of them do not know about this eye disease. To halt a potential epidemic of blindness, Macular Degeneration NZ says we need to be proactive so New Zealanders can live well in old age. ■ Register to attend this free seminar. Phone 0800 MACULA (622 852) or email info@mdnz.org.nz

Garden tour in Te Horo

Te Horo is holding a Country Garden Tour on November 16 and 17 with tickets valid for one day. Thirteen gardens can be visited for the $20 tickets and

All prospective parents and students are invited to attend the

PARENT & CHILD OPEN EVENING Thursday 24th October 2019 5.30pm - 7.30pm For students and whanau interested in attending Levin Intermediate School in 2020 Meet in the Quad area to begin your tour. When you arrive at Levin Intermediate, you will be greeted by a Student Guide and be taken on a tour of our School. Tour Guides will be available any time between 5.30pm and 7.30pm.

NO BOOKINGS ARE REQUIRED •

Visit the classrooms and specialist rooms to see our current students participating in learning

Introduce yourself to Sheree Garton, our Principal

See samples of student work on display in the classrooms and specialist rooms

Watch our promotional media

Learn more about our co-curricular programmes, i.e. AIMS Games, Japan Exchange, The Arts, Community Events

Enrolment forms will be available to take home

The staff will be available to answer any questions you may have about school life – please don’t hesitate to ask. There will be a complimentary sausage sizzle for all visitors. We look forward to meeting you and welcoming you to our School. Collingwood Street, Levin • Phone 368-8306

all proceeds go to the earthquake strengthening of the Te Horo Hall. ■ Tickets for the November garden tour can be bought at Te Horo Garden Centre,

Harrisons Gardenworld in Peka Peka, Watson’s Garden Centre in Ōtaki, Palmers Garden Centre in Plimmerton and at First National in Ōtaki.


Friday, October 11, 2019

Horowhenua Chronicle

9

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world on your

WALLS

Here are five room decor ideas for travel lovers

T

he joys of travelling the world, from soaking in the sunshine at sandy beaches on distant shores to walking through ancient temples and forts, make memories to last a lifetime. We buy souvenirs and take hundreds of photographs on our trips away, so that we have a lovely, constant reminder of the places we saw and the experiences we shared. Luckily, there are many ways you can decorate your bedroom so that even the months in-between your trips can feel like an exotic getaway!

5

Scan passport stamps as wall art: Place your passport face-down on the scanner, open to pages of stamps from places that really meant a lot to you. Using a high-resolution setting of over 300 dpi, scan through onto the computer and then print onto A4 paper, or alternatively take the project to a photo printing store for other sizes. Frame your prints and hang them side by side on the walls like a custom art gallery exhibition, only you and your adventures around the planet are the subjects on display. You can mix and match frame sizes to hang in a salon-style, or make them all identically sized so that they look neat and contemporary. Paint the frames too, if you like!

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1

Map the walls: Make your feature wall a world map by using wallpaper inspired by your favourite travel locations, such as the Resene Komar wall mural collection. A vintage, nautical theme will look great with printed photographs, airplane tickets, postcards or Polaroid pictures of the places you have been. Add these using Blu Tack® or other removable adhesives to make it a living memory wall. If you want to stick to the vintage look of the wallpaper, you can rub some damp tea bags over the backs of postcards and glue on some old stamps before you add them to the wall.

2

Use old suitcases as bedside tables: Stack up a pile of old suitcases, arranged so the smallest sits at the top in a pyramid format. Paint the bottom ones in Resene Double Sea Fog and the higher ones in Resene Ditto to create a subtle, natural ombre effect as the suitcases rise. Place some photo frames of your favourite travel memories on these globe-trotter inspired bedside tables. You can also add a vase of fresh flowers to complement the neutral white tones of the painted suitcases, making your time at home a relaxing R&R period before you jet off again!

3

Add a departure board dream wall: Paint an area of the room using Resene Write-on Wall Paint to work like a constant planning space for noting down travel budgets, next destination goals, cheap flight deals or notes to yourself about your upcoming escapades — especially information that needs to be a regular reminder such as applying for travel insurance or visas.

4

Make a globe lantern chain: Many craft shops and dollar stores sell white paper lanterns shaped like spheres. Sometimes they already come with LED lights inside, powered by batteries and hung in a chain. Other times, you can make your own DIY lantern chain by joining a row together with twine and stringing through some small lights. Before you hang it up, use sponges to paint each sphere in blue and green so it looks like a miniature planet Earth. Hang it along your curtain rod so the room has a pretty glow even in the evenings when they are drawn shut.

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Horowhenua Chronicle

Levin woman Angelina Smith before her head was shaved.

Friday, October 11, 2019

Raymond Smith, 6, gets used to his mother Angelina’s new hairstyle.

Angelina’s losing it all for the cause By PAUL WILLIAMS Losing her best friend and close family members to cancer prompted a Levin woman to shave her hair to raise money for cancer charities. Angelina Smith had visited the same hairdresser, Sue Rowlands, at Shears Cutting Bar in Levin for almost 20 years. This time, she asked for something different. Smith admitted being nervous as the sound of the clippers with a number one setting neared her head, but reminded herself it was

Sue Rowlands has been cutting Angelina Smith’s hair for more than 20 years. It was the first time she had asked for a number one.

Angelina Smith shares a laugh after having her head shaved by Sue Rowlands.

for a worthy cause. At the time of the cut she had managed to raise $1116.12 through Shave for a Cure. Her best friend died of cancer, as had her father and grandfather and members of her wider family. There were plenty of family and friends watching and supporting her as the hair fell to the floor. “Because I have had friends and family who have either lost their fight with cancer or won their fight with cancer . . . I wanted to raise awareness that it affects families too,” she said. “If any money raised can help lessen the worry for families I hope it can because every little bit helps.” “I just see how it affects the wider community and wanted to do what I can to help.”


Friday, October 11, 2019

Horowhenua Chronicle

11

OPINION

All have a part to play for water Although Land Air Water Aotearoa’s latest report is all “doom and gloom”, New Zealand’s waterways are still something to be proud of. After all, a supermodel with a zit is still a supermodel, writes Dr Jacqueline Rowarth.

T

he LAWA (Land Air Water Aotearoa) report released on Sunday was presented with doom and gloom. More rivers are deteriorating in New Zealand than improving. The news was extremely disappointing after the 2018 “cause for optimism” headline. A large number of farmers have spent hundreds of thousands of dollars to reduce their environmental impact. They have implemented the recommendations given to them by researchers and rural professionals: fence, plant, bridge, culvert, replace, retire . . . identify your contaminant source, put in wetlands, storage ponds, upgrade the effluent … So last year’s report made sense. Everything being done was working, and when things are going well, it is easy to feel positive about doing more. LAWA’s 2019 report was a shock. But the headline is based on a broadbrush analysis that doesn’t differentiate land use, source of contaminant, geographical concentration of measurements, or starting point. In addition, the state of a site is presented in comparison with the rest of New Zealand as being in the best 25 per cent, best 50 per cent, worst 50 per cent and worst 25 per cent. This is similar to the old school exam system where 50 per cent always failed. The “improving or deteriorating” trend is identified for each site generally over 10 years. This means that a best site could be deteriorating… but is still “best”. This is like achieving top of the class with a 90 per cent in an exam one year and being top of the class with 85 per cent the next. You are still performing highly but have deteriorated. Or like a supermodel with a zit — would she still be a supermodel? (Note, the man in the house said he’d be prepared to do the research if it would help science). The real problem with interpreting the data is the variable pass mark. LAWA does give some bands in the explanatory notes. These show that New Zealand rivers are high quality in many parameters in comparison with anything overseas. And though it is certainly true that New Zealand waters are “different“, we need to think what differences matter. In nitrate, Niwa has suggested that up to 1.5 mg/kg for the annual 95th percentile is unlikely to harm even the most sensitive of fish. The LAWA report indicates that 75 per cent of river sites tested are below 0.8 for nitrate and nitrite (a very small component) combined. The Thames in the UK has a nitrate of about 7 and also has 125 species of fish. For E. coli, the EU swimming directive gives a grade of “excellent“for a 95th percentile of coliform forming units of less than 540 cfu/100ml, and “good“for less than 1000. No health problems seem to occur (note that the EU does not measure within two days of heavy rain, and also discards outliers). LAWA reports that 75 per cent of sites have E. coli of less than 288. And the Macroinvertebrate Index thresholds are above 119 score for excellent, and less than 80 for poor. The

