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Get ready APME Journalism Excellence Awards: Deadlines and contest details

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From the Editor

Andrew Oppmann

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his edition of APME News is not only the first magazine for 2014, it represents the first efforts by our association’s Marketing Committee, led by Angie Muhs of Maine Today, to help extend the reach and depth of our content. Angie wrote our cover story, “Obstacles to access,” which begins on Page 6. She also was the inspiration of our APME Sounding Board survey on the topic of public access and the obstacles faced by our member editors. She also notes in the story how APME, working with the American Society of News Editors, made a principled stand about the White House’s frequent use of handout photos in lieu of providing access to President Barack Obama (you can read

from the two group leaders on Page 8). My thanks to Angie, Alan English and Autumn Phillips for their contributions to this issue, along with the inputs and edits from other colleagues and committee members. Speaking also of our sister organization, you can read a report on Page 5 about our upcoming joint conference with ASNE in Chicago. This will certainly be a don’t-miss event, so please make every effort to join this historic combination of these two groups. Also of note: Changes to the APME contest deadlines. Entries are due March 31, so make sure you read all about it on Page 18. Thanks for reading!

inside March 2014

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The President’s Corner: Historic APME/ASNE partnership is long overdue Ken Paulson: Students use bingo board to convey speakers’ tiresome topics Windy City wins: Chicago to welcome joint convention in September Obstacles to access: APME survey shows roadblocks in gaining access Dear members: Letter offers plea to White House for public press access Maine bout: Fighting government secrecy by various state agencies How They Did It: The Fire Line: Wildfire in Colorado How They Did It: Sea Change by The Seattle Times staff Great Ideas: APME features a collection of the industry’s best and brightest All aboard: Veteran editor, educator picked as new NewsTrain project director Alan English: In leaner times, one-person storytelling machines are needed Winners wanted: APME Journalism Excellence Awards deadlines, details Member Showcase: APME Photo of the Month winners Editors in the news: Promotions, appointments, awards and recognition AP Stylebook minute: 2013 edition alters longstanding White House entry 2014 APME Board of Directors

ABOUT THE COVER President Barack Obama greets audience members after a Jan. 30 speech in Nashville.

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EDITOR

Andrew Oppmann Adjunct Professor of Journalism Middle Tennessee State University Andrew.Oppmann@mtsu.edu DESIGNER

Steve Massie designmass@yahoo.com

APME News is the quarterly magazine of the Associated Press Media Editors, a professional, nonprofit organization founded in 1933 in French Lick, Ind. Its members include senior editors and leaders from news operations in the United States and Canada that are affiliated with The Associated Press, including more than 1,400 newspapers and online sites and about 2,000 broadcast outlets. The group also includes college journalism educators and college student media editors. APME works with AP to support and recognize journalism excellence and the First Amendment. To learn more about APME’s programs and activities, visit apme.com.

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APME NEWS

The President’s Corner

Debra Adams Simmons

APME/ASNE union: Embracing the spirit of collaboration, innovation

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he Associated Press Media Editors is enthusiastically preparing for the first-ever joint conference with the American Society of News Editors this fall. This historic partnership is long overdue. We plan to convene newsroom leaders from around the country as we continue to chart a new, digital course for gathering and delivering news. We look forward to seeing you Sept. 15-17, 2014, in Chicago. We are embracing this moment in the spirit of collaboration and partnership, experimentation and innovation. As we look forward, APME remains steadfast in our commitment to the core values that have been our foundation: journalism excellence, the training and development of editors, partnership with the Associated Press, diversity in news staff and coverage, and upholding the First Amendment. APME recently partnered with journalism organizations around the country to push back against White House limits on press access. A coalition of press organizations, including ASNE, APME, the White House Correspondents Association and many others, delivered a letter to White House Press Secretary Jay Carney expressing our concerns about the practice of issuing visual press releases rather than allowing press access. A subsequent meeting was held and we are watching closely. APME is pleased to roll out the 2014 News Train program, our premiere regional journalism training workshops. We thank Michael Roberts for an exemplary job leading NewsTrain in recent years and welcome Linda Austin as the new News Train project manager. Linda brings years of experience leading newsrooms and innovating in the classroom to the role. We are excited to kickoff this year’s NewsTrain series on April 25-26 in Vancouver, Canada. Additional sessions will be held in

Columbus, Ohio; Las Vegas, Nev.; and Austin, Texas. APME also is pleased to partner with the Maynard Institute for Journalism Education to offer virtual mentoring to journalists on careers, news coverage, training and development and leadership. Editors are still needed for this program. Each will serve one-week stints as an editor-in-residence, answering online questions about transitioning to editing, news coverage and other topics. If you are interested in being a part of the program, please contact Evelyn Hsu at the Maynard Institute, ehsu@mije.org. The Maynard Institute is hoping for robust participation from APME member editors. In our effort to highlight journalism excellence, APME has refined our journalism contest. The awards recognize work that is innovative, well-written and incisively reported. The categories include an annual Innovator of the Year Award, a best in show Public Service Award, the new Al Neuharth Award for Innovation in Investigative Journalism and the Tom Curley First Amendment Sweepstakes Award. Additionally, a new category has been added this year: best mobile platform. This category honors a news organization that made significant improvements to a mobile application or platform. The 2014 contest deadline has shifted to more closely align with the traditional contest season. Please consider entering your news organization’s best work. This program year marks another important milestone: the 26th anniversary of the APME Foundation. Established in 1988, the foundation was created to advance the educational programs of the APME. The sustainability and viability of the foundation remains one of our key priorities. We seek your continued support. n Adams Simmons is the editor of The Plain Dealer in Cleveland. She can be reached at DASimmons@plaind.com

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APME NEWS By Ken Paulson

CLICHE BINGO! Students should not snub these speech topics

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ou may have seen the attention-getting post of two Boston University College of Communication students who used a bingo board to convey how tiresome their college’s guest speakers are. From Romenesko: Kyle Clauss writes: “My roommate [Alex Reimer] and I are students at Boston University’s College of Communication. We’ve listened to our fair share of self-righteous, out-of-touch journalist guest speakers, so we created this bingo board. Thought you and your readers might appreciate it.” That’s surprising on a couple of fronts. First of all, it’s remarkable that Kyle and Alex know what bingo is. Second is the nature of the messages that the young men dismissed as empty clichés: n “Mentions small paper where career began” n “Do you want to be first or right?” n “We tell stories.” n “You need to be a one-man show.” n “You get to see the world.” n “Compares old school methods to ease of digital age” n “People say journalism is dead, but I think there’s no better time to be a journalist.” n “How many of you are on Twitter? Anyone? n “Bemoans corporatization of media” n “How many of you read The New York Times? Good.” n “Lame jab at Fox News” n “Free press is the foundation of a healthy democracy.” If you’re thinking about dropping by your local journalism school to offer some insights, don’t let the snark emanating from Boston University dissuade you. As a former newspaper editor and now dean of the College of Mass Communication at Middle Tennessee State University, I can tell you that not only do we want you, but we need you. We need you to tell our students about that first job in journalism and how it transformed your life. We need you to explain why you place accuracy above all other values and how the rush to publish without confirmation can damage lives irreparably.

