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Welcome Q&A with APME’s new president Debra Adams Simmons

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From the Editor

APME NEWS

Andrew Oppmann

If you didn’t make it to Indy for the 80th APME Conference, here’s the next best thing. Our Fall issue of APME News is traditionally the conference recap, giving members a concise summary of the high points of our annual gathering. Leaf through these glossy pages and glean some great ideas, management tips and insights generated at one of our industry’s best summits. My thanks to the journalism students and advisers from Ball State University, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and Indiana University Southeast, who formed our 2013 APME Conference Reporting Team. They filed dispatches for the event’s newspaper, which was printed by The Indianapolis Star, and our social media and blogging platforms. We are proud to feature their work in this issue.

Our new president, Debra Adams Simmons, was kind enough to appoint me for a third term as the association’s editor. I appreciate her faith and trust in our magazine team’s work, as well as the kindness shown me by our immediate past presidents, Brad Dennison and Bob Heisse. We view APME News as a value-added component of your membership and participation in our organization. As always, your feedback and ideas are welcome, as well as your articles, columns or submissions. We would love to feature “how-wedid-it” reports from your newsrooms that share insight into your good works and pride points. Reach out to me at Andrew.Oppmann@mtsu.edu.

inside Fall 2013

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Q&A with new APME President Debra Adams Simmons AZ Does it: The Arizona Republic’s tablet magazine is Innovator of the Year Hitting the street: The Advocate continues to tweak daily New Orleans edition APME Conference in Pictures: An eye on the APME action in Indy Rule change: AP chief Carroll praises new DOJ protections for journalists Right to know: Indiana Gov. Pence says shield law needed more than ever Not dead yet: Speaker says print can win by listening to readers Changing times: Five steps to managing today’s newsrooms Top 10: The nation’s top editors offer tips to strengthen newsrooms Great Ideas: APME features a collection of the industry’s best and brightest And the winners are: 2013 APME Journalism Excellence Award winners 2013 APME AP Staff Award winners Member Showcase: APME Photo of the Year, Photos of the Month winners It’s a first: ASNE and APME join forces for 2014 convention in Chicago A look back: Brad Dennison reflects on his year as APME president 2014 APME Board of Directors EDITOR

ABOUT THE COVER AZ, the twice-weekly tablet magazine from The Arizona Republic, azcentral.com and Channel 12 (KPNX), has been honored as Innovator of the Year by the Associated Press Media Editors organization. The AZ Tablet Team (left to right): Sherry Gannon (Photo/Multimedia Editor), Penny Walker (Editor), Dave Seibert (Photo/Multimedia Editor), Kylie Gad (Assistant Editor), Tom Nichols ( Assistant Editor), Keira Nothaft (Editorial and Creative Director), Chris Ballard (Design), Adrienne Hapanowicz (Design)

Andrew Oppmann Adjunct Professor of Journalism Middle Tennessee State University Andrew.Oppmann@mtsu.edu DESIGNER

Steve Massie designmass@yahoo.com

APME News is the quarterly magazine of the Associated Press Media Editors, a professional, nonprofit organization founded in 1933 in French Lick, Ind. Its members include senior editors and leaders from news operations in the United States and Canada that are affiliated with The Associated Press, including more than 1,400 newspapers and online sites and about 2,000 broadcast outlets. The group also includes college journalism educators and college student media editors. APME works with AP to support and recognize journalism excellence and the First Amendment. To learn more about APME’s programs and activities, visit apme.com.

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"Critical to my career has been having mentors, people both within the newsrooms where I've worked and in other parts of the news industry, who were there to support me and to help direct me."

Debra Adams Simmons

& QA

with APME President

Debra Adams Simmons By Devan Filchak Ball State University

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ebra Adams Simmons joined The Plain Dealer in Cleveland as managing editor in 2007. She was named editor in 2010. Previously, she worked as the editor and vice president of news at the Akron Beacon Journal for four years. Other stops included the Detroit Free Press and The VirginianPilot. Simmons earned her bachelor of arts degree from Syracuse University. She says networking and mentors have been keys to her success.

Q: What drew you to journalism? A: Really wanting to make a difference in the world is what drove me to this profession. My original plan after college was that I was going to take a year off to travel the world and go to law school. During that year, I was offered … a nine-month internship at the local paper in Syracuse, N.Y. I was going to do that nine-month postgraduate internship and then I was going to go to Africa and Europe. And then I was going to start school in September. Two weeks into my post-graduate internship, I was offered a full-time permanent job. That was in 1986 and I'm still in the industry, all of these years later.

Q: What are some of the biggest challenges facing APME this coming year? A: I think APME has a unique opportunity this year to innovate and collaborate. As you know, the industry is changing dramatically and APME is an organization of leaders who are trying to lead through a period of dynamic change. I think anything that we can do that helps our members develop tools to be successful as we navigate changes would be a key calling for us. Certainly, we are celebrating APME’s 80th anniversary. APME was founded 80 years ago in French Lick, Ind. And I think it is important to celebrate the past 80 years and the work that has come before us, as well as to plot of course for the future.

Q: What do you believe is in the future of print? A: Based on the readers that I hear from every day, I think print will continue to have a future. I don't think print is going away tomorrow. There are many people who continue to like words on paper. I would also say though, based on the feedback I have received as we've gone through substantial change here in Cleveland, the response is generational. Many of the readers of our content under 40 really prefer digital content. Many of those people say, ‘I never pick >> Continued on next page

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APME elects new leadership

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he Associated Press Media Editors organization elected four members to its board of directors and installed new leadership during its annual conference in Indianapolis. Elected to at-large positions were Meg Downey, managing editor of The TennesAutumn Agar sean in Nashville and Thomas Koetting, deputy managing editor at the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel. Autumn Agar, editor of the Twin Falls (Idaho) Times-News, was elected to represent small newspapers; and David Arkin, vice president of content & audience for GateHouse Media, was elected to represent online media. Meg Downey The new APME officers are: n President, Debra Adams Simmons, editor, The Plain Dealer in Cleveland; n Vice president, Alan D. Miller, managing editor/news, The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch;

n Secretary, Teri Hayt, executive editor of GateHouse Ohio Newspapers in Canton, Massillon and New Philadelphia; n Journalism studies chair, Laura SellersEarl, digital development director for the EO Media Group in Salem, Ore. n Treasurer is Dennis Anderson, editor of David Arkin the Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star. Simmons reappointed Andrew Oppmann, an adjunct professor of journalism at Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, Tenn., as editor of APME News, the association’s quarterly magazine. APME members are newsroom leaders at newspapers and broadcast outlets, journalThomas Koetting ism educators and student leaders in the United States and Canada. APME works with The Associated Press to encourage journalism excellence and support training and development of journalists in multimedia newsrooms. n lll

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up a paper. I read the e-edition of the paper. I read your website, but I'm not a paper person.’” The 40- to 70-yearold age group knows digital is where the future is moving. They don’t love it, but they have kind of resigned to the fact that this is the direction we are moving in. The 70 and over crowd is angry. They want print; they want it every day, and they want it to be the way it used to be. The challenge for newspaper editors is figuring out how to navigate all of the ways our audience likes to access our information. Print continues to be a huge part of that. For most news organizations, print revenue continues to pay the bills, even as their digital audiences are expanding exponentially. So we’re going to have to figure out how to do it all. But print is still alive and well and making a huge difference in communities across America.

Q: How would you describe the importance of social media in today's media environment? A: I think social media is critical in today's media environment. When I think about some of the biggest stories covered in my community in the past couple of years, social media was in the center both in terms of newsgathering and news dissemination. Engagement is key to the work that we do. We need new sources talking to us, so social media is a great way to access people and information. And we need to spread information on as many platforms as we can. Social

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media enables us to do both of those things better than we have ever been able to before. For years, our work was a one-way conversation with our audience. Social media has opened up tremendous opportunities to have a two-way conversation or a multiple way conversation with the audience.

