Page 1

APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:22 AM

Page 1


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:22 AM

Page 2

APME NEWS From the Editor

Andrew Oppmann

T

here were many great moments from the 2016 APME-ASNE News Leaders Conference in Philadelphia – and quite a few of them are captured on the pages of this edition of APME News. My thanks to the great coverage provided by the students from Ball State University and Penn State University. You can read all about the coverage team on pages 27 and 28. But my very favorite moment of the conference wasn’t at the conference. It was when sev-

eral editors took in one of the Phillies’ last home games of the season at Citizens Bank Park. In between one inning, a few of us raised enough ruckus to have the roaming videographer capture a few frames of The Daily Astorian’s Carl Earl (Astoria, Oregon) celebrating his birthday with his spouse, and our APME president at the time, Laura Sellers-Earl. It was indeed a conference for the record books – and another product of the teamwork that has developed between two great journalism organizations.

inside December.2016

5

3 5 7 10 11 12 13 15 16 20 23 27 30 31 33 35

20

30

The President’s Corner: Bill Church settles in, reflects on APME’s mission Ken Paulson: Stolen goods: Navigating through journalistic ethics The Great Race: How design centers handled a chaotic election night Accuracy and Innovation: Kathleen Carroll’s conference keynote speech Right on Cue: Apple executive emphasizes commitment to journalism Making Change: Washington Post editor shares transformation insights Numbers Game: Survey: Diversity in journalism still has a long way to go More Voices: Asbury Park’s Towns receives APME-ASNE diversity award Great Ideas: Creative new features, Web projects and social media tools A Grand Opening: Ben Franklin welcomes Philly conference attendees APME Innovator of the Year: Indiana newspaper wins with a civil tongue Who You Know: APME nurtures ties between students and media programs NewsTrain: The reviews are in after this year’s final stop in Tennessee Editors in the News: Promotions, appointments, awards AP Stylebook minute: Computer spellcheck may be fooled by homonyms APME Officers: Roster of APME Board of Directors

EDITOR Andrew Oppmann Adjunct Professor of Journalism Middle Tennessee State University Andrew.Oppmann@mtsu.edu DESIGNER Steve Massie smassie@crain.com

APME News is the quarterly magazine of the Associated Press Media Editors, a professional, nonprofit organization founded in 1933 in French Lick, Indiana. Its members include senior editors and leaders from news operations in the United States and Canada who are affiliated with The Associated Press, including more than 1,400 newspapers and online sites and about 2,000 broadcast outlets. The group also includes college journalism educators and college student media editors. APME works with AP to support and recognize journalism excellence and the First Amendment. To learn more about APME’s programs and activities, visit apme.com.

2

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:23 AM

Page 3

APME NEWS

GateHouse Media Center for News and Design in Austin, Texas.

The President’s Corner

Bill Church

Reflecting on APME’s mission

N

ew editors understand the challenges of getting to know the staff, figuring out best places for a quick lunch, and finding a home in a pleasant neighborhood. The staff in my new newsroom is friendly. Chuy’s is my favorite lunch place. We also found a cozy place across from a park with walking trails and a small lake. Bonus find: The neighborhood has a farmers’ market on Sundays. Our recent move to Austin hasn’t been a typical relocation. This is the first time that I’m not working for the local newspaper. GateHouse Media Center for News and Design works with more than 500 publications while also serving as the hub for our corporate news team. We don’t have a sports department. There isn’t a metro desk. I don’t get calls from readers wanting to discuss the editorial pages or why their Sunday newspaper was delivered in the hedges. Who knew that I’d miss grumpy voicemails from readers. Our Austin experience reinforces two issues facing members of the Associated Press Media Editors: 1. Readers don’t need us. Our first month was spent in constant Google mode. We searched for restaurants, things to do and latest local news. Blogs and niche sites popped up often in our mobile searches. 2. Readers need us. The Texas Book Festival is a big deal in Austin. So is politics. Searches gave us slices of information but

incomplete answers. The best context – from author profiles to voter demographics – came from the Austin American-Statesman. Many of us worry that APME preaches to its choir. How do we remain responsible journalists in an era where false news goes viral and the public’s right to know gets ignored? It is worth reflecting on the APME mission. (Learn all about our organization at APME.com or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.) We support our diverse network of current and emerging newsroom leaders. We champion the First Amendment and the freedom of information. We train journalists to succeed in a rapidly changing environment. We innovate through forward-looking ideas that benefit news organizations and the communities they serve. Our close ties to the Associated Press affirm our commitment to making a difference in this changing world. Our 2016-17 initiatives will be built on our mission to lead, nurture and innovate. My hope for APME is to explore new opportunities but also remember what we do best. We’re journalists. We’re also neighbors. We understand change. Bill Church is APME president for 2016-17. He was executive editor of the Sarasota Herald-Tribune before becoming GateHouse Media’s senior vice president of news.

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

3


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:23 AM

Page 4


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:23 AM

Page 5

APME NEWS

By Ken Paulson

STOLEN GOODS:

Navigating journalistic ethics

A

quick hypothetical: Imagine you’re the editor of a community newspaper (and if you’re reading this column, you probably are.) The mayor of your town is running for re-election and the contest is getting heated. An unknown person supporting the challenger hacks into the mayor’s email account and releases embarrassing messages once a week leading up to the election. There is no proof of illegal conduct in the emails, but they do make the mayor appear tawdry and opportunistic. What would you do? In most newsrooms, we would get together and talk it through. We would try to authenticate the emails and identify the source. We would review the ethical considerations and weigh the public interest in these emails against our discomfort with illegally obtained correspondence. We might come down in somewhat different places on this issue, but one thing is certain: responsible editors would think long and hard about being manipulated by an unknown figure sharing unverified content with the clear intent of affecting our communities’ most important election. Of course, that process would be in sharp contrast to the way the news media have handled the stolen emails released by Wikileaks in recent months. Despite a high likelihood that these emails were stolen by Russian agents and were being distributed in an effort to manipulate our national election, there wasn’t a lot of soul searching going on in America’s cable and network newsrooms, They didn’t hesitate. They just backed up the truck. That shouldn’t surprise us, particularly during a no-holds-barred election. You can argue that Donald Trump’s taxes and Hillary Clinton and John Podesta’s emails are fair game, particularly given the stakes No one deserves more scrutiny than the next leader of the free world. The publication of stolen data doesn’t always have a lofty purpose: In 2014, hackers stole 500 images of nude and half-dressed of celebrities from their private accounts on the iCloud. Websites, most notably Reddit, posted the photos and those very private photos were suddenly very public. Later in the year, Sony Pictures Entertainment was hacked by a group threatening to release stolen emails unless they agreed not to distribute “The Conversation,” the comedy mocking North Korea leader Kim Jong-un. When the stolen e-mails were released, many -including trade journalists-ran with them, reporting salary details and snarky executive gossip.

There are indisputably times when when illegally obtained material is of such overwhelming news value that we really need to publish. Exhibit A is the Pentagon Papers, but it’s hardly the only example of public service journalism fueled by illegally leaked information. But the key is always to apply high and consistent standards whenever laws are broken and content falls into our hands. America’s newsrooms can’t lose sight of their principles just because cable channels have already jumped all over a story and social media outlets are abuzz. Admittedly, it sometimes seems pointless to be the holdout once stolen documents are a part of a global conversation. There is a certain irony in this. Journalists fight aggressively for stronger public records laws and more transparency, but see very little support from the public. And yet transparency by theft is eagerly embraced. Using stolen information from questionable sources may help drive readership and audience size, but it’s a very uncomfortable place to be. If we are indiscriminate in the use of stolen content, we’re no longer journalists. We’re just fences. Ken Paulson is president of the First Amendment Center and the dean of the College of Media and Entertainment at Middle Tennessee State University.

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

5


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:23 AM

Page 6

APME NEWS

‘FOCUSED VISION’ The Associated Press names Buzbee to executive editor post

T

By The Associated Press

he Associated Press announced Nov. 17 that AP Vice President and Washington Bureau Chief Sally Buzbee has been named the news agency’s executive editor effective Jan. 1, 2017. Buzbee, who joined AP in 1988 as a reporter, spent the last six years in Washington, D.C. as chief of bureau, where she has overseen AP’s coverage of the 2012 and 2016 U.S. presidential elections, the White House, Congress, the Pentagon and polling and investigative units. In her new role as senior vice president and executive editor, Buzbee will be responsible for leading AP’s global news operations and overseeing news content in all formats from AP journalists based in more than 260 locations in 106 countries. She will relocate from Washington to AP headquarters in New York. “Sally's leadership and extensive history with the AP make her the perfect candidate to take the helm as executive editor,” said AP President and CEO Gary Pruitt. “Sally’s focused vision will guide our news content in all formats well into the future.” “The AP’s mission of strong, impartial, fact-based journalism has never been more important,” Buzbee said. “My colleagues are the most talented and committed journalists in the world, rededicating themselves to that mission each day. It is a privilege to be a part of this team as we dive into the future.” Prior to becoming Washington Bureau Chief, Buzbee was deputy managing editor in New York, where in 2010 she helped establish the Nerve Center, which coordinates AP’s global coverage. She spent the five years prior as AP’s Middle East regional editor, based in Cairo, where she led AP’s news report and oversaw operations in the region. Previously, Buzbee was the assistant bureau chief in Washington, running spot news coverage and overseeing in-depth

AP President and CEO Gary Pruitt: “Sally’s leadership and extensive history with the AP make her the perfect candidate to take the helm as executive editor.”

foreign affairs and national security coverage. Buzbee began her career with AP as a reporter in Kansas in 1988. During her tenure as a reporter, she covered immigration and border issues in San Diego, and foreign affairs and national security after the Sept. 11 attacks. She holds a journalism degree from the University of Kansas and a Master of Business Administration from Georgetown University. It was announced in July that Executive Editor Kathleen Carroll would step down at the end of the year after serving so ably as AP’s top editor for 14 years.