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We need you to provide a sense of history, including what happened when large corporations purchased familyowned newspapers, and how the profit motive affects the news media, for better and worse. We need you to talk about which news sources you value and which you don’t, and why. We need you to convey your enthusiasm for journalism’s past, present and future, including the digital tools that allow us to reach a wider and more engaged audience than ever before. And most of all, we need you to explain why you put up with long and unpredictable hours, uncertainty in the marketplace and a salary less handsome than you’d receive elsewhere, all because this is good and noble work. Keeping an eye on people in power, ensuring the free flow of information and looking out for the community you serve is at the heart of the free press clause, and yes, the foundation of our democracy. I’m sure there were young people with attitude at the time of the First Amendment’s ratification, taunting Tom Paine for his tiresome obsession with the “Rights of Man” and Thomas Jefferson for his old-school concern for “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” But the commitment of that first generation to freedom of the press and speech helped make this a singular nation and ensured that every generation would be free to mock its elders. Is it true that “there’s no better time to be a journalist?” I don’t know, but I sure want that conversation on my campus. Every journalism and mass communications college needs a committed faculty and well-executed curriculum, but we also need the hope, heart and perspective of those who have spent their careers in America’s newsrooms. Our doors are wide open. n Paulson is the dean of the College of Mass Communication at Middle Tennessee State University and president of the First Amendment Center in Nashville. He can be reached at ken.paulson@mtsu.edu


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Legendary city welcomes historic ASNE/APME convention in September

CHICAGO T he Windy City is about to become the Winning City. Oh, forgive the Cubs and look past da Bears, because this is about Chicago winning in other ways. A city that reinvented the hot dog and pizza. A city that made skylines sexy. A city with a Gold Coast, Magnificent Mile and a Billy Goat Tavern. Chicago becomes the Winning City in September, thanks to landing the first ASNE/APME convention set for Sept. 1517 at the Hyatt Regency Chicago. Chicago seems a perfect match for APME, ASNE and APPM members because of the city’s historic reputation for outstanding journalism and engaged readers. “True to our core values, we plan to honor exemplary work at this historic gathering of the nation's top editors, explore best practices in gathering and distributing information, promote experimentation in our newsrooms and two-way conversations in our communities,” said APME president Debra Adams Simmons, editor of The Plain Dealer in Cleveland. Conference planners are putting together a three-day schedule that focuses on leadership, innovation and engagement. Details to come, but #BETTERTOGETHER #ENGAGE #INNOVATE could serve as hashtags and descrip-

tors of what to expect from the 2014 convention. Adams Simmons said important issues will be illuminated in Chicago along with “our connection with readers, the continuing fight on behalf of the First Amendment and our ongoing commitment to diversity.” The convention will follow APME tradition in offering useful ideas and practices for journalists. The Sept. 16, agenda is being built on a “Toolkit Tuesday” theme, emphasizing workshops that provide innovative- and collaborative-focused takeaways for newsrooms. Save the dates – Sept. 15-17 – and look for more announcements soon as editors reunite in a city that deserves a big W. n

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President Barack Obama reacts with the audience during a speech in Nashville, Tenn., on Jan. 30.

APME survey shows editors face roadblocks in gaining access to public officials and information

By Angie Muhs Maine Today Media

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Obstacles to access

hen President Barack Obama settled in for his first day at work in 2009, the White House press corps was not allowed to photograph him. Instead, the White House released its own, vetted images. MUHS It was, the press soon learned, not an isolated incident. White House press photographers were allowed to photograph Obama in his office only two more times, in 2009 and 2010, and other events began to be deemed “private” with no media. But then the White House would provide images on social media channels. The issue came to national attention late in 2013, after a coalition of media groups, including APME, expressed con-

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cern about the practice. It drew even more attention after Santiago Lyon, vice president and director of photography at The Associated Press, wrote an op-ed in The New York Times, decrying the Obama administration’s “propaganda.” The next day, press secretary Jay Carney was grilled at a White House press briefing. Media access to the president may be a high-profile battle, but editors across the country say that they are concerned about roadblocks being put up for reporters seeking access to officials, records and meetings at all levels of government. In a recent survey by the Associated Press Media Editors, 65 percent of editors who responded said that they felt

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“Whatever the rules of the road are at the White House, they trickle down to governors and mayors. This seemed to be a page directly out of the Obama playbook.” Michael Oreskes, Associated Press senior managing editor

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government agencies had become “less helpful” or “far less” helpful in providing access to records, meetings and officials in the past five years. Michael Oreskes, the AP’s senior managing editor, told a recent APME ORESKES board meeting that the news service had found itself fighting to intervene when editors learned that incoming New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio planned to hold a private inauguration ceremony, with no media and a webcast done by government employees. Oreskes said he doesn’t see the incidents as isolated, but rather as a culture shift. “Whatever the rules of the road are at the White House, they trickle down to governors and mayors,” Oreskes said. “This seemed to be a page directly out of the Obama playbook.” In the APME survey, 57 percent of the editors also said they believe governments have imposed more restrictions to public access or exemptions to existing access laws in the past five years. Editors rated local and county government meetings and local courts as being most accessible. Federal records and state government records – and access to state government officials – are becoming less accessible, they said. Doug Oplinger, managing editor of the Akron Beacon Journal, said Ohio has seen $1 billion in education funding turned over to for-profit management companies and church-related private schools with little public information available. “We have a very dangerous situation in which business has gained access to billions of dollars in public money and state leaders have made provisions to allow that to happen with little or no accountability or oversight,” he said. “The state purposely has canceled data-gathering programs so that there is no ability to analyze and hold accountable.” Other restrictions have even hit local governments. J.J. Perry, executive editor of the American News in Aberdeen, S.D., said some local police agencies used to provide incident reports that included addresses. Now, reporters receive a brief description, such as “assault” and a time of day. Perry said his paper also has hit roadblocks as it tries to investigate possible mismanagement of funds for a state program. “Readers have told me ‘keep at it!,’ but they consistently vote for officials who clearly do not value openness,” Perry said. About a third of editors surveyed said they think many

readers make the connection between access issues and watchdog journalism, while another 40 percent said that some readers do. Still, 60 percent of those surveyed said they think the public knows little about their own rights under access laws. Educating the public can be a delicate balance, Oplinger said. “News organizations are reluctant to write about the access issues we face because we fear looking like we’re whining,” he said. The survey did find some bright spots. Eighty-eight percent of editors reported having a lawyer available to help them fight access battles. Almost 80 percent said they are spending the same, or even more, on legal fees than they were five years ago. Most organizations also felt their reporters were welltrained or “okay” on fighting for their own access. “We work hard in our newsroom to fight the battles ourselves, resorting to lawyers only when we don't win and run out of options,” said Alan Miller, managing editor/news at The Columbus Dispatch. “And more often than not, we have been successful.” n Muhs, an APME board member, is director of audience engagement for Maine Today Media in Portland. She can be reached at amuhs@mainetoday.com.

OFFICIAL WHITE HOUSE PHOTO BY PETE SOUZA

The White House frequently releases official photos on its website, WhiteHouse.gov, and to the media. In this Oct. 11, 2013, photo, President Barack Obama, first lady Michelle Obama and their daughter Malia meet with Malala Yousafzai, the young Pakistani schoolgirl who was shot in the head by the Taliban a year ago, in the Oval Office.

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The following letter is from ASNE President David Boardman, dean of the School of Media and Communications at Temple University, and APME President Debra Adams Simmons, editor of The Plain Dealer. lll

November 21, 2013 Dear Members of the American Society of News Editors and the Associated Press Media Editors:

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or decades, American news photographers have captured iconic moments in and around the White House: President Kennedy, from behind in silhouette in the days before the Cuban Missile Crisis. President Carter, triumphantly joining hands with Anwar Sadat and Menachem Begin at the signing of the Camp David Accords. President Reagan, walking out of the Oval Office for the final time. President George W. Bush, taking counsel from President George H.W. Bush along the White House Colonnade. These presidents have recognized that photographic access by the public's press to their leader is essential to Americans' trust in the workings of government. But not this president. The administration of President Obama is routinely denying the right of independent journalists to photograph or videotape the president while he is performing official duties. Instead, the White House is issuing visual press releases - handout pictures taken by official government photographers - and expecting news outlets to publish those. These are not instances where national security is at stake, but rather, presidential activities of a fundamentally public nature. In recent months, these restricted events have included President

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Obama meeting with the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, with former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, with African-American clergy, and with Pakistani human rights activist Malala Yousafzai. In each case, the White House deemed the events "private," but then sent its own photographs to the press and directly to the public over social media. This is, we are sure you will agree, unacceptable practice, raising both constitutional and ethical concerns. These photographs are, in essence, government propaganda tailored to serve the president's interests and not the public's. Today, a coalition of press organizations, including ASNE, APME, the White House Correspondents Association and many others, delivered a letter to White House Press Secretary Jay Carney expressing our concerns about this practice and asking for an immediate meeting to discuss those concerns. In the meantime, we must accept that we, the press, have been enablers. We urge those of you in news organizations to immediately refrain from publishing any of the photographs or videos released by the White House, just as you would refuse to run verbatim a press release from them. We urge those of you in journalism education to highlight this issue in your classrooms. And we urge those with editorial pages to educate and activate the public on this important issue.