LAWA report indicates 75 per cent of sites are above 92. Further analysis shows that many of the declining sites are associated with human habitation. This is partly a function of geographical concentration of sampling, but also reflects the difficulty of keeping human activity separate from the environment. Leaking septic tanks and sewerage systems, runoff from roads (including zinc and copper), plus dogs, ducks and seagulls create problems. And so do earthworks and buildings. There are few people in New Zealand who don’t value the concept of clean rivers supporting wildlife, and they like the thought of swimming in the rivers when the weather suits. It is known that native fish are struggling, and work is being done on how to assist their survival. It is the migratory species that are most at risk, but Minister Sage’s proposal to limit whitebaiting caused uproar. Other suggestions such as creating places for fish to hide by reducing sediment, allowing trees to fall into rivers, and building fish tunnels, have been implemented in various places; time will indicate whether they have or haven’t been effective. As for swimming, the LAWA data indicates that the problem is not as great as feared. Furthermore, during the 1950s when some current people in power were children swimming in rivers in the long hot summers that always existed… the E. coli between Cambridge and Hamilton was measured at 500-600 cfu per 100ml. Downstream of Hamilton, 6000 to 110,000 was measured. New Zealand rivers have improved since the 1950s and though a deterioration in some indicators has been recorded in the past decade, the overall quality is still good to excellent. The latest LAWA report has used different measuring techniques from the last one, but shows we have an excellent starting point from which improvements can be made, targeting the area of concern. The Government’s Freshwater Reforms have indicated that we all have a part to play. The LAWA website shows where we can focus. Change will require further investment — through increased rates for urban regions, through farm income in rural areas. Before we make the commitment, we need to be very sure that what is being suggested will have the desired effect. And, perhaps, how bad the perceived problem really is. Zits improve with the right treatment and a supermodel with a blemish is still a supermodel. - Dr Jacqueline Rowarth has a PhD in Soil Science (nutrient cycling) and has been analysing agri-environment interaction for several decades.

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12

Horowhenua Chronicle

Friday, October 11, 2019

Gardening Q&A

GARDEN TASKS

WITH GLENYS WOOLLARD What kind of herb is epazote?

It’s a tall leafy annual with a fairly strong taste, popular in Mexican cooking but also having medicinal uses. Seeds are sometimes available in NZ; plant in a sunny,

Refill and tidy ponds

Empty your ponds and water features and clean them. Refill with clean water, and buy a couple of new water plants.

Watch for leaf curl

Watch for peach leaf curl. It shows up as curled and blistered leaves on the new spring foliage of your peach, nectarine and almond trees. Spray with copper.

Thin out seedlings

Thin out carrots, parsnips and beetroot to allow plants more room to develop.

Trim hedges

Give new hedge plants a gentle trim. They’ll be putting on new growth now but topping them will encourage growth at the base.

GROW YOUR OWN

Photo / Getty Images

AVOCADOS

A

vocados are rich in vitamins, antioxidants, fibre and healthy monounsaturated fats, so they’re a powerhouse of nutritional goodness. If you’re keen on creating guacamole, salsa and salads from homegrown avocados, consider including some trees in your garden. Avocados are mainly grown in warm areas of the North Island of New Zealand, however they can also be grown in a warm frost-protected spot in slightly cooler areas. Here are a few important tips when it comes to growing avocados at home: Avocados need moist but well drained soil. Poorly drained soil can quickly lead to root rot and plant death. Choose a sunny, sheltered site that is protected from frost and wind. Avocado flowers contain both male and female organs which open twice over two days. When the flower first opens it’s female, when it reopens on the second day it’s male. The timing of this flowering classifies avocados into either A or B types. Although there can be some self pollination in warm areas, planting two different varieties (from an A and B type) will help improve pollination and fruit set.

well-drained spot, and once away pinch back the leaves to make a bushier plant. You can harvest epazote after 45-60 days, young tender leaves and stems are best, but note that too much of this herb can be toxic, and it isn’t recommended for pregnant women. Coriander is considered an acceptable substitute, even in Mexico.

What’s the difference between the various kinds of iris?

Their growing system. Irises grow from either bulbs or rhizomes, which separates them into two main categories with numerous subdivisions. Examples of bulbous

Photo / 123RF

‘A’ varieties that are great for growing in medium sized backyards include Haas and Reed. ‘B’ varieties include Bacon and Fuerte. Grafted plants will fruit earlier than seedling trees. Avocados will not ripen on the tree. Pop a too-firm avocado in a paper bag with a banana for a few days to help it soften. Avocados perform best when planted into soil that’s been enriched first with a concentrated source of organic matter like Yates Dynamic Lifter Organic Plant Food. Yates Dynamic Lifter will help improve the

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quality of the soil, encourage earthworms and beneficial soil microorganisms and provide the tree with gentle nutrients as it establishes. Reapplying Yates Dynamic Lifter every six weeks from spring to autumn will help ensure the trees have enough nutrients to promote healthy foliage and a great harvest. Mulching around the root zone with an organic mulch will help reduce moisture loss and add further organic matter to the soil. ■ For more ideas and information, visit yates.co.nz

irises include Dutch, English and Spanish irises (the xiphium group) as well as reticulata (aka dwarf bulbous iris). Both bearded and non-bearded types grow from rhizomes, likewise flag, Louisiana, Siberian and Japanese irises — with 300-odd species and many natural hybrids, it can be confusing. Named after the rainbow goddess, there’s an iris for most situations. If you have a gardening question, email Glenys at glenyswoollard@icloud.com

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Friday, October 11, 2019

Horowhenua Chronicle

13

PEST OF THE MONTH — LESSER HOUSE FLIES

Managing that annoying house fly It is at this time of the year, as the weather warms, that the urban pest season starts to impact on us. Generally, the first thing we notice is the increase in fly numbers. One fly species of considerable annoyance is Fannia canicularis (common name: lesser housefly, or sometimes referred to as the ‘poultry yard fly’). The lesser housefly is considered a cool climate species, particularly more prevalent in spring and autumn. After lying dormant through the winter months and having survived these cooler temperatures, lesser housefly suddenly begins to emerge in numbers. Certain environments contribute to the rapid increase in populations. One example is the presence of chickens or having poultry sheds nearby. They often are an enormous contributor to lesser housefly numbers. The reason for this is lesser house fly prefer to lay their eggs in chicken manure over any other decaying medium. Similarly chicken manure is also a particularly favourable maggot food source. Lesser houseflies have some serious breeding capacity. Eggs are laid in batches, approximately 50 eggs each. Would you believe that one single female fly can lay over 2000 eggs during her lifespan. Furthermore in a warm environment (25 degrees) the lifespan of lesser housefly, beginning from egg to adult, takes only 22 days. Obviously, this means a lesser house fly infestation can very quickly develop into a huge problem. Adult flies tend to congregate in numbers in certain areas. Favourites are shaded areas near poultry yards, within garages, porches and the internal environment of our houses. Interestingly often these represent areas where there is little air movement. One reason the lesser housefly prefers these environments is simply that they are unable to fly in winds that exceed 25 kph. Contrary to belief, lesser houseflies are not really interested in our food so are not often a problem with this aspect. Instead they create a nuisance factor by flying in a circular pattern usually below a hanging light fitting or a light source. This is likely to be located in the middle of a room. Similarly they can be found swarming in

LVN111019pest

Lesser house flies congregating on a porch wall.

front of us when we are sitting on a sheltered veranda. This annoying flight path of the lesser housefly more often than not is at human face height, thus maximising their nuisance factor. The question is how to control lesser housefly populations. Actually control can be particularly difficult especially when large numbers of flies are continuously emerging from a breeding source that includes a poultry shed or nearby animal manure or compost. Ultimately the best method of control is via removal of this breeding material and the implementation of this regular hygiene practice. Finally, for the average house owner there exists a vast range of fly control devices such as sticky tapes, insect lights, pheromone traps, fly bags and fly sprays that can be used but these may not always significantly reduce fly levels in heavily infested areas. Reducing numbers, in terms of restricting flies entry into houses is the best option, particularly for those houses located near high fly population areas. A long-term, and effective solution will involve the installation of fly excluding screens on windows and doors. ■ Brent Page is a Horowhenua Entomologist and Director of Nature’s Way Pest Control. For more information, visit www.nwpc.co.nz/pests/flies

Reducing numbers, in terms of restricting flies entry into houses is the best option, particularly for those houses located near high fly population areas. A long-term, and effective solution will involve the installation of fly excluding screens on windows and doors.

