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inside Spring.2017

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The President’s Corner: Oppmann, Earl, Graham earn Lifetime Membership Ken Paulson: Antidote for fake news: The real thing Back to the Future: AP returns to its roots as HQ returns to Manhattan Q&A: Sally Buzbee: AP’s new executive editor and senior vice president Capital Ideas: News Leadership Conference focus: Healthy civic culture How They Did It: Beyond the Wall: Tuscon Daily Star revisits timely project Honored: NewsTrain’s Linda Austin receives 2017-18 RJI Fellowship Great Ideas: Creative new features, Web projects and social media tools On the move: AP names U.S. news chief Carovillano as managing editor News Train: Workshops end busy 2017 schedule with stop in Seattle The Castro Plan: Miami Herald set guidelines long before leader’s death Editors in the News: Promotions, appointments, awards Member Showcase: AP awards top photographs of the month AP Stylebook minute: Checking the proper style of academic words APME Officers: Roster of APME Board of Directors

EDITOR Andrew Oppmann Adjunct Professor of Journalism Middle Tennessee State University Andrew.Oppmann@mtsu.edu DESIGNER Steve Massie smassie@crain.com STAFF WRITER Autumn Phillips Autumn.Phillips@lee.net

APME News is the quarterly magazine of the Associated Press Media Editors, a professional, nonprofit organization founded in 1933 in French Lick, Indiana. Its members include senior editors and leaders from news operations in the United States and Canada who are affiliated with The Associated Press, including more than 1,400 newspapers and online sites and about 2,000 broadcast outlets. The group also includes college journalism educators and college student media editors. APME works with AP to support and recognize journalism excellence and the First Amendment. To learn more about APME’s programs and activities, visit apme.com.

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The President’s Corner

Bill Church

APME’S life sentence

Don’t hold the applause for these five friends

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o executive order was issued. No rioting ensued. Instead, when faced with a choice, APME board members voted with smiles and applause. We achieved consensus. The highlight of our winter board meeting went beyond reuniting with honest, hardworking friends who happen to be journalists. Our New York state of mind was about honoring three special friends who have given much to APME. Meet Andrew Oppmann, Carl Earl and Gary Graham, the newest honorees of APME’s Lifetime Membership award. Please, don’t hold the applause. The award involves no cash or dust-worthy plaque. Instead, we offer gratitude of the exceptional kind. The award also has a short history. Journey back to October and the 2016 APME-ASNE News Leadership Conference. At some point between working the conference and celebrating Philly’s nightlife, board members agreed there must be some way to recognize retiring Associated Press Executive Editor Kathleen Carroll and Annette McGruder, the wife of the late APME President Robert G. McGruder and a diversity advocate in her own right. An executive decision was made quicker than it takes to order a cheesesteak. That is how Kathleen and Annette became APME honorary lifetime members.

Who knows if APME has started a tradition, but the latest lifetime honorees reflect everything we love about our organization. Their biographies could fill this magazine and still not reflect the impact they’ve had on APME through the years. No one enjoys life more than Andrew, who is APME’s version of the Most Interesting Man in the World. I’ve known Andrew for more than 20 years, and he continually amazes me with his enthusiasm and talents (such as getting editors to turn in stories for APME News, which he serves as editor for life.) Carl and Laura Sellers-Earl (our splendid past president and current foundation prez) are APME legends. Carl’s quiet demeanor reflects his kind soul and extraordinary work ethic. Our conferences happen because of Carl. (And maybe Flip.) Gary recently retired after a distinguished career as a journalist, editor and life mentor. Everyone gravitates to Gary because of his charm, humor and giving nature. He finds wonder in everything, especially dogs sitting in trucks. Andrew, Carl and Gary are more than lifetime honorees. They have become lifelong friends for many in APME. We have laughed with them. We have grieved with them. We’ve become better because of them. Bill Church, senior vice president for news at GateHouse Media, is president of the Associated Press Media Editors. He can be found on Twitter at @BillChurchMedia.

“We have laughed with them. We have grieved with them. We’ve become better because of them.”

CARROLL

EARL

GRAHAM

McGRUDER

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Why are so many Americans unwilling or unable to recognize partisan fairy tales?

By Ken Paulson

Antidote for fake news: The real thing (Editor’s note: Ken Paulson recently wrote a column for USA TODAY making the case for newspapers and journalism of integrity. It’s resonated with readers across the country and APME is making it available to any newspaper that would like to republish it. The only requirement is that you note that it was first published in USA TODAY.)

F

ake news is becoming a real problem, according to successive presidents of the United States. President Obama described it as a threat to democracy, while President Trump decried it as a threat to his administration. So it must be a big deal. Surely this nation’s inventive spirit can give us something to counter bogus stories and give Americans the accurate information they need. Just consider this potential Kickstarter campaign: We’re pleased to offer you the opportunity to invest in the Fake News Eradicator, a content delivery system that will keep you informed in a timely and reliable manner, engage and entertain you and shore up democracy in the process. Among its features: • The option of digital or retro packaging • Custom-built for your geographic location without the need for GPS • Fully portable • Built-in fact-checking • Creates local jobs; the product is manufactured in the USA by your neighbors. • The product is redesigned daily to meet your changing information needs • Family friendly; absolutely porn-free • The retro model is delivered to your doorstep free of charge, and requires no batteries. It’s also guaranteed to be virus-free, and has no annoying pop-up ads. Yes, the best way to combat this spawn of new technology is with old technology, circa 1690, the year the first newspaper was published in America.The most effective weapon against fake news is real journalism. The notion of caring professionals living in your community and writing about your town and government is admittedly very old school, but it has served us well for more than three centuries. We’ve had fake news at the checkout counter since the ‘70s, but there was also the real thing delivered to our doorstep each morning. Obviously print newspapers will one day disappear, but the touchstones of local journalism don’t have to. Keeping an eye on local government, celebrating achievements and telling the stories that shape the fabric of a community have never been more important. For those now rolling their eyes because they’re convinced the local paper is “biased” along with the rest of the media, I’d invite you to reconsider. By and large, local newspapers strive for balance for both ethical and business reasons. With newspapers struggling economically, they can’t afford to alienate anyone. That’s why many newspapers have abandoned endorsements. They can’t take the

risk of losing a chunk of their readership. Many factors fuel the proliferation of bogus news. In a polarized society, there are certainly cynical partisans who manipulate social media to their own ends. But we also can’t let the American people off the hook. “Fake news thrives because there is a lazy, incurious, self-satisfied public that wants it to thrive; because large swaths of that public don’t want news in any traditional sense, so much as they want vindication of their preconceptions and prejudices,” author and Lear Center Fellow Neil Gabler wrote recently. “Above all else, fake news is a lazy person’s news. It provides passive entertainment, demanding nothing of us.” Why are so many Americans unwilling or unable to recognize partisan fairy tales? Who’s to blame when millions of Americans seem incapable of distinguishing the truth from nonsense? Have America’s schools failed to foster critical thinking? Yet the biggest driver of fake news has been the reluctance of the public to pay for information and the subsequent decline of traditional news media. Faced with declining circulation, newspapers have priced their content at astonishingly low levels. In recent months, a number of daily newspapers have marked down their annual digital subscription to $4.99 a year. Yes, you read that right. For the price of a cup of coffee or a Big Mac, you get 365 days of information about your community, your neighbors and your government. Unless you don’t care. And that may be the real problem. The click culture has revealed a lot about who we are as a nation and what our priorities are. We’ll spend hundreds of dollars on cable TV or $14 on a movie ticket, but we refuse to pay for news and information. In the end, you do get what you pay for. No disrespect to America’s television and radio stations, but those newspapers and websites drive broadcast reporting. Facebook posts on current events come from real news sites that need revenue to stay alive. Unless we invest in journalism – at the national or local level, in print or online – fake news is all we’ll have. Democracy can’t survive on memes alone. There are powerful politicians and their followers who say you can’t believe anything you read in the press. “Trust us,” they say. They want you to believe that America’s news organizations are all just like that strident and sensational cable channel you hate. They suggest that the nation’s 1,300 daily newspapers, thousands of weekly and alternative papers, 1,700 TV stations, 14,0000 radio stations , hundreds of magazines and thousands of online news sites can all be condensed into the singular “media,” united by a shared political agenda and a disdain for the American people. And that’s the most dangerous fake news of all. Ken Paulson is the president of the First Amendment Center of the Newseum Institute and the dean of the College of Media and Entertainment at Middle Tennessee State University