Q: What do you believe the future of paywalls will be? A: I think that the future of pay walls is undecided. Clearly, there are two schools of thought. One is that people should pay to access information, but we also know that young people believe that information should be free. At least in my organization, there's a hesitancy to cut information off from significant numbers of audience members who want to engage with that information. I think there is a lot of experimentation right now, and experimentation is critical for our industry. I think we will assess the results of those experiments before a decision is made about what the future of pay walls will be. I don’t think we are absolutely moving toward pay walls or we're absolutely not. Several news organizations have dipped their toes in. Some have had tremendous success; others have backed away. I think paywalls are one of many experiments happening in the news industry. The verdict is still out on what the ultimate outcome will be. n


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AZ DOES IT

The Arizona’s Republic’s ‘smart’ and ‘gorgeous’ tablet magazine receives Innovator of the Year honor By Randy Cordova The Arizona Republic

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Z, the twice-weekly tablet magazine from The Arizona Republic, azcentral.com and Channel 12 (KPNX), has been honored as Innovator of the Year by the Associated Press Media Editors organization. The announcement was made Oct. 30, during the APME convention in Indianapolis. Editorial and Creative Director Keira Nothaft presented AZ to APME editors at the conference. The award recognizes innovation that “demonstrates a bold, creative effort to improve a news or information product and increase audience,” according to contest rules. AZ is an interactive magazine for tablets that contains four chapters: Gallery, Captivate, Amuse and azcentral sports. Content includes in-depth news stories, sports features and humorous feature content. Interactive elements

AZ Tablet Team (left to right): Sherry Gannon (Photo/Multimedia Editor), Penny Walker (Editor), Dave Seibert (Photo/Multimedia Editor), Kylie Gad (Assistant Editor), Tom NIchols (Assistant Editor), Keira Nothaft (Editorial and Creative Director), Chris Ballard (Design), Adrienne Hapanowicz (Design).

help put the reader in the middle of the story. “AZ is smart, gorgeous and fun — it's the person you want to hang out with at the party,” says Penny Walker, AZ editor. “AZ is somewhere between print and online: You can kick back with it, like a print magazine, but it incorporates the video and archive elements of online, as well as a level of interactivity that’s uniquely tablet.” There are also special issues of AZ, such as a Phoenix Suns preview issue and the azcentral Best issue, which was released Nov. 1 and was made available Nov. 6. The publication, which launched in December 2012, is >> Continued on next page

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included with Arizona Republic and azcentral.com subscriptions and publishes Mondays and Thursdays. Issues are also available for individual purchase. The app can be downloaded on an iPad at AZ.azcentral.com or by searching for "AZ Today" in the iPad app store. An Android version soon will be available. Other finalists for the honor included the Columbus Dispatch in Ohio, which moved from a broadsheet to a tabloid; and WLRN public radio in Miami for an initiative that involves listening to the public. As winner, AZ will receive $1,000. n

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ditors from The Arizona Republic, The Columbus Dispatch and WLRN-Miami Herald gave presentations about their latest efforts as part of their finalist presentations for APME Innovator of the Year. Meg Downey, managing editor of The Tennessean and moderator of the presentation, said this was her favorite session each year. “The news organization has to be able to offer a new, creative and forward-thinking concept that has long lasting effects and attracts new audiences or dollars,” she said. “So it can be a product, it can be a new technique or a new structure. But it must be able to show a specific goal over a period of time, and it should have the potential to become a industry standard over a period of time.” Keira Nothaft, a deputy managing editor with The Arizona Republic in Phoenix, presented AZ, a semiweekly newsmag for iPad. The app focuses on presenting feature stories in a more in-depth and interactive way. Nothaft said they found a way to do what monthly iPad magazine publications haven't done – be timely and get readers to come back multiple times a week. Ben Marrison, editor of The Columbus Dispatch, showed how changing the newspaper's format was innovative. The organization moved from a full broadsheet to a tabloid-style newspaper. Marrison said the newspaper is now easier and more convenient to read and carry. The Dispatch also began placing ads in the middle of the spreads. That helps open up room for text while forcing the readers' eyes to go across ads between stories. Kenny Malone, WLRN-Miami Herald reporter, discussed how staffers at his organization started doing something that may sound simple – just listening. Reporters at the radio news and newspaper partnership have gone out to talk with the public about whatever is on their mind, getting the pulse of the community even when not working on a particular story. The practice results in telling unexpected stories that truly show the voice of the Miami area, Malone said. n


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Meg Downey of The (Nashville) Tennessean, Hollis Towns of the Asbury Park (N.J.) Press, Karen Magnuson of the Rochester (N.Y.) Democrat and Chronicle, Keira Nothaft of AZCentral and Nancy Andrews of The Detroit Free Press, proudly display their 2013 awards. The Tennessean won the midcirculation category award for First Amendment. Asbury Park Press won in Public Service and the Best in Show. The Rochester Democrat and Chronicle received a Robert G. McGruder Award for Diversity Leadership. AZCentral was named Innovator of the Year, and The Detroit Free Press won for Digital Storytelling in the large circulation category.

APME CONFERENCE IN PICTURES

BRITTANY GONZABA-BRODERICK

ABOVE: Victoria (Texas) Advocate Editor Chris Cobler listens to one of the speakers at the 2013 APME Conference in Indianapolis. LEFT: APME Directors Laura Sellers-Earl of EO Media Group in Oregon and Dennis Anderson of the Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star ham it up at the APME Foundation Auction at the Indiana Roof Ballroom.

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LEFT: AP VP and Director of Photography Santiago Lyon discusses White House photo access during the Associated Press Spotlight, Oct. 30. BELOW: Students and advisers from Ball State University, Indiana University, Indiana UniversityPurdue University Indianapolis and Indiana University Southeast produced much of the stories, photos and social media during the conference.

AP/MICHAEL CONROY

AP/MICHAEL CONROY

APME NEWS

ABOVE: AP Vice President/Senior Managing Editor Michael Oreskes talks about The Associated Press' past year and initiatives Oct. 30. RIGHT: Andrew Oppmann of Middle Tennessee State University assists in the live APME Foundation Auction at the Indiana Roof Ballroom Oct. 28.

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LEFT: Summer Moore of the Canton (Ohio) Repository and incoming APME Vice President Alan D. Miller of the Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch look over some of the silent auction items at the APME Foundation Auction at the Indiana Roof Ballroom Oct. 28.

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"We are, as an institution, glad the rules have been changed so there will be additional oversight when the media is involved. Kathleen Carroll, Associated Press Executive Editor

AP editor Carroll praises new DOJ protections for journalists By Tom LoBianco Associated Press

AP/DOUG McSCHOOLER

AP/DOUG McSCHOOLER

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NDIANAPOLIS — Associated Press Executive Editor Kathleen Carroll said she is looking forward to the start of new Obama administration protections for journalists after the Justice Department’s “overly broad” collection of AP phone records. Justice Department officials acknowledged in the spring they seized records for 21 AP phone lines during an investigation into the leak of information on a foiled alQaida bomb plot. The revelation spurred strong criticism from press and civil rights groups. It also resurrected longsimmering questions of what tools journalists should use to protect their sources and where the line is drawn in protecting national security interests. “The Justice Department has agreed to amend the rules that we spoke about, because in many ways the protections that were in those rules seemed not to have occurred in our particular case,” Carroll said. “We are, as an institution, glad the rules have been changed so there will be additional oversight when the media is involved. And we look forward to the implementation of those new rules, which have not yet to this point occurred.” Carroll's comments came during a panel discussion titled “Is journalism a crime?” during the 80th annual Associated Press Media Editors’ conference in Indianapolis.

Kathleen Carroll, executive editor and senior vice president of The Associated Press, center, listens to the commentary of fellow panelist Gary Ross, left, during a panel discussion titled “Is Journalism a Crime?” at the 80th Annual Associated Press Media Editors’ conference in Indianapolis.

The Obama administration has been aggressively pursuing people it believes have revealed government secrets, including seeking records and testimony of journalists who were given classified information and then published stories about it. The Justice Department launched its investigation of the AP shortly after the news cooperative reported that U.S. intelligence had learned that al-Qaida’s Yemen branch hoped to launch a spectacular attack using a new, nearly undetectable bomb aboard a U.S.-bound airliner around the anniversary of Osama bin Laden’s death. The May 7, 2012, story attributed details of the operation, including that the FBI had the bomb in its possession, to unnamed government officials. CIA Director John Brennan has called the leak “irresponsible and damaging,”

A panel discussion titled “Is Journalism a Crime?” during the APME conference.