Nation’s capital to host 2017 APME-ASNE conference

W

ashington is always a great place for an editors’ conference. But in 2017, is there anyplace else you’d rather be? The nation’s capital will be the site of the 2017 Associated Press Media Editors-American Society of News Editors News Leadership Conference. We’ll be joined once again by the Associated Press Photo Managers. STEWART The conference will open on Sunday, Oct. 8, and run through midday Wednesday, Oct. 11, at the Marriott Wardman Park in beautiful Northwest Washington. The ASNE-APME conference will start one day after the conclusion of the 2017 meeting of the Online News Association, also at the Marriott Wardman Park. Leaders of APME and ASNE say Washington is the perfect spot for next year’s conference. “The D.C. site will make travel easier for news executives who want to attend the News Leadership Conference and ONA,” said APME President Bill Church, senior vice president for news for GateHouse Media.

6

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

ASNE President Mizell Stewart III said: “This is a perfect time to return to Washington with a new president in the White House and First Amendment freedoms coming under greater attack.” Stewart is vice president of news operations for Gannett and the USA TODAY Network. Here are three things to know about the convention location: 1. The Marriott Wardman Park is just a few steps from the Woodley Park/Zoo stop on the Washington Metro’s Red Line. From there, it’s a quick trip to landmarks like the White House and Capitol Hill. 2. The National Zoo itself is a short walk up Connecticut Avenue from the hotel. Admission to the zoo is always free. 3. Not interested in the zoo? Take Uber to explore beautiful, historic Washington National Cathedral or the gardens at Dumbarton Oaks, both within a mile of the hotel. A committee with members of both organizations is already at work planning the conference. Watch for more details at apme.com or on our Facebook page.


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:23 AM

Page 7

APME NEWS Examples of Lee Enterprises page 1 election layouts created by Regional Design Centers in Munster, Indiana, and Madison, Wisconsin.

the

GREAT RACE

How design centers across the nation handled election night

T

The Columbus Dispatch printed an Extra edition, which was sold by hawkers on the streets of downtown Columbus, Ohio.

By Autumn Phillips APME News

his year marked the first time many newspapers produced print coverage of a president election with remote teams of copy editors and page designers. Gannett, tronc, McClatchy, GateHouse Media and Lee Enterprises have moved design and editing functions at most of their newspapers to combined service centers. The tight deadlines and last-minute, large-scale changes took immense amounts of planning and close communication between the centers and newsrooms before Election Day on Nov. 8 and throughout the night in order to pull it off. GateHouse Media designs 235 publications (63 dailies, the rest weeklies) in its Center for News & Design in Austin, Texas. The Center opened in 2014. On election night, it was staffed with more than 130 night-side designers, wire editors, graphic artists and proofers, said Tom Clifford, vice president at the center. “It was an all-hands night.� Design centers on election night faced a challenge as staff managed multiple deadlines for newspapers across four time zones. The Associated Press called Wisconsin for Republican nominee Donald Trump, winning him the presidency, at 2:33 a.m. EST. Most East Coast papers were already printed. It was early enough that some, but not >> Continued on next page

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

7


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:23 AM

Page 8

APME NEWS

>> Continued from previous page

all, newspapers in the Central time zone were able to redesign front pages to announce a Trump victory on newsstands the next day. Papers on the West Coast had a distinct deadline advantage. “Our floor managers and team leaders coordinated the crews to clear early sections, close the East Coast papers that were unable to hold for late results, and then align personnel and teams to focus on producing multiple versions of fronts as deadlines approached,” Clifford said. “Communication with the field was by phone, email and Google Chat.” In the end, most of GateHouse’s East Coast and central newspapers went without a final result - with the exceptions of Daytona Beach, Florida, and Rockford, Illinois, Clifford said. “There were no true ‘stop the presses’ moments, but there were many, many nail-biting decisions to hold beyond deadlines in hopes of getting the results finalized,” Clifford said. The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch, a GateHouse newspaper, printed an old-fashioned “Extra” edition, which the circulation team gave to hawkers to sell on the streets of downtown Columbus, said Dispatch Editor Alan Miller. They also made the edition available online. Like many newspapers, the Dispatch had three front pages ready to go, Miller said. “She wins, he wins and too close to call.” The first edition and makeover edition had the “too close to call headline.” They held the makeover a half-hour past their stated deadline (which was an hour past the normal deadline), but it was still too late. For the design centers of Lee Enterprises, a few more publications – 20 in all – got the called race on their front page. Many of the company’s newspapers are in the Mountain MILLER and Pacific time zones. Lee operates two regional design centers. Copy editing is still done at the individual newspapers, but all page design has moved to the centers in Munster, Indiana, and Madison, Wisconsin. Lee had 82 designers working on election night, putting out 49 different editions/publications for Wednesday morning. Ben Cunningham, senior manager for news presentation at Lee Enterprises, said they started gearing up for election night – and large scale news events like it – more than a year ago. A Special Presentation Team was formed with nine designers between Madison and Munster. The design centers developed three front page options, including a commemorative poster page, for editors to choose. “We were designing to set the tone for the next day’s conversation,” Cunningham said. Members of the Special Presentation Team chose iconic images and made headline suggestions through the night, sent by email and Cisco Jabber. New pages were designed and sent out as results were updated in a visual write-thru process to meet staggered deadlines. “The recommendations gave editors a chance to focus on local material,” Cunningham said. After election night, editors sent Cunningham a lot of feedback about the process, mostly positive. The lesson he learned from his first presidential election in this role was the benefit of managing national content at the design center level, he said. “My biggest takeaway is how important the visuals (maps and graphics) are to telling the story. We can do a lot of that here.” Autumn Phillips is the executive editor of the Quad-City Times and qctimes.com.

8

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:23 AM

Page 9

APME NEWS

Stop the presses: Lead headlines on chaotic election night

E

APME News

ditors across the U.S. struggled to capture the late-breaking news of President-elect Donald Trump’s historic victory over Democrat Hilary Clinton in their print editions. Some went late, some re-plated presses with an updated design and some, particularly on the west coast, benefitted from the Mountain and Pacific time zones. Here’s a sampling of lead headlines on Trump’s win: Chattanooga (Tennessee) Times Free Press: White House bound! Knoxville (Tennessee) News Sentinel: TRUMP SURGES Montgomery (Alabama) Advertiser: BELIEVE IT

Los Angeles (California) Daily News: HE’S HIRED! Los Angeles Times: STUNNING TRUMP WIN New York Post: PRESIDENT TRUMP?! The Philadelphia Inquirer: TRUMP WINS The Post-Crescent (Appleton, Wisconsin): SEISMIC SHIFT The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, Washington): NATION PLAYS TRUMP CARD Tampa Bay (Florida) Times: IT’S PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP The Seattle (Washington) Times: IT’S TRUMP The (Nashville) Tennessean: IT. JUST. WON’T. END. USA Today: PRESIDENT TRUMP

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

9


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:23 AM

Page 10

APME NEWS 2016 APME-ASNE NEWS LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

“But the part of the job that is ours alone to do, is holding fast to our mission, to deliver accurate, authoritative and credible news coverage…Each of us renews our fidelity to that mission thousands of times a day, with each decision we make with what to cover and how to cover it.”

AP veteran Kathleen Carroll, who is retiring at the end of the year, shared the history of AP’s innovation with news editors during the 2016 News Leadership Conference.

Kathleen Carroll, longtime Associated Press executive editor and senior vice president

PHOTO / KELLEN HAZELIP

ACCURACY & INNOVATION

Carroll’s keynote speech stresses innovation and core values

A

By Kaitlin Lange Ball State University

central focus of this year’s 2016 News Leaders conference was innovation. There may be few people more qualified to talk about the topic than longtime Associated Press executive editor and senior vice president Kathleen Carroll. During Carroll’s 14 years as the organization’s leader, the AP opened bureaus in North Korea, Mynamar and Saudi Arabia, and has won five Pulitzer Prizes. As she was leading the wire service, newsrooms were going through seismic changes, like decreased staffing and merging of media companies. The News Leader conference opened with a keynote from Carroll who emphasized the two features vital to journalistic success: constant innovation and constant renewal of core values. AP has a history of innovation, which Carroll shared with the news editors. Created in 1846, The AP was the organization that got news where it needed to go and quickly – by 19th century standards anyways. In 1864, they could send news from Europe to North America by telegraph at a rate of eight words per minute, she said. “Unthinkable speed. Eight. Words. A. Minute,” she said, leaving long pauses in between. In 1935, the AP started transmitting photos by wire, allowing newspapers to print photos from across the states immediately following, or in some cases during, events. In 2003, the AP created

10

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

APTM to provide a live video service to customers. Much of the news agency’s technological advances have been made possible by partnerships. During all of the changes and the focus on technology, their mission still largely stayed the same. They have to be accurate and they have to remain credible. “The partners’ contributions are critical to the innovation piece,” Carroll said. “But the part of the job that is ours alone to do, is holding fast to our mission, to deliver accurate, authoritative and credible news coverage…Each of us renews our fidelity to that mission thousands of times a day, with each decision we make with what to cover and how to cover it.” With technology it’s easy to edit photos, adding something that wasn’t actually present. It’s also easy to accidently make mistakes as people want news the second it breaks. “All the technology in the world won’t save you if a reporter mixes up facts or quotes or people,” she said. Carroll is retiring at the end of the year. News editors agreed with her message. Manny Garcia, executive editor for the eastern U.S. at USA Today, said as the industry changes, accuracy, quality journalism and investigative reporting always would be a hallmark. “At the end of the day, what you focus on is what she talked about: The importance of being accurate, and your core values don’t change,” Garcia said. “She has had a great career. She’s done great work. It really elevated The Associated Press to new heights.”