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John Daniszewski, AP vice president of standards and editor at large, overlooks the new AP newsroom. AP PHOTO/MARK LENNIHAN

BACKto theFUTURE

AP returns to its roots with new HQ in lower Manhattan

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Midtown, but hits above its weight in many other ways. AP now occupies 172,201 square feet at 200 Liberty St., which is part of the Brookfield Place retail and office complex. The newsroom is located on the 5th floor. Technology, Corporate Strategy and Americas Revenue, including its various divisions, occupy two other floors, with Corporate CommuMarjorie Miller, nications, Executive, Finance, Associated Press Human Resources and Legal vice president of departments on a third floor. Global Enterprise The newsroom, of course, is the heart of the operation. Its open floor plan – no offices for anyone – overlooks the 9/11 Memorial and Museum and the Oculus transportation hub on the east and the Hudson River and New Jersey on the west. Much of the space is a giant octagon designed to enable cross-format planning and coordination. It holds national and international news, entertainment, sports, the AP’s Nerve Center, interactives, photos and video. The bureau that covers New York City is down a short hall, and business news and the national writing team are at the front of the office.

I’ve never seen so many happy journalists in one place.”

T

By The Associated Press

he orange packing crates are gone. Some tacky, if sentimental, knickknacks are left behind in Midtown. The construction zone of AP’s former home in Hudson Yards is not yet a distant memory, but moving in that direction. The headline here is AP has moved its headquarters to lower Manhattan, a new perch for its editorial, executive and sales employees helping to bring news to the globe each day. Actually, it’s a bit of Back to the Future for the AP, which began its storied history in 1846 just blocks from here “in the modest apartments at the corner of Broadway and Liberty streets, up 78 stairs,” according to a journalist writing in Putnam’s Monthly Magazine. PRUITT The downtown Manhattan of today looks very different than in the 1800s. Metal and glass skyscrapers, including the new World Trade Center, dominate the skyline. And at AP, the 78 stairs are gone, transformed at the new location to four newly renovated floors. The transition was painless but included moving from Midtown in four phases over the course of six weeks. Almost 60 truckloads of gear, personal and shared departmental files and the AP photo archive were moved. The new headquarters is smaller and less costly than that in

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The new headquarters for AP is in Brookfield Place, immediately across from the World Trade Center memorial.

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Still uncharacteristically clean for a newsroom, the early reviews are hugely positive. “I’ve never seen so many happy journalists in one place,” said Marjorie Miller, VP of Global Enterprise. The newsroom “is fun... and it’s a good working environment.” AP’s team, led by CFO Ken Dale dedicated countless hours gathering input and collaborating with architects, a project management firm, specialists in acoustics, lighting IT and video integration, and a construction manager to design a long term, costappropriate and comfortable headquarters. His work has paid off. “The setup, layout and environment really encourage collaboration and conversation,” said Brian Carovillano, managing editor of US News. “There’s lots of common space and it’s contributing to more conversation and better ideas.” Space to collaborate is abundant, from casually grouped couches to team rooms. The office is also energy efficient with a design that incorporates renewable resources, which has earned the space LEED gold certification. Building AP’s new headquarters required the following: • 232 miles of IT copper cable • 76 miles of IT fiber cable • 3,482 network ports • 43 new conference, team, and specialty rooms • 4 TV studios • 1 radio studio • 2 live positions • 20 video editing positions • Live production facilities • 900 new monitors and arms

AP PHOTO/MARK LENNIHAN

• 60 new Macs for Photos & Video “The move came in on time and under budget,” President and CEO Gary Pruitt said at a staff party to launch the new space, “We all moved in and didn’t miss one story. That’s what AP does.”

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SALLY BUZBEE

& QA

A Q&A with AP’s new executive editor and senior vice president

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ally Buzbee took on the role of AP executive editor on Jan. 1, after the retirement of Kathleen Carroll. Buzbee, 51, had previously served as AP’s Washington chief of bureau since fall 2010. She is a graduate of the University of Kansas and Georgetown University who began working for the AP in Topeka, Kansas. She also worked extensively in California, Washington DC and overseas as AP’s Mideast bureau chief in Cairo, Egypt during the Iraq war from 2004 through 2009.

quite an interesting time to take on this new job. Q It’s What are the main challenges?

A

AP has a unique and important role to play in covering the Trump presidency. We are committed to remaining true to our core values of fair, unbiased and accurate coverage while doing the strong and factual accountability journalism we ALWAYS seek to do with any administration. We have put more journalists onto the story, as we do at the start of any new presidency. Interest in the story is intense, both across the U.S. and globally. Another goal is to ensure we are capturing a wide spectrum of views across the country as the new administration begins work. That’s a unique advantage AP has because of our state footprint. Stories like the recent pieces by Claire Galofaro examining how people in one Wisconsin county are strongly supportive of Trump, hoping for job growth, provide unique insight into how Trump’s policies are playing out across the country. We’ll also be focusing heavily on explanatory stories: as complex health care and tax proposals emerge, we will focus heavily on how those would impact normal people. Of course, our reporters in every state look each day additionally to be first and best on breaking news, and to identify and deliver the most interesting stories from every corner of the nation.

Q

There’s a lot of attention paid to access issues in Washington. What is AP’s view? We want to cover the president, not fight with him. That said, it is part of AP’s core mission to fight hard for access to the workings of government and we are strongly focused on that. Our White House correspondent Julie Pace chose not to attend a briefing in late February when it became apparent that major news organizations were being banned. That’s dangerous territory and Julie did exactly the right thing. Our goal is not to sound whiny but to clearly and strongly explain why the American public should care about having access to the president, his team and other governing officials.

A

about beyond Washington? That’s not the only Q What story going on in the world.

A

One of the joys of this new job is that I get to engage in other parts of AP’s broad mission. As a sports fan, I’m keenly interested in how we keep our sports coverage across formats strong and compelling in coming years. We’re also looking at ways to beef up our health and science coverage and make it more consumer-focused and more visual - and thus more valuable to our members and customers. That’s been a longtime desire on my part, personally. The rise of populism in Europe is another story of global interest

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Buzbee says AP’s main goal is to report strong and compelling stories. AP PHOTO/ MARK LENNIHAN

this year. And of course the continued fight against Islamic State, both overseas and in the United States. Fact checking, which AP has done for many years, is clearly paramount this year, on both a national and state level. We’re also looking hard at the opioid crisis which continues to devastate so many communities, and gun violence in Chicago and other cities. do you see as AP’s core challenges in the years Q What ahead, beyond the immediate focus of today’s stories?

A

Our main goal is keeping our news report strong, compelling and relevant to our members, customers and the public. We want to dominate on big stories and spot news and we want to provide exclusive journalism that makes us essential. We want to do that as efficiently and smartly as possible, leveraging our resources to focus on the things that really matter. I do think we have some work to do on presentation: as news consumption habits change, we have to stay nimble on presentation: whether that means more video, more “chunky text” alternative story forms, shorter pieces, whatever next comes down the pike at us.

have you found the move from Washington to Q How New York?