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“I really do believe that media shields are not about protecting reporters - it is about protecting the public’s right to know.” Indiana Gov. Mike Pence

Governor: Shield law needed more than ever By Devan Filchak Ball State University

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eporters need the protection of a federal media shield law, and Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, who sponsored shield legislation while in Congress, said he renewed his call for the protection after news surfaced about government monitoring of Associated Press phone calls. “I really do believe that media shields are not about protecting reporters - it is about protecting the public’s right to know,” Pence said at the opening session of the national Associated Press Media Editors conference in Indianapolis. “The ability to keep confidential sources confidential is an essential part of the news gathering process.” Pence said he wrote to House and Senate leaders following news that 21 telephone lines used by AP reporters and editors were subpoenaed by the U.S. Department of Justice. Pence said state shield laws already in place aren’t enough. “The First Amendment was always considered to be sufficient (previously),” he said. “I noted over the last decade a disturbing pattern of cases where reporters were being placed in a position to reveal confidential sources, and that’s what motivated me to introduce the Free Flow of Information Act.” APME represents editors from across the United States and Canada. The theme of this year’s conference was "Content Is King,” a reference to the industry’s efforts to monetize its flow of text, photos, video and other content across platforms.

Kay Coyte, The Washington Post managing editor, said the theme “Content is King” is about newsrooms digging deeper and going beyond a Google search. Coyte pointed to a series her newspaper produced about Washington homeowners losing their homes due to a faulty tax system. The Post exposed the problem through deep investigation and tracked down the homeowners. The articles drew strong responses and the mayor promised the problem would be resolved. After the series was published, Coyte said The Post did not relent on the issue, continuing to hold people accountable. “We challenged the elected leaders in D.C.,” Coyte said. “We kept at them, like terriers, at their heels.” The first session of the day dealt with a particularly thorny issue for mainstream media outlets: access to sports events in the digital era. John Cherwa, of the Los Angeles Times, said his newspaper has fought to retain access to players and coaches of the Lakers as the NBA team’s owners increasingly grant greater access to the team’s television media partners. Recently, for example, the Lakers granted Time-Warner Cable greater access on a team trip to China. Pence said local newspapers are vital to helping people make informed decisions about their communities. Like politics, he said, "All news is local.” Editors everywhere are adapting to new technology and what their audiences want. n Mitchell Paul, Indiana University, and Anna Ortiz, Ball State University, also contributed to this report.

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while Attorney General Eric Holder said the story was the result of “a very serious leak, a very grave leak.” About a year after the story was published, the Justice Department informed the AP that it had secretly obtained nearly two months of call records for 21 telephone lines used by AP reporters and editors, including some who worked on the story. The news cooperative protested the government's actions as chilling to investigative journalism. AP chief executive Gary Pruitt called the records’ seizure a “massive and unprecedented intrusion” into how news organizations gather the news. The very scope of the Justice Department's records seizure was surprising, Carroll said Monday. Phone lines for reporters and editors in Washington, D.C., were gathered along with AP phone lines in Hartford, Conn., but so were phone records of employees' spouses, Carroll said.

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“You can see where we felt this was broad, overly broad: What in the world could they hope to gain from records like Hartford, Connecticut’s?” Carroll said. Panelists discussed a broad range of concerns outlining tensions between national security interests and the public's right to know what its government is doing. Gary Ross, a veteran national security worker and author of “Who Watches the Watchmen?” said it may appear the Obama administration is cracking down more frequently on leaks, but changes in the digital age have raised the stakes in that debate. People like WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange and former CIA contractor Edward Snowden now have access to much greater troves of information and the rise of non-traditional media outlets have broken governmental relationships that used to be maintained by more mainstream outlets, he said. “Where do you draw that line in protecting government information and the public's right to know?”Ross said. n


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“We need to use predictive metrics that will help us understand how our readers feel about stories. Just because you think it's important doesn’t mean that it is.” Bill Day, Frank N. Magid Associates, Inc.

Not dead yet: Print can win by listening to readers, speaker says By Matt Holden and Devan Filchak Ball State University

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ewspapers should strive for an emotional connection with readers to thrive in the years ahead, according to a consultant with a national research firm. Bill Day, executive director of Frank N. Magid Associates, Inc., spoke to editors at the annual APME conference in Indianapolis. He said his studies show that 40 percent of people still read newspapers and that the industry needs to leverage what is left of circulation to build for the future. Day said television news is successful because they do a better job of listening to what viewers want. “The most important reason people pick ABC versus NBC versus CBS isn’t because they think they’re very good. It’s not because they need to know the weather. Yet why do viewers still watch their local television news? It’s because they have a strong, visceral relationship with the product.” If newspapers did more of what readers wanted, sales would go up. On his list of things to do: n Provide even more depth to its news stories n More about local activities and things to do n More local coverage in the main section n Give them opinions they want to read “You know who people think is doing a really good job?” asked Day. “Judge Judy. What job are consumers hiring her to do? To look in on others’ amazingly train-wrecked lives and say ‘my life’s not that bad.’” Judge Judy delivers on expectation, Day said, and the show makes $78 million annually. Day says his company's studies find similar responses across markets. “We do this same study in market after market, and the results are amazingly consistent.” He called on newspapers to make “data-driven” choices about what goes into the paper. He said newspapers often make the mistake of using data derived from a small percentage of readers, those who are the most vocal. Day said his goal was to not only look at those who felt strongly one way or the other about how a newspaper was doing, he also wanted to look at the all of the people who were undecided in order to get a real sense of what the entire market looked like. “We don't want find people who

are excited, we want to find everyone else.” The theme of the session was to focus primarily on the print product and how to extend its life, because Magid's research showed that 40 percent of all demographics are still reading the paper. The consistent example used throughout was that of the soda industry. “When people like the soda you make, you need to tell them you have it and keep making it," said Day. This was especially true when it came to small-market papers, where readers in his study said that they wanted more local content, such as high school and collegiate sports as well as local lifestyle. Small-market papers have an advantage because of the lack of options available. Sixty-one percent of people polled in small markets said that it would be a huge loss if the paper in their area were to disappear. Justin Rumbach, managing editor of the Dubois County Herald in Jasper, is also seeing this at his paper. “I think that we don’t see the decline nearly as rapidly as the big metro papers because we still reach a huge portion of our community with our print product.” Day also looked at other media industries, such as television news, and their approach to marketing. “Television news shows have a relentless goal of moving the needle (of viewers) to evaluate success.” Using this example, he said newspapers should consider evaluating reporters based on how much traffic their stories get, and using this information to guide daily budget meetings. Local research could help newspapers better understand reader interests. “We need to use predictive metrics that will help us understand how our readers feel about stories” we might cover, said Day. “Just because you think it's important doesn't mean that it is.” Besides editorial decision-making, analytics could also be used to help with design, distribution and advertising. Layout analytics can be used to guide front-page design, for example. “People don’t read the newspaper, they scan it,” said Day. “Stories must be presented visually.” The plight of the media is an important story, but Day said newspapers may have gone too far in covering their own troubles. “Television never tells people that their numbers are down from the previous year,” he said. n

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Ward offers five steps to managing newsrooms in times of great change By Alan Miller Associated Press Media Editors

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uccessfully managing change in newsrooms during this time of significant change hinges on five points, according to Butch Ward. First, newsroom managers need to provide clarity to middle managers and their staffs about expectations and how they will support them, said Ward, of the Poynter Institute, during a presentation at the Associated Press Media Editors conference in Indianapolis. Ward said they also need to invest in the ambitions of their staff members, coach them and provide feedback on performance, provide tools and training, and take a risk with staff members when appropriate. Providing clarity is as simple as being clear about your expectations for the staff in covering and presenting the news, said Ward, a former newspaper editor. Not everyone does that well, and the lack of clarity allows for confusion and aimlessness. Investing in employees' goals starts with a manager asking people about their dreams. “Being asked by my boss what I want to be and do says a lot,” Ward said. And it gives managers an opportunity to coach their employees and support them toward that goal. Coaching, he said, involves feedback that will help end the need for managers to put out daily fires. “Coaches know that if I said … ‘if we spend 10 minutes on a problem today and never have to deal with it again,’ everyone in this room would do it.” He said that coaches have their heads up as opposed to down on today's work: “They have their eyes on the arch of a person's career and know that feedback is the most important thing they have to offer,” he said. Provide tools and training, he said, because they reinforce the commitment to your staff members and their development. And when it comes to taking a risk, Ward said, remember the boss who took a risk on you. “That boss who took a risk on you is like a hero.” When we find someone who is really good at what they do, he said, we tend to leave that person alone. But taking a risk with that person to help him or her grow toward a goal or into a bigger role often pays dividends for the individual