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Horowhenua Chronicle

Friday, October 11, 2019

Walk with us on November 9 to raise vital funds to fight animal cruelty. Join the pack at greatpawswalk.co.nz

Proudly supported by

Best Practice Accreditation what does it mean for you and your pet? Levin and Horowhenua Veterinary Centre is the only local clinic with Best Practice Accreditation.

and your patient is monitored throughout the procedure by a registered nurse with modern monitoring equipment.

Best Practice Accreditation is the sole quality accreditation programme in New Zealand for veterinary clinics and hospitals, ensuring the highest standard of care for your pet. It is currently a voluntary programme for practices, which means you know that your veterinarians stand by their excellence, as they undergo voluntary auditing every two years.

This can be reflected by considering our points of difference with a routine cat spey.

What does this mean for you and your pet? When you choose a Best Practice Accredited clinic, you can be confident that your pet is receiving a high standard of care, by highly trained professionals, in modern well maintained facilities. This means that when your pet is examined, treated or undergoing a procedure, we use modern medicine or surgical techniques,

In clinic, there are separate areas for cats and dogs in reception as well as separate cat and dog wards in clinic. In addition, we use pheromone diffusers (Adaptil and Feliway) in all clinical areas to reduce stress. All animals receive a pre-anaesthetic exam, pre-emptive pain relief prior to the procedure, intravenous catheterisation, monitoring throughout the procedure (a minimum of blood pressure, oxygen saturation, heart rate and respiratory rate with additional monitoring for compromised patients), post-operative pain relief, and free post-op checks. We take pain management seriously and often use multiple types of pain relief to keep your pet as comfortable as possible.

On Saturday November the 16th from 2pm until 4pm, Levin and Horowhenua Veterinary Centre will be celebrating its 80th birthday with an open day and festivities. Watch this space for more information nearer the time, and be sure to check out our website: lhvc.co.nz for information on how to enter and vote in our photo competitions!

Crouch, Touch Paws!

Animal Control (06) 366 0999

Clinic Hours & Small Animal After-Hours Service

Monday - Friday 8.00am - 5.30pm Saturday 9.00am - 3.00pm Sunday

Urgent Appointments Only

10.00am - 2.00pm

Companion Animals After-Hours Service

Massey University Pet Emergency Centre

0800 73 83 63

518 Queen St, Levin Ph: 368 2891 www.lhvc.co.nz


Friday, October 11, 2019

Horowhenua Chronicle

MEET TŌTARA | PODOCARPUS TOTARA

The mighty tōtara Meet tōtara | Podocarpus totara Tōtara are forest giants, the largest known species in the podocarp family. What you need to know about tōtara: Threat status: Tōtara is a species of podocarp tree endemic to New Zealand. It is still widespread, but is no longer found as a dominant vegetation type in much of its former range. Likely to be spotted: Tōtara is commonly found in lowland areas where the soil is fertile and well drained. It grows throughout the North Island and north-eastern South Island in lowland, montane and lower subalpine forest at elevations of up to 600 m. Doing what: Stretching up to Ranginui (the sky) — tōtara is a light-loving species so it reaches for the forest canopy, growing up to 30m high. As a young tree, tōtara is bushy and spreading. As it gains height, it acquires a massive trunk covered in thick, stringy bark. Tōtara is prized by tangata whenua; its durable timber is traditionally used for canoes (waka) and carving. You might not know that: Tōtara is a conifer with separate sexes, belonging to the podocarp family. Like all conifers, podocarps reproduce using cones, but podocarp cones are extremely modified and look more like berries. These are attractive to birds, which help to spread the seeds. The male tōtara has pollen cones, which develop in spring at the ends of the old stems in groups of one to three. New cones are green, but turn brown as they open and release pollen. The female fruit is a rounded green seed (4-5mm) which sits on a smooth succulent red stem. Threats to our forest giants: · Land clearance and timber harvesting has reduced the size of our podocarp forests.

Cones and fruit on a female tōtara tree. PHOTO / DOC

· Possums do enormous damage to native New Zealand forests. They also compete with native animals for food, and prey upon birds, their eggs and nestlings. · Weeds, often garden escapees, have invaded our forests and in many cases out-compete native plants. · Browsing by introduced mammals such as deer and sheep seriously limit the ability of a forest to regenerate. · Fire is an obvious threat to forest. ■ To find out more about local species or conservation work, contact DOC Manawatu (email manawatu@doc.govt.nz, phone 06-3509700) or visit www.doc.govt.nz

YOUR LETTERS

Junk mail I get fed up with all this junk mail in my letter box. I know it is advertising but from my point of view it is junk mail and a shocking waste of resources in this day and age of pollution. I don’t ask for it, I never read it and I should not have to put up with it. And it damages the environment. I also read that you shouldn’t burn paper with colour print/pictures. So, why don’t I just put a sign on my letter box saying “no junk mail”? I did, only to discover that I then no longer got my local newspaper! Apparently that is also in the category of “junk mail”. So, I had to take the sign off. Philosophically, I think that tells you a lot about our society. A newspaper that allegedly informs is junk mail! I know people read this “junk” and the advertiser wants to sell their goods, but its just another pollutant. I think the advertisers should find better ways of advertising their goods that do not pollute the environment. What does that tell you

about our society? We have all the wrong priorities. YVONNE SUMMERS Levin

Wellbeing expo The Wellbeing Expo held at Levin’s Public Library Te Takeretanga o Kura-hau-pō on Friday September 24: A big thank you to Renee MacDonald and all who participated in bringing all the various health initiatives as one body, for the public to see and experience. What a brilliant event. It brought the whole community together. Persons who were lucky enough to come together as one. Kotahitanga, manaakitanga, arohanui. After a couple of hours there, I didn’t want to leave. It was that good. Hopefully the event can happen more often, for if one becomes sick, one cannot help others. CHARLES RUDD LEVIN

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Horowhenua Chronicle

Friday, October 11, 2019

CROSSWORD

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DECODER

Each number

letter of the alphabet. Write the given letters into all squares with matching numbers. Now work out which letters are represented by the other numbers. As you get the letters, write them into the main grid and the reference grid. Decoder uses all 26 letters of the alphabet.

Y

ABCDE FGHIJKL MNOPQRSTUV WXYZ

1

How many words of three or more letters can you make, using each letter only once? Plurals are allowed, but no foreign words or words beginning with a capital. There’s at least one six-letter word. Good 17 Very Good 20 Excellent 23

465

Fill the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 to 9.

Black out squares to reveal a completed grid All puzzles © The Puzzle Company

WORDBUILDER

BLACKOUT A L A R I A N N L D G I L T L E A O V E R M I A P R O M P T U O I T Z E R O E E N E N D E D

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A I R C R A F T M E E O T E M G A R B L E I R E L H E T T O S T O M R U E V P E E V E F R O L R R O L D H A N D S E E U E D E F E W R I T E

1

S

Learn, 12. Idiot, 13. Deter, 16. Perish, 17. Twitch, 19. Orate, 20. Gnarl, 21. Scour, 22. Eagle.

Exalt, 15. Skint, 18. Tongue-twister, 23. Safari, 24. Trough, 25. Sac, 26. Health, 27. Horde. Down: Across: 1. Power, 4. Unfurl, 7. Air, 8.

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SUDOKU

B I O G R A P H E R

DECODER 22

A L T E R A T I O N E

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I V L O E G P D R W D

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WORDBUILDER

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A W T X H R F N O G E

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I B I O G R A P H E R

3

Ale, all, ate, awl, eat, ell, eta, lat, late, law, lea, leal, let, tael, tale, tall, taw, tea, teal, tell, wale, wall, WALLET, weal, well, welt, wet.