Sincerely, David Boardman ASNE President

Debra Adams Simmons APME President


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Our commitment to watchdog journalism has prompted some state officials to retaliate.

Maine bout: Fighting government secrecy by various state agencies

Access issues also have flared in court. Last year, a judge in the infamous Zumba prostitution case in Kennebunk tried conducting secret jury selecteenager calls the Biddeford, Maine, tion because she feared prospective jurors “would police and pleads for help because his not be candid if they were questioned publicly.” landlord is threatening him. An offiOnce again, the Press Herald fought the secret cer promptly arrives, but soon practices, arguing that an open and public trial is leaves after determining it’s a civil one of our vital First Amendment values. Maine’s issue. SCHECHTMAN highest court unanimously overruled the judge Three minutes later, the teenager and his girland ordered the jury selection to be conducted in public, a friend lie dead, his mother wounded and the landlord about decision that will likely change the way jury selection is to be arrested and charged with murder. done in Maine. Why did police leave the scene? Had the victim told disOur commitment to watchdog journalism has prompted patchers the landlord was armed, and did the dispatcher some state officials to retaliate. pass that on to police? Last year, Gov. Paul LePage’s administration ordered The Portland Press Herald had been trying to answer department heads to no longer speak to Press Herald those questions but was stymied by law enforcement’s reporters after the newspaper published a series examining refusal to release the 911 tapes. how the state’s top environmental regulator supported poliDoes the public have the right to know how well law cies that benefitted her former lobbying clients in the chemenforcement is doing its job? Apparently not in Maine, ical and drug industries. where the state’s Attorney General for years had imposed National criticism rained down on the administration and blanket confidentiality on all 911 transcripts related to it eventually lifted the gag order. homicide investigations. “It is the position we have taken in As editor, I’m in the enviable position of running a news every single homicide investigation. End of story,” said organization with an enlightened owner who believes probdeputy attorney general William Stokes. ing journalism is our highest calling. But no amount of But nearly a year after the killing, the Press Herald won resources can take the place of a newsroom's passion for what legal observers said was a precedent-setting case the mission. when Maine’s Supreme Judicial Court unanimously deWe should not be observers but truth seekers. n clared that 911 transcripts should be released to the public.

By Cliff Schechtman Portland Press Herald

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The Press Herald has been aggressively fighting government secrecy across various agencies throughout the state and has been having some success. But these small victories reflect more than our good fortune to have a legal budget. They reflect our efforts to build a newsroom-wide sensibility that we are the watchdogs for the community. We have miles to go before we can say we’ve succeeded - but we’re on a good path. It requires training, discipline - every reporter should have one working FOI request at all times - and an evangelical approach to public service reporting in every corner of the newsroom, including features and sports. We’ve had to fight for inspection records of daycare facilities, internal fire department incident reports and statewide restaurant inspection records. In each of these cases, our coverage resulted in positive changes.

Cliff Schechtman is executive editor of the Portland (Maine) Press Herald. In 2013, Gov. Paul LePage’s administration ordered department heads to stop speaking to the Portland (Maine) Press Herald. After national criticism, the gag order was eventually lifted.

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HOW THEY DID IT

THE FIRE LINE: WILDFIRE IN COLORADO By Autumn Phillips Twin Falls Times-News

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ENVER - The documentary was 30 minutes long, but almost a year in the making. “The Fire Line: Wildfire in Colorado” was a stand-alone piece of journalism - shot, edited and produced by The Denver Post’s photo staff. It went live on denverpost.com on Dec. 21 and focused on the Waldo Canyon fire that burned in 2012, four miles north of Colorado Springs. The blaze caused the evacuation of 32,000 residents, destroyed 346 homes and was part of a

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growing and dangerous trend. Tim Rasmussen, assistant managing editor of photography and multimedia, said the idea came from a brainstorming session of the photo staff in December 2013. They wanted to take on a project unlike anything they’d done before as a team. “Every year, we try to ramp up the level of work we do,” Rasmussen said. “We did this to get better, to raise the standard of excellence for ourselves.” Megan Lyden, a senior multimedia photo editor, took the >> Continued on next page


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“It’s important that the staff is passionate about it. They have to be willing to do what it takes.” Tim Rasmussen, assistant managing editor of photography and multimedia, The Denver Post

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lead as the editor of the project. The staff made lists of interviews they needed and divided up the work, and they shot the wildfire season of 2013 – including dramatic footage from when photographer Helen H. Richardson and AAron Ontiveroz got stuck behind the fire line of the Black Forest fire near Colorado Springs. With a year to plan, they mapped out images they wanted to capture. They built a 10-foot rail system in Rasmussen’s garage out of electrical conduit pipe from Home Depot, brackets and a transformer for a hobby train. The system ran on a car battery. They hiked with it out in the woods and let it run for 10 hours to create the video time-lapse featured in the documentary. In it, you see the moon rise and move across the sky behind the movement of the trees. Audio was a big part of the project, some pulled from video given to them by the Colorado Springs Fire Department and some pulled from 911 dispatch calls. The biggest cost in the project was $1,000 spent to buy the music.

“The Fire Line: Wildfire in Colorado” was a huge learning experience for The Denver Post staff in their ongoing effort to learn new multimedia skills, Rasmussen said. “When I got to The Post 71/2 years ago, there wasn’t any video. “The first videos we did were OK. We got better. We challenged ourselves and we learned from our mistakes.” Since the video wasn’t connected to a story, The Denver Post ran a tease to it on its Sunday front page and it ran in its entirety on the Channel 7 newscast, The Post’s television news partner. “I’ve worked at small papers, and at any paper there are great stories to be told,” Rasmussen said. “It’s important that the staff is passionate about it. They have to be willing to do what it takes.” Watch the documentary online at: http://www.denverpost.com/fireline/ci_24638312/ watch-denver-post-documentary-fire-line

Autumn Phillips is the editor of the Twin Falls (Idaho) Times-News. She can be reached at aphillips@magicvalley.com

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THE SEATTLE TIMES/STEVE RINGMAN

HOW THEY DID IT

Tadi, a Bajau octopus- and fish-spear fisherman, holds onto an octopus he has just speared in a small hole in the coral.

SEA CHANGE THE SEATTLE TIMES By Autumn Phillips Twin Falls Times-News

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cean acidification. It’s a chemistry lesson in the effect of carbon dioxide on the sea. It’s the eye-glazing stuff of academic science journals. But The Seattle Times environmental reporter Craig Welch and photographer Steve Ringman saw the potential. The oceans were changing, sea life was dying and those who make their living off the sea would soon see a shift in their livelihoods if the world didn’t start paying attention. “We were brainstorming last year about doing a big project about coal, but as Craig talked about it, it was obvious

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he was passionate about ocean acidification,” said The Seattle Times Deputy Managing Editor Jim Simon. “It had a dramatic impact in this part of the country – on the southwest Washington coast where it had already caused a die off of oysters. “The Seattle Times and others had written about acidification. But few had really looked at the global scope of the problem.” Welch found that acidification was posing a threat to marine life on a much larger scale and much faster than many scientists had originally predicted. Bolstered by a $19,000 grant from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, reporter Welch and Ringman traveled >> Continued on next page


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A Bajau woman fishing in shallow waters off their community of stilts, spears a stone fish which is very deadly if stepped on - not to eat but to get rid of so nobody gets hurt. The stonefish has spines across its back that project out when stepped on.