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BRITTANY GONZABA-BRODERICK

Poynter's Butch Ward said newsroom managers should invest in the ambitions of their staff members and provide coaching and feedback.

and the news organization. “It is an investment in your relationship with them that they will never forget,” he said. Summing up, Ward said, “Remember this: You can’t do it alone; get your team involved. You can’t do it from the weeds; you need to get above the daily production. And you can’t do it overnight; change and relationships take time.” n


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Tips to strengthen your newsroom By Anna Ortiz Ball State University

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the news is posted. Don’t wait. Post early and often.

ome of the best advice comes from the ones who do it every day. Take a look at what the nation's top editors, attending this year's national APME conference, say are ways to improve your newsroom.

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Enhancing the story through multimedia. Danny Gawlowski, photo/video editor of The Seattle Times, says text and visuals should not compete but enhance each other. Gawlowski pointed to how his newspaper covered ocean acidification in the Pacific Ocean using a web page to tie in several story elements. His advice: Tell good stories with good tools. Consider how you can make the experience immersive. Combine multimedia elements for a single experience.

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Be the source of breaking news in your community. Linda Negro, Evansville Courier & Press managing editor, says be indispensible. Break news and present it in different ways so readers have a choice how they consumer the information.

Keep up with the community. Listen to what readers want, advises Negro. She said the Evansville Courier & Press is striving to be a community source for what's going on in local education, events and other community news. A newsroom can’t just break news, she says. They have to be the pulse of the community.

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Make news easy to understand. Make the news as digestible by analyzing complex topics. The reader should not have to read 16 inches into the story to know what the story is about, Coyte said. Make it easily understandable to the reader.

Work with what you’ve got. Thomas Koetting, deputy managing editor at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, said his newsroom has lost about half of its staff in the last six years. Despite downsizing, the newspaper has won three Pulitzer Prizes in that time. Pick what you do well and let go of what you don’t provide exclusively, he says. Everyone has limited resources. Pick your shots.

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Have leaders who think ahead. Kay Coyte, The Washington Post managing editor, said having an owner who has deep pockets and out-of-the-box thinking doesn't hurt. But even big newsrooms need to learn how to move more nimbly to keep up with technology and not be distracted by fads. Be ready to use all platforms, even if you don't know what that platform is yet.

Keep coaching. Virginia Black, senior writer and writing instructor of the South Bend Tribune, says many newsrooms have cut training across the board. When the level of work rises in one work group, it will in others.

Encourage adaptability. Jeff Knox, director of photography at the Daily Herald, a newspaper in Arlington Heights, Ill., says cross training is essential in today's newsroom. He says writers should be trained in photography and photographers trained in writing. n

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Be an investigative newsroom that digs deep. Good, old-fashioned, shoeleather reporting resonates with readers. Boil down the story and offer up strong analysis, advised Coyte. Dig into complex issues that are important to everyone.

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Embrace social media. Jeni O’Malley, Associated Press Indiana news editor, said she sees social media setting media companies apart in breaking news. There’s a lag time between when a reporter leaves the scene and

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2013 APME INDIANAPOLIS CONFERENCE

great ideas H

ave you launched a great new feature, page or web project, or used a social media tool in a great new way? Well, we want to recognize your great idea. Associated Press Media Editors recognizes a Great Idea every month on APME.com and we'll showcase monthly winners in our popular annual Great Ideas book, which was released at our

conference in October. This is a chance for your newspaper to show off great work and to help fellow editors by providing ideas that might work in their markets. It’s simple to submit your Great Idea. Just go to the Great Ideas page at APME.com, fill out the online form and attach an image or submit a link.

GONZAGA BASKETBALL: THE ROAD TO NO. 1 The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash. Geoff Pinnock WHAT THEY DID: When Gonzaga University rose to the top of the NCAA men’s basketball rankings for the first time, The Spokesman-Review led Page One with photos and scores from every game of the season to that point. The page was a huge hit with readers, producing a near-sellout of that day’s paper. An image of the page went viral on Facebook, and glossy reprints sold well from the company store for weeks.

SUMMER FUN GUIDE The Gazette, Colorado Springs, Colo. Nathan Van Dyne WHAT THEY DID: The newsroom’s idea of creating a special guide with recommendations from its columnists, staff members and readers had success not only as a great read but in advertising sponsorship. The first year of the section was a tremendous success financially. Now we’re planning a Winter Fun Guide for November.

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COLLEGE FOOTBALL SECTION FRINGE FESTIVAL REVIEWS BOOKLET Winnipeg Free Press, Winnipeg, Manitoba Julie Carl WHAT THEY DID: Every year, we review all 160 or so plays at the Winnipeg Fringe Festival within the first four days of the festival. We post each review online and make them searchable by venue, by genre and by star rating – ours and readers’. We also create pullout sections of the reviews in the daily paper to make it easier for subscribers to carry our reviews with them as they decide what to see. But given the monumental effort we put into this project, we wanted to get more mileage from the content. So we repurposed the reviews into four- to eight-page booklets, printed in full color on high-quality paper and distributed 1,200 a day to various Fringe venues. This gave us extra space to sell advertising (at a lower rate than the daily paper so we could reach out to smaller businesses that normally can’t afford to advertise with us) and created a beautiful product that marketed us to non-readers. We consider theatergoers more likely than average to be potential newspaper subscribers.

The Columbus Dispatch, Columbus, Ohio Alan Miller WHAT THEY DID: The appetite for college football coverage is huge in the hometown of the Ohio State Buckeyes. And to help feed the hungry fans, The Dispatch developed a standalone, weekly College Football section in the past year to run each Sunday during the fall. The Buckeyes will be predominant, but the section also looks across the college landscape, providing stories, columns, photos and statistics for those who can’t get enough on college football. It’s also a new venue for advertisers.

PERSONAL JOURNEYS The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Atlanta, Ga. Ken Foskett Personal Journeys is a weekly narrative in Sunday Living & Arts. It features a compelling narrative arc, strong writing and arresting photography. The pieces look and feel like a magazine article, with large cover presence spilling to one to three inside pages. Readers LOVE this feature! It’s resulted in new subscriptions, renewed subscriptions and great community buzz. Staff love the opportunity to stretch writing and reporting skills, and write deeply about a subject. Most exciting addition to the AJC in years.

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CITY TRAVEL SWAP THE FOOD ISSUE The Kansas City Star, Kansas City, Mo. Jill Silva WHAT THEY DID: Our Food Issue is a once-a-year premium section that goes to all subscribers. The section captures what’s new and behind the scenes in the Kansas City food community in pictures and words. Our Food Issues have won state and national awards.

SPRING DINING GUIDE NOLA.com, The Times-Picayne, New Orleans Ann Maloney, Jennifer Evans Each year, NOLA.com and The Times-Picayune creates a themed dining guide for spring for print and online. This year, we tackled cheap eats. We made certain to make the selections geographically and culturally diverse. The section is always popular with readers and with advertisers. It eats up a lot of man hours, but it is nearly evergreen copy that just keeps on giving online. This year, topics included food at every price point, dishes under $15, value meals and breakfasts for $5 or less.

The Seattle Times, Seattle Lynn Jackson WHAT THEY DID: We partnered with The Oregonian on a special project to drive travel-ad sales. The Seattle Times created two tabs aimed at weekend visitors to Seattle, which were inserted into The Oregonian; our neighbors to the south created two Portland visitor guides, which were inserted into The Times. Each paper sold ads into the tabs they produced. Our spring Seattle visitor’s guide ran 24 pages, with seven pages of advertising. It included an enticing array of stories and photos about dining, shopping, daytrips, events and more.