BLACKOUT

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Y T 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 R

DOWN 1. Carpenter’s tool (5) 2. Faint smell (5) 3. Scallywag (6) 4. Child; sea creature (6) 5. Lint (5) 6. Hoist (5) 10. Syrupy (5) 11. Memorise (5) 12. Fool (5) 13. Discourage (5) 16. Expire (6) 17. Spasm (6) 19. Give formal speech (5) 20. Knotty protuberance (5) 21. Clean by rubbing hard (5) 22. Bird of prey (5)

ACROSS 1. Might (5) 4. Open out (6) 7. Ventilate (3) 8. Tooth decay (6) 9. Relative (6) 10. Smugly complacent (4-9) 14. Praise, glorify (5) 15. Broke (colloq) (5) 18. 23. Hunting expedition (6) 24. Gutter (6) 25. Pouch (3) 26. Wellbeing (6) 27. Multitude (5)

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Friday, October 11, 2019

Horowhenua Chronicle

17

Rowing team brings home medals A small team of Horowhenua Masters rowers returned home with a huge medal haul from the national competition at Lake Ruataniwha in Twizel at the weekend. Between them Andrew Bealing, Bruce Tate and Kevin Horan recorded 10 gold, 11 silver and four bronze medals in the various events competing against more than 300 other rowers aged between 26 and 83 at the two-day regatta. Such was their success, they are now looking to compete at the Australian Masters Champs in April 2020 on Lake Barrington. They were joined in some events by Whanganui rower Martin Bridger. There were 36 clubs from New Zealand competing, and a visiting team from Australia. Competition was strong as several rowers were former NZ elite representatives, including World and Olympic medalists. Racing was ‘average aged’, so boats were put in the division of the average age of the crew rowing.

LVN091019row

The Horowhenua Masters Rowing Club team could be off to Australia.

Triples champions at bowling club

SPORTS RESULTS ■ GOLF Buckley Golf Club Sunday 6th October. STBFD Ricky Matiaha 41 Joe Winiata 40 Ricky Judd 38 Kerry Moore 37 Danny Waerea 36 çb Kelvin Blayney 36 Shane Metcalfe 36. Twos. Darren Brown no. 3 Joe Winiata no. 14 Jackpot struck No. 14 Joe Winiata Foxton Golf Club 5 October.- Kim Kuiti 42, Charlie Gribble 42, Mark Hoffman 41, John Baird 40, Richard Carnnachan 39, Elliott Olson 38, Graeme Morgan 38. 2's- John Baird, Elliott Olson. Levin Golf Club Results week ending October 6 Wednesday - Ladies Net: Sue Staples 76, Carol Louisson 76, Leanne Ward 76; 9 Hole Mixed Gross: James MacKenzie 45, Peter Price 48, Ray Ferguson 49. Michael Christensen got a two; Thursday - Early Levin Men Stableford: Russ Baldwin 40, Mike Tate 39, Owen Bonis 38. Mike Tate got a two; Early Foxton Men: Charles Gribble 40, Keith Norris 38, Gary Stratford 38; Late Men Net: Gavin Jones 70, Mark Duston 71, Peter Johnston 74; Friday 9 Hole Mixed Stableford: Helen Latham 20, Graham Cottrell 20, Phil Hessell 19. John Hailwood got a two; Saturday - Early men Stableford: Owen Bonis 44, Peter Holmes 41, Ivan Franklin 40; Ladies Net: Rosie Priest 66, Joanne Wilton-Eadie 69, Leanne Ward 73; Late Men Stableford: Klaas De Graaff 40, Phil Beale 40, Nathan Murray 38. Rod Batchelar got a two.

■ BOWLS Levin RSA Bowling Club Gala Results for October 7. 1st Ngaire Fluerty, Rona Cutler & Patrick Albert. 2nd Teresa Borane, Timeri Sanders & Mervyn Jakeman. 3rd John Graumans, Beryl Carter & Izzy Kennedy.

Victory needed

LVN091019bowls2

LVN091019bowls1

Levin Bowling Club Men’s Triples competition winners: G Law, A Jansson and L Judd.

Levin Bowling Club Women's Triples winners in a very close match: L Moy, M Copeland and B Law.

Last weekend the final of the Women’s and Men’s Triples were played at the Levin Bowling club in bright sunshine. The women’s triples winners

team to play in Wanganui next weekend and for Maggie who teamed up with Dylan Thomas from the Levin Central Bowling club to win the Centre’s Pairs

were L Moy, M Copeland and B Law. It has also been a good week for Bella, who has been named in the Kāpiti Centre Women’s rep

2x4x2 competition at the Waikanae Bowling club. The club’s men’s triples competition was won by G Law, A Jansson and L Judd.

Horowhenua-Kāpiti can still make the playoffs for the Heartland rugby championship in their final match against Wanganui at Levin Domain tomorrow. But they will need a bonus point victory, and Poverty Bay to beat Buller. Kickoff 2.30pm. Horowhenua-Kāpiti: 1 David McErlean. 2 Dean Ropata. 3 Scott Cameron. 4 Tuitonga Katoa. 5 Sonny Woodmass. 6 Logan Broughton. 7 Nathan Kendrick. 8 Thomas Zimmerman. 9 Kane Tamou. 10 Pakai Turia. 11 Himiona Henare. 12 Jaxon Tagavaitau. 13 Kameli Kuruyabaki. 14 Willie Paia’aua. 15 Jono Ihaka. 16 Jordan Tupai-Ui. 17 Isaako Ulutoa. 18 Pita Marshall. 19 Sean Pape. 20 Ethan Reti. 21 Cody Hemi. 22 Dylan Taylor.


2-for t i c ke - 1 ts on

Grab your girlfriends, mum or daughters for a great day out! Sat 19 & Sun 20 Oct, 10am–5pm TSB Stadium, New Plymouth Door Sales $10 | Kids Under 12 Free Everything from gourmet food, tea and artisan products to fashion, beauty, travel and more: • 130 Exhibitors • Skin On Forty-Five Beauty Lounge • NV Hair Lounge • Etcetera Bridal Gown Sale • Artisan Craft & Taste Zones • Goodie Bags

You deserve a girls day out.

Dilmah is celebrating the amazing women of New Zealand with the gift of tea. Stop by our stand to nominate the unsung heroes in your life!

womenslifestyleexpo.co.nz


Friday, October 11, 2019

Horowhenua Chronicle

AT THE YARDS

19

SERVICE DIRECTORY ADVERTORIAL

Yearling cattle the Growing our region flavour of the day Levin Levin Sale prices were on a par with last week’s sale. 4 day old calves sold well, F/H bulls $40-$200, Freis bulls $70, F/H heifers $60-$120. Sheep — fat lambs $110-$185, store lambs $90-$120, ewes & lambs $110-$125, all counted. Cattle — 2 yr steers $1100, Rsg 2 heifers $9040, ylg F/H steers $840, F/H heifers $640-$800, xbred steers $550-$700. Cattle Fair planned for Tuesday, November 5. All entries and inquiries phone David Haworth 027 450 4133, Margaret 021 252 1977.