THE SEATTLE TIMES/STEVE RINGMAN

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along a sweeping arch of the Pacific Ocean from Dutch Harbor, Alaska to Papua New Guinea. (Visit Pulitzercenter.org for more information on grants available for international reporting.) In order to pull off the project, titled “Sea Change,” Ringman and Welch had to learn how to scuba dive – in December in the cold waters of the Puget Sound. In the field, the reporting involved interviews with about 150 people, as well as visits to Indonesia, Papua New Guinea and four states. And in the newsroom, more than 15 staffers – designers, graphic artists, photo and video editors, producers, developers – had a hand in the project. “It was by far the most ambitious multi-platform, multimedia storytelling we had ever done,” Simon said. “We wanted to create an immersive experience for readers.” The digital design for the stories was created from scratch, integrating photos, video, animated graphics, even short interviews with scientists. In print, the first three stories of the Sea Change series were published on Sept. 15-17. But online, all those stories

were published simultaneously as a single package. “We rolled it out in a different way than we ever do,” Simon said. “The first part published Sunday, Monday and Tuesday in print, but we made it all available online, all at once, on the previous Friday.” They sent it out to subscribers through email and selectively through social media, hoping to create a viral buzz. “We don’t think it diminished the print product doing it that way,” Simon said. “In fact, we hoped people gravitated to our print product because of it.” Sea Change was among the most-read stories on Seattletimes.com after the rollout. “For such a long piece and complex subject, it was remarkably well read,” he said. “There’s still a big appetite for longer form journalism, especially if it’s built in this immersive environment. Readers will respond.” To read (and immerse yourself) in the Sea Change project, visit http://bit.ly/1hhZ4P2) Autumn Phillips is the editor of the Twin Falls (Idaho) Times-News. She can be reached at aphillips@magicvalley.com

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2013 APME INDIANAPOLIS CONFERENCE

great ideas

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ave you launched a great new feature, page or web project, or used a social media tool in a great new way? Well, we want to recognize your great idea. Associated Press Media Editors recognizes a Great Idea every month on APME.com and we showcased monthly winners in our popular annual Great Ideas book, which was released at

our conference in October. This is a chance for your newspaper to show off great work and to help fellow editors by providing ideas that might work in their markets. It’s simple to submit your Great Idea. Just go to the Great Ideas page at APME.com, fill out the online form and attach an image or submit a link.

MAYAN APOCALYPSE San Antonio Express-News, San Antonio Emily Spicer WHAT THEY DID: For the “Mayan apocalypse” in December, we had an overall cover illustration for our “Party like there’s no tomorrow” theme. The whole staff contributed pieces: It’s the last supper/last party – how to throw the ultimate end-of-the world bash, with a playlist, décor, menu, etc.

DON’T FEAR THE MENU The Virginia-Pilot, Norfolk, Va. Jim Haag WHAT THEY DID: When a food lede fell through, our food writer put together a pronunciation guide, complete with definitions, of all those fancy terms turning up on menus. Words like quinoa, pho, blue curacao. We even included the names of a couple of local restaurants that we had been incorrectly pronouncing for years. And, inside the section, we gave readers a pocket version of the pronunciation guide that they could cut out and keep in their wallets.

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GREAT IDEAS

IF THESE INSTRUMENTS COULD TALK

CHALK IT UP TO THE PHOTOGRAPHER Arizona Daily Star, Tucscon, Ariz. Ryan Finley WHAT THEY DID: Our staff photographer, Kelly Presnell, used his love of comic books and street art to give our Winter High School All-Stars package a special feel. Using a black background tarp from the Star’s studio and some chalk, he sketched out basketball hoops, soccer goals and a wrestling mat, then posed our players of the year on the floor. The result: A street-inspired Sunday centerpiece that popped.

News-Record, Greensboro, N.C. Cinday Loman WHAT THEY DID: Arts & Entertainment reporter Dawn Kane came up with the idea to have symphony members write pieces about their instruments – as the voice of the instruments. Dawn shepherded their submissions, and we got exceptional photographs to illustrate the stories.

WOMAN OF SPIRITS postgazette.com, Pittsburgh Bob Batz WHAT THEY DID: We gathered a dozen of the top female bartenders in the city for a group picture and separate vignettes on each of them.

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GREAT IDEAS WINTER STORM: BEFORE AND AFTER South Shore Newsrooms, Massachusetts GateHouse Media WHAT THEY DID: With a winter storm bearing down on New England, a group of GateHouse Media newsrooms on the South Shore reached out to readers to send them photos from before the storm and after the storm. Readers were asked to take photos in the same spot to illustrate just how much the snow had changed the landscape.

A B’MORE LOVE STORY Baltimore Sun, Baltimore Anne Tallent WHAT THEY DID: For Valentine’s Day, The Sun dining critic outlined the ideal destination for every stage of a relationship, from first date to meeting the parents to one-year dating anniversary to breakup spot. Funny and painfully accurate.

Veteran editor, educator Linda Austin picked as NewsTrain project director

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PME is pleased to announce a new project director for its popular regional NewsTrain workshops. Veteran editor and educator Linda Austin will run NewsTrain, a 10-year-old national touring workshop serving journalists in their own cities. Programs are designed to AUSTIN provide training in the skills, knowledge and information newsroom leaders need in a rapidly changing media environment. This year’s NewsTrain workshops will be hosted in Vancouver, Canada; Columbus, Ohio; Las Vegas, Nev., and Austin, Texas. “APME looks forward to delivering the high-quality, lowcost training to journalists that has been one of our core initiatives and is thrilled that Linda Austin will lead our efforts,” said APME President Debra Adams Simmons. Austin has been the executive director of the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism and a professor of practice at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication

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for the past five years. Before that, she was the editor of the Lexington Herald-Leader in Kentucky; executive editor of The News-Sentinel in Fort Wayne, Ind.; and managing editor of the News & Record in Greensboro, N.C. She also held leadership positions at The Philadelphia Inquirer, including business editor, graphics editor, assistant managing editor/finance and editor/ publisher of PhillyTech magazine. She was a fellow in the Punch Sulzberger Executive News Media Leadership Program at Columbia University’s Journalism School and earned a master’s degree in educational technology from Arizona State University. She will jump right in. The first NewsTrain of 2014 is April 25-26 in Vancouver. “I want to continue helping journalists to access highquality, low-cost training after I leave the Reynolds Center in March,” Austin said. “As a former APME member and NewsTrain attendee, I know firsthand how essential this training program is. I’m honored to help continue its proud tradition in its second decade.” n


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In leaner times, one-person storytelling machines are needed

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shley Smith, chief photographer at the TimesNews, Twin Falls, Idaho, is one. Val Horvath Davidson of The Times, Shreveport, La., is too. They are taking their future into their own hands and increasing their stock within their news organizations the same way reporters willing to learn video and photography are. Smart moves. “News organizations are going to get leaner. We are going to have to do more than less, and I think that is obvious,” said Smith. “But that doesn’t mean you have to give up on good storytelling. You just have to prioritize and adapt.” Smith decided to take a writing course at a local college, finding he needed the time to make some mistakes and build his confidence as a writer. He wanted to be a greater part of the storytelling efforts in Twin Falls. He has found the change writing more of his own complete packages - enlivens his work and experience as a journalist. For example, soon after taking classes, Smith embarked on learning all he could about Ernest Hemingway’s retreat in Idaho. Newfound skills taught him to observe more than what a photographer would see. He took in other external stimuli, learned to listen for special quotes. He became more involved in story subjects-interacting with the community and fully immersing himself gave Smith a unique perspective on the story. “Everybody knows the more skill sets you have, you’ll be standing on better ground,” said Smith, who wants to be part of the future and keep having fun. Smith’s experience has reinvigorated his journalistic passion - he finds greater pleasure in working on the whole story rather than just a part.