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PEEPS RECIPE CONTEST Baltimore Sun, Baltimore Anne Tallent WHAT THEY DID: Though there are wellknown contests asking participants to create scenes or dioramas with Peeps, we had not seen any contest that asked readers to actually cook with Peeps. And we thought one was needed. Though this was the first year, we still got nearly 50 entries. We awarded winners for best savory, best sweet, most creative and bravest (winning entry: Peeps crab nuggets). Just Born happily provided prize packs for our champs.

BEST OF HOLIDAY SHOPPING The Roanoke Times, Roanoke, Va. Kathy Lu WHAT THEY DID: We launched our first readers’ poll asking for the best local holiday shopping advice – like who’s the best holiday caterer or best place to get something for your special guy or gal. Voting happens in the fall (September to midOctober) with the issue coming out in mid-November, just in time for shopping season. The marketing/ad departments also produced fliers, cards, etc., that businesses could access online and download to post at their businesses. We just launched our second poll this month.

SUMMER DARES The Kansas City Star, Kansas City, Mo. Sharon Hoffman WHAT THEY DID: Our department was asked to create a one-time-only special section with an upcharge, something with a summer theme but ot the usual events guide. We asked every staffer to write about Summer Dares, ways to step out of their comfort zone and help readers break out of their summertime rut. One tried to hit a fastball against a pitching machine. Another tried exotic ice cream flavors, like Chinese Five Spice and a Tamarindo Mexican Popsicle. A roller-coaster-phobe took a fast ride. An artist went sky diving and then described his adventure in a two-page comic book. Inspiration for our readers and fun for the staff.

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Asbury Park, V.I. Daily News take top honors in APME competition

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he Asbury Park (N.J.) Press and the Virgin Islands Daily News won top awards in the annual Associated Press Media Editors’ Journalism Excellence Awards. APME also announced the winner of its seventh annual Innovator of the Year award, voted on by conference attendees. More than 30 winners were announced in the 2013 contest in the categories for media organizations. “We had a large number of high-quality entries in this contest, but I find it interesting how smaller news organizations like the Virgin Islands Daily News continue to compete very well in this contest every year,” said APME President Brad Dennison. “Overall, we saw incredible amounts of watchdog and enterprise reporting, as well as news innovation. I find that very encouraging for our industry.” There were 244 entries this year, including those for the separate AP staff awards. The Asbury Park Press was voted as the 43rd annual Public Service Best of Show for its multiplatform news coverage as APME President Debra Adams Simmons presents Hollis Towns, well as its online Resource Center for Superstorm Sandy. executive editor of the Asbury Park Press, with the Public The award carries a $1,500 prize. Service Best of Show award for the paper's coverage of Superstorm Sandy. “With its community wrecked along with much of the New Jersey shore by the furor of Award winner for its project “The Superstorm Sandy, The Asbury Park Battle for V.I. Senators’ Spending Press staff performed a public servRecords,” which spotlighted how ice like few others," the judges government officials were using milwrote. "And it demonstrated hardlions of dollars in taxpayers' money hitting investigative journalism on to “live large.” The award carries a causes and effects and by donating $1,000 prize. profits of books to the Red Cross. “The Virgin Islands Daily News “APME Public Service judges conteam's tireless reporting set the sidered some incredible work this standard for what embodies the year, but Asbury Park’s Sandy coverhighest standards of commitment to age stood above the rest." results,” the judges said. “This scrapThe Virgin Islands newspaper was py newspaper clearly overcame `siga winner in the under 40,000 circunificant official resistance to legal lation category for its “Our Money, application of the First Amendment Their Failure” project, which or FOI laws.’ The V.I. Daily News J. Lowe Davis, editor at-large of the Virgin Islands exposed a plan by the Islands’ govdemonstrated both fluency with the Daily News, and Gerry Yandel, the paper's execuernor to build a $30-million sports local FOI law and tenacity in asserttive editor, accept an award at the luncheon. The complex with private partners who ing the public's right to know under paper received two awards, one for its coverage had questionable backgrounds. of a questionable sports complex project and the the law." It was also named The Tom Curley other for its investigation into senators' spending >> Continued on next page of taxpayers' money. First Amendment Sweepstakes

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APME NEWS In the Innovator contest, The Arizona Republic was voted the winner for its AZ iPad app of an evening news magazine. It was the second year the Republic was a finalist. They received $1,000 from the contest’s sponsor GateHouse Media Inc. The other two finalists were WLRN-Miami Herald News radio and The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch. “It was exciting to choose three finalists with such different but innovative projects,” the judges said. “It shows again how news organizations are willing to adapt and innovate to meet of the changing needs of their audiences.” APME also announced award winners in three other innovation categories as well as Digital Storytelling, International Perspective and others. Awards were presented during an Oct. 30 luncheon at the conference in Indianapolis.

Here are the winners: > 43rd Annual Public Service: n Winner of Public Service Best of Show and $1,500: The Asbury Park Press, “Superstorm Sandy” Under 40,000 circulation: n Winner: The Virgin Islands Daily News, “Our Money, Their Failure” n Honorable mentions: The Log Cabin Democrat, Conway, Ark., “Mayflower Oil Spill”; and The Springfield (Mo.) News-Leader, “Making a Difference in the Life of Every Child” 40,000 to 149,000 circulation: n Winner: The Asbury Park Press, “Superstorm Sandy” n Honorable mention: The Columbus Dispatch, “Credit Scars” Over 150,000 circulation: n Winner: The New York Times, “Unlocked” n Honorable mentions: The Denver Post, “Failed to Death”; and The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, “Side Effects” Judges: Bob Heisse, executive editor, The State JournalRegister, Springfield, Ill.; Otis Sanford, Hardin Chair of Excellence in Journalism, University of Memphis, Tenn.; and AP Managing Editor Kristin Gazlay.

> Finalists for the Seventh Annual Innovator of the Year: n Winner: The Arizona Republic, for its AZ app of an evening news magazine for the iPad n WLRN-Miami Herald News radio, for its “News as a Shared Experience” n Columbus Dispatch, for its bold, new print format Judges: Joe Hight, editor, The Gazette, Colorado Springs, Colo.; Meg Downey, managing editor, The Tennessean, Nashville; George Rodrigue, managing editor, The Dallas Morning News, and Laura Kessel, managing editor, NewsHerald, Willoughby, Ohio.

> Second Annual Innovator of the Year Awards for Radio and TV n Winner: Cognoscenti, sponsored by WBUR in Boston, for its platform which takes the concept of “letters to the editor” and infuses it with performance-enhanced perspectives Judges: Martin Reynolds, senior editor- community engagement, Bay Area News Group, Oakland, Calif.; Elbert Tucker, director of News, WBNS-10TV, Columbus, Ohio; and Greg Peppers, AP executive producer, domestic video.

> Second Annual Innovator of the Year Award for College Students n Winner: “Campus Lifeline: A Report on College Suicide,” a project of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Kent State University. The special project examined suicide, the second-leading cause of death among college students. Judges: Chris Cobler, editor, Victoria (Texas) Advocate; Angie Muhs, executive editor/Interactive, Portland (Maine) Press Herald; and Martin Reynolds, senior editorcommunity engagement, Bay Area News Group, Oakland, Calif.

> Fourth Annual Gannett Foundation Award for Innovation in Watchdog Journalism

Kent State University student Jessica White accepts the Innovator of the Year Award for College Students, "Campus Lifeline: A Report on College Suicide."

Winners in the Fourth Annual Gannett Foundation Award for Innovation in Watchdog Journalism. Each will receive $2,500 in prize money: 75,000 and below winner: n The Journal News, White Plains, N.Y., “District in Crisis”

Above 75,000 winner: n The Blade, Toledo, Ohio, “Battle Lines: Gangs of Toledo” Judges: Alan Miller, managing editor, The Columbus Dispatch; Jim Simon, assistant managing editor, The Seattle Times; Debra Adams Simmons, editor, The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer; Brad Dennison, president/large daily division, GateHouse Media Inc.; and Kurt Franck, executive editor, The Blade, Toledo, Ohio.