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:23 AM

Page 11

APME NEWS 2016 APME-ASNE NEWS LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

RIGHT ON CUE

Apple executive emphasizes commitment to journalism

I

By Alan Hovorka Ball State University

n a rare conference appearance, Apple’s Eddy Cue spoke candidly with the nation’s top newspaper editors, reaffirming the tech company’s commitment to supporting quality journalism in a turbulent time. “The only reason that I came here is because of how much we value what you guys do,” said Cue, senior vice president of internet software and services. “And you can go back and go look, we don’t do this kind of stuff. I don’t go speak at any events because I rather spend my time working on new versions of a new product.” Cue, speaking at the 2016 APME-ASNE News Leadership Conference in Philadelphia, discussed the tech company’s efforts in supporting journalism with Apple News, the relationship it envisions with publishers and tidbits on how to survive in fast-changing industries. When it comes to the future of news, Apple wants to enable publishers to experiment with content presentation, distribution and monetization with Apple News, Cue said in his chat with Eric Ulken, executive director of digital strategy for Philly.com, The Philadelphia Inquirer and the Philadelphia Daily News.

around it that make it a little difficult.” Cue’s Monday keynote received warm reception from the room of news editors, some of whom commended him for his mindfulness and nuanced perspective on the challenges facing journalism. “I was not only impressed, but pleased with what he said about the importance of journalism and of news and of an informed electorate in a democracy,” said Bob Haiman, retired president of the Poynter Institute. “I felt that was a wonderful endorsement of the work that most of the people at this meeting are so committed to and have committed their lives to.” When questioned by NPR’s Michael Oreskes, senior vice president of news and editorial director, about Facebook censoring a Pulitzer Prize winning Vietnam War-era photograph, Cue said he wants to leave editorial judgment to the experts. He wants to scale back from Apple choosing Apple News’ top five stories. “The question starts becoming of where do you draw the line, and it becomes liberating when you let it go. That’s why my goal is to move backwards,” he said. “I don’t even want to do five stories. I don’t want to do any. … It’s not as simple as running algorithm, and it’ll be perfectly fine.” As the son of Cuban immigrants, Cue feels that an independent and strong press is needed now more than ever. “I think as you look at the world today, all over the world, it’s really important that we have great, successful, expanding news organization in the world,” he said. “You guys do incredible work that’s extremely valuable and makes society better. Without you, it would be a disaster.”

Apple views itself as a potential partner with publishers, where they provide the tools so that publishers can focus on quality content, Cue said. “Our piece of it is, how do we make it so that we can give you tools for capabilities to make it easier for you to not have to build those [development] teams and allow you to focus on the things that make you really great?” Cue said. “That’s what Eric Ulken of Philadelphia Media Network, we’re trying to do at Apple News. For us, left, talks with Eddy Cue, Apple senior vice Apple News is not a money maker and president of internet software and services. never will be.” PHOTO / SHUYAO CHEN Currently, Apple News has about 70 million monthly active users, where the app has grown its monthly active users by about 10 to 15 percent every month since launch, according to Cue. His keynote came days after the unveiling of the iPhone 7 and before the launch of iOS 10. One of the significant advantages of working with Apple that Cue sought to convey was the potential publishers have in streamlining the transaction process for news, where readers would no longer fumble to input their credit card information repeatedly. The problem is how do publishers price content out? “It’s not clear to me. It’s not as simple as the music industry,” the Apple executive said. “I don’t think we can say each article is the same price. I think there are some more complexities

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

11


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:23 AM

Page 12

APME NEWS 2016 APME-ASNE NEWS LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

MAKING CHANGE Cap Executive Editor Baron shares transformation insights

T

By Alan Hovorka Ball State University

he Washington Post’s relationship with owner Jeff Bezos, CEO and founder of Amazon, enters its third year this October with Marty Baron leading as executive editor. Under both tenures, the paper has made strides in expanding its audience and competing neck-and-neck with The New York Times in web traffic numbers. It’s created the Washington Post Talent Network, now a 2000-strong network of freelance journalists all over the country, revolutionizing the company’s ability to tap into breaking news nationwide and abroad. Fast Company called The Washington Post the most innovative company of 2015. Baron spoke to editors at the annual News Leaders Conference in Philadelphia. Here are some lessons learned he shared about transforming one of the nation’s most historic newsrooms and how the Post’s success provides examples for the industry.

Don’t be boring

readers to content. “Of course [the headline] had to be accurate and responsible, but they had to be written in plain and snappy and alluring language,” he said. “They need to succeed in the world of social media. Let me say this, this is not click bait. It’s just good headline writing. Headlines that get people to read stories.”

Circumventing intermediaries The email newsletter has seen a resurgence as a driver of traffic to websites and content. The Post has revamped its email newsletters regarding the curation, design and times they’re sent, Baron said. “They can be a major source of traffic,” he said. “And, by the way, they circumvent intermediaries like Facebook and Twitter and Google and allow us to reach readers directly.” If this industry follows, it will be left behind Working hard to innovate and engage readers isn’t enough anymore, Baron said. “Now, we have to work smart and technology is absolutely key. If we don’t lead on technology, we will be forced to follow,” he said. “And, we have been following for too long. If this industry follows, it will left behind. We can’t let that happen.” The need to lead and not be left behind has led to the Post change into a tech and newspaper company. “At the most basic level, as our CTO likes to point out, it means technologists are first-class citizens in our new organizations,” he said. “They are not there to merely provide support to journalists or the ad department. Our engineers serve as a creative force that drives work.” PHOTO / KELLEN HAZELIP

Great journalism doesn’t have to be stiff and stuffy. Baron and the Post have found that producing great journalism that affects change or provides value to culture can be done doesn’t mean a newsroom has to take itself so seriously. “We can be contemporary and even fun in the style of our storytelling while remaining faithful to our traditions and our values and our mission.” The Post has won two Pulitzers during the three years that Bezos has owned the Post. The internet has given us some gifts The internet constitutes The internet made it possible to cut across an entirely new medium Marty Baron: Seize the benefits geographic distribution and reduce the cost of It’s been long enough. The internet is its own that the internet offers. reaching readers, which has threatened the news medium and it should be treated as such, he said. industry’s security, but there is a silver lining. “Today, I think we should recognize, once and for all, that the “If we were hurt because the internet had taken so much from internet constitutes an entirely new medium,” Baron said. This new us, why shouldn’t we seize the benefits of the internet that the medium calls for its own form of storytelling just as radio has its internet had to offer?” he said. “Why shouldn’t we capitalize on the own, just as television has its own.” opportunity for wide distribution?” What’s more, the emergence of mobile as a major platform for

Move quickly and experiment When Bezos first acquired the Post, he focused the paper’s efforts immediately on the need to experiment and try a lot of different things, providing runway, in the way of capital, and time to let experiments percolate, Baron said. A major game changer for the Post’s news operations occurred when they began aggregating other news organization’s reporting. “Rather than mandating that all reporting needed be carried out by our own reporters,” Baron said. “This meant that we could write stories more quickly. Also, of course, it required us to be especially careful because we could only rely on publications that had a history of reliability and high standards.” It’s not click bait. It’s just good headline writing. Part of the Post’s new strategy in writing plain and simple covers writing the best headlines possible. Accurate headlines that drive

12

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

content presents the possibility of it becoming its own medium. “It may turn out that mobile represents a new medium of its own with new forms of storytelling that are distinct from what you encounter while browsing the internet on a desktop or a laptop,” he said.

Mourning must come to an end at some point To Baron, journalism’s future is clear and that it’s time to move on from what’s been lost and that adapting to change isn’t enough. “I went through my own period of mourning, of what I thought was being lost amid all the change. It was hard not to,” he said. “Mourning must come to an end at some point… The truth is that it is futile and counter-productive to resist the inevitable changes in our profession. “We can’t just adapt to this dramatic change, we have to embrace it. Even as we do that, we also have to remember what doesn’t change and that is our mission.”


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:23 AM

Page 13

APME NEWS 2016 APME-ASNE NEWS LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

NUMBERS GAME

ASNE survey: Diversity in journalism still has a long way to go

R

By Kaitlin Lange Ball State University

onnie Agnew, executive director of Mississippi Public Broadcasting, has moderated quite a few panels on diversity in newsrooms. When he first led one at the ASNE conference five or six years ago, he said there were about 10 people who attended. This year’s panel drew a much larger and diverse audience. “This is a great crowd…The commitment is strong,” said Agnew. “I know a lot of you are working very hard to make your newsrooms diverse.” The 2016 ASNE Diversity Survey, released earlier this month, found that the number of minorities has increased by nearly 6 percent in those newsrooms that responded in both of the last two surveys. For comparison, the survey looked at only newsrooms that responded in 2015 and 2016. But those participating in the panel and in the audience said journalism has a long way to go. TRUONG The recent survey showed that minority journalists comprise 17 percent of newsroom employees – at least in those that responded to the survey. Juan Gonzalez, panelist and columnist at the New York Daily News, brought up that fewer newsrooms are responding to the survey, and those not responding could have lower diversity numbers. “There is less importance being placed on how well they are doing (with diversity),” Gonzalez said. “I would argue the numbers that have been reported are an overstatement.” The panelists called for more editors to hire editors and writers of color for their newsrooms. But they also focused on the need to help minority journalists become leaders. Doris Truong, the weekend homepage editor for the Washington Post, suggested looking for potential leaders who may not fit the

stereotype or perhaps rotating reporters into page one meetings. “The bigger thing is if you’re the manager, you really need to be looking around the newsroom for people who can bring that diverse perspective,” Truong said. “If you’re sitting there and you’re looking around the room and not seeing diversity of perspectives … that’s a real problem.” The 2016 ASNE survey found that of the newsrooms that responded, 13 percent of newsroom leaders were minorities while 37 percent were women. Besides making sure journalists are diverse, panelist Hollis Towns emphasized making sure coverage was diverse. Communities of color are often left out of the picture, he said. “As our industry changes, it’s no longer what the editor feels is the story of the day,” said Towns, executive editor and vice president of the Asbury Park Press. “It’s what the metrics are showing.” And metrics, he said, shouldn’t be king. Sometimes a story needs to be covered because it’s important, not because it drives traffic. Towns also was named recipient of this year’s Robert J. McGruder Diversity Leadership Award. Tyler Tynes, race and sports reporter for SB Nation, said white reporters should also be learning how to cover race issues. “It shouldn’t just always be us who has to do this work and tell our own stories,” Tynes said. “Sometimes it should also be you.” Most of the panels’ attendees were editors in the industry. And as such, Towns pointed out it’s easier for them to enact change. “As decision makers we have the capacity to make the change immediately,” Towns said. “We talk as if we’re speaking in abstract about an entity of people not in this room, when in fact, we’re talking about ourselves. We have the capacity to make that change immediately, not in the abstract.”