Rongotea Rongotea Sale Report from Wednesday, October 9: Yearling cattle were the flavour of the day, with most breeds represented Rongotea reported Darryl Harwood of NZ Farmers Livestock. 2 year Friesian-Hereford steers 482kg made $3.01/kg. 2 year Friesian-Hereford bulls 458kg made $2.84/kg and 2 year Hereford rigs 525kg made $2.95/kg. 2 year Friesian-Hereford cross heifers 349kg-449kg made $2.92/kg-$3.09/kg, Friesian heifers 530kg made $2.55/kg and Jersey heifers 445kg made $2.49/kg. Yearling Angus cross steers 270kg350kg made $2.51/kg-$2.57/kg. Simmental cross steers 303 kg made $3.00/kg and White Galloway cross steers

270kg made $2.74/kg. Yearling Friesian bulls 210kg-385kg made $2.30/kg-$2.98/kg, FriesianHereford cross bulls 356kg made $3.14/kg and Simmental cross bulls 225kg-357kg made $2.22/kg-$2.69/kg. Ayrshire bulls 240kg made $2.12/kg and exotic bulls 170kg made $2.65/kg. Yearling Friesian-Hereford cross heifers 168kg-294kg made $2.84/kg-$3.33/ kg, Angus cross heifers 165kg-335kg made $2.63/kg-$2.76/kg. Simmental cross heifers 215kg-340kg made $2.60/kg-$2.82kg and cross bred heifers 260kg made $2.08/kg. Weaner Friesian-Hereford cross steers 140kg-230kg made $575-$605, Angus cross steers 162 kg made $495 and Red Devon cross steers 225kg made $700. Weaner Friesian bulls 160kg made $350, Angus cross bulls 247kg made $660 and Friesian-Hereford bulls 162kg-165kg made $485-$560. Weaner Friesian-Hereford cross heifers 130kg made $480. In calf Friesian cows made $1310, in calf Friesian heifers made $1370 and in calf cross bred heifers made $1260. Friesian boner cows 370kg-526kg made $1.76/kg-$2.31./kg. In the calf pens, Friesian bull calves made $100, Friesian-Hereford cross bull calves made $160-$210. Angus cross bull calves made $80-$130 and White Galloway cross bull calves made $155. Friesian-Hereford cross heifer calves made $60-$120 and Angus cross heifer calves made $80-$100.

After more than 20 years of service to the Horowhenua region, Paul Ireland Digger Hire knows the community well. With the new highways being developed, our region is set to expand. Our team has been doing projects for land development and maintenance, a reflection of the new highways creating long-term work for civil construction. We are excited to watch the town grow. To keep up with demand, we have acquired new excavators and trucks capable of carrying out a multitude of tasks including root cutting, section clearing, foundations and driveways, all at competitive pricing with workmanship guaranteed.

We also have a stump grinder, which has been busy. There are also loaders and grabs, rollers, compactors and graders available. We also provide a wide range of concrete services, including concrete cutting and core boring. We have designed a hotbox for hot mixing jobs to help with utility reinstatement jobs. Underground thrusting is another specialised service. If you need topsoil, metal, sand or raceway lime supplies it’s no problem.

EXCAVATIONS

ONSITE COMPUTER SERVICES

■ Do it yourself. Get it from Paul Ireland Digger Hire Ltd at 101 Hokio Beach Road or phone (06) 367-8007. Call Danny and have a chat on 0274 845 385.

PROMPT On-Site Computer Repairs & Support. We Come to YOU!

• New Computers & Laptops Fully Hardware Checked • Repairs & Upgrades • Onsite New Computer Installations • Internet & Email Setup

• Virus & Spyware Removal • Data Backup & Recovery • Secure Network & Wireless Setups • Follow-Up Support Services

B L MicroTek Ltd LEVIN 06 367 9709

The Taitoko and Kerekere Cluster of Schools are looking to employ 9 Permanent Learning Support Coordinators across 16 Primary and 3 Secondary Schools. Start date is 20 January 2020. Levin North School principal@levinnorth.school.nz

Learning Support Coordinator Levin North School and Levin Intermediate School

Koputaroa School principal@koputaroa.school.nz

Learning Support Coordinator Koputaroa School, Poroutawhao School and Manakau School

Taitoko School principal@taitoko.school.nz

Learning Support Coordinator Taitoko School, Levin School and Ohau School

Fairfield School amaclean@fairfieldlevin.school.nz

Learning Support Coordinator Fairfield School

Levin East School rikki@levineast.school.nz

Learning Support Coordinator Levin East School and St Joseph’s School

Coley Street School principal@coleystreet.school.nz

Learning Support Coordinator Coley St School, Shannon School and Foxton Primary School

Manawatu College Learning Support Coordinator Manawatu College, St Mary’s School and Foxton Beach School principal@manawatucollege.school.nz

Each position is a Permanent Full Time Teaching Equivalent (FTTE) using the Primary Teachers Collective Agreement or the Secondary Teachers Collective Agreement, depending on teaching qualifications.

027 284 6020

www.blmicrotek.co.nz

Kapiti & Horowhenua Homes & Businesses

DIESEL SERVICES

CENTRAL AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES Full Diesel repairs & Maintenance TRANSPORT & GENERAL ENGINEERING

Phone

06 368 2037 06 368 1591 Mobile Ian 021 432 995 Ken 021 246 8202

We are looking for experienced teachers holding a current practising certificate, who have the ability to manage learning support (in some cases) across multiple schools, drawing together whānau, agencies, specialists and Early Childhood Educators by working within a delivery model which is at the forefront of learning support.

B.G. Buck Ltd

Role Description: Learning Support Coordinators will work alongside schools to help identify and meet the needs of all learners in our cluster, and work to build the capability of kaiako/teachers. This is a coordinating role (rather than a teaching role) but requires the successful applicants to work alongside kaiako/teachers, Principals and SENCo’s, agencies, whānau, iwi and support the development of teacher practice in working with children and young people with a range of learning needs. The LSCs will be expected to work together as a network, sharing knowledge and expertise within the cluster, alongside an Across School Teacher (AST) with a designated inquiry focus of our LSC network.

YOUR TOTAL ELECTRICAL SPECIALISTS

Due to this being an exciting new opportunity within the education sector, please visit https://conversation.education.govt.nz/assets/LSC/Learning-Support-Coordinator-Role-Description.pdf A detailed description of each of the positions advertised, (including position specific qualities) is available from each of the ‘Employing School’s Principal’ at the email addresses provided. If applying for multiple roles, please send a covering letter and CV for each position. Applications Close: 5pm - 18 October 2019

Industrial – Domestic – Commercial Commercial Refrigeration • Accredited Heat Pump Suppliers & Installers • Home Ventilation Systems • Inspections • Caravan Certificates 2 Sheffield Street • Town & Rural Levin • Pumps, Motors Ph: 367 9086 • Generators Email: bgelect@xtra.co.nz SERVICING THE HOROWHENUA FOR OVER 54 YEARS The best test is the test of time!

Certified Plumbers, Gasfitters, Drainlayers, Roofers • Plumbing • Gasfitting • Roofing & Roofing Repairs • Drain Clearing/Unblocking • Drain CCTV Inspections • Spouting and Gutter Repairs • Free Quotes Any questions please call 0800 463 569 | 06 3678111

Email levin@gowiththeflow.co.nz www.gowiththeflow.co.nz Taking Care Of The Horowhenua

WANT TO PROMOTE YOUR BUSINESS IN THE

?

SERVICE DIRECTORY

Call (06) 368 5109 today


20

Horowhenua Chronicle

FamilyNotices Deaths

In Memoriam

GOWAN, COPELAND, Leslie (Les) Eric. Charles Finlay (Chic). 11th October 2012 Passed peacefully away, aged 81 years on Remembering you Friday 4th October is easy, 2019 with Joy by his I do it everyday, side. Beloved husband But the emptiness of Joy, cherished inside me father of Sonia Gowan Will never go away. and Natasha Senior, Vi (Violet) and father-in-law of Darren Senior. Funeral service today, Friday 11th October at 11:00am at Shone and Shirley Funeral Home, 164 Tahunanui Drive, Nelson. Shone & Shirley Funeral Directors Nelson

Remember us in your Will and leave a legacy of hope For more information, call

A legacy for generations to come

>> localclassifieds >> say it. sell it. buy it.

ADVERTISING (06) 368 5109

levinclassads@chronicle.co.nz Public Notices

An afternoon to enjoy with Greg Christiansen, solo singer and entertainer. Wednesday 30th October at 1:30pm - War Vets Lounge $6 per head + raffle drawn on the day WORLD STROKE CLUB AWARENESS WEEK

For more information, call our Bequests Coordinator on 04 245 0864.

Whaioro Trust Invites you or your representative to attend the

2019 ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING Friday 25th October 2019 10:00am

Māori Battalion Hall/Te Rau Aroha 138 Cuba Street, Palmerston North 4410 Please RSVP to: tkeelan-cox@whaioro.org.nz by 18th October 2019

Please donate to help more Kiwis live a long and happy life.