A

I’m starting to feel very comfortable in the new job and the new family situation now that I’m a few months in. As many people know, my husband John passed away in early September after a long battle with colon cancer. My daughters, ages 17 and 16, and I are starting to feel a bit more stabilized after that very painful and sad situation. Emma will head off to college next fall and Meg will live with me in New York. Having a challenging and meaty job is a godsend. We are all looking forward to the new adventure.


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Marriott Wardman Park Hotel

2017 News Leadership Conference focus: How good journalism can build healthy civic culture

CAPITAL IDEAS

T

he 2017 News Leadership Conference, a collaboration of the Associated Press Media Editors, American Society of News Editors and Associated Press Photo Managers, is rounding into shape. The conference is scheduled for Oct. 8 to 11 at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel in Washington. The event’s focus will be the intersection of journalism and citizenship and how good journalism can build healthy civic culture. The planning team is working to involve “embedded citizens” who will participate in conference sessions — and challenge editors’ thinking. “We are facing implicit and real threats against the freedoms our nation embraced in the Bill of Rights” said APME President Bill Church, senior vice president for news at GateHouse Media. “The News Leadership Conference is more than a meeting of similar minds about journalism and citizenship. This is about our democracy’s heart and soul.” The presidents of the three associations invited President Donald Trump to speak. In a letter to Trump, they noted that the president had said he was engaged in a “running war” with the media, said journalists “are among the most dishonest human beings on Earth” and described the news media as the “enemy of the American people.” “Respectfully, Mr. President, we beg to differ,” they wrote. Noting that sitting presidents and other political leaders had for decades taken the opportunity to address the audience of editors, the letter said: “We invite you to join our gathering for an on-therecord address and Q&A with top newsroom leaders. We hope you see this as an opportunity to discuss your criticisms of the press in an open forum with the people who help set the news agenda.”

Because the 2016 campaign raised questions about journalists’ ability, or lack thereof, to connect with voters across class and color, the conference’s diversity programming will focus on the challenges of covering economic as well as racial disparities. Among others invited to speak or serve as panelists at the conference: • Campbell Brown, head of news partnerships at Facebook. • Connie Schultz, who won a Pulitzer Prize with the Cleveland Plain Dealer “for her pungent columns that provided a voice for the underdog and underprivileged,” according to the citation that accompanied the award. • Matt Eich, a documentary photographer whose book “Carry Me Ohio,” is described as a “photographic meditation on the American condition.” Plans are also underway for the conference to host a live broadcast of NPR’s daily program “1A,” a two-hour conversation about important issues hosted by Joshua Johnson. The show’s name is inspired partly by the First Amendment, and editors will be able to engage with the radio audience. “In an era of hyperpartisan politics and rapidly changing technology in media, it is critical that leaders of the nation's news organizations reexamine the relationship with our readers and viewers, “ said APPM President Patrick Traylor, photo editor of the Denver Post. “Visual journalists in particular are uniquely positioned to engage citizens and bring disparate groups across our communities face to face with one another through photography, video and multimedia storytelling.”

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The international border fence is seen from the air west of Nogales, Arizona (U.S. is at right).

Read the project online: http://tucson.com/special-section/ beyond-the-wall/

MIKE CHRISTY ARIZONA DAILY STAR

HOW THEY DID IT

BEYOND THE WALL

MAMTA POPAT ARIZONA DAILY STAR

Veronica Nepomuceno, 43, right, visits with her mother through the U.S.-Mexico border fence in Friendship Circle at Border Field State Park in San Diego, California. Every weekend the U.S. Border Patrol allows people to walk up to a portion of the border fence to visit with friends and family members.

Tucson Daily Star revisits project on Trump’s vision

T

By Autumn Phillips APME News

he Tucson Daily Star project “Beyond the Wall” is a case study in prescient, time-release journalism. In July 2016, the Tucson paper published a 28page special section of investigative work, examining the feasibility of then-candidate Donald Trump’s proposal to build a wall along the entire U.S. / Mexico border. They chose to publish it on one day, because they wanted to get it in the hands of decision makers – a single link online and a single section in print. “We went back and forth, because we knew it was a lot to ask people to digest,” said Daily Star Editor Jill Jorden Spitz. They sent hard copies to lawmakers on the border, to the Republican National Committee and the Democratic National Committee and to the campaigns of Trump and Hillary Clinton. They also tweeted and emailed links to the series to the same list. “It was disappointingly quiet when the section came out,” Jorden Spitz said. “From Trump supporters we heard that he doesn’t actually plan to build a wall. It’s rhetorical. It’s much hay about nothing. “Clinton supporters said he’s not going to win, so it’s a moot point.” But Trump did win. And the week he took office, he started talking about the wall. “The day he started talking about it, we started repromoting the series,” Jorden Spitz said. “We didn’t send the physical section, but

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MAMTA POPAT ARIZONA DAILY STAR

Bill Pape, 60, built a home in Jacumba, California in 1992. He is near a portion of the U.S.-Mexico bollard border fence which ends at Airport Mesa range we sent the tweets and emailed links and ran a promo to the section in print.” They also ran an editorial titled “We do not need Trump’s wall” that largely referenced the project. The response this time around was no longer lukewarm. In the >> Continued on next page


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Gerardo Vasquez, 26, plays with his daughter, Tabata Abigail, 3, at Playas de Tijuana in Tijuana, Mexico. The U.S.-Mexico border fence runs into the Pacific Ocean on the right.

MAMTA POPAT ARIZONA DAILY STAR

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first week after re-promoting the project online, they doubled the traffic from the original publication date. “This time, we’re getting more clicks, more comments, more emotion. Either people are strongly in favor or strongly against what we’ve written. It’s amped up,” she said. “We feel we were ahead of this.”

A Lot Has Changed Exactly ten years ago, the Tucson Daily Star traveled the border exploring the feasibility of a wall. That series ran over five days with a huge headline: IT WON’T WORK. “We took a strong stand,” Jorden Spitz said. A lot has changed over ten years, including the fact that the Daily Star newsroom is half the size it was a decade ago. “When [Trump] first came down that escalator and said he’d build the wall last spring, we started talking,” Jorden Spitz said. “At first, we thought we could do a small version of what we did 10 years ago, but as the idea of Trump’s wall gained momentum, we decided, no, we’ve got to do it right.” In 2006, the Daily Star newsroom had 160 staff members. In 2016, they had 70. In 2006, the Daily Star sent four reporters and three photographers to travel the border and report. In 2016, they sent four reporters and two photographers. In 2006, they also sent a digital storyteller to shoot video. This time, reporters shot their own video. “In 2006, we sent people for a month. This time, we knew the issues so much better. We targeted places that we knew. It was a month of reporting this time, but reporters would go for a week or two weeks so they weren’t all gone at once.” Here’s the gamble. The Daily Star news team believed this was an important project, but it came in response to the political moment. They had not planned for it. They had not budgeted for it. “We really couldn’t afford it, but we decided to pinch pennies. We asked people to share rooms, share cars, eat cheap meals, which they did,” she said. “It was a scary decision.” One thing that helped – on the balance sheet, anyway – was the retirement of then-editor Bobbi Jo Buell. She retired May 20, leaving a little financial wiggle room with the open position. “That was kind of scary, too,” Jorden Spitz said. “She was such a strong leader. I couldn’t imagine doing it without her.” Jorden Spitz was the paper’s projects editor at the time, and she took on the lead editor role for “Beyond the Wall.”