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

13


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:23 AM

Page 14

APME NEWS 2016 APME-ASNE NEWS LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

READER RESPECT

How to achieve audience engagement in the short, long term

E

By Kayleigh Barber Penn State University

ngaging audiences is key, advised Emily Ramshaw, editor-in-chief of The Texas Tribune and Jennifer Brandel, CEO and co-founder of Hearken. Both sat down with moderator Monica Guzman, recipient of the 2016 Nieman Fellowship, and discussed how to achieve engagement with audiences that pay off in the short and long run. Both have seen successes as well as failures when working to engage their readers in the work they’ve been publishing. ‘The impact we are going for is engagement,” Ramshaw said of The Texas Tribune. Brandel described a system of mutual respect and a partnership of understanding. One side should be able to influence the other in a mutually beneficial cycle. “Our goal at the end of the day is to build a robust community of engaged Texans,” Ramshaw said, continuing that proper engagement will result with “turning our readers into more engaged users of our site. And then from donors into evangelists of the product.” Brandel said it’s not true reader engagement if you are not taking

14

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

reader’s opinions into account. They pointed out that it is not difficult or necessarily high-tech to crowd source and listen to what readers want. Journalists have to be able to receive feedback and work with their editors to incorporate it back into their work. In order to encourage more community engagement, the panel suggested going beyond discussion-based events and adding in more entertainment elements. Ramshaw said that events that require an attendance fee could act as both an engagement strategy and a financial revenue strategy, citing The Texas Tribune’s festival as an example. She said that the three-day festival of speakers raises nearly $1 million. Brandel suggested even a simple newsletter or email chain can draw community interest. Additionally, comment sections on publications should be reconsidered. While there is the chance that readers can leave rude or unhelpful comments, that’s not always the case. Brandel suggested the program called Civil Comments, where it requires users to only use constructive criticism to comment. Implementing user engagement models in local newsrooms creates a bond between the readers and the publications allowing for a prosperous and reliable media source, she said.


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:23 AM

Page 15

APME NEWS 2016 APME-ASNE NEWS LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

Hollis R. Towns, executive editor and vice president of the Asbury Park Press, receives the McGruder Award for Diversity Leadership. PHOTO / ANDREW OPPMANN

MORE VOICES

Asbury Park’s Towns receives APME/ASNE diversity award

H

By Kaitlin Lange Ball State University

ollis R. Towns, the executive editor and vice president of the Asbury Park Press, has long been an advocate for increasing diversity in newsrooms. APME and ASNE awarded Towns the McGruder Award for Diversity Leadership at the 2016 News Editors Conference. The award is given each year in honor of the late McGruder, once an editor of the Detroit Free Press and managing editor of The Plain Dealer. Grateful for the award, Towns said he has mostly led by example to encourage diversity. Since his first days as managing editor of the Kalamazoo Gazette, Towns has made an effort to increase the diversity of both the newspaper coverage and the staff. Before going to the Ashbury Park Press, he was the executive editor of the Cincinnati Enquirer.

“The point is, diversity is a reflection of the country,” Towns said. “It’s more than just one local community. Having a variety of opinions and having a variety of voices in a story, as well as a variety of people telling those stories, I think is an important component to the story telling itself.” When he searches for job candidates, he makes sure he’s given diverse applicants. And if not, the paper simply needs to reach further. While Towns has constantly strived for diversity at his own papers, he said newsrooms still have a long way to go. “I’m disappointed in where we are,” Towns said. “I think we should be farther along than where we are as a country. I said a little bit yesterday in the (Minority Newsroom Experience) session about the fact that there are leaders in that room who have the capacity to make a difference immediately. The problem with not having a diverse newsroom is not someone else’s problem. That decision starts at the top.”

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

15


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:23 AM

Page 16

APME NEWS

2016 APME/ASNE PHILADELPHIA CONFERENCE

great ideas

H

ave you launched a great new feature, page or Web project, or used a social media tool in a great new way? Well, we want to recognize your great

idea. Associated Press Media Editors recognizes a Great Idea every month on APME.com and we will showcase monthly winners in our popular

HISTORY INITIATIVE The Times of Northwest Indiana, Munster, Ind. Doug Ross WHAT THEY DID: Indiana’s bicentennial prompted us to focus on the history of our region and our state. We built a coalition of historical societies to act as partners in our effort to create a history website with a focus on material from our market area. We developed a sold-out pictorial history book

16

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

annual Great Ideas book, This year’s project was released at our conference in Philadelphia. This is a chance for your publication or station to show off great work and to help fellow editors by providing ideas that might work in their markets. It’s simple to submit your Great Idea. Just go to the Great Ideas page at APME.com, fill out the online form and attach an image or submit link.

and a premium special section with historic front pages from our past. We turned our annual progress section into a Then & Now section focusing on the region’s history as well as where it’s headed. We partnered with the Indiana Historical Society to develop a daily history quiz, and we’re repackaging archived content as well as developing new content including profiles of famous Hoosiers. Readers can’t get enough of this!


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:23 AM

Page 17

GREAT IDEAS

MONDAY MEMORIES The Toledo Blade, Toledo Luann Sharp WHAT THEY DID: Recognizing the popularity of Facebook's Throwback Thursday, The Blade decided to give that idea a twist, and showcase some of its photographers' great work from over the years. The feature is called Monday Memories. Originally planned for just the website, it was decided that the feature would also run in the print edition. Monday was selected as a way to provide local copy for what is typically a slow copy day. A large staff-produced photo — almost always a black and white shot — is selected from The Blade’s archives to run online and in the features section of the newspaper. Accompanying the photo is a short story, usually 8-12 inches, to describe the story behind the photo, the date the photo was taken, and the name of the photographer who shot it. At the end of the story is a refer that tells readers how they can purchase a copy of the photo, or any of the photos previously featured. Most of the orders for photo reprints are handled by MyCapture, an outside vendor who will also mail the photos to the customers. We also will do a feebased page reprint that includes the photo and the article, if the reader requests it. In terms of purchases, our most successful sales have been photos of breaking news events, such as major floods, storms or fires; photos of famous politicians, sports figures or entertainers who visited or performed in Toledo; and, quirky slice-of-life photos such as those that showcase animals or road issues, such as potholes, sink holes, or weird traffic accidents. The feature is often among our top 5 stories on our website every Monday. We sell about 10 of these photos a month, but sometimes they lead to larger opportunities. For example, a new law firm opening in downtown Toledo wanted to display some old photos of the downtown area — they got they idea from a Monday Memories photo - and purchased a total of 10 different large frame-able reprints for their office.

THE BIG STORY Quad-City Times, Davenport, Iowa Autumn Phillips WHAT THEY DID: We stole this idea for The Big Story from the Twin Falls (Idaho) Times-News, because it’s a good one. We have always had a strong enterprise story on our Sunday page 1, but decided to restructure our planning process and our presentation to make sure that story has focus, depth and is as visually compelling as possible. Without adding pages to the paper, we eliminated our Metro cover, moving that content into the first A section. Then, we gave the first two open pages and a third inside page over to a section we call The Big Story in large letters at the top of the section cover. As for planning, we schedule the stories months in advance. We have every reporter in the rotation write one. We have an editor focused on the production of The Big Story and every Tuesday we have a meeting to order graphics, maps, edit photos, schedule sidebars and look for holes in the edited copy

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

17


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:23 AM

Page 18

GREAT IDEAS

DO THIS Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia Daily News and philly.com, Philadelphia Michelle Bjork WHAT THEY DID: The weekend sections of the Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News got a long awaited face-lift — in print and online — in May 2016 with the launch of “DoThis” under the direction of assistant features editor, Molly Eichel. The overhaul is a total departure from the old weekend section, from the way it’s produced, the coverage and the look, to how it works online. Because DoThis includes more (and shorter) stories that are a reader service or that serve as evergreen, two It was the first story styles that work for a digital audience, as comprehensive, shown by analytics, we can drop content online throughout the week. The result is a must-consult and weekly, joint section infused with immediacy and a youthful venture of the sensibility that both reflects and feeds the digital needs of Philly.com. three staffs after Each week the Inquirer and Daily News share merging into one the entire entertainment content — not just DoThis newsroom. stories but actual pages — which requires an unprecedented level of communication and coordination with advertising, page makeup, and the features and design desks of both papers. No small feat. It was the first comprehensive, and weekly, joint venture of the three staffs (Inquirer, Daily News and Philly.com) after merging into one newsroom at the beginning of the year, and paved the way for subsequent — and successful — combined efforts. DoThis is an example of content that serves a variety of audiences, with a variety of tastes, in a variety of formats. We believe it is a vehicle that can be duplicated in other markets. We are proud to say DoThis began in Philadelphia.