> 43rd Annual First Amendment Award and Citations The Tom Curley First Amendment Sweepstakes Award. The winner will receive $1,000 in prize money. n Winner: The Virgin Islands Daily News, “The Battle for V.I. Senators’ Spending Records” Over 150,000: n Winner: The Wall Street Journal, “Watched” 40,000-149,999: n Winner: The Tennessean, Nashville, “Department of Children’s >> Continued on next page

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Services Special Report” n Honorable mention: The Commercial Appeal, Memphis, Tenn., “Ernest Withers' Secret” 40,000-under: n Winner: The Virgin Islands Daily News, "The Battle for V.I. Senators' Spending Records." Judges: Teri Hayt, executive editor, GateHouse Media Ohio, Canton Repository; AP Senior Managing Editor Mike Oreskes; Andrew Oppmann, adjunct professor of journalism, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, Tenn.; Mark Baldwin, executive editor, Rockford (Ill.) Register Star; Bill Church, executive editor, Herald-Tribune Media Group, Sarasota, Fla.; Bob Heisse, executive editor, The State Journal-Register, Springfield, Ill.; and AP corporate counsel Vikram Bhagat.

> Digital Storytelling Awards (previously Digital Storytelling and Reporting Awards) Over 150,000: n Winner: The Detroit Free Press, for its examination of the defunct Packard Plant, “now home to graffiti artists, illegal dumpers, scrappers, urban explorers and thieves who rob and mug them, arsonists, firefighters who risk their lives and camera crews from around the world” n Honorable mention: The Seattle Times, “Glamour Beasts” n Honorable mention: The Boston Globe, “68 Blocks: Life, Death, Hope” 40,000 to 149,999: n Winner: The Commercial Appeal, Memphis, Tenn., for its digital narrative telling the dramatic story of Martin Luther King Jr.’s last hours before his assassination. n Honorable mention: The Roanoke (Va.) Times, “The Damage Done: How heroin claimed one young life and devastated another” n Honorable mention: The Tennessean, Nashville, “Abortion in Tennessee” Less Than 40,000: n Winner: Waterloo-Cedar Falls (Iowa) Courier, for its coverage of two missing girls and the long, tragic search that followed. n Honorable mention: Press & Sun Bulletin, Binghamton, N.Y., “The Face of Courage”

APME President Debra Adams Simmons presents Meg Downey, managing editor of The Tennessean, with a First Amendment Award for its special report on the state's Department of Childrens Services.

Judges: Laura Sellers-Earl, digital development director, EO Media Group, Astoria, Ore.; Monica Richardson, managing editor, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution; and Alan English, publisher, Log Cabin Democrat, Conway, Ark.

> International Perspective Awards Over 150,000: n Winner: Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, “Paper Cuts,” John Schmid and Mike De Sisti 40,000 to 149,999: n Winner: Omaha World-Herald, “China Connection,” Paul Goodsell and Matt Miller Under 40,000: n Winner: Argus-Leader, Sioux Falls, S.D., “South Dakota to South Sudan,” Steve Young Judges: Jim Simon, assistant managing editor, The Seattle Times; Gary Graham, editor, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash.; AP Senior Vice President John Daniszewski; and Jack Lail, director of digital, Knoxville (Tenn.) News Sentinel n

2013 APME AP Staff Awards announced

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overage of Superstorm Sandy and terrorism in Africa won awards for deadline, enterprise and state reporting from the Associated Press Media Editors association for journalism excellence by AP

staffers. “AP’s New York and New Jersey staffs' coverage of the 800mile-wide mashup called Sandy was, in a word, exceptional,” the APME judges said in awarding the Deadline Reporting prize to the team that covered the storm. They said that under the worst of conditions, including their personal storm woes and risks, the staff provided up-to-the

minute, authoritative coverage that was “nothing short of stellar.” They described the coverage as “wire service reporting at its best – quickly updated, well-written, compelling and comprehensive.” The New York and New Jersey staffs also were awarded the Charles Rowe Award for distinguished state reporting for the Sandy coverage. In honoring West Africa bureau chief Rukmini Callimachi for Enterprise Reporting for her pieces on terrorism, the >> Continued on next page

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judges said the stories were “fascinating, horrific and well-told.” Callimachi's work included a story in December 2012 describing how al-Qaida was carving out its own country in Mali; a month later, France sent its military to rout Islamic extremists from the northern part of the country. Callimachi went to Timbuktu, where she found documents left behind when alQaida fled the storied city ahead of advancing French and Malian troops. They included a letter from al-Qaida reprimanding the alleged mastermind of the deadly hostagetaking at an Algeria gas plant and a maniSantiago Lyon (right), AP’s director of photography, interviews Boston festo detailing al-Qaida’s plan to conquer photographer Charles Krupa (left) about his award-winning image from northern Mali. Callimachi also wrote “Love the Boston Marathon bombing during the AP News Presentation. in the Time of Shariah,” the story of a the school,” the judges said. woman who was flogged by Islamic militants for her relaIndia bureau chief Ravi Nessman and Kristen Gelineau, tionship with a married man. bureau chief for Australia, won the Feature Writing award The judges said Callimachi “showed much bravery, enterfor “The Longest Journey,” the story of a young man's quest prise and knowledge in uncovering these stories.” They to find his mother after they were separated decades earlier described her work as “courageous pursuit of news under in India and he was adopted by a family in Australia. The extreme conditions; an important voice that many more judges said the story, based on reporting from two continews outlets need to reflect. Her reporting reminds us why nents, read like a novel. the AP matters so much in this profession.” “The writers avoid a clichéd fairy-tale ending and instead Photographer Charles Krupa, based in Boston, won the tell a story of loss, hope, an improbable reunion and the News Single Photo award for his image from the Boston harsh reality of two lives changed forever," they said. Marathon bombing of medical workers running an injured Interactive producers Nathan Griffiths, Peter Santilli and man past the finish line in a wheelchair. Peter Hamlin, all of New York, were cited for Best Use of “This dramatic image of the Boston Marathon bombing Multimedia for leading the Interactive Department in its aftermath is the iconic image for that event,” the judges work on the AP's coverage of the selection of said. “For the photographer to have the comthe new pope at the Vatican. The package was posure to capture this amid the chaos is described by the judges as "deep, rich and incredible.” fact-laden," providing a picture of a pope who Cairo photographer Khalil Hamra won the was relatively unknown to readers. News Story Photo award for his series on the A video series on last year's devastating fighting in Syria, which the judges described drought in the Midwest was cited for the Best as “raw, detailed and insightful” images. Use of Video. The series was produced by the Photographer David Goldman of Atlanta team of John Mone, a video journalist based won the Feature Single Photo award for his in Dallas, former AP video journalist Robert image of a retired Marine teaching a young Ray, Omaha-based photographer Nati Harnik Boy Scout the proper salute at a veteran’s and former Washington video producer Nicole grave. “It's a compelling and poignant photo,” Grether. The judges described the series as the judges said. "show-and-tell journalism at its best. The Altaf Qadri, a photographer based in New video documented the heart-breaking effects Delhi, won the Feature Story Photo award for Hannah Dreier was awarded his series on a makeshift school for slum chil- the John L. Dougherty prize of the lack of water." Hannah Dreier was awarded the John L. dren under a New Delhi bridge. “As a result of for exemplary work by an Dougherty prize for exemplary work by an AP this photo story, readers were inspired to give AP staff member who is 30 donations that resulted in improvements to >> Continued on next page years old or younger.

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staff member who is 30 years old or younger. The judges said her work in California's Sacramento bureau "holds government and our leaders accountable, challenging them." They cited her stories analyzing public records on legislators' frequent vote changes after the outcome was certain and the use of funds from a special license plate for 9/11 victims that went instead to shore up the state budget. Dreier is now a newswoman in Las Vegas. The judges also awarded the following honorable mentions:

> Deadline reporting The Wisconsin staff for coverage of the Sikh temple shooting and the Colorado staff for coverage of the Aurora theater shootings.