*8+1&&: 8(947 197 #6431/47 .: /04 '13) 51%-&: 2-9+4 !"$,

$%-#)./ '!)#,&+)( " *&+-# 0.(+-(

Notice of General Meetings These branch meetings will elect delegates from qualifying members in order to form the Otaki Electorate Selection Committee to select the candidate for the 2020 general election.

Otaki

Tuesday 15th October at 7:00pm Rotary Hall, Aotaki Street, Otaki

"C4$6I; 1 =';#5 OC6P

the72club.co.nz

='C4$ M:4#&#@C4#:;5 K;N#;' E 000D#@LC6PD@:D;G

Levin

Wednesday 16th October at 7:00pm Thompson House, Kent Street Levin

Paraparaumu

Monday 21st October at 7:00pm Kapiti Community Centre Ngahina Street, Paraparaumu Known for Excellence. Trusted for Value. Our company has been serving the families of our district for 96 years Chapels in Levin, Shannon & Otaki Cemetery Memorials We own & operate Horowhenua Crematorium Large variety of Caskets and Urns

Main Office: 284 Oxford Street, Levin Phone: (06) 368 2954 or Freephone: 0800 FD CARE Email: support@harveybowler.co.nz

www.harveybowler.co.nz

LEVIN RACING CLUB INC. NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of members of the Levin Racing Club Incorporated will be held in the Hudson Room of the Levin Cosmopolitan Club, Oxford Street, Levin, Sunday 20th October 2019 at 10:30am. BUSINESS: ➣ Apologies ➣ ➣ ➣ ➣ ➣

To confirm the minutes of the 2018 AGM To receive the Annual Reports To elect Office Bearers To elect Auditor General Business

S. McCarrison Secretary

P O Box 73 Levin Phone 027 474 4936

HOROWHENUA KIDS, TEEN AND FAMILY TRUST

AGM

Tuesday 15th October 7:00pm at the Hinemoa Hall 35 Hinemoa St, Levin

Funeral Directors

E*AB* B*BB %>O?8" ! JB,H /,*E*AB* -.- E -.+ 93''; 746''4 <C54F !'2#; A)+ O#NN 8:C(F K4CP#

Building & Renovations BUILDER 28 yrs in trade, from kitchens to roofs and anything in between. Phn 022 603 5268.

MUSIC LOVERS

Leaving a bequest in your will is one of the most effective ways you can help make sure there is always someone there for those most in need throughout Greater Wellington.

Leave a bequest in your will

Friday, October 11, 2019

Waikanae

Wednesday 23rd October at 7:00pm Waikanae Presbyterian Church Hall Ngaio Road, Waikanae Apologies to Anne Rogers: national.otaki@xtra.co.nz Ph: 06 368 5151

Public Notice of Application for On-Licence Sections 101, Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012

72 Milky Whey Ltd, 72 Main Street, Foxton has made application to the District Licensing Committee at Horowhenua for the issue of an On Licence in respect of the premises situated at 72 Main Street, Foxton known as Mrs Nubs. The general nature of the business conducted under the licence is Cafe. The days on which and the hours during which alcohol is intended to be sold under the licence are: Monday to Sunday 8am to 1am the following day. The application may be inspected during ordinary office hours at the office of the Horowhenua District Licensing Committee at 126 Oxford Street, Levin. Any person who is entitled to object and who wishes to object to the issue of the licence may, not later than fifteen working days after the date of publication of this notice, file a notice in writing of the objection with the Secretary of the District Licensing Committee at Private Bag 4002, Levin 5540. Closing date for objections is Monday 4th November 2019. No objection to the issue of a licence may be made in relation to a matter other than a matter specified in Section 105(1) of the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012. This is the first publication of this notice.

ADD SOME

COLOUR ERT!

TO YOUR ADV

TO PLACE AN AD

Ph: 06 368 5109 Fax: 06 368 2366

To Let

Gardening & Landscaping LANDSCAPE maintenance. Ring Mike 368-0630 or 027-242-3773.

Landscape Garden & Turf TREE work, removal, stump grinding, branch mulching, fences, decks, building maintenance. BJ’s Building & Property Maintenance 027 249 2575 or 368 7895.

Painting & Decorating A GRADE PAINTER 30 years experience, phone Matt 021 175 3536.

1 bdrm flat, refs req’d, h/pump, Kinross St, no PAINTER int/ext, phone osp, no pets, $220p/w. now for a free quote. 021 168 7671 or 06 367 0604. Phone 06 368 7443.

Select and Expert Service

STORAGE

SAFE SECURE LOCKUPS • Short or long term

• Range from lockers to large garages • Security coded access 24 hours • Smoke alarms fitted in each building (Special conditions apply) Enquiries 0800 4 LEVIN (0800 453 846) Email: manager@levinlockups.co.nz 10 Sheffield St, Levin. www.levinlockups.co.nz

Community Events SUPPORTING Families in Mental Illness. Connections with Hope. How to deal with anxiety, free confidential treatment programme for people experiencing mild to moderate anxiety. A trained councillor facilitates the programme. If you are interested contact Lulu for an assessment 06 368 6116.

Stock Auctions

For Sale

TUESDAY SALE

CARPET OVERLOCKING SERVICE

10.30 am Calves 11.00 am Prime sheep Store lambs Ewes 11.30am Weaners Yearlings 2yr old cattle CONTACT CARRFIELDS:

D Haworth (06) 368 2642 mob 0274 504 133

Available at our factory shop together with a large selection of NZ and imported rugs. Monday - Friday 8.00am - 5.00pm Open Saturday 9.30am - 12.30pm NORCA RUG CO. LTD 248 Oxford Street Levin Phone 368-8844 MOBILITY scooter, good condition $650. Phone 368 6006.

RONGOTEA SALEYARDS

Wednesday Sale

BEEF & DAIRY CATTLE SHEEP, PIGS, CALVES 11:00am start All cattle weighed before sale

Darryl Harwood 027 449 1174 or 06 323 2399 Office (06) 324 8135


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Horowhenua Chronicle

HOT Y R G L

Ready Meals made fresh daily

• Butter Chicken • Shepherd’s Pie • Sweet & Sour Chicken • Lasagne • Macaroni Cheese • Devilled Sausages • Potato Bake • Beef or Chicken Rissoles • Spaghetti Bolognese

THE GEORGE CAFÉ is OPEN DAILY from 8.30am – 3pm SATURDAYS open all day: 8.30am til late • ALL DAY BREAKFAST • LUNCH

Phone (06) 920 2055

Email: thegeorgecafenz@gmail.com

Bookings are Recommended!

(Cabinet + Ala Carte menu)

• DINNER from 5.30pm til late Thursday, Friday & Saturday

NOW FULLY LICENCED!

Speldhurst Country Estate

This photo provided by The Metropolitan Museum of Art shows a watercolour on vellum by Jacob Marrel titled Four Tulips: Boter man (Butter Man), Joncker (Nobleman), Grote geplumaceerde (The Great Plumed One), and Voorwint (With the Wind) circa 1635-45. AP Photo

70 Kimberley Road, Levin

Flower

Call to Pre-order; Bulk Buy 5 for $25 Priced from $4.99 to $6.99 AVAILABLE AT NEW WORLD LEVIN Cnr SH1 & Bath St, Levin Open: 7am - 10pm, 7 days Phone: (06) 366 0873

Weddings, Functions & Conferences Home of meals on wheels 6 days a week!

Levin

NOW OPEN FOR FRIDAY NIGHT DINING

Call to book now Mon-Fri 3.30-5.30pm

Phone: (06) 367 94 63 149 Tiro Tiro Road, Levin

western.house.ltd@gmail.com www.facebook.com/Western.house/

open 8.30am - 4.00pm daily

FULLY LICENSED

MON-FRIDAY:10AM & SAT - SUN FROM 9AM

4 Buller Road, Ohau, Levin OPEN ffor LUNCH CHRISTMAS DAY Book now 06 368 4212

Phone: 06 368 7270

hours may vary on public holidays

Menu is available at Poppies - Adults $55 pp - Children 11-15 $30 pp - Children 6-10 $15.00pp - Children under 5 $10 pp LUNCH: Tues-Sat 11am-2pm

BOOK YOUR CHRISTMAS FUNCTION NOW Phone: LARISSA on 06 368 4212

DINNER: Tues-Thurs 5pm-8pm

DATES ARE FILLING FAST SO GIVE US A RING

Fri & Sat 5pm-8.30pm

CLOSED SUNDAY & MONDAY

ARE YOU PLANNING YOUR WEDDING?