Digital first, words later Another thing that was different this time around – 2006 vs 2016 – was the focus on digital. Ten years ago, the planning process was focused almost entirely around print. This time, all planning was digital-first. “It was really cool,” she said. “We included a digital producer from the beginning to decide what we needed, before we did any reporting. We had a 360-camera in the newsroom and we knew we wanted to show people the border through video.” Each reporter got a portable GPS and recorded coordinates with every photo they took. The photos were then embedded into a map of the border,

with a card explaining why the place was relevant.” Planning digital first made everything easier, she said. “Planning the words is the last thing we need to do. We know how to do words. It’s muscle memory.” The digital presentation included an interactive map of the whole U.S./Mexico border, broken out by state. There’s an arching story video covers the entire project, created as both an introduction and as a device for those who will probably never read the project. For the long form display, Samantha Munsey watched coding videos on YouTube and used Atavist, which is conducive to more visual, multimedia storytelling. “[Munsey] wanted it to be accessible. She put a list of all the stories in the hamburger menu, as chapters,” Jorden Spitz said. “She was the real hero for this whole thing. She pushed us to put digital first, which we needed.” (Munsey was a Daily Star digital producer at the time and has now moved to another product, #ThisisTucson.) What stands out in “Beyond the Wall” is the fact that the staff took a stand. Visit the landing page of the project and the introduction headline reads, “Why we don’t need Trump’s ‘great, great wall.’” In 2006, the Daily Star also took a stand with the loud headline, “IT CAN’T BE DONE.” Back then, the stand felt a little uncomfortable, Jorden Spitz said, “but we felt that’s where the reporting took us. Since then, we’ve done 10 years of reporting. We feel confident in our knowledge. This time, it wasn’t such a stretch to take an advocacy role.” This time around, they also included a first-person piece in the project, written by one of the reporters who had worked on both projects. She wrote first person about how the border and the issues had changed. “That felt more comfortable,” Jorden Spitz said. “Now, I’ve become an advocate for first-person journalism. It’s engaging.” The planning of this project has changed the way the Tucson Daily Star approaches what they do. From expanding the newsroom’s digital thinking to energizing them to go all out on stories that need to be told, even if it means being creative with resources and making some sacrifices to pull it off. “I really strongly believe, this is the kind of thing that’s going to take us into the future,” Jorden Spitz said. “It can be difficult and painful, but I strongly believe this is what we need to do.”

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NewsTrain’s Linda Austin receives 2017-18 RJI Fellowship

CASSANDRA NICHOLSON

T

he Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute has selected six fellowship projects for 2017-2018 that will focus on filter bubbles, bite-size training and business-side analytics. “If you were looking for one word to describe this class, I’d suggest ‘practical,’” said Executive Director Randy Picht. “These projects are built to have an impact from the minute they’re finished.” The 11th class was selected from nearly 300 applicants. Each year, RJI seeks ideas from anyone who wants to help journalism sustain itself or thrive as an important pillar of democracy. There are three types of fellowships available: residential, nonresidential and institutional. Residential fellows spend eight months on the University of Missouri campus. Nonresidential fellows explore their ideas from their home or office, with an occasional visit to campus. And institutional fellows have projects that leverage resources at the company or institution they are affiliated with. Meet this year’s class:

Residential

GUESS

Christopher Guess, a technologist and journalist, will add important new features to Push, an open-source mobile news app designed to make it easier or possible for small news organizations to provide a user-friendly mobile news solution. Research based on the usage of the app will also be conducted and shared with the industry.

Nonresidential Linda Austin, project director for NewsTrain, the Associated Press Media Editors’ touring workshop, will create and distribute a mobile-learning program that offers, in bite-size chunks, best practices for digital journalism and provides an interactive component to allow users to compare notes as they experiment.

Institutional Rebekah Monson, co-founder of WhereBy.Us, will help publishers find revenue opportunities hidden in their data by developing and testing a common data toolkit that will give small, independent publishers the ability to gather and analyze information from various audience engagement events.

MONSON

Christian Skotte, co-director and head of digital of the public radio show Science Friday, will put together short and shareable informative resources from scientists to help listeners and others combat misinformation on social media. Skotte then wants to measure how much impact the resources have, and share those results and resources with the news industry. SKOTTE

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A team from The Gazette in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, will address the troubling trend of trust in news media by creating an interactive game that will give news consumers an inside look at how a newsroom operates. The real-time strategy game will be based on real newsroom situations. The team consists of Executive Editor Zack Kucharski, Managing Editor of Digital Max Freund and Opinion Editor Jennifer Hemmingsen. Pam Dempsey, executive director of the Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting, will co-lead a team of data journalists and computer scientists who will develop a searchable, interactive database that will help journalists report on large multinational agribusiness companies and provide insights into the many ways these giant companies affect a community, a state and the world. Her co-leader will be Brant Houston, a professor and Knight Chair in Investigative Reporting at the University of Illinois.

About the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute The Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute works with citizens, journalists and researchers to strengthen democracy through better journalism. RJI seeks out the most exciting new ideas, tests them with real-world experiments, uses social science research to assess their effectiveness and delivers solutions that citizens and journalists can put to use in their own communities.


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2016 APME/ASNE PHILADELPHIA CONFERENCE

great ideas

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ave you launched a great new feature, page or Web project, or used a social media tool in a great new way? Well, we want to recognize your great

idea. Associated Press Media Editors recognizes a Great Idea every month on APME.com and we will showcase monthly winners in our popular

annual Great Ideas book, This year’s project was released at our conference in Philadelphia. This is a chance for your publication or station to show off great work and to help fellow editors by providing ideas that might work in their markets. It’s simple to submit your Great Idea. Just go to the Great Ideas page at APME.com, fill out the online form and attach an image or submit link.

FRIDAY EXTRA: YEAR IN REVIEW The Daily Astorian, Astoria, Ore. Laura Sellers-Earl WHAT THEY DID: For our first Friday Extra section of 2016, we commissioned a local graphic artist to capture 2015 in cartoon. This seemed doubly appropriate given the wealth of oddball news the area experienced. Then, the artist suggested the line-drawing version for folks to color. Lots of fun!

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GREAT IDEAS

101 THINGS THAT PLAY IN PEORIA

LIFE ON THE BUS The Seattle Times, Seattle Lynn Jacobson WHAT THEY DID: This year, The Seattle Times experimented with an intensive, multidisciplinary approach to storytelling that we dubbed a newsroom “hackathon.” The idea was to coalesce a group of writers, photographers, data journalists, developers, graphic artists, editors, videographers and others around a single topic over a short period of time and see what new ways of presenting stories they might devise. At first, we didn’t even know what our topic would be. We just gathered newsroom volunteers in a couple of brainstorming sessions and agreed that the project would be ... 1. Organic (we would start without a certain end in mind) 2. Cross-departmental (pairing staffers from different corners of the newsroom) 3. Brief (no piece of the project should take more than a couple days) 4. Audience-focused, and inclusive of diverse voices 5. Designed for web first, with some elements likely seeing print as well What took shape was a series of stories, videos, animations, quizzes and more that looked at Seattle — area bus riders — a population rapidly expanding as Seattle’s economy booms. We visualized ridership data; crowd-sourced stories on bus etiquette; videotaped drivers on the job; compiled a transit-themed playlist in collaboration with a local DJ; even shot a music video on a bus of a local band performing one of its signature songs, titled, perfectly, “Bus.” We pushed our technical skills into new territory, utilizing gifs, audio recording and illustrated animations. And we chalked up hundreds of thousands of page views, hundreds of comments and hundreds of Facebook shares in the process.

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Journal Star, Peoria, Ill. Dennis Anderson WHAT THEY DID: 101 Things That Play In Peoria was a daily series of items in the city that attract attention, are unique to our city and are a point of pride. To determine our list, columnist Phil Luciano asked readers to submit their suggestions online, by email or by mail. We got more than 101 ideas. Starting in March 2015, we ran one item per day with a photo and a video on PJStar.com. As we rolled out the 101 selections, each had a hint referencing the next day’s Thing. The first correct answer to our quiz on Facebook received a prize provided by one of our five sponsors. Readers bombarded us with requests to compile the complete list of 101 Things. So, we did a special section at the completion of the series in June. Further, readers asked for a book, so we researched the possibility and determined it was a great idea. As of this writing, more than 1,200 copies of the book have been sold.