Davidson's route to a job change included being chosen to write more stories to help provide more community news, and then she embraced the opportunity to be a bigger part of the newsroom. Davidson started writing community features and kept them coming, while balancing photo assignments coming her way. Her writing improved with feedback from a team editor. Ultimately, Davidson landed a community reporter job – her perseverance and experience paid off as the newsroom grew smaller. She is versatile. “If I had a choice, I wouldn’t go back to just being a photographer. I love being on the front lines finding the stories,” Davidson said. “I can’t believe I used to work in a separate room as photographers and thinking that was ideal. I love being in the middle of it all, and this job has me there.” The sentiment is shared by others advancing their skills. “You’re an added commodity for the newsroom, more valuable. I’m more engaged. Doing this relit a spark for me,” Smith said. Times photojournalist Henrietta Wildsmith sees a day when she’ll convert to taking on a beat rather than only photo assignments. She sees what Davidson has done and realizes the potential. She wants to write more and have a greater role. She doesn’t want to be outmoded. “It’s exciting. I see so many possibilities handling the writing too,” Wildsmith said. Alan English is general manager and executive editor of The Times, Shreveport, La. His first journalism jobs included staff photographer, chief photographer and photo editor before stepping into newsroom and newspaper management. He can be reached at english@gannett.com

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APME Journalism Excellence Awards: Deadline, contest details

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he 2013 APME Journalism Excellence Awards, which honor superior journalism and innovation among newspapers, radio, television and online news sites across the United States and Canada, have a new deadline: Monday, March 31. The awards seek to promote excellence by recognizing work that is innovative, well-written and incisively reported. A special award honors innovation by colleges and universities. All awards will be presented for journalism published or launched between Jan. 1, 2013, and Dec. 31, 2013. Because of the change in the entry period, first-place winners in the previous contest (running from May 1, 2012- April 30, 2013) are not eligible to enter their winning work in the current contest. All other entries are eligible and will be considered by judges. Besides the new deadline, the APME awards will feature a new category: Best Mobile Platform. This new category will honor a news organization that produced or made significant improvements to a mobile application or platform in 2013. Four of the categories offer monetary awards: the Seventh Annual Innovator of the Year Award for newspapers, the Best of Show in the Public Service Awards, The Al Neuharth Award for Innovation in Investigative Journalism and the Tom Curley Sweepstakes Award in the First Amendment Awards. The entry fees are $75 per entry for APME members and $100 per entry for non-members. The awards will be presented at the ASNE/APME Conference Sept. 15-17 in Chicago, and are linked on the APME website. The finalists of the newspaper Innovator of the Year will make presentations at the conference, and the winner will be selected by conference attendees. Nominations are received online only. The first step is signing up as an "entrant" at the APME contest site. Please keep your entrant username and password. You will need it to submit entries and return to the site to edit or add more entries before submitting them for judging. Submit all entries before accessing the payment page to check out.

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>> Enter at: https://www.omnicontests4.com/ Default.aspx?comp_id=1265 Again, the deadline to submit entries will be midnight EST Monday, March 31. For more information, contact Sally Jacobsen (sjacobsen@ap.org) at The Associated Press at 212621-1838 or Joshua Schwartz (jsschwartz@ap.org) at The Associated Press at 212-621-7831.

>> Eighth Annual Innovator of the Year Award The award recognizes innovation in print, online, management, structure or other area that demonstrates a bold, creative effort to improve a news or information product and increase audience. Demonstrable success is required for the entry’s standing. The winner will be awarded $1,000. The sponsor is GateHouse Media. n Definition of Innovation: A new, creative and forward-thinking concept that has long-lasting effects and attracts new audiences or dollars. It can be a product, a technique or a new structure, but it must be able to show how it met a specific goal over a period of time. It should have potential to become an industry standard over a period of time. n Eligibility: The competition is open to any editor or staff member of an AP-member news organization, a team from a member news organization or a member news organization. n Submissions: A total of 20 files can be uploaded with each entry. This can include a combination of documents, published pages and multimedia files, if applicable. n Online innovation: The entrant is responsible for making the site available to judges through a Web link. URL should be submitted with the application. n Print innovation: Submit electronic files of published tear sheets. n Online and print: Combinations are welcome, and should be submitted according to rules for both. n Management, structure or other: Explain thorough>> Continued on next page


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ly the innovation and how it improved or increased efficiency, effectiveness, coordination and audience or enhanced the newspaper’s competitiveness or ability to improve content. Provide examples of resulting content as appropriate. n Judging: A panel of APME board and committee members will judge all entries and select three finalists. The finalists will be presented to attendees of the ASNE/APME joint conference in Chicago, and a vote of attendees will determine the winner. A representative of each finalist will be asked to present his or her news organization’s entry at the conference. Attendance is not required to win, but it will difficult for attendees to select a winner without a representative’s presentation. >> Enter at: https://www.omnicontests4.com/ Default.aspx?comp_id=1265

>> Third Annual Innovator of the Year Awards for Television and Radio The awards recognize innovation in television and radio that demonstrates bold, creative efforts to improve a news or information product and increase audience. Demonstrable success is required for the entry’s standing. An award will be given for the TV winner; another for the radio winner. n Definition of Innovation: A new, creative and forward-thinking concept that has long-lasting effects and attracts new audiences or dollars. It can be a product, a technique or a new structure, but it must be able to show how it met a specific goal over a period of time. It should have potential to become an industry standard over a period of time. n Eligibility: The competition is open to any news manager or staffer of an AP-member TV or radio station or network, or a team from a member TV or radio station or network. n Submissions: A total of 20 files can be uploaded with each entry. This can include a combination of produced segments or stories, documents, and/or multimedia files as appropriate. n Management, structure or other: Explain thoroughly the innovation and how it improved or increased efficiency, effectiveness, coordination and audience or enhanced the station or network’s competitiveness or ability to improve content. Provide examples of resulting content as appropriate. n Judging: A panel of APME board members will judge all entries and select the winner.

>> Enter at: https://www.omnicontests4.com/ Default.aspx?comp_id=1265

>> Third Annual Innovator of the Year Award for College Students The award recognizes innovation by university students in print, online, management, structure or other area that demonstrates a bold, creative effort to improve a news or information product and increase audience. Demonstrable success could improve the entry’s standing. n Definition of Innovation: A new, creative and forward-thinking concept that has long-lasting effects and attracts new audiences or dollars. It can be a product, a technique or a new structure, but must be able to show how it met a specific goal over a period of time. It should have potential to become an industry standard over a period of time. n Eligibility: The competition is open to any APME affiliate member who is either an enrolled student or faculty member. n Submissions: A total of 20 files can be uploaded with each entry. This can include a combination of documents, published pages and multimedia files, if applicable. n Online innovation: The entrant is responsible for making the site available to judges through a Web link. URL should be submitted with the application. n Print innovation: Submit electronic files of published tear sheets. n Online and print: Combinations are welcome, and should be submitted according to rules for both. n Management, structure or other: Explain thoroughly the innovation and how it improved or increased efficiency, effectiveness, coordination and audience or enhanced the newspaper’s competitiveness or ability to improve content. Provide examples of resulting content as appropriate. n Judging: A panel of APME board members will judge all entries and select the winner. >> Enter at: https://www.omnicontests4.com/ Default.aspx?comp_id=1265

>> The Al Neuharth Award for Innovation in Investigative Journalism This award recognizes groundbreaking work by a newspaper that creatively uses digital tools in the role of being a community’s watchdog. The winner in each circulation category will be awarded $2,500. >> Continued on next page

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n Eligibility: The awards are given to Associated Press or Canadian Press member newspapers. n Criteria: This award recognizes groundbreaking work by a newspaper that creatively uses digital tools in the role of being a community's watchdog. Special consideration is given to journalism that helps a community understand and address important issues. Criteria for evaluating innovation include interactivity, creation of new tools, innovative adaptation of existing tools, and creative use of any digital medium. n Nominations: Nominations may be made by a newspaper itself, other newspapers, by AP bureaus or by civic or cultural organizations. n Circulation categories: There shall be two awards: one for newspapers with average daily circulation up to 75,000, and the other for newspapers of 75,000 average daily circulation or more, according to the latest audited figures. The winner in each category will receive $2,500 in prize money. APME reserves the right to decline to award a winner in any category. n Submissions: Entries should include electronic files of clippings of stories, series and/or editorials and community reaction. No more than 20 electronic files may be submitted, including a detailed letter outlining the background, accomplishments and results of the effort. Entrants are responsible for making the digital tools available to judges through a Web link. URL should be submitted with the application. The letter should discuss significant challenges to the accuracy or the approach of the entry, and steps the newspaper took to address those concerns. The entry must include all published corrections or clarifications. n Judging: Judging will be done by a panel of APME board members, including the APME president. >> Enter at: https://www.omnicontests4.com/ Default.aspx?comp_id=1265

>> NEW: Best Mobile Platform This award is presented to the news organization that produces or made significant improvements to a mobile (smartphone or tablet) application or platform in 2013, which most advances the state of the art in utility and engagement. The ideal entry will embody improvements in content, design, functionality and technology that set an example worthy of emulation by the industry. n Eligibility: The competition is open to any editor or staff member of an AP-member news organization, a team from a member news organization or a member news organization.