18

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

FRIDAY EXTRA The Daily Astorian, Astoria, Ore. Laura Sellers WHAT THEY DID: In 2015, we launched a four-page C section in our Friday publication and a section online called Friday Extra. It offers full-page or nearly full-page display for reporters, photographers and some community members. It has an often quirky, fun attitude, paired with “sense of place” columns and stories and occasionally even entices paid advertising


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:23 AM

Page 19


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:23 AM

Page 20

APME NEWS 2016 APME-ASNE NEWS LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

A GRAND OPENING

Conference attendees met in the Grand Hall Overlook of the National Constitution Center for the opening night reception. The event featured live music by a Philly jazz quartet including Tanqueray Hayward, one of the city’s top jazz vocalists. The buffet tables were piled high with Italian meats, grilled vegetables, cheesesteaks and chicken sandwiches, but the icing on the cake was a presentation by Benjamin Franklin, played by impersonator Ralph Archibold. PHOTOS BY SHUYAO CHEN PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

20

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:24 AM

Page 21

APME NEWS 2016 APME-ASNE NEWS LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

21


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:24 AM

Page 22

APME NEWS 2016 APME-ASNE NEWS LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

22

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:24 AM

Page 23

2016

APME

INNOVATOR OF THE YEAR

The Times of Northwest Indiana brings a civil tongue to its community

T

By Kaitlin Lange Ball State University

he Times of Northwest Indiana was named the 2016 APME Innovator of the Year, pulling ahead of two Pulitzer Prize winning newspapers, which were finalists for the honor. Editors attending the conference decided among the three finalists and civility won out. The Times worked over the last year to bring a civil tongue to its community, leading the way by refusing to publish vitriolic speech. “This is something any of you can do in your communities,” Editor Bob Heisse told news leaders upon accepting the award. “It’s a concept that our community has embraced.” The Times originally partnered with the Gary Chamber of Commerce, but added community partners like local school corporations, churches and other media organizations. Community Civility Counts is now much bigger than Gary, Indiana, where it started. On the newspaper side of the movement, the editors refuse to publish any stories or letters to the editor with “name-calling” in it. The editors send back letters that have negative language and don’t have an online comments section on the website. Originally, people were angry and felt their freedom of speech was being taken away, said Deputy Editor Summer Moore. Not so anymore. “Eighteen months in, the feedback has completely changed,” said Moore said. “Now all we’re getting from the community is they’re so exited and so happy that we’re not putting that stuff in our paper anymore.” They vet stories about politics that they get from the Associated Press as well to make sure it follows the same no name-calling guidelines. They also write stories spotlighting civility and co-host events to increase visibility about the topic. The movement is much bigger than the newspaper. Even government bodies have passed resolutions promising to eliminate negative language. The initiative could still get bigger. After the presentation, Moore

Bob Heisse: “This is something any of you can do in your communities.”

passed out flyers prompting other media organizations to get involved in making the world a more civil place. Other finalists for the Innovation Award were the Milwaukee Journal Gazette and the Herald-Tribune in Sarasota, which won a Pulitzer this year for a year-long collaborative project the Tampa Bay Times detailing horrific conditions in Florida’s mental health hospitals. “The voters got it right,” said APME President Bill Church, whose paper, The Herald-Tribune, was a finalist for the award. “Civility Counts is a magnificent engagement effort that meets the definition of innovation. It is a creative solution that changes the environment.”

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

23


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:24 AM

Page 24

APME NEWS 2016 APME-ASNE NEWS LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

tips

on how to remain a player in today’s content game

N

By Casey Smith Ball State University

ewsrooms everywhere are undergoing some big changes. With traditional practices heading out the door, reporters and editors are evolving into the digital world, making stories and content more available to audiences on the web, but also learning how to make that content transferable to print. Editors from four major metros, involved in the project led by the Knight Foundation and Temple University, discussed their journeys to create digital and mobile-focused newsrooms and how the changes have impacted journalism, business models and communities. Called “Table Stakes,” the yearlong project was named to reflect what it takes to be in today’s content game. Here are some takeaways.

three news organizations – merge philly.com, the Inquirer and the Daily News. “When we got ourselves into a single newsroom, we had to find the best ways to work with one another with the different mediums we have,” Wischnowski said. The combined newsroom also uses Slack to keep on top of communication between staff members. Wischnowski said the increased collaboration helps reporters and designers create the most meaningful daily content for both print and digital.

Focus on your audience Focusing on the audience is key, said Wischnowski. In his newsroom, analytics editors work with all of the teams to find the best ways to connect with different audiences, also coding every story for relevance factors. “We need to make sure we listen to our audience and that they’re actually listening to us,” Wischnowski said. “With what we’ve been doing, we now have much greater insights for what is working for audiences overall and we can find out which stories are working, when they’re working and why.” Mindy Marqués Gonzalez, executive editor and vice president for news at the Miami Herald, has led her publication through audience-driven improvements as well, she said. In Miami – a city where Spanish and English are both heavily prevalent – Gonzalez said “We have a lot in the pressure cooker, but we’re figuring out where the best leverage is,” Gonzalez said. “But we live in a city where the minority is the majority, and it means we have to think about our audience in different ways than others may have to. But it goes to say that different cities have different audience, all with different characteristics and needs.”

More, better, faster stories

The Dallas Morning News, Tomlin said, is giving a special focus to immediacy and depth. “Breaking news and things that are happening right now do real well with audiences,” she said. “So like some other legacy newsrooms out there, we’ve been giving attention to, especially in recent events.” During the July shootings of police officers in Dallas, Tomlin said the new model helped reporters bring in the best stories on social media and on the web. But when it came time for print, reporters and designers were able to work together to bring the best pieces to the morning paper. DARDARIAN At the Miami Herald, Gonzalez said her staff used the more, better, faster model to bring the stories of the Orlando shooting victims to the public first – and in two languages. “When we got the stories out about the victims online, it was a big hit, Don’t depend on kitten videos especially when we made sure we put the bilingual version up then, too,” Although the large push and necessity for digital presence means more Gonzalez said. “We might have had smaller stories going up, but we were able content, it doesn’t mean that meaningless work should become a placeholder to produce a lot of those, focusing on those micro aspects really well, and it online. “Quick work with more locally focused angles are really crucial,” Darhelped our audience to connect with more people and more stories much darian said. quicker.” Likewise, the content should also have a certain degree of newsworthy

Digital is here – and it’s not going away

No one is arguing that the digital age has swept through the media realm, but with more technology comes more need to focus on how to best use the tools that are available. “Print is declining, but digital challenges still exist,” Suki Dardarian, senior managing editor and vice president of the Star Tribune said. Dardarian said improved digital content makes for better print content, but the transformations in the newsroom have to happen across the organization before results are most noticeable. “Longlasting impacts can be seen through more attention to audience, more collaborative work in the newsroom and strong goals for the overall merge between print and digital content.”

quality. Although audiences may be drawn to certain topics, depending on the reach of the publication, topics should be carefully vetted and tested on consumers. “When we’re telling stories, we need to be focused on what the story is that we’re telling,” Dardarian said. “Whether it’s a short story that day or a huge piece of enterprise, it needs to have appropriate purpose.”

Become one newsroom Panelists spoke highly of integrated newsrooms, emphasizing the need for reporters, editors, designers and staffers of kinds to work closely together. Often, this means newsrooms need to be spatially reorganized, but in some cases, this means some may experience title changes and shifts in job descriptions. Robyn Tomlin, vice president and managing editor, The Dallas Morning News, said her newsroom has seen some of the most drastic changes of all. “Fifty percent of people in our newsroom are now in different jobs than they were before the overhaul,” she said. “It’s been a massive transformation that has been a very, very long process. But we have been seeing great results so far.”

Improve internal communication With newsroom reorganization comes the need for better communication between those in the newsroom. Stan Wischnowski, executive editor and senior vice president of Philadelphia Media Network, was a part of the merging of

24

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

Print later and better At his Philadelphia-based media organization, Wischnowski said his staff focuses on digital content first, then the pieces for print can be chosen later. “Print later and better, that’s what we’re really looking to do,” Wischnowski said. “This helps designers have a better idea with what they’re working with, and it helps us translate what’s online into print.”

Re-strategize when things fail With all of the new strategies and models entering newsrooms, Gonzalez said it’s still important to know what’s working and what isn’t. “If you try something and it didn’t do great or you didn’t approach it the right way, you have to cut the cord,” Gonzalez said. Although it might not work the first few times, Gonzalez was encouraging and said newsroom leaders should encourage their staffs to come up with new goals and to refer to audience trends when attempts result in failure.

Not everything is changing Of all the changes newsrooms are seeing today, one thing isn’t going away – quality work. Accountability that comes with good, quality investigative journalism isn’t – and shouldn’t – be affected with changes made in today’s newsrooms, Dardarian said.


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:24 AM

Page 25

APME NEWS 2016 APME-ASNE NEWS LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

FORWARD MOTION Video creates a stronger emotional connection with subjects

I

By Morganne Mallon Penn State University

ncorporating video into the newsroom is becoming increasingly essential in the digital age. Danny Gawlowski, the photo and video editor of The Seattle Times, and Danese Kenon, the deputy director of photography for video/multimedia at the Tampa Bay Times, stressed the importance of video in the “Video Numbers and Mobile Must-Haves” session. “Video production is larger than a few dedicated staffers,” Gawlowski said. “It’s newsroom-wide.” Gawlowski explained the numerous reasons why utilizing video more important than ever. Video advertising pays at a higher rate than banner ads, and audiences are watching an increased amount of video content. He said videos make a greater social media impact and that a wider audience sees video content because it is shareable. And perhaps most importantly, video creates a much stronger emotional connection for a story’s subjects. “This is how we can do our journalistic mission,” Gawlowski said. “We’re getting our audience to plug in and care about these issues we care about.” Gawlowski and Kenon offered plenty of tips to an eager audience of managers and editors looking to get their staffs thinking more about video. Here’s some of their advice:

Spend more time on enterprise video The Seattle Times produces 78 percent of daily video, which is produced and published as quickly as possible due to the content being time-sensitive, Gawlowski said. The remaining 22 percent of video is enterprise, which takes a much longer time and effort to produce. However, 82 percent of video traffic goes to enterprise, which is why The Seattle Timesfocuses these types of video on stories that are unique, engaging and not time-sensitive.

Assess and reorganize At least one staff member has to have video in their job descrip-

tion, Kenon said. This person, or small group, of video-focused staffers needs to assess what they have, what their budget is and what the staff is capable of doing. Managers also need to assess what equipment or new technology they are able to purchase for their newsroom, and how many reporters they can give it to.

Coffee chats are key Kenon highly recommended that editors and managers have coffee chats with all of their staff members at least once a year. When Kenon meets with her staff, she focuses the conversation on learning what they can do, what they’re working on, what project they’re passionate about and what she can do to help them be the best they can be.