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GREAT IDEAS

FILLING IN THE GAPS

SOLUTIONS JOURNALISM The Fayetteville Observer, Fayetteville, N.C. Michael Adams WHAT THEY DID: A couple of years ago, the Observer committed to taking a meaningful look at crime in the community. We settled — through a lot of discussion — on an approach known as solutions journalism. Solutions journalism looks at issues from the perspective of what is working or has the promise to work in addressing a significant community issue. I’ve included an example of one story in a year-long series, but it is not necessary to do a major project to apply the principles. We’ve done one-shot stories using the principles of seeing what works and talking with officials about how and why — or why not — such answers could be applicable to problems in our community.

WINTERFEST WEB Journal Star, Peoria, Ill. Adam Gerik WHAT THEY DID: During the holiday season, the city of Peoria held its first downtown Winterfest, complete with an outdoor ice rink. The Journal Star worked with the city to install a web cam overlooking the festival and the ice rink for readers to watch the action.

Sarasota Herald- Tribune, Sarasota, Fla. Maggie Clark WHAT THEY DID: While reporting my series, “2 Million Kids, $24 Billion Battle,” on Medicaid for children in Florida, I noticed that there was no research on what pediatricians thought about the state’s program. Since they care for kids and bill the Medicaid system, it seemed like a huge oversight not to hear their voice. To fill in this gap, I asked the executive director of the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families, which has a long history of researching Florida’s Medicaid program, if they’d be interested in finding out more about the experiences of pediatricians in the system. They agreed to do the research, and the Community Foundation of Sarasota County and Sarasota County Openly Plans for Excellence (SCOPE) agreed to provide funding. The foundations saw the connection between kids’ health and their own work on school readiness and grade-level reading. The partnership yielded a statewide pediatrician survey and study, which was published June 13 and shared at a public forum in Sarasota the following day.

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“We are setting up a management structure that puts more reporters and visual journalists out in the world, covering and telling great stories.” Brian Carovillano

AP names U.S. news chief Carovillano as managing editor

T

he Associated Press named its head of U.S. news to the new position of managing editor, appointing Brian Carovillano to take the No. 2 position in the newsroom of the global news cooperative. The appointment was announced by Sally Buzbee, AP’s senior vice president and executive editor. As Buzbee's chief deputy, Carovillano takes on responsibility for AP’s news gathering efforts around the world and in all media formats. “Brian is a strong and creative news leader, deeply committed to upholding AP’ mission and to exploring the newest, most vibrant ways to tell stories,” Buzbee said. “He excels at helping talented people rise to new heights.” Also Tuesday, Buzbee named David Scott, AP’s U.S. political editor since 2014, to the new position of deputy managing editor for operations. Scott will have a series of responsibilities inside the AP's global newsroom, including oversight of content distribution, news gathering logistics, budgeting and staffing. “We are spread around the world, often in challenging situations,” Buzbee said. “David is formidably skilled when it comes to tackling problems and creating the conditions that allow our journalists to do their best work.” Carovillano and Scott will report directly to Buzbee, as does Ian Phillips, who was named AP’s head of international news in June 2016. The changes further the cooperative's shift to a new leadership structure in which news leaders at its bureaus around the world, its regional hubs and its New York headquarters are responsible for AP's news report in all media formats. “We are setting up a management structure that puts more reporters and visual journalists out in the world, covering and telling great stories,” Carovillano said. SCOTT “That will serve us well for years to come.” Carovillano, 43, was named managing editor for U.S. news in November 2013. In his new role, he will directly oversee AP’s heads of U.S. news, enterprise, investigations and business news. Buzbee said Tuesday she expects to add to his responsibilities over the next several weeks. Before his tenure as managing editor for U.S. news, Carovillano was AP’s regional editor in Asia. In that role, he helped open AP bureaus in North Korea and Myanmar, and led coverage of Japan’s 2011 earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis. He joined AP in 2000, working as a reporter and editor in Providence, Rhode Island, Boston and San Francisco. In 2008, he was named regional editor for the southern U.S., where he directed

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CAROVILLANO

AP’s award-winning coverage of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. “It is my great fortune to work with the best journalists in the world,” Carovillano said. “Every day I am in awe of the work they do and the dedication with which they do it.” Scott, 40, joined AP in 1999 as a reporter in St. Louis. After four years as North Carolina news editor, Scott was named AP’s central region editor in 2009, overseeing AP’s report in middle America. As U.S. political editor, Scott directed coverage of the 2014 midterm elections and the 2016 presidential campaign and elections. In his new role, Scott will continue to oversee AP's Washington-based race calling and polling teams.


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A packed classroom at the Lexington, Ky., NewsTrain. LINDA AUSTIN

NewsTrain workshops ends busy 2017 schedule with stop in Seattle

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PME’s NewsTrain will bring its high-quality, affordable, digital training to Massachusetts, Ohio, Oklahoma and Washington state in 2017. Here are the dates and locations for the workshops, which have an early-bird rate of $75 each to attend: • Norman, Oklahoma, on March 4; • Beverly, Massachusetts, 26 miles north of Boston, on Oct. 14; • Columbus, Ohio, on Oct. 21; • Seattle, Washington, on Nov. 11. The Norman workshop was wildly successful, with 110 attendees and NewsTrain’s first training in 360-video. Instructor Socrates Lozano, national technology coordinator and photojournalist for The E.W. Scripps Co., urged attendees to experiment with this storytelling technology, now that cameras start at $200. His slides and handouts, as well as those from other trainers at recent NewsTrains, are at https://www. slideshare.net/newstrain. AUSTIN Registration is open at http://bit.ly/ NormanNewsTrain for the workshop in Beverly, Massachusetts. It will feature training in social-media reporting and branding, datadriven enterprise, smartphone video and mobile storytelling. Please provide an email at http://bit.ly/2017NewsTrain to be notified when more information becomes available on the agendas and instructors for the other workshops. NewsTrain’s low tuition is made possible by donors, big and

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Greg Pitts, director of Middle Tennessee State University School of Journalism, checks videos he shot with Twange Kasoma, assistant professor from Radford University.

By Linda Austin APME News

APME NEWS

LINDA AUSTIN

small, who in 2016 included The Associated Press, The APME Foundation, the Samuel I. Newhouse Foundation, GateHouse Media LLC, Pepper Hamilton LLP, Levine Sullivan Koch & Schulz LLP, the Scripps Howard Foundation and APME past and present board members. We’d also welcome your financial support. To keep NewsTrain serving journalists in their communities, please donate at bit.ly/NewsTraindonate

For updates on NewsTrain’s next stops, follow us on Twitter @NewsTrain or like us at Facebook.com/NewsTrain. Linda Austin is the project director for NewsTrain. Contact her at laustin.newstrain@gmail.com or @LindaAustin_. >> Continued on next page


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Matt Wynn, formerly of the Omaha World-Herald, teaches data journalism at Lincoln NewsTrain. LINDA AUSTIN

>> Continued from previous page

By the numbers: NewsTrain in 2016 • NewsTrain has trained more than 7,000 journalists since 2003. • It completed its 84th workshop and 13th year with workshops in Lexington, Kentucky, on Jan. 21; Lincoln, Nebraska, on April 9; Halifax, Nova Scotia, on May 6-7; and Murfreesboro, Tennessee, on Sept. 30-Oct. 1. • On average, attendees rated our training as 4.4 for content and 4.5 for presentation on a 5-point scale, with 5 as very effective and very useful. • Registration was up 4 percent to 376 from 2015. • Attendance was up 11 percent to 345. • Most popular topics were social media, smartphone video, mobile storytelling and newsgathering, and data journalism. • The 138 slide sets and handouts from past workshops on slideshare.net/newstrain have garnered 22,455 views in the past year.