LEVIN COSMOPOLITAN CLUB

We can provide a one stop Venue We now have an in-house Marriage Celebrant Our venue is also available for special occasions, Conferences, Seminars and funerals

Oxford Street, Levin Phone: 06 368 2571

Members, Affiliated Members and Guests Welcome

For information phone 06 368 4212

Garage Sales

FOXTON

558 FXTN SHANNON RD Sat 12th October 8am. Furniture, plants, free stuff. TO VISIT VISITED

LEVIN

LEVIN

SHANNON

18 TASMAN ST Sat 9am. Bdrm drawers, sgle beds, clothes, shoes, tent, glass cabinet, exercise equip, weedeater. Cancelled if wet. TO VISIT VISITED

PLIMMER TCE Sat 12th 8:30am. Big sale next to Shannanigans Shopping Complex. Cancelled if wet. TO VISIT VISITED

LEVIN

LEVIN

56 RIMU ST BALLANCE ST 27 MAIN RD STH Saturday 12th 8am to 12pm. Assorted house- 8:30am start. All sorts, no 8am, factory clear out, all prices, fair offers. sorts. hold. TO VISIT VISITED TO VISIT VISITED TO VISIT VISITED

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E IN

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Friday, October 11, 2019

Do you know where your nearest CIVIL DEFENCE sector post is? Ring your local council to find out.

T

Power

hink of botanical illustrators, and you might envision a world of medieval herbalists, tulip or orchid collectors, or affluent young women of the 17th and 18th centuries making detailed drawings and watercolours of garden plants. But there’s nothing oldfashioned about botanical illustrations. “Plants and flowers eternally speak to us, and there’s a great admiration now for realistic drawings and observing nature, and a renewed interest in handmade crafts,” says Femke Speelberg, associate curator in the department of drawings and prints at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. “As a source of inspiration, the relationship between decor and nature has always been very important,” she says. Today, as we lose biodiversity, botanical drawing is also an important way to examine and document plants that might not always be there, says Helen Bynum, who with her husband, William Bynum, compiled Botanical Sketchbooks (Princeton Architectural Press, 2017), a compendium of botanical illustrations by 80 artists from around the world. “Being a sketcher of whatever ability makes you really engage with what you are looking at it,” says Bynum. Botanical drawing dates back to at least to the times of the Pharaohs. It was particularly developed in the Middle Ages, when plants were often used for medicinal purposes and people needed to be able to tell safe from poisonous plants. A lot of plant families contain both. For instance, the nightshade family of plants includes belladonna, a poisonous plant, and also edibles like tomatoes, peppers and eggplants. Explorers often brought a botanical artist along to record the plants encountered. During “Tulip Mania” in 17th century Holland, when rare bulbs sold for the equivalent of an average person’s annual salary, it was

This photo provided by The Metropolitan Museum of Art shows a watercolour over graphite by Anonymous titled Decorative Design with Natural and Abstract Flowers, from the late 19th century. AP Photos

Botanical drawing dates back to at least to the times of the Pharaohs. crucial for collectors and breeders to record each flower’s unique patterns and contours. And botanical art can be about more than accuracy. Often, the story a botanical illustration tells is more mesmerising than the perfection of the drawing itself, says Bynum. “What I learned doing this book is that you don’t have to be a great artist to get things down on paper in a way that can communicate to other people.” Robin Jess runs the Botanical Art and Illustration programme at the New York Botanical Garden, the oldest certificate programme in the subject in the country. “We tend to be very accurate, and to pay attention to all the details. We require that students

take classes in plant morphology, so they understand what it is exactly that they are drawing. It requires a strong basis in botany,” she explains. The garden is also the headquarters of the American Society of Botanical Artists, with about 1800 members. “Contemporary botanical artists share a concern for the environment, particularly in light of climate change, as well as for drawing attention to plants,” Jess explains. Before photography was invented, botanical illustrations were essential to understanding plants. But today, too, drawings can illuminate aspects of plants in a way photos cannot. “An illustration can show various parts of a plant at the same time, something a photo really can’t. “It can show extra details of the fruit, for example, and what it looks like bisected.” And making botanical illustrations for a patron is alive and well, she points out. Florilegia — documentation of all the plants growing in a specific garden — is a big thing right now, she says. — AP


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Horowhenua Chronicle

Friday, October 11, 2019

BMW’S new M-badge monsters unveiled ANDREW SLUYS They’re the two big BMW SUVs that shouldn’t be able to embarrass most modern-day sports cars, but have more than enough power to do so. Ahead of their official debut at this weekend’s DTM race at Hockenheim, BMW has pulled the covers off its X5 M and X6 M brutes. Sitting under the hood of both these big-bodied vehicles is BMW’s 4.4L M TwinPower Turbo V8 engine that pumps out an astonishing 441kW and a monstrous 750Nm of torque. This power plant is strapped to BMW’s eight-speed M Steptronic transmission, which sends power

to all four wheels through an Active M differential. Thanks to this whopping power plant and drive train combination, these two SUVs can accelerate to 100km/h in just 3.9 seconds, before topping out at an electronically limited 250km/h. If this is a little low for your liking, M Driver’s Package increases the top speed to 290km/h. Should you require more power for your daily commuting needs, BMW is also offering Competition variants of the X5 M and X6 M models. The engine in these two SUVs has been tuned to pump out a larger 460kW, but torque remains the same. To achieve handling that matches this straight-line performance, both models are equipped with adaptive suspension and active roll stabilisation. In terms of braking,

Under the hood is BMW’s 4.4L M TwinPower Turbo V8 engine that Photo / supplied delivers 441kW and 750Nm of torque. a high-performance six-piston caliper system with a 395mm disk

sits up front, and a single caliper system sits at the back.

BRYANT&SIMPSON LTD TRANSPORT, MANUFACTURING AND GENERAL ENGINEERS

Visually, the revised front and rear ends of the two SUVs have been aerodynamically designed, and two sleek mirrors sit either side. The four-tailpipe exhaust system is said to produce an “aural accompaniment that stirs the emotions”. Base X5 M and X6 M models come with standard 21in wheels at while Competition models have staggered wheels that measure 21in at the front, and 22in at the rear. Looking on the inside, the cabin mostly carries over from the X5 and X6, although a few special touches have been added. These include a leather-wrapped steering wheel, multifunction sports seats, and a carbon fibre shifter. New Zealand pricing and availability is yet to be announced, but we’ll keep you updated.

LEVIN MITSUBISHI Mitsubishi-approved warranty servicing The only authorised Mitsubishi parts and service outlet in Levin

SUPPLIERS OF

Qualified, experienced staff

Team of three with over 80 years’ experience in automotive service and repair

Power Steering Hose • Brass Fittings • Earls Hose & Fittings Enzed Hose & Fittings • Bearings • Nuts & Bolts • Hose Clips • Rod Ends • Trailer Parts

Total one-stop repair shop

Using Genuine Parts for repairs, services and WOFs

Easy and effortless

14 Hokio Beach Rd, Levin

Ph 06 368 9029 Fx 06 368 1227

Levin Mitsubishi owner Lyndon Wood repairs all vehicles makes and models, large and small.

We’ll ensure you’re back on the road in no time with friendly, efficient service

FOR ALL YOUR VEHICLE

RENTAL NEEDS?

MINIVANS FROM $100 PER DAY

11 & 12 Seater vans, petrol and diesel, unlimited mileage

CARGO VAN FROM $100 PER DAY Unlimited mileage

CARS FROM $60 PER DAY

Unlimited mileage

Phone - 0800 744 111 or (06) 368 7169 for rental enquiries

Bryant & Simpson - your transport & general engineers since 1964.