Newsrooms need the right equipment Having the equipment to support video and photo is important and worth the cost, Kenon said. She encouraged not only videographers and photographers to approach their managers when they don’t have a piece of equipment they need, but also managers to use moments like the coffee chats to ask what their staff needs. Kenon encouraged managers in the audience to look into purchasing USB adapters, Eye-Fi cards and microphones capable of plugging into iPhones. She also recommended the mobile efficiency app, Teripix, which allows reporters to take pictures, upload them to their smartphones, add a caption and then upload the photos to the news organization’s website, all within minutes.

Managers need to keep up with their staff Investing in training a staff on videography and the newest technology is not enough, Kenon said. Managers need to be able to be able to contribute content to newsroom as well, not only so they can set an example to reporters, but also should they be thrown into a situation where they have to report breaking news themselves. “Are you, as a manager, staying up on the latest and the greatest?” Kenon asked her audience. “You’re feeding your staff, but are you feeding yourself?”

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

25


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:24 AM

Page 26

GET IN THE MIX

Multimedia elements spur reader engagement, interaction

T

By Kayleigh Barber Penn State University

he digital age of news and trends in readership have made it evident that long-form stories, which once found their place in newspapers, are no longer keeping readers engaged. The more that content is conveniently placed online, the lower the attention span seems to be of the audience, and, as Val Hoeppner stated, time on site is more valuable to advertisers than number of clicks. Because maintaining attention is just as important as grabbing it, multimedia elements have become important to reader engagement and interaction. “Multimedia, whether it’s graphics, whether it’s timelines, audio or video, all of that is there so our audience hangs around with us more,” Hoeppner said. In their session, Free Tools You Should Be Using Now, Hoeppner, from the Center for Innovation in Media at Middle Tennesse State University, and Val Hoeppner Media and Consulting, and Jamie Stockwell, managing editor of San Antonio ExpressNews, offered over a dozen free resources that newsrooms can and should be using to incorporate multimedia components into their publications. Here are some you should be implementing in your newsroom: Mixlr-Broadcast Live Audio: This is free online radio that news organizations can use to broadcast anything they want for free up to an hour a day. It can be used to broadcast anything from news reports to play-by-play game coverage; if you decide you want more than a hour-a-day, it is $99 a year for 12 hours of broadcast a day. Facebook Live and Mevo: While Facebook Live may not be new, this resource can be enhanced using the new camera, Mevo, to produce engaging TV-quality content. The goal, Hoeppner said, is to broadcast things that are not typically broadcast in full on television but with the same scripted quality as for TV. Mevo is a camera that can capture nine different angles with a single lens and can be controlled in real time by a smartphone. At $400 it is pricey, but Hoeppner believes it is worth the investment for your newsroom. Timeline/StoryMap: Developed by Knight Lab, both of these multimedia tools can add a lot of interactive elements to your article without requiring extensive knowledge of coding. Timeline allows you to show the chronology of your story by creating a unique timeline to which you can upload text, video and audio. StoryMap gives you a map of an area you are focusing on and allows you to upload different content in different map locations. You upload your research onto a spreadsheet, like Google Sheets, and link it to the tool. DocumentCloud/SoundCloud: These sites allow for docu-

26

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

“Mult timeli audie

APME NEWS 2016 APME-ASNE NEWS LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

Val Hoeppner: “Multimedia, whether it’s graphics, whether it’s timelines, audio or video, all of that is there so our audience hangs around with us more.” PHOTO / SHUYAO CHEN

ments like PDFs and court documents and sound bites, respectively, to be easily embedded into your publications. SoundCloud is also a free platform for the creation and sharing of podcasts. Storify: This allows you to aggregate previous coverage of a topic. All you need are the links to your content to upload. All of these tools can be used on desktop and mobile platforms because, as Hoeppner said, “if it doesn’t work on mobile, then it doesn’t work.” Stockwell encourages the use of these free tools because multimedia illustrates particular points in a story, provides transparency in the reporting process and invites reader participation. To encourage journalists to use these tools, Stockwell said, have them think like their readers. If the story is important but dull, readers will not want to read it. “Give them important stories but make them interesting,” she said.


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:24 AM

Page 27

APME NEWS 2016 APME-ASNE NEWS LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE By Juli Metzger

WHO YOU KNOW

APME nurtures ties between students and media programs

I

t's all about the relationship. That's what I tell student journalists who one day will turn to a hiring editor and ask for a job. Likewise, I talk to editors all the time who cannot find the talent they need to work in their lean and demanding multimedia, cross platform news operations. APME continues to nurture its relationship with university journalism and media communications programs across the country. As professionals, we know relationships don't happen in an instant. They build over time. As a Ball State University journalism instructor and Coordinator of Unified Media for Ball State's College of Communication, Information and Media, I have led students covering the Associated Press Media Editors/American Society of News Editors conferences every year since 2013. Besides my students, I recruit area students from other colleges near the venue to participate in a conference coverage team producing real-time, multi-platform content. We’ve covered conferences in Indianapolis, Chicago, Stanford and this year in Philadelphia. Ball State students have worked with students from Indiana University, Columbia College, Stanford University, San Jose State University and this year Penn State to cover this For the second year, convention. This also is an opportunity for APME paired editors to meet and take note of the most promising student journalists students with emerging from some of the best mentor editors. They college programs in the country. For the second year, APME met initially via paired students with mentor ediemail then in person tors. They met initially via email - sometimes several then in person - sometimes several times - during the conference. times - during the Mentors provided feedback on student work. They discussed the stuconference. dent's career plans and made arrangements to stay in touch post conference. Beyond the mentors, editors took notice of the work students were doing, from reporting and writing of conference sessions to photography to videography to motion graphics. One Ball State student - a senior available in May 2017 - was hired on the spot for Christmas break work at her hometown newspaper, The Cincinnati Enquirer. It’s a great way to get to know a potential employee and for them to get to know you. The other Ball State seniors connected with multiple editors poised to make spring hires. Some editors want more seasoned hires. I made at least a halfdozen referrals of Ball State alums that are working now but may be in a position to move up or on. In addition, I came home with a stack of business cards, and conference organizers shared its entire mailing list (300+ news media executives). All student work from the convention is posted here https://newsleaders2016.wordpress.com/. The media assets provide content not just for the student-driven

website but for the websites of two professional organizations apme.com and asne.org — as well as their social media channels, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter accounts. Finally, the student work during the conference provides a fair percentage of the content for this magazine, which is published each winter and mailed to the entire membership. Students get copies of the magazine for their professional portfolios. Conference organizers know it is the relationship with Ball State and the other universities that ensures they'll have quality content for multiple uses across all platforms and editors will nurture leads on their next hires. But how do students feel? Here's one response: “Thank you for organizing the trip and inviting me to go. It was a great experience to get to know my colleagues (and you) better as well as hearing what others all over the industry are doing. I would say this experience was as valuable as my time in internships all summer — mainly because I was able to get a sense of what is happening across the industry, instead of in isolated newsrooms.” In the Academy, we can teach students to report, write, shoot, and edit but they have to apply those classroom lessons before they'll get good at it. It’s the same with networking and soft skills. Talking to the pros and connecting on a meaningful level are the kinds of skills that can make a difference for them when they hit the job market. It's just one more way industry can have an ongoing relationship with the young professionals they need in order to flourish. Juli Metzger, M.S., teaches in the Department of Journalism at Ball State University, Muncie, Ind., and is Coordinator of Unified Student Media, Ball State's multiplatform student media news studio. Formerly, she was publisher of three newspapers and editor of three others. Before she joined Ball State in 2011, she was Executive Editor for Digital at the Indianapolis Star. She has received the APME Public Service Award and James K. Batten Award for Public Service Journalism and is a former Gannett Editor of the Year.

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

27


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:24 AM

Page 28

APME NEWS 2016 APME-ASNE NEWS LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

Meet the APME-ASNE Conference coverage team Ball State University

Penn State University

Tyson Bird is a junior journalism graphics major at Ball State from Sandpoint, Idaho. He has worked as a page designer for Ball State Unified Media and as an intern for CNHI’s Anderson (Ind.) Design Center. Tyson has interned as a web designer for The Spokesman-Review in Spokane, Washington. He worked as part of a design team at the Chicago Tribune this summer as part of Ball State’s BSU at the Games immersive learning experience covering the 2016 Summer Olympics. He can be reached at tabird@bsu.edu or tysonbird.com.

Kaitlin Lange is a senior majoring in Journalism and Telecommunications News and Political Science. She was Editor-in-Chief, Managing Editor and News Editor during her tenure at The Ball State Daily News. She has completed internships at the Evansville Courier & Press and the Indianapolis Star, where she was a Pulliam Fellow. She has been involved in journalism since working for her high school news magazine in Cincinnati, Ohio. Although she is primarily a news junkie, Kaitlin has worked for a variety of sections, including design. She can be reached at kllange@bsu.edu.

Casey Smith is a junior majoring in Journalism and Telecommunications and Anthropology with a minor in Spanish. Over the summer, she interned at the Smithsonian Institution, working on multimedia press projects and external affairs assignments at the National Museum of the American Indian. She is News Editor for The Daily News, Ball State’s campus newspaper. You can reach her at casmith11@bsu.edu. Kellen Lee Hazelip is a sophomore majoring in Telecommunications and specialized in video production. He is the video editor for the Ball State Daily News and the official photographer of the Student Government Association on campus. He also was part of Ball State’s BSU at the Games immersive learning experience, covering the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio. He can be reached at klhazlip@bsu.edu. Alan Hovorka is a senior journalistic data analysis and presentation major at Ball State University. He has worked as an investigative reporter and social media director for The Ball State Daily News. He’s passionate about public records requests and data journalism. He interned at The Dubois County Herald and the Evansville Courier and Press. He worked as part of a design and data content team at the Chicago Tribune this summer as part of Ball State’s BSU at the Games immersive learning experience covering the 2016 Summer Olympics.He can be reached at afhovorka@bsu.edu, on Twitter @ajhovorka and his website is https://alanhovorka.com/.