What are attendees saying about NewsTrain? • “This is the best hands-on collection of practical sessions with knowledgeable ‘in-the-field’ instructors I’ve experienced.” – Kelly Shiers, Halifax Typographical Union reporter • “The training made me excited to bring new strategies to work tomorrow!” – Cheryl Truman, Lexington Herald-Leader reporter • “This is the best training program I’ve attended in 10 years.” – Lynda Edwards, regional reporter, Knoxville News Sentinel • “Presenters were knowledgeable, charismatic. Topics were highly relevant to areas our publication should be improving.” – Adam Rollins, copy editor, Beatrice Daily Sun in Nebraska • “Keep this up! This is one of the best training opportunities available for professionals, faculty and students.” – Greg Pitts, director of the School of Journalism, Middle Tennessee State University

Bowdeya Tweh, formerly of The Cincinnati Enquirer, does a “look-live” video with a partner at Lexington NewsTrain. • “Great program. I loved how interactive this was and intimate the setting was.” – Ameena Rasheed, community content specialist, The Des Moines Register • “Awesome information for a new news director in the broadcast field.” – Kalin Krohe, news director/radio producer, KCOW-Double Q Country in Alliance, Nebraska

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Alexandra Villoch, president and publisher of the Miami Herald Media Company, hands out a special edition of the Miami Herald with the headline “Castro Dead,” in front of the Versailles Restaurant in the Little Havana neighborhood of Miami as members of the Cuban community react to the death of Fidel Castro, Nov. 26, 2016. AP PHOTO WILFREDO LEE

HOW THEY DID IT

The

CASTRO PLAN

Miami Herald set guidelines long before Cuban leader’s death

T

By Autumn Phillips APME News

he coverage plan for Fidel Castro’s death has been a part of the Miami Herald newsroom culture for as long as Aminda “Mindy” Marques Gonzalez can remember. “I was always aware of it. It’s one of those things that always existed,” said Marques, the paper’s executive editor and former member of the Associated Press Media Editors Board of Directors. But when Castro actually died on Nov. 25, 2016, no one looked at the plan. No one needed it to guide them. They knew what to do. Reporters, editors, photographers and digital producers went immediately into action. Marques started at the Miami Herald as an intern in 1986. She spent most of her career at the paper, save a brief stint at People, and was promoted to Marques executive editor in 2010. In all those years, the Castro plan was there, adapting to the political times as they changed, and adapting to the industry. “Somebody told me it was almost a 100-page document at one point,” Marques said. “It was that complicated. It was far more complicated document when we were planning for his possible death when he was still leading the country and based on the assumption that chaos would ensue.” They planned for stories about a mass exodus from Cuba, about family members trying to find each other. Part of the plan explained

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how they would get a boat to get there and how they would get copies of the print product there. “That’s how old it was, that we were trying to get papers there,” she said. “It was very elaborate.” For the longest time, there were names associated with roles in the plan. Someone was assigned to talk to exiles. Someone else was assigned to talk to police. Later, the names changed to titles so it didn’t need to be updated as newsroom roles changed. In the past few years, the document was transferred from hard copy to a Google Document. “Things shifted again when Fidel got sick and relinquished power to his brother,” Marques said. “We changed the plan.”

Thinking Digital The iterations of the Castro plan seemed to follow the changing trends in publishing. The early Castro plan had three versions of the obituary and which one would be published depended largely on what time of day Castro died. For example, if Castro died at noon, they only had two hours to get the street edition out. “Remember those days,” Marques said. “We’d need a shorter version to get into the paper quick to get to the presses and then follow up with a special section the next day.” In the end, Castro died. It was a peaceful transition. “It was almost a non-event over there.” They posted the obituary – the long version – to the web immediately. >> Continued on next page


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>> Continued from previous page

‘Are you sure?’ It was the Friday night after Thanksgiving when Marques got the phone call that Castro was dead. “You can plan for decades, but you never plan for it to happen on a holiday weekend when everyone is out of town,” she said. Her night news editor called with the news. “No. Seriously,” he said. “We have been through this a thousand times. So it took me a minute to believe it was true. When he said it was the AP reporting, I knew it was true.” The first Miami Herald alert came from Matt Bunch, a part-time producer working the holiday weekend night shift. He saw the alert from the BBC and called night social media editor Adrian Ruhi. The metro editor was in New York for the holiday. He worked from there, contacting and moving staff. But the truth was, staff knew what to do. One reporter headed to Hialeah, a largely Hispanic, blue-collar city, where they expected celebrations. “He was there 40 minutes before people poured into the streets,” Marques said. A food writer who lives really close to Little Havana went to work covering the action there. A reporter from the Herald’s D.C. bureau was in town for the holiday and was out at a bar with her friends. “She just hit the streets.” A video team headed out to record the night. “After all that planning, my first instinct wasn’t to open the plan. It’s kind of ironic,” she said. Those who did use it was the social media team for a checklist of stories that were already written and ready to be posted.

job is to write for digital, in the office as others are out on the street. Anchors are taking feeds from one place – a Google file everyone sends to – and over the phone. Anchors write and update the story, blog style, with the most recent thing at the top. When any blog-style story hits a critical mass, the anchor breaks it off into a separate digital headline. During the Castro coverage, Patricia Mazzei, the Herald’s politics writer, jumped in as the anchor.

Castro in print

One more tip

The digital presence of the Miami Herald on the night of Castro’s death was quick, robust and lively. But the print edition had gone to the press early because of the holiday. His death didn’t make it in the Saturday print edition. Instead, they printed a poster of a full front page with the word “Dead” and Castro’s face, in English and Spanish. Then, several Miami Herald staff, including the publisher, went to Little Havana and distributed it on the streets. Then, the Sunday paper became an extensive Fidel Castro special edition.

Having a plan The Castro plan, in many ways, was a template for covering large-scale breaking news. “It made us think about everything, not just stories but distribution,” Marques said. The Miami Herald took the same approach to coverage of Hurricane Matthew. “We did 24/7 coverage.” One of the keys to covering that kind of breaking news event, Marques said, is to choose someone to be the “anchor,” which is almost like the rewrite man of the past. This is someone whose sole

For more than 20 years, the Miami Herald planned coverage for the inevitable day when Fidel Castro died. JEFF KLEINMAN THE MIAMI HERLAD

Marques said one mundane detail caught her off guard on the night of Castro’s death. Some of the pre-written content had been sitting in the content management system so long that it needed to be updated to style. Editors lost some time refreshing the pieces, adding photos and getting them ready to post with the right keywords and good social headlines. “It’s the most boring thing ever,” she said. “It’s a reminder that you get a sense of security by planning, but no matter how well you plan, the plan is going to change. You have to react. There was a whole new layer because Trump had just been elected and his stance on Cuba was very different. Then, it was 12:30 on a holiday weekend. You plan and plan and then you just have to react and be nimble.” The Castro plan has been such a legacy the Miami Herald carried for so many years, that Marques said it’s “almost freeing” to have it behind them. “That was going to be our biggest story we ever covered, but we had the earthquake in Haiti. We couldn’t have planned for that and it was a far more complicated story.”

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editors in the news

Industry’s promotions, appointments, awards and recognition Gabriel Escobar to lead Philadelphia Media Network

assistant managing editor, managing editor and senior editor for enterprise and projects.

Gabriel Escobar has been named editor and

vice president of Philadelphia Media Network, a promotion that puts him in charge of the entire news report for the Inquirer, Daily News, and Philly.com. Escobar, 60, also will play a leading role in driving the newsroom’s strategic planESCOBAR ning and serve as a key member of the company's executive team. Previously the managing editor for news, he will report directly to Stan Wischnowski, PMN’s top newsroom executive.