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n Submissions: A total of 20 files can be uploaded with each entry. This can include a combination of documents, published pages and multimedia files, if applicable. n Online: The entrant is responsible for making the site available to judges through a Web link. URL should be submitted with the application. n Management, structure or other: Explain thoroughly the mobile application and how it improved or increased efficiency, effectiveness, coordination and audience or enhanced the newspaper’s competitiveness or ability to improve content. n Judging: A panel of APME board and committee members, including one who has experience with development of mobile apps, will judge all entries and select the winner. >> Enter at: https://www.omnicontests4.com/ Default.aspx?comp_id=1265

>> 44th annual Public Service Awards The APME Public Service Awards are given to Associated Press or Canadian Press member newspapers for meritorious service to the community, state or nation. From the three division winners, an Overall Winner will then be chosen and receive $1,500, as provided by the APME Foundation. n Criteria: Entries will be judged on the basis of how the newspaper made full use of its resources in serving the public good and on the high quality of journalism exhibited in the work. Work that demonstrates evidence of positive change that has benefited the public or its institutions will be given strong consideration. The entry may be a single article or a series, and, in addition to the primary print coverage, can include sidebars, graphics, online work, commentary and editorials. n Nominations: Nominations may be made by a newspaper itself, by other newspapers, by AP bureaus or by civic or cultural organizations. n Circulation categories: There shall be three awards: one for newspapers with average daily circulation to 39,999; one for newspapers with average daily circulation of 40,000 to 149,999; another for newspapers of 150,000 average daily circulation or more, according to the latest audited figures. APME reserves the right to decline to award a winner in any category. Only newspapers are eligible to submit entries, except that bureau work may be entered by a single newspaper for judging in the 150,000-and-over circulation category regardless of the size of the paper in which the work appears. n Submissions: Entries should include electronic files of >> Continued on next page


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clippings of stories, series and/or editorials and community reaction. No more than 20 electronic files may be submitted, including a detailed letter outlining the background, accomplishments and results of the effort. The letter should discuss significant challenges to the accuracy or the approach of the entry, and steps the newspaper took to address those concerns. The entry must include all published corrections or clarifications. n Judging: Judging will be done by the president and three past presidents of APME plus a senior editor of The Associated Press. Judges will select the Overall Winner from the three division winners. >> Enter at: https://www.omnicontests4.com/ Default.aspx?comp_id=1265

>> First Amendment Award and Citations The 2013 APME First Amendment Awards will be given to journalists or newspapers for work that advances freedom of information, makes good use of FOI principles or statutes, or significantly widens the scope of information available to the public. Other distinguished efforts will be honored with First Amendment citations. The Tom Curley Sweepstakes Award of $1,000 will be given to the winning entry that best exemplifies the spirit of the First Amendment. n Criteria: The objective is to honor journalists and newspapers for significant or breakthrough work that protects or advances the First Amendment or federal and state FOI statutes. A story or project that makes good use of an FOIA law does not necessarily meet the criteria for the APME First Amendment Award, and may be deserving of consideration in the APME Public Service competition. Judges in the First Amendment contest will give preference to entries that break ground in the use of freedom of information principles or overcome significant official resistance to legal application of the First Amendment or FOI laws. Newspapers must choose whether to enter their projects in the First Amendment or Public Service contests. n Nominations: Nominations will be made by individuals, newspapers, professional societies, journalism schools, state AP associations and others. n Circulation categories: There shall be three awards: one for newspapers with average daily circulation to 39,999; one for newspapers with average daily circulation of 40,000 to 149,999; another for newspapers of 150,000 average daily circulation or more, according to the latest audited figures. The Tom Curley Sweepstakes Award, carrying a $1,000 prize, will be given to the winning entry that best exemplifies the

spirit of the First Amendment. APME reserves the right to decline to award a winner in any category. n Eligibility: Individual staff members of The Associated Press or Canadian Press member newspapers, or the newspapers themselves, are eligible. However, an individual or newspaper may be nominated for contributions to freedom of information over the years. n Submissions: The objective is to honor newsmen, newswomen and newspapers for efforts to obtain information to which the public otherwise would not have access. It is important that entries emphasize and document those efforts. Electronic images of pages must include publication dates. A total of 20 files may be uploaded and can be a combination of published pages, documentation and/or multimedia files. A detailed explanation of the entry to be submitted as a document file to your online application should discuss significant challenges to the accuracy or the approach of the entry, and steps the newspaper took to address those concerns. The entry must include all published corrections. n Judging: Nominations will be judged by members of the APME Executive Committee, the chairman of the APME First Amendment Committee and distinguished experts on public access issues. >> Enter at: https://www.omnicontests4.com/ Default.aspx?comp_id=1265

>> Digital Storytelling Awards The award recognizes Associated Press or Canadian Press member newspaper, television, radio and online partners for the effective use of digital storytelling. n Criteria: These awards recognize print-online or broadcast-online combinations that draw on feature storytelling, data visualization, social media, use of apps, games, video and/or blogs in presenting the story. The article can be on any topic, but it must have a narrative or feature approach to it. Entries should demonstrate the effective use of the digital medium, highlighting its ability to engage readers, viewers or listeners and present information in compelling new ways. n Nominations: Nominations may be made by a newspaper or broadcast outlet itself or its online partner. n Circulation categories: There shall be three awards: one for newspapers with average daily circulation to 39,999; one for newspapers with average daily circulation of 40,000 to 149,999; another for newspapers of 150,000 average daily circulation or more, according to the latest audited figures. APME reserves the right to decline to award a winner in any >> Continued on next page

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category. n Submissions: Entry should include main URL, three supporting URLs, plus a 500-word (max) statement explaining why the work deserves recognition. Judges will give special weight to entries that highlight reader engagement and interactivity. You can include electronic files of stories, series and/or editorials and community reaction. No more than 20 electronic files may be submitted, including a letter describing the nominated story and how it was developed. The letter should discuss additional elements produced for online and how the online efforts contributed to development of the story in print or broadcast. The letter also should discuss any action resulting from the coverage. It also should mention significant challenges to the accuracy or approach of the entry, as well as steps the news media outlet and/or the online unit took to address those concerns. Published corrections or clarifications must be included. n Judging: Judging will be done by a committee appointed by the president of APME. >> Enter at: https://www.omnicontests4.com/ Default.aspx?comp_id=1265

>> International Perspective Awards The 2013 APME International Perspective Awards will be given to Associated Press and Canadian Press member newspapers for outstanding coverage of international news for local readers. n Criteria: These awards recognize newspapers that provide effective and thoughtful coverage of world events for a local audience. This could be reflected in coverage from the newspaper's own foreign staff; consistent, discriminating selection of

news agency and syndicate material with an eye to overall importance, the quality of writing and the specific interests of the local community; locally produced stories tracing the international connections of people, businesses and other organizations in the newspaper's circulation area; articles about, or by, local people living or traveling abroad; and the effective use of local experts to provide background on international developments. n Nominations: Nominations may be made by a newspaper itself, by other newspapers, by AP bureaus or by civic or cultural organizations. n Circulation categories: There shall be three awards: one for newspapers with average daily circulation to 39,999; one for newspapers with average daily circulation of 40,000 to 149,999; another for newspapers of 150,000 average daily circulation or more, according to the latest audited figures. APME reserves the right to decline to award a winner in any category. n Submissions: An entry can include electronic files of stories, series and/or editorials and community reaction. The files should include proof of publication date. A total of 20 files may be uploaded, and should include a letter with a description of the newspaper’s criteria and philosophy for internationally related coverage. The letter also should discuss any accomplishments resulting from the coverage. It should also discuss significant challenges to the accuracy or approach of the entry, and steps the newspaper took to address those concerns. Published corrections or clarifications must be included. n Judging: Judging will be done by a panel of APME board members. >> Enter at: https://www.omnicontests4.com/ Default.aspx?comp_id=1265

CHICAGO! SEPT. 15-17 y HYATT REGENCY

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member

showcase

APME recognizes contributions to the AP photo report through the Showcase Photo of the Month Award. The competition is judged by AP and member photo editors. The monthly winners are displayed at the annual conference and a Showcase Photo of the Year Award is presented.