Juli Metzger is an Instructor of Journalism and Coordinator for Unified Student Media at Ball State University’s College of Communication, Information, and Media. She has more than 25 years experience as practicing journalist, editor and publisher, having been top editor at three newspapers and publisher at three others. She was a 2016 Entrepreneurial Journalism Fellow at the Cronkite School of Journalism at Arizona State University. As Executive Editor for Digital at the Indianapolis Star, Metzger oversaw the newspaper’s website, content development, worked with a team to create strategies to drive online traffic, mobile initiatives and social media engagement. Metzger and news organizations under her direction have been cited by the Associated Press Managing Editors for outstanding public service journalism, the Scripps Howard Foundation with its National Journalism Award, the Knight Foundation for public service journalism, state press associations in Vermont, Ohio, Indiana, and Louisiana. In addition to teaching, Metzger owns her own publishing company –– http://www.thejmetzgergroup.com/ specializing in custom audiences and social media. She can be reached at jmetzger@bsu.edu.

28

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

John Beale teaches photojournalism courses at Penn State. He previously worked as a staff photographer and chief photographer for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Beale’s work has been honored with numerous regional and national awards, including the Community Service Photojournalism Award from the American Society of News Editors. He may reached at jhb169@psu.edu.

John Dillon is the Norman Eberly Professor of Practice in Journalism in the College of Communications at Penn State University. He teaches news writing, editing and newsroom management, and is director of the Dow Jones Center for Editing Excellence at Penn State. He also guides selected students each semester in writing news stories for the Centre Daily Times in State College. He joined Penn State in 2007 after a 32-year career as a reporter and editor at the Richmond TimesDispatch in Virginia. He can be reached at jad53@psu.edu.

Kayleigh Barber is a senior at the Penn State and is double majoring in journalism with an emphasis in digital and print mediums, and English with a concentration in both professional and creative writing. During her time at Penn State, she has interned with the Pennsylvania Center for the Book and is currently a marketing intern with the Penn State University Press. She can be reached at kjb5637@psu.edu

Morganne Mallon is a Penn State senior expecting to graduate in May 2017 with dual degrees in journalism and international politics. She has interned at CNN in Atlanta and PennLive in Harrisburg, and has had her work published in the Centre Daily Times and the Pike County Courier. In the fall, she will work for Penn State Athletics as a videoboard production intern. At Penn State, she is a founding member of The Daily Collegian’s investigative reporting team; an executive producer and director for PSN News, Penn State’s student-run live news show; and a producer and director for 46 LIVE, a live broadcast of Penn State’s THON fundraiser. You can view her work at www.morgannemallon.com or on her Twitter, @MorganneMallon. You can reach her at morgannemallon@gmail.com

Leon Valsechi is a junior at the Penn State pursuing a digital/print journalism major with an English minor and is set to graduate in December 2017. In Spring 2016, Leon was selected to a team of six students who contributed feature stories and covered spot-news stories for the Centre Daily Times. His work has also been published in Mainstream, the Penn State Sustainability Institute’s online magazine. Leon was a 2016 Edward J. Nichols Memorial Award winner for creative non-fiction and the 2015-2016, 2016-2017 John and Jean Gooch Trustee Scholarship recipient. After graduation he plans to begin a journalism career and eventually pursue a graduate or law degree. You can reach him at leon.valsechi@gmail.com

Shuyao Chen is a senior at Penn State majoring in photojournalism. She is currently a photographer for Onward State, an independent student news website. She also is the Penn State football correspondent for Sports Illustrated Campus Rush. In 2015, she participated in the Online News Association’s Student Newsroom in Los Angeles. Shuyao, from Wenzhou, China, is genuinely curious about the world and passionate about visual storytelling. Her hobbies include playing the piano and singing Italian operas. You can reach her at shuyao.chen72@hotmail.com.


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:24 AM

Page 29


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:24 AM

Page 30

APME NEWS

NewsTrain receives rave reviews after autumn stop at MTSU By Linda Austin APME News

A

PME’s NewsTrain stopped at the College of Media and Entertainment at Middle Tennessee State University on Sept. 30 and Oct. 1. The training, coordinated by Val Hoeppner, director of MTSU’s Center for Innovation in Media, attracted almost 100 attendees. Here’s some feedback: “Very thought-provoking. Wheels still turning on how to apply these ideas.” Paul Leach, reporter, Chattanooga Times Free Press

“This is the best training program I’ve attended in 10 years.” Lynda Edwards, regional reporter, Knoxville News Sentinel “From a professor’s perspective, this was definitely worth the time outside the classroom.” Twange Kasoma, assistant professor, Radford University

“Keep this up! This is one of the best training opportunities available for professionals, faculty and students.” Greg Pitts, director, School of Journalism, Middle Tennessee HOEPPNER State University “Very informative and 100% would recommend.” Shayla Simmons, student, Tennessee State University “All training was very beneficial. Wonderful speakers. ”Sheryl Morris, associate professor, Tennessee State University “It’s amazing. Useful, cheap tools that can be used in big or small companies.” Brittany Martin, graphic designer, The McKenzie Banner “Lots of great information – so much to digest. Loved it.” Joel Washburn, publisher, The McKenzie Banner “There is no better value. A big ‘thank you’ to the sponsors that made this such a great value.” John McCommon, marketing and PR coordinator, Jackson State Community College

30 D E C E M B E R

2016

PHOTO / ANDREW OPPMANN

Project Director Linda Austin is thrilled to have almost 100 attend Murfreesboro NewsTrain. Attendees work on a digital coverage plan for breaking news.

PHOTO / LINDA AUSTIN

MTSU student Katie Inman creates a graphic in Datawrapper.

APME NEWS

Tony Gonzalez of Nashville Public Radio teaches mobile newsgathering. PHOTO / LINDA AUSTIN

PHOTO / LINDA AUSTIN


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:24 AM

Page 31

APME NEWS

editors in the news

Industry’s promotions, appointments, awards and recognition

Wisconsin’s Joel Christopher named The Courier-Journal executive editor The Courier-Journal’s new executive editor is Joel Christopher, vice president of USA Today Network-Wisconsin. Christopher assumed management of digital and print news operations for the newspaper in Louisville, Kentucky, on Dec. 2. In Christopher's native Wisconsin, he oversaw 10 newsrooms across the state. He joined The Post-Crescent in Appleton, Wisconsin, in 2005 as metro editor and became digital editor in 2006. CHRISTOPHER In 2013, he took over digital operations for the network's 10 newsrooms and was named vice president of news in 2014. Christopher replaces Neil Budde, who resigned Oct. 14.

Community Newspaper Holdings appoints regional editors in content upgrade plan Community Newspaper Holdings, Inc., has appointed regional editors to work with the media group’s newsrooms in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Georgia and Florida as part of a print and digital content improvement program. Editor Dennis Lyons of the Sunbury Daily Item and Danville News in Pennsylvania will expand his responsibilities to CNHI Pennsylvania newspapers in Meadville, New Castle and Sharon, and Ashtabula, Ohio. Editor Jim Zachary of the Valdosta Daily Times in Georgia will oversee CNHI papers in the Georgia communities of Dalton, Milledgeville, Moultrie, Thomasville and Tifton, and the North Florida towns of Live Oak, Jasper and Mayo.

Bureau veteran Karl Ritter named AP Southern Europe News Director Karl Ritter, The Associated Press’ bureau chief for the Nordic and Baltic countries and a lead reporter on climate change, has been appointed Southern Europe News Director. In his new role, Ritter will lead a team of text, photo and video journalists covering Italy, Spain, Portugal, Greece, Turkey, Malta and Cyprus — a vast region on the front lines of the mass migration of people that is reshaping our world. Ritter RITTER worked as an associate producer at local TV station KTVK in Phoenix before joining the AP in 2000 as an intern.

Oregon’s Statesman Journal names Northwest native Crosby executive editor Northwest native Cherrill Crosby has been named executive editor of the Statesman Journal, of Salem, Oregon. Crosby, who replaces Michael Davis, comes to Salem from The Arizona Republic in Phoenix, where she has been director of the News

Former Sarasota executive editor Church to lead GateHouse news efforts GateHouse Media announced that Bill Church, president of the Associated Press Media Editors, has been named senior vice president for news for GateHouse Media. Church’s appointment was effective Sept. 26 Most recently, Church has served as executive editor of the award winning Sarasota (Florida) Herald-Tribune where he has elevated the quality of both print and digital editions of the newspaper. Church was given the additional responsibility of southeast regional editor for GateHouse Media in June 2015. “Bill has thoughtfully balanced the preservation of our traditional mission and values while fostering a culture of entrepreneurial journalism at newspapers large and small,” said Kirk Davis, CEO of GateHouse Media. “Digital storytelling, creative content partnerships and community engagement are all found in his toolbox.” Church will guide the Company’s news strategy and lead its Austin, Texas-based Center for News and Design, which provides editing and design services for more than 216 GateHouse newspapers.

Watchdog Center. The Arizona Republic and the Statesman Journal are both part of the USA TODAY NETWORK owned by Gannett. Crosby grew up on a family owned and operated farm in southwest Idaho about 30 miles from the Oregon border. >> Continued on next page

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

31


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:24 AM

Page 32

APME NEWS

Paul Bryant named managing editor of The Daily Sentinel in Nacogdoches, Texas

>> Continued from previous page

City Editor Paul Bryant is the new managing editor of The Daily Sentinel, of Nacogdoches, Texas. A New Orleans native and son of a retired newspaper publisher, Bryant joined The Sentinel as a beat reporter in May 2012 and was named city editor in September of that year. He succeeds Ryan, who has been named publisher. GAUGER

Jonathan Mattise named reporter in AP’s Nashville bureau Jonathan Mattise, an award-winning reporter who helped lead The Associated Press' coverage of a massive chemical spill in West Virginia, is joining the AP's Nashville bureau.

Spitz named Arizona Daily Star editor

Gauger named new editor and news director at Monroe’s The News-Star Jeff Gauger, editor of The Times in Shreveport, Louisiana, will also serve as executive editor of The News-Star. He succeeds Kathy Spurlock, The News-Star’s executive editor and general manager, who retired. Content Coach Mark Henderson was also named the organization’s news director. Gauger is former editor and publisher of the Greensboro News & Record. He has spent 18 years as a senior editor at various publications and has been the top editor of awardwinning dailies in two markets.