LIPMAN

USA Today names Lipman as top editor

DAYS

New roles for Philadelphia editors As part of the transition at Philadelphia Media Network, former Inquirer editor William K. Marimow and Daily News editor Michael Days have taken on new roles. Marimow, 69, becomes PMN editorat-large and vice president, a role in which he will serve as a lead writing and editing coach for the investigations, power and policy, and regional coverage teams of reporters. Days, 63, will become PMN editor for reader engagement and vice president, ensuring that the news organization connects with the Philadelphia metropolitan community. He will collaborate with the team assigned to build PMN’s audience and with the leaders of 10 new news-coverage teams.

Ex-Seattle Times exec Simon named new new managing editor of Honolulu Civil Beat After a 32-year career at The Seattle Times, Jim Simon has accepted a job as Managing Editor of Honolulu Civil Beat, a nonprofit news website started by Pierre Omidyar, the founder of eBay. Simon came to The Times in 1985 as an East Bureau reporter and worked as a political reporter, environmental reporter and magazine writer before turning to editing. He went on to become metro editor,

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Gannett has named Joanne Lipman as the editor-in-chief of USA Today, one of the country's biggest newspapers. Lipman has been with McLean, Virginia-based Gannett Co. since December 2015 and will keep her chief content officer position. Patty Michalski, who had been USA Today’s acting editor-in-chief, will now focus on digital efforts for USA Today and Gannett's other papers.

Veteran Mason City newsman takes over as editor in Charles City A veteran newsman from Mason City has been named editor in Charles City, Iowa. The Charles City Press reports that Bob Steenson is the new leader of the newsroom. Steenson said that he’s replacing Chris Baldus, who left the Press to seek other opportunities. Steenson has spent time at newspapers in Dyersville and Webster City in Iowa and at the Fairmont Sentinel in Fairmont, Minnesota.

Thames retires as Charlotte Observer editor The publisher of The Charlotte Observer has announced that editor Rick Thames is retiring. Thames, editor since 2004, told newsroom staffers of his decision March 15. Publisher Ann Caulkins said managing ediTHAMES tor Sherry Chisenhall will succeed Thames as editor. Under Thames, three of the Observer’s projects were rec>> Continued on next page


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ognized as Pulitzer Prize finalists, including a 2007 investigation into foreclosures and the subprime mortgage business.

his career at The Southern as a telemarketer in 1999. He also has been a copy editor, sports copy editor, night editor and city editor.

New managing editor Brummer-Clark has history at The Daily Nonpareil in Iowa

Sentinel newspaper names Brian Cox managing editor

The new managing editor is a familiar face in the offices of The Daily Nonpareil newspaper in Council Bluffs, Iowa. Courtney Brummer-Clark has returned to the Nonpareil as its top editor, replacing John Schreier. The Nonpareil reports that he’s accepted a post with another BH Media newspaper. Brummer-Clark joined the Nonpareil in 2000 after graduating from the University of Iowa.

Brian Cox has been promoted to the position of managing editor at The Sentinel in Lewistown, Pennsylvania. Cox began working at the newspaper in 2008 as a sports reporter, and went on to serve as news editor, city editor and most recently as assistant managing editor. Cox is a 2007 graduate of Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania. He lives in Mattawana.

The Associated Press names 5 to roles in Asia-Pacific cross-format leadership

Wisconsin native Keith O’Donnell named editor of Chippewa Herald

The Associated Press has named five of its journalists to its crossformat leadership team in the Asia-Pacific region, where the news organization is merging its text, photo and video operations to maximize coordination and speed. At the AP’s Asia-Pacific hub in Bangkok, Leon Drouin-Keith, the region’s enterprise editor, becomes deputy director for newsgathering; Celine Rosario, who had been video editor, is now director of planning; and Charles Dharapak moves from regional photo editor to deputy director for production and presentation. Japan Chief of Bureau Ken Moritsugu is now news director for Japan and the Koreas. And Bernat Armangue, the New Delhi photo editor, has been named South Asia news director, a position he had held in an interim capacity.

Chippewa Valley Newspapers has named a new editor for the Chippewa Herald, of Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin. River Valley Media Group Publisher Mike Burns has announced Keith O’Donnell has taken over for longtime former editor Ross Evavold. O’Donnell will oversee the newsroom staffs of both the Chippewa Herald and the Dunn County News.

>> Continued from previous page

AP names new regional news director The Associated Press has named Ravi Nessman regional news director for the U.S. South, a new position overseeing AP’s journalism and news operations across formats in 13 states. Nessman is based in Atlanta, AP’s regional hub for the South. AP is merging text, photo, video and interactive journalism at each of its four U.S. hubs in a reorganization similar to one completed overseas. Nessman will oversee 13 states in the South, which will become fully cross-format, with multimedia journalists and integrated editing desks that emphasize video and social media, along with a streamlined management structure.

Las Vegas Optic editor resigns The Las Vegas Optic editor has resigned for a position at the Albuquerque Journal. The northern New Mexico newspaper announced that Martin Salazar stepped down to take a job as a reporter covering Albuquerque City Hall and Bernalillo County. He had been at the helm of the Las Vegas Optic for the last four years.

Joyner named executive editor of North Boston Media Group David Joyner has been named executive editor of North of Boston

Media Group, a company that includes eight newspapers, 15 magazines and multiple digital platforms, including The Daily News of Newburyport. Joyner will oversee all editorial operations for the group and will also become executive editor of The Eagle-Tribune in North Andover.

English to head The Southern Illinoisan Craig H. Rogers, publisher of The Southern Illinoisan, announced that Tom English was named executive editor. English was named

ENGLISH

Warhover resigns as Missourian editor Columbia Missourian Executive Editor Tom Warhover stepped down to return to teaching and conducting research, the University of Missouri School of Journalism said in an email. Warhover, an associate professor, will return to teaching and research for the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute based at the school, according to the email announcement.

Adam Causey named AP’s Oklahoma City administrative correspondent Adam Kealoha Causey, an Associated Press newsman in Phoenix, has been named administrative correspondent in Oklahoma City. Causey, 34, joined the AP in Phoenix in 2015 from the Las Vegas Review-Journal, where he was a reporter and an assistant city editor for breaking news and crime coverage. He's also worked as a projects reporter for the Florida Times-Union in Jacksonville.

Editor of Christian Science Monitor to lead The Principia in St. Louis The chief editor of the Christian Science Monitor is poised to become the chief executive of a nonprofit that oversees Christian Science education in St. Louis from pre-kindergarten through college. The board of trustees at The Principia announced the appointment of Marshall Ingwerson, saying his career as a journalist and editor prepared him to fill the position at the nonprofit institution. He will oversee Principia College in Elsah as well as Principia school in west St. Louis County for pre-K through high school.

Sue McFarland named executive editor of Tribune-Review The Tribune-Review has named Sue McFarland executive editor of the revamped company's two western Pennsylvania daily newspapers, 14 weeklies and its online-only Pittsburgh edition. McFarland has been editor of the Greensburg edition of the Tribune-Review for the last 12 years. The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review put out its last print edition the end of November and became an online-only publication Dec. 1.

interim editor July 5 and has served in that position since. He began

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member

showcase

APME recognizes contributions to the AP photo report through the Showcase Photo of the Month Award. The competition is judged by AP and member photo editors. The monthly winners are displayed at the annual conference and a Showcase Photo of the Year Award is presented.

JANUARY

FEBRUARY

AP Photo/The Orange County Register

AP Photo/Chicago Tribune

Ana Venegas

Nuccio DiNuzzo

Isabella Busse, 6, walks through floodwater near the Seal Beach Pier during a storm in Seal Beach, Calif. The heavy downpour on Sunday drenched Orange County in one of the heaviest storms of the year. Fast-moving floodwaters swept through California mountain communities and residents fled homes below hillsides scarred by wildfires.