OCTOBER AP Photo/AL.com

Mark Almond Huntsville's Anna Hahnemann is hit in the nose while making a return during the Alabama High School Athletic Association (AHSAA) Class 6A Elite Eight State volleyball tournament championship match against Bob Jones at the Crossplex in Birmingham. Bob Jones won the championship.

NOVEMBER

DECEMBER

AP Photo/Santa Rosa Press Democrat

AP Photo/The Oregonian

Kent Porter

Beth Nakamura

Firefighters from Schell Vista of Sonoma County and Santa Clara County Cal Fire prepare to put out hotspots on a fire in the hills of Soda Canyon above Napa, Calif., Friday, Nov. 22, 2013. The fire grew to over 300 acres by daybreak, fanned by high winds.

Phillip Hartlip, 9, a patient at Randall Children’s Hospital from Camas, Wash., shares a moment with Santa in Portland, Ore. Santa and his elves made the windows of the Randall Children's Hospital at Legacy Emanuel extra bright Monday, Dec. 16, 2013. The window washers have been washing the hospital’s windows for 22 years

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editors in the news

Industry’s promotions, appointments, awards and recognition The Tennessean announces changes The Tennessean and TN Media, a Gannett company, announced key changes to the newsroom’s leadership team and structure. Stefanie Murray, 33, formerly assistant managing editor/digital with the Detroit Free Press, was named to the newly created role of vice president/content and engagement. This position is the top leadership role inside The Tennessean’s news center. In this role, Murray is responsible for strategic approach, performance management, audience growth and development and news content and quality across all platforms and products. Maria De Varenne will continue to serve as News Director / Editor for The Tennessean and will report to Murray in the newly announced structure. De Varenne has been the editor for The Tennessean since December 2011. Also, Meg Downey, The Tennessean’s Managing Editor since 2006, announced her retirement after 35 years of service with Gannett.

Miller to lead Monterey newsroom Don Miller, the editor of the Santa Cruz (Calif.) Sentinel, has been named editor of the Monterey County Herald, replacing Royal Calkins. The move is part of a reorganization plan, said Publisher Gary Omernick, who manages both The Herald and Sentinel. Miller is a veteran journalist who joined the Sentinel in 1984 and was named editor in 2007. While continuing his role in Santa Cruz, he vows to continue The Herald’s focus on local reporting and photography, both in print and online.

AP hires new editor for Va., W.V. The Associated Press has named a Denver journalist as its new editor for Virginia and West Virginia, filling a position that opened last fall when the news organization fired three staff members over an erroneous story about then-gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe. Steve McMillan is moving to the Richmond-based position after spending 16 years at The Denver Post. McMillan, 56, was a writer and editor in Denver. He spent 41/2 years there as business editor. He has also worked as business editor and as an assistant city editor at the Albuquerque Journal.

AP hires Bussewitz for Hawaii post Cathy Bussewitz, an award-winning Santa Rosa (Calif.) Press Democrat reporter skilled in multimedia and data reporting, has been hired as a government and politics reporter for The Associa-

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ted Press in Hawaii. Bussewitz previously covered state government for the AP in two states, Nevada and California, in 2009 and 2010. While covering the Nevada Legislature, she broke stories on suspicious contract awards and a historic state budget shortage. Bussewitz later covered the California Public Employees' Retirement System, the country's largest public pension fund.

Kessel named managing editor in Canton Laura Kessel has been named managing editor of The Repository in Canton, Ohio. Previously she worked for the NewsHerald of Willoughby, Ohio, where she served as managing editor beginning in 2005. Kessel has coordinated a number of long-term and special projects for The Herald and its sister paper, The Morning Journal in Lorain. She will direct the content gathering and other operations as well as oversee the universal design and copy desk that paginates Gatehouse Ohio’s two additional papers, The Times-Reporter and The Independent. She is a former member of the Associated Press Media Editors board. She reports to Executive Editor Teri Hayt.

Brink named business editor in Cleveland Mary Lou Brink, former interactive media and niche publications director for the Fort Wayne Newspapers in Fort Wayne, Ind., and most recently a community relations specialist for ITT Technical Institute, has been appointed the business editor for The Plain Dealer in Cleveland. Brink, an Ohio University graduate who grew up in Columbus, will oversee seven full-time business journalists who write for Ohio's largest newspaper in print and online at cleveland.com.

Wilson top editor in Paducah, Ky. Steve M. Wilson has been named executive editor of The Paducah (Ky.) Sun. The western Kentucky newspaper reports Wilson has more than 30 years of experience in senior positions at newspapers, most recently serving as editor of The Kentucky Enquirer.

Lovett top editor in Henderson, Ky. Tom Lovett has been named editor of The Gleaner in Henderson, Ky. The Gleaner says Lovett is a longtime Owensboro resident and a veteran of The Evansville Courier & Press. Both papers are owned by The E.W. Scripps Co. Lovett will succeed David Dixon, who retired last year after more than 37 years in the newsroom. >> Continued on next page


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Mike Hengel, editor of the Las-Vegas Review-Journal, will now oversee the editorial content of all of Stephens Media’s 75 daily and weekly newspapers in nine states, the company announced.

The Times-Georgian reports that all of the publications are owned by Paducah, Ky.-based Paxton Media Group. Enderle's previous positions include publisher of The EnquirerJournal in Monroe, N.C., and publisher of Paxton Media Group's newspaper in Russellville, Ark.

AP names Gillespie as deputy sports editor

Herald-Journal publisher to head Fla. group

Noreen Gillespie, a deputy regional editor for The Associated Press who helps oversee news coverage of 14 states and was a key editor at the past two Olympics, has been appointed deputy sports editor for the news agency. Gillespie, currently based in Chicago at the AP’s Central Regional Desk, will be based in New York and will report to Global Sports Editor Michael Giarrusso, who announced the promotion. She will work with four regional sports editors in the United States and International Sports Editor Simon Haydon to oversee more than 100 sports journalists around the globe, handling spot coverage of games, investigative reporting and planning for events such as the Super Bowl, World Cup and Olympics.

Kevin Drake, publisher of the Herald-Journal of Spartanburg, S.C., has been named head of the Ledger Media Group in Lakeland, Fla. Both newspapers are part of the Halifax Media Group. The move was announced by Halifax Media Group CEO Michael Redding and South Region Publisher Jim Doughton in Lakeland and was reported by the Herald-Journal. Drake replaces Jerome Ferson, who resigned last week.

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Hengel to lead content for media group

Register hires Michigan journalist as editor The Des Moines (Iowa) Register has named a Michigan journalist as its editor. The Register announced it had appointed Amalie Nash as its editor and vice president for audience engagement. The 37-year-old Nash fills a position that became available when Rick Green moved from editor to president and publisher of the Register in August. Nash has worked for the past three years as assistant managing editor for metro-state news at the Detroit Free Press. Nash also spent the last 15 months coordinating the Gannett Michigan network of news sites, including six newspapers and one television station.

Star-Banner names Ross managing editor Jim Ross, senior editor of the Star-Banner since May 2009, has been named managing editor of the Ocala, Fla., news organization, according to Doug Ray, executive editor. Ross succeeds Tom McNiff, who recently left the Star-Banner to become executive editor at the Leesburg Daily Commercial, a sister news organization.