> Enterprise reporting The Syrian civil war by Cairo bureau chief Hamza Hendawi, former Beirut staffer Ben Hubbard, Chief Palestinian correspondent Karin Laub, Cairo newsman Steve Negus and Amman, Jordan, correspondent Jamal Halaby; China’s reach, a series analyzing China's global reach by Beijing business James Martinez, AP’s New York state editor, receives an award from APME writer Joe McDonald, Seoul newswoman President Debra Adams Simmons. Martinez accepted awards for Deadline Youkyung Lee, former Beijing bureau chief Reporting and the Charles Rowe Award for distinguished state reporting for Charles Hutzler, Canberra, Australia, newsman the AP’s New York and New Jersey staffs’ coverage of Superstorm Sandy. Rod McGuirk, Paris newswoman Sarah Dilorenzo, Wellington, New Zealand, newsman Nick Perry, United States and Canada. It works closely with the AP to fosBangkok newsman Denis Gray, and Tokyo business writer ter journalism excellence. Elaine Kurtenbach; and California license plates by Hannah Judges were Michael Days, editor, Philadelphia Daily News; Kurt Dreier and Juliet Williams, of the Sacramento bureau, about Franck, executive editor, The Blade, Toledo, Ohio; Mark diverting funds from a special license plate for 9/11 victims to Baldwin, executive editor, Rockford (Ill.) Register Star; Debra help the state's budget. Adams Simmons, editor, The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer; Angie > Feature writing Muhs, executive editor/Interactive, Portland (Maine) Press • Chicago-based National Writer Sharon Cohen for “The Man Herald; Laura Sellers-Earl, digital development director, EO Who Saved Many,” the story of an Army captain who helped Media Group, Astoria, Ore.; Jan Touney, executive editor, Quadmany with trauma in Iraq but couldn't save himself at home. City Times, Davenport, Iowa; Monica Richardson, managing • Best Use of Multimedia: Nick Harbaugh and Phil Holm, based editor, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution; Bill Church, executive in New York, for the civil war in Syria. editor, Herald-Tribune Media Group, Sarasota, Fla.; Aminda • Charles Rowe Award: Hannah Dreier and Juliet Williams for Marques Gonzalez, executive editor, The Miami Herald; Dennis California legislative vote-switching. Anderson, executive editor, Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star; Laura • News Single Photo: Sue Ogrocki, based in Oklahoma City, Kessel, managing editor, News-Herald, Willoughby, Ohio; Jack tornadoes in Moore, Okla. Lail, director of digital, Knoxville (Tenn.) News Sentinel; J.B. • News Series Photo: Bernat Armanque, based in Jerusalem, Bittner, managing editor, The Elk City Daily News, Vici, Okla.; the conflict in Gaza. Gary Graham, editor, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash.; • Feature Single Photo: Emilio Morenatti, based in Barcelona, Elbert Tucker, director of news, WBNS-10TV, Columbus, Ohio; Spain, a nun reacting to white smoke from the Vatican signaling Greg Peppers, AP executive producer, domestic video; and a new pope. Chris Cobler, editor, Victoria (Texas) Advocate. • Feature Series Photo: Bebeto Matthews, based in New York, for “Sandy Claus,” a series chronicling a man who started a Judges for the photo awards were Jeff Knox, director of phocharitable enterprise to collect and deliver toys to children tography, Daily Herald, Arlington Heights, Ill.; Bob Heisse, execaffected by Superstorm Sandy. utive editor, The State Journal-Register, Springfield, Ill.; Debra Adams Simmons, editor, The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer; and Alan APME is an association of editors at newspapers, broadcast Miller, managing editor, The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch. n outlets and journalism educators and students leaders in the

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member

showcase

APME recognizes contributions to the AP photo report through the Showcase Photo of the Month Award. The competition is judged by AP and member photo editors. The monthly winners are displayed at the annual conference and a Showcase Photo of the Year Award is presented.

APME PHOTO OF THE YEAR AP Photo/ The Boston Globe

John Tlumacki Bill Iffrig, 78, lies on the ground as police officers react to a second explosion at the finish line of the Boston Marathon in Boston, Monday, April 15, 2013. Iffrig, of Lake Stevens, Wash., was running his third Boston Marathon and near the finish line when he was knocked down by one of two bomb blasts.

MAY

JUNE

AP Photo/The News-Review

AP Photo/Las Vegas Review-Journal

Michael Sullivan

John Locher

A firefighter works on a mop-up detail at the 206-acre Shively Creek Fire 11 miles southeast of Canyonville, Ore.

Fireworks explode over the Las Vegas Motor Speedway during the Electric Daisy Carnival in Las Vegas.

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JULY AP Photo/ Kitsap Sun

Meegan M. Reid A bald eagle looks out over the Strait of Juan de Fuca at the Salt Creek Recreation Area in Port Angeles, Wash.

AUGUST AP Photo/ Naples Daily News

Scott McIntyre Simon Charry drives to the basket during a pick-up game of basketball with his classmates from Naples High School at Fleischmann Park on Tuesday Aug. 27, 2013, in Naples, Fla. The group tries to play after school as much as they can depending on the weather.

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“The list of great news minds working on programming, the cost synergies, the drawing power for both audience and high-profile speakers – it’s an exciting proposition.” Brad Dennison, APME past president

It’s a first: ASNE and APME are joining forces for 2014 convention

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or the first time, the two premier news leadership organizations in North America are joining forces to present a joint convention. The American Society of News Editors and the Associated Press Media Editors have reached an agreement that will bring the two influential groups together on Sept. 15-17 at the Hyatt Regency in Chicago. A joint convention has been discussed for years, but has never materialized until now. “In this day and age it just makes sense to hold one terrific conference for leaders of news organizations,” said ASNE president David Boardman, dean of the School of Media and Communication at Temple University and former executive editor of the Seattle Times. “We’ve always had great conventions. This will be bigger, better and smarter than ever.” ASNE and APME members include senior editors of news organizations, deans and journalism educators, members of journalism foundations and news executives. “I’m thrilled the stars finally aligned to make this happen,” said APME Past President Brad Dennison, who is president of GateHouse Media’s Large Daily newspaper division. “The list of great news minds working on programming, the cost synergies, the drawing power for both audience and high-profile speakers – it’s an exciting proposition.” Associated Press Senior Managing Editor Mike Oreskes said, “This is a time of great challenge for journalism, so it is heartening to see these two important organizations of

journalists standing shoulder to shoulder to discuss and address those challenges.” Oreskes is on the boards of both organizations. Joint ASNE-APME committees are already meeting to plan various aspects of the 2014 conference, including programming and fundraising. ASNE and APME have similar priorities. APME works closely with The Associated Press to foster journalism excellence and to support a national network for the training and development of editors who run multimedia newsrooms. APME is a vocal presence in setting ethical and journalistic standards for newspapers, as well as in freedom of information and First Amendment issues. ASNE’s priorities are to advance the cause of quality, independent professional journalism. Founded in 1922 to “defend the profession from unjust assault,” ASNE is primarily an organization of newsroom leaders in the United States. It focuses on issues related to the First Amendment, diversity, leadership and innovation, ethics and credibility, and media literacy. In addition to ASNE and APME, the Associated Press Photo Managers will be involved in the effort. APME and APPM traditionally have their annual conferences together. n For more information, contact APME Executive Director Sally Jacobsen at sjacobsen@ap.org or visit our website, APME.com

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A look back: Dennison reflects on year as APME president By Hannah Ash IU Southeast