Baraa Haj Khalaf, left, gets a kiss from her mother, Fattuom Bakir, after arriving at O’Hare International Airport, in Chicago. Baraa and Abduljmajeed Haj Khalaf and their daughter, who were told earlier they couldn’t fly to Chicago because of President Donald Trump’s executive order on refugees, made it to their new home.

The next step: APSE pushes continued diversity and training

Y

ears ago, leaders of the Associated Press Sports Editors, the country’s professional organization for those who lead in sports journalism, knew they had a problem. They saw it every day in their own newsrooms. As a profession, sports journalism had made some modest progress in increasing the diversity of the journalists covering sports. But that progress in no way came close to reflecting the diversity of our country, or of those who play sports at any level, or even of those who are interested in sports. So, those APSE leaders turned to Richard Lapchick, the human rights activist and internationally recognized expert on sports and society. Lapchick pioneered the Racial and Gender Report Card published annually by the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport, and its impact on professional and collegiate sports hiring practices in front offices over two decades has been immense. APSE leaders asked that they be graded, too. The results were predictable. The Fs, Ds and occasional Cs show much work remained to be done at all levels, but especially in leadership. Looking to fill a void in industry diversity efforts, APSE went to work. This past summer APSE graduated the fifth class of its Diversity Fellowship in Leadership program. The program, which has graduated 21 fellows, targets mid-career professionals and puts them

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through nine months of rigorous training to prepare them to be candidates for leadership positions and for promotion. The program works—most graduates have earned promotions, several of them multiple times—but there is still much we need to do. Now APSE is ready to take the next step. With the support of Knight Foundation, the program will begin its sixth year with an updated curriculum that focuses less on sports journalism-specific skills, more on digital expertise and fluency, business, marketing and entrepreneurial skill-building, and broader leadership qualities, including strategic leadership. Most grants go toward funding specific projects. We thank Knight Foundation for its vision in supporting this “project of people.” For building a dynamic, growing and thriving journalism model into the future requires capable and forward-thinking innovators who represent all of America. Michael A. Anastasi is vice president of news for the USA TODAY NETWORK–Tennessee and vice president/executive editor of The Tennessean. He is a board member for the Associated Press Media Editors and a past president of the Associated Press Sports Editors (APSE). He is founder of the APSE Diversity Fellowship in Leadership program, which Knight Foundation is supporting with a grant of $31,250.


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By David Minthorn

AP Stylebook minute

Capital offense: Checking the proper style of academic words

W

hat’s amiss in this sentence of a news story? Jane Smith earned a Bachelor of Science in Clinical Nutrition and Counseling after completing an Associates Degree in Applied Science. If you spotted some capitalized words that should be lowercase, you’re familiar with intricacies of AP style for university and college references. Academic terms are among the most searched at AP Stylebook online, and we field numerous questions about the proper style for college degree abbreviations, course names and teaching and administrative titles. Let’s look at some of the basics you’d likely see in Editing 101. First, a review of the corrected sentence above using AP Stylebook guidance in the “academic degrees” entry: Jane Smith earned a Bachelor of Science in clinical nutrition and counseling after completing an associate degree in applied science. We capitalize only Bachelor of Science in that formulation, and associate degree is spelled lowercase without a possessive. The field of study or major is lowercase in AP usage unless it includes proper nouns (e.g., a Bachelor of Arts in English). Moving to the classroom, the “course numbers” entry says study subjects are lowercase: He took calculus. She studied world history. However, if specific classes are named with a numeral, capitalize the subject: Editing 101, History 6, Philosophy 209. In the halls of ivy, academic departments get lowercase spellings except for words that are proper nouns or adjectives: the department of nursing, the English department. One exception: When the department is part of an official and formal name, capitalize it: University of Connecticut Department of Economics. College administrators come under the Stylebook's “academic titles” entry: Capitalize and spell out formal titles such as chancellor, chairman, etc., when they precede a name: Dean of Students Arthur White. But lowercase those titles when they stand alone or follow a name: The chancellor opened the faculty meeting at 8 a.m. Let’s not forget those stalwarts of the teaching faculty -the professors. The “professor” entry says spell it lowercase preceding a name and never abbreviate as prof. Why lowercase? Because in AP style it's considered more an occupational description than a formal title as in this usage: The students took notes as professor Mary Jones delivered her lecture. There is one exception: capitalize Professor Emeritus as a conferred title before a name: Professor Emeritus Susan Johnson. One frequent question from Stylebook users is how to handle degree abbreviations such as B.A. for Bachelor of Arts, M.S. for Master of Science and Ph.D. for Doctor of Philosophy. The “academic degrees” entry says use such abbreviations after a name only when there's a need to identify many individuals by degree on first reference: John Snow, Ph.D., spoke. The preferred form establishing someone's academic credentials is to avoid an abbreviation and use instead a phrase: John Jones, who has a doctorate in psychology.

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2016 2017

APME BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Officers

Directors

President: Bill Church, GateHouse Media, @BillChurchMedia Vice President: Jim Simon, Honolulu Civil Beat, @jsimon88 Secretary: Angie Muhs, State Journal-Register, Springfield, Illinois, @amuhs Leadership Chair: Michael Days, Philadelphia Media Network, Philadelphia, @mikedays Treasurer: Dennis Anderson, Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star, @dennisedit

(Terms expiring in 2017) Eric Ludgood, Fox 5 News, Atlanta, @EricLudgoodFOX5 George Rodrigue, The Plain Dealer, Cleveland, @gprodrigue3 Kurt Franck, The Blade, Toledo, Ohio, @KGFranck_Blade Matt Christensen, Twin Falls (Idaho) Times-News, @TimesNewsEditor Maria Caporizzo, The Providence Journal, @mariacap

Executive Committee (officers above plus) Past President: Laura Sellers-Earl, The Daily Astorian, Astoria, Oregon, @lsellersearl AP Executive Editor and Senior Vice President: Sally Buzbee, New York, @SallyBuzbee AP Managing Editor: Brian Carovillano, New York, @bcarovillano Program Chair: Mark Baldwin, Rockford (Ill.) Register Star, @MarkFBaldwin Program Co-Chair: Angie Muhs, State Journal-Register, Springfield, Illinois, @amuhs Marketing Chair: Jim Simon, Honolulu Civil Beat, @jsimon88 Marketing Co-Chair: Summer Moore, The Times of Northwest Indiana, @summerNWI

Our communication vehicles www.apme.com www.facebook.com/APMEnews www.twitter.com/APME www.facebook.com/NewsTrain https://twitter.com/NewsTrain and, APME Update: www.apme.com/?page=Newsletters

(Terms expiring in 2018) Carlos Sanchez, The Monitor, McAllen, Texas, @CarlosASanchez Michael Anastasi, The Tennessean, @ma_anastasi Traci Bauer, The Journal News, New York, @tbauer Anne Brennan, Cape Cod Times, Maine @annebrennanMWDN Ronnie Agnew, Mississippi Public Broadcasting, @ronagnew Tom Arviso, Navajo Times, Window Rock, Arizona Alison Gerber, Chattanooga Times Free Press, Tennessee (Terms expiring in 2019) Dennis Anderson, Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star, @dennisedit Mark Baldwin, Rockford (Ill.) Register Star, @MarkFBaldwin Katrice Hardy, The Greenville (S.C.) News and GreenvilleOnline.com, @kkatgurll1 Thomas Koetting, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, @tkoetting Summer Moore, The Times of Northwest Indiana, @summerNWI Autumn Phillips, The Quad City Times, Davenport, Iowa, @AutumnEdit Sandra Clark, WHYY, Philadelphia, @SandraSWClark

APME News Editor Andrew Oppmann, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, @aoppmann

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Spring 2017 APME News  
Spring 2017 APME News  

In this issue: • The President's Corner: Oppmann, Earl, Graham earn Lifetime Membership • Ken Paulson: Antidote for fake news: The real thin...

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