HOROWHENUA MOTOR CO. LTD Cnr Bristol & Stanley Streets, Levin or visit www.hmcholden.co.nz After Hours: Gary (06) 368 4123

HMC Levin Have Mini Vans & Cars For Hire


Friday, October 11, 2019

Horowhenua Chronicle

Jazzy new interior By Colin Smith

M

odel year 2020 improvements have been announced for the Honda Jazz with the focus on interior trim changes and an upgraded audio system. The 2020 Jazz range features a new infotainment system with an improved touchscreen, physical volume buttons and smart phone connectivity. Standard for the base model Jazz S is Apple CarPlay and a CD/DVD player plus an option to upgrade to the Premium Audio system. Premium Audio is standard for the RS, RS Sport and RS Mugen models with a larger screen, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. There’s also a customisable Android interface with optional skins, fast charge USB ports to plug in and charge devices, Bluetooth, Voice Control and steering wheel-mounted controls to help make the driver’s selections easier and safer. All of the 1.5-litre Jazz RS models have also had style enhancements with a sports trim added to the interiors. The seats, door panels, steering wheel, dash and shifter all feature orange detailing and bold stitching which creates a contemporary feel. The Jazz comes standard with classleading space space including the innovative magic seat system along with reversing camera, parking sensors, Hill Start Assist,

Emergency Brake Assist, Emergency Stop Signal and a 5-star safety rating. The Jazz balances fun-to-drive performance with great fuel economy thanks to its EarthDreams powertrains. The entry level Jazz has a 1.3-litre engine developing 73kW at 6000rpm and 119Nm of torque at 5000rpm to achieve 5.1 litres per 100km with its advanced Atkinson Cycle technology. The three derivatives of the Jazz RS have a 1.5-litre engine with 97kW output at 6600rpm and peak torque of 155Nm at 4600rpm and achieve combined cycle consumption of 5.6L/100km. The RS also continues to benefit from sports suspension and steering, resulting in a more direct sporty drive and the 1.5-litre models move onto 16-inch alloy wheels and gain disc brakes on the rear. Other equipment highlights include proximity key smart access and push button start, City Brake Assist, LED headlights and daytime running lights, leather trimmed gearshift and steering wheel plus alloy pedals. The RS Mugen model has a Mugen sports body kit and Mugen alloy wheels. The Jazz RS models are available with a CVT transmission offering seven-speed sequential shifting or with a six-speed manual. Eight exterior colours are offered in the 2020 Honda Jazz line-up and there is a 5-year/ unlimited kilometres warranty and 24/7 national roadside assistance.

189 Cambridge Street, Levin Phone/Fax: 06 368 8364 Mobile: 027 808 5749 Email: kmae@xtra.co.nz

AUTO ELECTRICAL & MECHANICAL REPAIRS WOF - AIR CONDITIONING

23

UPHOLSTERY SPECIALISTS FURNITURE • AUTOMOTIVE • MARINE

Visit Our Showroom “We Extensive Fabric Samples

Cover Anything”

No obligation FREE Quotes Available

PH/FAX 06-368 9792 • MOB 027 439 5277 1 Hokio Beach Road, Levin

For all Furniture, Automotive & Marine Upholstery or Rhino Roof Rack systems & accessories phone Kerry’s Upholstery Specialists.

• All parts & servicing • Free Warranty Services Servicing all Vehicle types Specialising in Holden, Suzuki, Izuzu and Mazda The Team At HMC Service Department Can Look After All Your Vehicle Servicing Needs

Lite/Heavy & Industrial Vehicles

www.panelbeaterslevin.co.nz

Approved Structural Collision Repair Specialist

NO REPAIR TOO SMALL SPECIALISING IN: The Mason Automotive team (formerly Ken Mason Auto Electrician) left to right: Wendy Tinsley auto electrician, Robbie Ericsson - parts and administration, Carol Yorke - reception, administration and parts, Steve Yorke - mechanic and Warrant of Fitness, Jo Mason - owner, Adriaan (Attie) Botha auto electrician.

See Colling & Gray at 22 Liverpool Street for all your Panelbeating & Spraypainting requirements

• All Vehicle Insurance Claims • Plastic Welding • Chassis Repairs & Straightening • Accident Damage • Rust Repairs • Motorbike Repairs • Vehicle Restoration Work • Relief Vehicles Available

PH: 368 4722

collingandgray@xtra.co.nz 22 Liverpool St, LEVIN www.panelbeaterslevin.co.nz


360 Oxford St www.hmclevin.co.nz Bevin 021 468 058 06 3673924

Specials, Specials, Specials Weekly from $44

Weekly from $44

6,995

$

$

2006 Suzuki Swift

1998 Toyota Landcruiser Prado

1.3l auto, only 54210kms, cd stereo, window tints, keyless entry/start

$

$

2013 Suzuki Swift GLX

2.4L, 6 Spd Auto, Only 42,120Kms, Rev Camera/Sensors, Touchscreen, Climate A/C, Smartphone Connectivity, 5 Seater

2018 Ford Mondeo Ambiente

8,995

$

2007 BMW 320i

1.4L, Auto, Keyless Entry/Start, Bluetooth/CD Stereo, A/C, Window Tints, Towbar, Cruise Cont

Weekly from $92

14,995

$

9,995

2006 Holden commodore SS

5.6L, Auto, V8, Full Body Kit, Alloys, NZ New, Climate Control A/C, Window Tints, Leather Seats

Weekly from $55

$

2012 Holden Cruze Sri-V

2.0L, Auto, NZ New, Rev Camera/Sensors, Balance Of New Car Warranty, Only 11,010Kms, Climate A/C

NOW

1.4L, 5 Spd Manual, NZ New, A/C, USB/Cd Stereo, Abs, Only 104680Kms

Weekly from $55

2.0L, Auto, Alloys, Window Tints, Roof Rails, CD Stereo, A/C, Cruise Cont, Only 127,500Kms

Weekly from $71

Weekly from $37

5,995

$

7,995

2004 Daihatsu Sirion

1.3L, 5 Spd Manual, NZ New, Only 101,390Kms, Electric Windows/Mirrors, Cent Locking, Fog Lights

Weekly from $164

Was $19,790

Weekly from $97

ONLY

10,995 2015 Holden Commodore VF

1.4l turbo, 6 spd manual, aux/cd stereo, a/c, only 100850kms, alloys, auto headlights

3.6L, Auto, Rev Camera/Sensors, USB Port, Smartphone Connectivity, A/C, Cruise Cont, Only 77,820Kms

Weekly from $37

Weekly from $137

ONLY

3.8L, Auto, A/C, Cd Stereo, Elec Windows, Cruise Cont, Rev Sensors, Only 143,980Kms

Was $21,790

23,995

$

5,995

2004 Holden Commodore Executive

28,995

$

2018 Holden Trax LT

1.4L, 6 Spd Auto, Balance of New Car Warranty, Sunroof, Rev Camera/Sensors, Touch Screen, Only 6,320Kms

2015 Mitsubishi Lancer GSR

GSR, 2.0L, Auto, NZ New, Only 81,670Kms, Window Tints, Alloys, Rev Camera, USB/AUX Stereo, Towbar

Weekly from $107

Weekly from $44

ONLY

5,995

$

18,500

$

2019 Suzuki Ignis GLXC

ONLY

16,995

$

2011 Holden Cruze Sri

$

6,995 Weekly from $71

20,995

2016 Holden Captiva LS

$

28,995

$

3.4L, 4WD, Auto, Petrol, 7 Seater, Bluetooth/USB/CD Stereo, Window Tints, Towbar, Alarm

Weekly from $120

Weekly from $164

1.2L, Auto, Ex Demo, Only 20Kms, Balance of New Car Warranty, Smartphone Connectivity

2006 Suzuki Liana GLX

1.6L Auto, NZ New, A/C, CD Player, Elec Windows

Talk to us today about finance options • Best value new & used vehicles • Comprehensive repair & maintenance options • Practical pick up and drop off service • Guaranteed genuine parts & accessories

360 Oxford Street, Levin Bevin 021 468 058 06 3673924 hmclevin.co.nz WHERE JOURNEYS BEGIN

This finance estimate is calculated based on a 60 month term at 14.95% fixed interest per year, with 0% deposit - actual interest may differ. $500.00 establishment and $2.50 monthly maintenance fees apply. Lending terms and conditions will apply

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