New editor named at suburban edition of Tribune-Review in Pittsburgh

Jill Jorden Spitz has been named editor at the Arizona Daily Star. Jorden Spitz joined the Star in 1998 as a reporter and also has served as business editor, assistant managing editor and was most recently a senior editor. Most of her time at the Star has been focused on watchdog and investigative reporting; projects she directed and edited have won 15 Lee Enterprises’ President’s Awards or other national honors.

Kevin Burkett appointed new editor at Indiana’s Pharos-Tribune Kevin Burkett, an accomplished journalist and native of Logansport, Indiana, has been appointed editor of The PharosTribune, effective Oct. 3. A member of the Logansport City Council since January, Burkett has resigned from that elected position. He is also stepping down from his part-time teaching position at the Century Career Center. Burkett returned to Logansport two years ago after 17 years at the Philadelphia Inquirer, a newspaper that has won 15 Pulitzer Prizes since 1980.

Veteran newsman Andrew Fraser has been named editor of the Valley News Dispatch edition of the Tribune-Review in suburban Pittsburgh. He had been business editor at the Tribune-Review in Pittsburgh since 2013. The 53-year-old Fraser replaces Jeff Domenick, who is now editor of the company's 11 Gateway weekly papers. Fraser worked for The Associated Press for many years, starting as a reporter in Hartford, Connecticut. He was also a business writer in New York, the news editor in Miami.The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review became an online-only publication Dec. 1.

Delano Massey, a multimedia reporter and newsroom leader, has been named Ohio news editor for The Associated Press. As news editor, Massey will work with AP journalists based in Cleveland, Columbus, Toledo and Cincinnati to develop the most competitive enterprise and spot stories, and to hold public officials accountable through strong records reporting. Massey, 37, joins AP from WEWS, the ABC affiliate in Cleveland, where he worked with a converged newsroom as digital director.

Kim Johnson Flodin new AP Texas, Arkansas, Oklahoma news editor

City editor Jesse Chaney promoted to editor of Independent Record

Kim Johnson Flodin, a veteran photo-news journalist and editor at The Associated Press, has been named news editor for Texas, Arkansas and Oklahoma. In her new role, Flodin will work with AP reporters and photographers throughout the three states to break news on the biggest stories of the day as well as to produce deeply reported enterprise that sets the news agenda.

Aritz Parra new AP chief correspondent for Iberia Aritz Parra, a multi-format journalist based in Beijing, China, has been named The Associated Press' chief correspondent for Iberia. In his new role, Parra will head a team of text journalists in Spain and Portugal, and be the cooperative’s chief Spanish-language correspondent in Europe.

32 D E C E M B E R

2016

APME NEWS

AP names Delano Massey Ohio news editor

Jesse Chaney, the city editor of the Independent Record newspaper in Helena, Montana, has been promoted to editor. Chaney began working as city editor in May 2014 and was named interim editor when Greg Lemon left the paper eight months ago for a position with the state Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks.

Laura Elder named new Galveston County managing editor Laura Elder, business editor of The Galveston County Daily News, has been named the daily’s new managing editor. She succeeds Scott E. Williams, who died of a heart attack Aug. 17. Elder will continue to edit the newspaper's business pages, as well as Coast Monthly magazine and the League City and clear Lake Connection editions.


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:24 AM

Page 33

APME NEWS

By David Minthorn

AP Stylebook minute

Beware: Computer spellchecks may be fooled by homonyms “Fair is foul, and foul is fair;? Hover through the fog and filthy air.” -Three witches in “Macbeth”

S

hakespeare’s dramatic dialogues are peppered with puns, historical allusions and figurative language that his contemporaries could grasp and relate to. In the opening scene of “Macbeth,” the witches introduce the theme of a world where morality is set on its head. Evil replaces good - “Fair is foul, and foul is fair ...” - in the malodorous climate -“filthy air” -of medieval Scotland. Such metaphors illuminated social and political issues for Elizabethan audiences. Daily journalism didn’t exist, so theatrical performances were vehicles for addressing, if indirectly, the burning topics of those times. Shakespeare’s use of homonyms -imilar words with different meanings -was one device for underlining dramatic developments in his plays. When Macbeth displays confusion after assassinating the Scottish king, Lady Macbeth, his co-plotter, exclaims “... If he do bleed/ I’ll gild the faces of the grooms withal;/For it must seem their guilt.” She meant to “gild” or smear the king’s blood on his sleeping servants to make the killing appear to be their “guilt.” Modern journalism puts a premium on factual and straightforward writing. Clear, precise and balanced presentations are the norm. There’s limited room for Shakespearean literary devices. Traditional journalism is now shrinking as advertising realigns and social media flourish. This comes at a time of momentous political developments that require credible, independent reporting to maintain a healthy democracy. Wise use of resources and renewed commitment to minimizing errors can help legacy journalism maintain standards and meet these challenges. This includes the obvious requirement to use the right word for the context. The AP Stylebook lists many problematic terms that crop up in news stories, including these homonyms: beside, besides Beside means at the side of. Besides means in addition to. complement, compliment Complement is a noun and a verb denoting completeness or the process of supplementing something: The ship has a complement of 200 sailors and 20 officers. The tie complements his suit. Compliment is a noun or verb that denotes praise or the expression of courtesy: The captain complimented the sailors. She was flattered by compliments on her project. discreet, discrete Discreet means prudent, circumspect: “I’m afraid I was not very discreet,” she wrote. Discrete means detached, separate: There were four discrete sounds from a quadraphonic system. faze, phase Faze means to embarrass or disturb: The snub did

not faze her. Phase denotes an aspect or stage: They will phase in a new system. forego, forgo To forego means to go before, as in foregone conclusion. To forgo means to abstain from, as in: He decided to forgo his senior year of eligibility. mantel, mantle A mantel is a shelf. A mantle is a cloak. pore, pour The verb pore means to gaze intently or steadily: She pored over her books. The verb pour means to flow in a continuous stream: It poured rain. He poured the coffee. reign, rein The leather strap for controlling a horse is a rein, hence figuratively: seize the reins, give free rein to. Reign is the period a ruler is on the throne: The king began his reign. Computer spellchecks may be fooled by homonyms, approving the wrong word for the context. The best strategy is to look up the correct term in the Stylebook or a dictionary before publishing the story. Don't guess. Credibility is on the line.

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

33


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:25 AM

Page 34


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:25 AM

Page 35

APME NEWS

2016 2017

APME BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Officers

Directors

President: Bill Church, GateHouse Media, @BillChurchMedia Vice President: Jim Simon, The Seattle Times, @jsimon88 Secretary: Angie Muhs, State Journal-Register, Springfield, Illinois, @amuhs Leadership Chair: Michael Days, Philadelphia Daily News, Philadelphia, @mikedays Treasurer: Dennis Anderson, Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star, @dennisedit

(Terms expiring in 2017) Eric Ludgood, Fox 5 News, Atlanta, @EricLudgoodFOX5 George Rodrigue, The Plain Dealer, Cleveland, @gprodrigue3 Kurt Franck, The Blade, Toledo, Ohio, @KGFranck_Blade Matt Christensen, editor, Twins Falls (Idaho) Times-News, @TimesNewsEditor Maria Caporizzo, managing editor-digital, The Providence Journal, @mariacap

Executive Committee (officers above plus) Past President: Laura Sellers-Earl, The Daily Astorian, Astoria, Oregon, @lsellersearl AP Senior Vice President/Executive Editor: Kathleen Carroll, New York, @kathleenatap AP Managing Editor: Brian Carovillano, New York, @bcarovillano Program Chair: Mark Baldwin, Rockford (Ill.) Register Star, @MarkFBaldwin Program Co-Chair: Angie Muhs, State Journal-Register, Springfield, Illinois, @amuhs Marketing Chair: Jim Simon, The Seattle Times, @jsimon88 Marketing Co-Chair: Summer Moore, The Times of Northwest Indiana, @summerNWI

Our communication vehicles www.apme.com www.facebook.com/APMEnews www.twitter.com/APME www.facebook.com/NewsTrain https://twitter.com/NewsTrain and, APME Update: www.apme.com/?page=Newsletters

(Terms expiring in 2018) Carlos Sanchez, The Monitor, McAllen, Texas, @CarlosASanchez Michael Anastasi, The Tennessean, @ma_anastasi Traci Bauer, The Journal News, New York, @tbauer Anne Brennan, MetroWest Daily News & Milford Daily News, @annebrennanMWDN Ronnie Agnew, Mississippi Public Broadcasting, @ronagnew Tom Arviso, Navajo Times, Window Rock, Arizona Alison Gerber, editor and director of content, Chattanooga Times Free Press, Tennessee (Terms expiring in 2019) Dennis Anderson, executive editor, Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star, @dennisedit Mark Baldwin, executive editor, Rockford (Ill.) Register Star, @MarkFBaldwin Katrice Hardy, executive editor, The Greenville (S.C.) News and GreenvilleOnline.com, @kkatgurll1 Thomas Koetting, deputy managing editor, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, @tkoetting Summer Moore, digital and audience engagement editor, The Times of Northwest Indiana, @summerNWI Autumn Phillips, The Quad City Times, Davenport, Iowa, @AutumnEdit Sandra Clark, vice president for news and civic dialogue, WHYY, Philadelphia, @SandraSWClark

APME News Editor Andrew Oppmann, adjunct professor of journalism, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, @aoppmann

DECEMBER 2016

APME NEWS

35


APME.DEC.16.qxp

12/3/2016

9:25 AM

Page 36

Winter 2016-17 APME News  

There were many great moments from the 2016 APME-ASNE News Leaders Conference in Philadelphia and quite a few of them are captured on the...

Winter 2016-17 APME News  

There were many great moments from the 2016 APME-ASNE News Leaders Conference in Philadelphia and quite a few of them are captured on the...

Advertisement