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utgoing APME President Brad Dennison has had a sharp focus on journalism since his freshman year at college, said Jim St. Clair, retired IU Southeast journalism professor. St. Clair said he remembers the first conversation he ever had with Dennison. Dennison was a freshman at the time, and St. Clair was the professor of his journalism class. “It was obvious he had a focus on what he wanted to do,” St. Clair explained. As 2013’s president, Dennison has maintained that focus throughout his career and in his position as APME president. As outgoing president, Dennison said he is proud of the organization’s accomplishments in the past year. He emphasized the accomplishments of the group as a whole instead of focusing solely on his own contributions. “AMPE is a big group of volunteers,” he said. “It takes a full, active board.” Dennison said NewsTrain, a touring workshop that trains journalists in their own cities, is a point of pride for the APME and for him. This year marks the program’s 10th anniversary. “It’s so rare for a program to work that long,” he said. He said programs like APME’s NewsTrain are a vital part of keeping up with advances in the industry. Training journalists is an important function of the APME. St. Clair explained that training in the industry is more important than ever because of the changing nature of development. “It is important to share ideas and learn from others.” Dennison also said that staying up-to-date with technological advances is one of the greatest challenges the journalism industry faces. However, he said the APME continues to offer cutting-edge training. “We’ve been able to stay relevant when being relevant is hard to do.” When tablets first became popular, professionals in the industry were unsure how to handle them, Dennison said. Now, journalists have embraced the use of tablets as a media platform. “We are now much more coordinated as an industry,” Dennison explained. He said remaining fluid in a time of great technological advancement is important. “You don’t know what’s next,” he said. “As long as it’s an available platform, it’s something we need to focus on.” Dennison said another recent APME accomplishment is

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the planning of a joint 2014 APME/ASNE conference in Chicago. The conference will mark the first time the two organizations will combine conventions. The Associated Press Photo Managers also will be involved in the conference. The APME is on solid ground for the future, Dennison said. With plans for continued training and education programs and the joint conference in the works, the APME will continue to foster the exchange of ideas and promote the goals of the industry. Dennison said he has seen many changes during his involvement in the industry, but the basic functions of the APME have remained the same. For instance, Dennison said the organization still handles a variety of First Amendment issues. "We are as relentless as ever,” he explained. He said journalists will always face First Amendment and access issues, and the APME will continue to serve as a watchdog. Dennison has spent his entire career in the journalism industry. “I’ve done just about everything you can do in news,” he explained. “I even spent some time in sales.” Dennison is currently GateHouse, Inc.’s vice president of publishing for the large daily division. After graduating from IU Southeast, he began his career at the News and Tribune in New Albany, Ind. where he worked as a general assignment reporter. After that, he advanced to an editor position for a newspaper in Jeffersonville, Ind. Then, Dennison moved to Augusta, Ga., where he was a city editor. He also later worked for newspapers on the south side of Chicago. Dennison also did consulting work. Later, Dennison got a position as vice president of news for Community News Holdings, Inc. He later took a vice president of news position at Gatehouse. St. Clair said he has followed Dennison’s career advancement over the years and is proud of his progression in the industry. A student’s success is the best way to pay tribute to a teacher, St. Clair said. He said he is proud of Dennison’s success and advancement. Dennison said he enjoyed every position he has held in the industry. “It all naturally led to where I am now,” he explained. Dennison said the process of his advancement has helped him understand how everything works together. He said although he is currently on the corporate side, understanding the news side of situations is beneficial. “Where I am today is my favorite place to be,” Dennison said. n


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Roberts receives 2013 APME President’s Award

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eteran journalist Michael Roberts was honored by the Associated Press Media Editors for his leadership with APME’s signature program, NewsTrain. Roberts, who received the APME President’s Award, has been involved with NewsTrain from its inception in 2003. After starting as a featured speaker for the low-cost, national traveling journalism workshop, he became a crowd favorite and remained a staple of the program. Roberts became the program’s director in 2011. “We are indebted to Michael for his service and dedication to NewsTrain,” said APME Past President Brad Dennison. “He’s passionate about the program and protective of its quality, and we’re fortunate to have him. It’s time to say ‘thank you’ in a public way.” The President’s Awards are given at the discretion of the organization’s president, and this recognition comes as NewsTrain celebrates its 10-year anniversary. Roberts received the award during the 80th APME conference, which was held in Indianapolis. Roberts is overseeing four NewsTrain workshops in 2013 – Springfield, Ill.; New York; Colorado Springs and Seattle. Sponsors of NewsTrain 2013 include The Associated Press, the APME Foundation, the Ethics & Excellence in Journalism Foundation, the Gannett Foundation, the Scripps Howard Foundation, GateHouse Media Inc., Medicare News Group, Athlon Sports, and The World Company. Outside of his work with NewsTrain, Roberts is a newsroom trainer and consultant who works with news organizations in the United States and Canada. He was deputy managing editor of staff development at The Arizona Republic from 2003 to 2010, where he was responsible for all newsroom training, served as writing coach and edited major projects. Previously, Roberts

HOLIDAY MUGGING APME wants to mug you. Give $80 this holiday season to support APME in its 80th year, and we’ll send you one of these stylish mugs. Tax-deductible donations to the APME Foundation assist newsroom leaders by providing training and ideas, protecting First Amendment rights, safeguarding Freedom of Information and fostering innovation and watchdog journalism. Another way to help: Become a NewsTrain Ambassador with a donation of $100 or more. The low-cost, highimpact NewsTrain traveling short-course program is 10

Bob Heisse (left), former APME president, presents the APME President's Award to veteran editor Michael Roberts for his leadership of NewsTrain, APME's signature training program.

designed and taught the American Press Institute's first online seminar for copy editors, and has presented programs for the Poynter Institute, American Press Institute, the Maynard Institute, Freedom Forum and various National Writers Workshops. Before the Republic, Roberts was a senior editor, including 10 years as training editor/writing coach at The Cincinnati Enquirer. He has also held writing and editing positions at the Midland (Mich.) Daily News and the Detroit Free Press, and worked as an editor at two magazines. He is a graduate of the University of Michigan and holds a master’s degree in training and human resource development from Xavier University in Cincinnati. n

years old and remains wildly popular. The ’Train will make four stops in 2014. And consider joining APME or renewing your membership heading into a momentous year that includes an unprecedented joint conference with the American Society of News Editors Sept. 15-17 in Chicago. Or become a lifetime member and never pay a membership fee again! Members receive discounts on APME Journalism Excellence Contest fees and annual conference registration, which more than pays for your membership. Do it all at www.apme.com. n

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2014

APME BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Officers n President: Debra Adams Simmons, The Plain Dealer, Cleveland n Vice President: Alan D. Miller, The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch n Secretary: Teri Hayt, The (Canton, Ohio) Repository n Journalism Studies Chair: Laura Sellers-Earl, EO Media Group., Salem, Ore. n Treasurer: Dennis Anderson, Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star

Executive Committee (officers above plus) n Past President: Brad Dennison, GateHouse Media, Fairport, N.Y. n AP Senior Vice President/Executive Editor: Kathleen Carroll, New York n AP Vice President/Senior Managing Editor: Mike Oreskes, New York n Conference Program: Bill Church, Herald-Tribune Media Group, Sarasota, Fla.; Jim Simon, Seattle Times

APME News Editor n Andrew Oppmann, Middle Tennessee State University

(Terms expiring in 2014) n Bill Church, Herald-Tribune Media Group, Sarasota, Fla. n Michael Days, Philadelphia Daily News n Alan English, The Times, Shreveport, La. n Kurt Franck, The Blade, Toledo, Ohio n Gary Graham, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash. n Joe Hight, The Gazette, Colorado Springs n Eric Ludgood, Fox 5 News, Atlanta n Aminda Marques Gonzalez, Miami Herald n Martin G. Reynolds, The Oakland Tribune n Monica R. Richardson, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (Terms expiring in 2015) n Dennis Anderson, Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star n Mark Baldwin, Rockford (Ill.) Register Star n Chris Cobler, Victoria (Texas) Advocate n Angie Muhs, Portland (Maine) Press Herald n Jim Simon, The Seattle Times (Terms expiring in 2016) n David Arkin, GateHouse Media n Autumn Agar, The Twin Falls Times-News, Twin Falls, Idaho n Meg Downey, The Tennessean, Nashville n Thomas Koetting, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel

Our communication vehicles n apme.com

Directors n http://www.facebook.com/APMEnews n https://twitter.com/APME n http://apmeblog.blogspot.com/ n http://www.facebook.com/NewsTrain n https://twitter.com/NewsTrain and, APME Update: n http://www.apme.com/?page=Newsletters

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Fall 2013 APME News magazine  
Fall 2013 APME News magazine  

Our Fall issue of APME News is traditionally the conference recap, giving members a concise summary of the high points of our annual gatheri...

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