New publisher for Forsyth County News Swartz-Morris Media Inc., which is headquartered in Cumming, Ga., has named Vince Johnson as the new publisher at the Forsyth County News, replacing John Hall, who is on medical leave. The County News reports that Johnson started working in newspapers in 2007 and has six years of digital media experience. He previously held digital media positions in Statesboro, Santa Clarita, Calif., and Birmingham, Ala.

Publisher named for west Ga. newspapers A group of newspapers in west Georgia has a new publisher. Marvin Enderle has been named publisher of the TimesGeorgian in Carrollton, the Douglas County Sentinel in Douglasville and associated weekly newspapers.

CEO Fenwick out at Dow Jones subsidiary In an unexpected shakeup, News Corp said that it is replacing Lex Fenwick, CEO of its Dow Jones subsidiary. The media company controlled by Rupert Murdoch said it plans to review how Dow Jones serves institutional clients. The company named William Lewis Dow Jones’ interim CEO. News Corp. CEO Robert Thomson said the review will include improvements to DJX, a product for institutions that includes a variety of services such as Factiva and the Dow Jones newswire. The product was meant to compete with rival Bloomberg's financial data and news services and was largely developed by Fenwick, who joined Dow Jones in February 2012 after 25 years at Bloomberg LP, where he held positions including that of CEO at Bloomberg Ventures.

Gibson to lead Ugandan newspaper A retired University of Kansas professor has been named executive editor of a media group in Uganda. The Lawrence (Kan.) Journal-World reports that Malcolm Gibson, a retired KU journalism professor, recently signed a two-year contract with Nairobibased Nation Media Group to serve as executive editor for Monitor Newspapers in Kampala, Uganda. As executive editor, Gibson will oversee editorial operations of the national daily newspaper, the Daily Monitor, and two radio stations.

Nelson leaves publishing position Todd Nelson, regional publisher of Lee Enterprises’ Central Illinois Group, announced that he is leaving Lee to become president of the Northwest Arkansas Newspapers, LLC and vice president and general manager of the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette Northwest Edition.

Loyal named editor, general manager Gannett Co. Inc.’s U.S. Community Publishing division announced it has named Taylor Loyal as editor and general manager of The Daily News Journal in Murfreesboro, Tenn. Loyal, previously worked as news director and digital director at The DNJ. He became the editor and general manager of Smyrna A.M., a weekly DNJ product, shortly after that newspaper launched in 2007. >> Continued on next page

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AP Stylebook minute 2013 edition modifies longstanding entry on the White House

S

ome AP Stylebook users noticed that the 2013 edition - print and online - dropped a longstanding entry on the White House. The Stylebook editors meant no disrespect to the venerable residence. Rather, the guidance not to “personify” the White House with phrases such as "the White House said" has been overtaken by common usage in news. The advice to use only phrases such as “a White House official said” seemed unnecessarily wordy and added little substance to an initial attribution for breaking news. Not that the deletion minimizes the importance of attributions. On the contrary. Details on how the news was conveyed to AP need to be included - though placed lower in the story. For accuracy and precision, the story should name the source of the information or say whether it came in a news release. By the same token, a company may be cited initially for

corporate developments, or an agency or other recognized group for an announcement or other piece of news. Specifics on sourcing should be included in amplifying information in the story. The Stylebook's attribution entry currently says: attribution AP news reports must attribute facts not gathered or confirmed on our own, whether the pickup is from a newspaper, website, broadcaster or blog, U.S. or international, AP member or subscriber. AP reports must also credit other organizations when they break a story and AP matches or further develops it. To underline guidance, we're adding a sentence along these lines: News from a government, agency, organization, company or other recognized group may be attributed to that entity on first reference in the story: the White House announced. In a follow-up attribution, specify whether the information came from a spokesman or other named official or in a news release. n

>> Continued from previous page

Horne was publisher of the East Valley Tribune in Arizona and general manager of 1013 Communications, which offers digital services in Phoenix, Dallas and Houston. He also was CEO and president of the Orange County Register from 2007 to 2011. He also served as vice president of community newspapers for The Arizona Republic from 2004-2007.

N.C. editor adds title of publisher The editor of The Daily Dispatch of Henderson, N.C., has become the newspaper's new publisher. According to The Daily Dispatch, Rick Bean, the president of the North Carolina division for Paxton Media Group, announced that Alan Wooten will be the new publisher and also retain his current title as editor. Wooten replaces James Edwards as publisher.

Cawthon named news editor in N.C. Online editor Graham Cawthon has been promoted to news editor at The Star of Shelby, N.C. The Star reported his appointment. He joined the staff in 2005, and has been a crime reporter, business reporter and city editor as well as online editor. In his new role, Cawthon will lead the news team and oversee coverage. Cawthon has led The Star's social media initiative, which currently has more than 25,000 followers.

Pensacola names new publisher Terry Horne has been named president and publisher of the Pensacola News Journal, Gannett Company announced.

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Niblett named publisher in Mississippi Jason Niblett has been named publisher of The Chronicle newspaper in Laurel, Miss., outgoing publisher Kevin Williamson announced. The Chronicle is owned by Emmerich Newspapers. Williamson previously announced his plans to accept a leadership role with the Hattiesburg Impact, a free newspaper owned by a division of Buckley Newspapers Inc. Niblett has been with The Chronicle since it launched in April 2012.

Pike is new editor in Glasgow (Ky.) Daniel Pike has been named editor of the Glasgow Daily Times in Glasgow, Ky., Publisher Keith Ponder announced. A Glasgow native, Pike returns to his hometown newspaper after more than six years as a newsroom manager at the Bowling Green Daily News. n


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APME BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Officers n President: Debra Adams Simmons, The Plain Dealer, Cleveland n Vice President: Alan D. Miller, The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch n Secretary: Teri Hayt, The (Canton, Ohio) Repository n Journalism Studies Chair: Laura Sellers-Earl, EO Media Group., Salem, Ore. n Treasurer: Dennis Anderson, Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star

Executive Committee (officers above plus) n Past President: Brad Dennison, GateHouse Media, Fairport, N.Y. n AP Senior Vice President/Executive Editor: Kathleen Carroll, New York n AP Vice President/Senior Managing Editor: Mike Oreskes, New York n Conference Program: Bill Church, Herald-Tribune Media Group, Sarasota, Fla.; Jim Simon, Seattle Times

APME News Editor n Andrew Oppmann, Middle Tennessee State University

(Terms expiring in 2014) n Bill Church, Herald-Tribune Media Group, Sarasota, Fla. n Michael Days, Philadelphia Daily News n Alan English, The Times, Shreveport, La. n Kurt Franck, The Blade, Toledo, Ohio n Gary Graham, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash. n Joe Hight, The Gazette, Colorado Springs n Eric Ludgood, Fox 5 News, Atlanta n Aminda Marques Gonzalez, Miami Herald n Martin G. Reynolds, The Oakland Tribune n Monica R. Richardson, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (Terms expiring in 2015) n Dennis Anderson, Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star n Mark Baldwin, Rockford (Ill.) Register Star n Chris Cobler, Victoria (Texas) Advocate n Angie Muhs, Portland (Maine) Press Herald n Jim Simon, The Seattle Times (Terms expiring in 2016) n David Arkin, GateHouse Media n Autumn Phillips, The Twin Falls Times-News, Twin Falls, Idaho n Meg Downey n Thomas Koetting, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel

Our communication vehicles n apme.com

Directors n http://www.facebook.com/APMEnews n https://twitter.com/APME n http://apmeblog.blogspot.com/ n http://www.facebook.com/NewsTrain n https://twitter.com/NewsTrain and, APME Update: n http://www.apme.com/?page=Newsletters

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March 2014 APME News magazine  
March 2014 APME News magazine  

ACCESS DENIED: APME survey shows editors face roadblocks in gaining access to public officials and information. Also, HOW THEY DID IT, GREAT...

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