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Raise the bar AP CEO Gary Pruitt outlines five steps to ensure press freedom in response to DOJ actions. see page

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APME NEWS

From the Editor

Andrew Oppmann

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PME has prided itself on being a source of great ideas for our member newsrooms. We’ve devoted considerable space and attention in APME News to the sharing of these ideas – and this quarter’s magazine is no exception. In addition to our Great Ideas centerspread, now a staple of the magazine, you will find “How They Did It” columns in this issue from Bob Heisse in Springfield, Ill., Teri Hayt with GateHouse Ohio and Kurt Franck in Toledo, Ohio. And, in our cover story, you can take a tour of the new

newsrooms that now house the content operations of the Miami Herald and the Des Moines Register. This issue marks our return to quarterly publication of APME News. My goal was to return the magazine’s frequency to four times a year and we appreciate the help of our member editors in helping us restore that tradition. Finally, in these pages, we preview the upcoming APME conference in Indianapolis. I hope to see you in Indy!

inside Summer 2013

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3 The President’s Corner/Brad Dennison: Speakers I can’t wait to hear 4 Spicy in The Big Easy: Competition heats up in New Orleans

6 Hitting the street: The Advocate continues to tweak daily New Orleans edition 9 APME Conference Preview: May the Indy force be with you 12 DOJ tightens rules: Standards raised for obtaining phone records, e-mail 14 Ken Paulson: The five First Amendment freedoms: United they stand 15 How they did it: Gatehouse Illinois papers join forces on the Deadbeat beat 16 Great Ideas: APME features a collection of the industry’s best and brightest 19 How they did it: Renaissance in Ohio sparks launch of business journal

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20 Turning the page: Tour sparkling news headquarters in Des Moines, Miami 25 How they did it: Two Blade staffers create “Battle Lines: Gangs of Toledo” 27 Member Showcase: Photos of the Month winners are honored 29 Editors in the News: Promotions, appointments and recognition 32 Get on board: NewsTrain schedules fall stops in Colorado Springs, Seattle 34 AP Stylebook Moment: Marking 60 years with dozens of updates, revisions

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ABOUT THE COVER Editors in Des Moines and Miami take you on a tour of recently unveiled news headquarters. Pictured is the Register’s “Mission Control” in its new newsroom.

EDITOR

Andrew Oppmann Adjunct Professor of Journalism Middle Tennessee State University Andrew.Oppmann@mtsu.edu DESIGNER

Steve Massie designmass@yahoo.com

APME News is the quarterly magazine of the Associated Press Media Editors, a professional, non-profit organization founded in 1933 in French Lick, Ind. Its members include senior editors and leaders from news operations in the United States and Canada that are affiliated with The Associated Press, including more than 1,400 newspapers and online sites and about 2,000 broadcast outlets. The group also includes college journalism educators and college student media editors. APME works with AP to support and recognize journalism excellence and the First Amendment. To learn more about APME’s programs and activities, visit apme.com.

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inside 2013 APME CONFERENCE When: Oct. 28-30 Where: Indianapolis Register: www.apme.com n Check out our conference preview y Pages 9-11 y

The President’s Corner

Brad Dennison

Digging deeper: Conference speakers I can’t wait to hear

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’ve been to scores of conferences over the years, APME and otherwise, and must admit: Panel-style sessions can be a hit or miss proposition. From a conference planning perspective, they’re unpredictable. When five people are involved, you can’t possibly know exactly what you’re going to get and the results can vary from inspiring to flat. And from a conference attendee perspective, a 60-minute panel can be quite engaging yet unfulfilling. Certain topics just beg for more depth. In 2013, when attending a conference is a luxury rather than a given, APME is working hard to ensure you will get the most from our 80th annual gathering in Indianapolis on Oct. 28-30. Along with my conference planning partners, The (Rockford, Ill.) Register Star Executive Editor Mark Baldwin and (Sarasota, Fla.) Herald-Tribune Executive Editor Bill Church, we have meticulously built a conference program lineup that strikes a satisfying balance of individual experts going deep into specific topics, with plenty of time for audience Q&A, as well as a handful of panel-appropriate topics covering serious issues we all grapple with. You can find a full listing of the conference schedule inside this magazine, but here are a few individual speakers I’m personally excited to hear:

(although that was a given for me). When I asked him what question he most frequently gets these days, he didn’t hesitate: “What’s it like to be a direct report to Warren Buffett?” Well? “It’s pretty great.”

n Bill Day Executive Director, Frank N. Magid Associates Magid is a leading research-based consulting firm focused on consumer interaction with entertainment and media across all platforms. The firm has worked with many major companies you’ve heard of, as well as with most major newspaper companies. As does BH Media, Magid believes the print runway is much longer than most believe, and much of their print-focused research revolves around extending it even further. By assembling huge reader panels within a market, Magid collect large amounts of data about what readers want and expect from the newspaper. And frankly, Magid has been through this process hundreds of times through the years and certain universal truths have emerged. Bill Day – one of the most engaging speakers I have ever heard – will present those universal truths about print products and reader expectations. Have your pen and paper ready.

n Kelly McBride n Terry Kroeger CEO, Berkshire Hathaway’s BH Media More than once, I’ve heard journalists say they would like to work for “Warren Buffet’s company.” I understand why without even asking: Optimism for the future of newspapers simply oozes from BH Media. And when I invited Terry Kroeger to join us as a speaker on the conference’s final day, he quickly and eagerly committed. He has an inspiring message about the future of the industry we all love and he takes every opportunity to further that message. As an aside, he insisted on a Q&A with attendees

Co-Author, “The New Ethics of Journalism” An eight-year faculty member of the Poynter Institute and co-author of “The New Ethics of Journalism: A Guide for the 21st Century” (available July 30 at the time of writing this column), Kelly McBride will discuss our evolving world of journalism ethics. This will include the changing landscape and new pressure points. And, oh my, how things have changed in this area over the past 15 years. n Dennison is president of GateHouse Media’s Large Daily newspaper division and will serve as president of APME through the October conference.

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SPICY IN THE

BIG EASY In New Orleans, a nearby rival declares a readership war against the venerable Times-Picayune

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ew Orleans is perhaps best known for its spicy and flavorful food, stylish restaurants, Cajun style and party atmosphere. Also, increasingly, with the recent changes to its newspaper landscape, it is gaining national notice as a competitive media market. In 2012, The Times-Picayune, under a national strategy outlined by its owner, Advance Publications, cut its print frequency to three editions a week. Shortly afterward, The Advocate, a nearby rival, changed ownership and declared an ambitious strategy to expand the Baton Rouge newspaper into a daily New Orleans presence. Not long after The Advocate’s announcement, The T-P opted to start a streetsales tabloid edition, restoring its print options to daily. The recent moves by both organizations are recapped in APME News through articles from their publications.

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“We promised to invest in our community, and we’re fulfilling that promise.” Ricky Matthews, president and publisher, The Times-Picayune

After paring back, Times-Picayune returns with new ‘TP Street’ tab product By Jim Amoss

Editor, The Times-Picaynue and NOLA.com (New Orleans)

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he Times-Picayune launched an additional print publication on June 24 that appears three times a week on New Orleans newsstands and focuses on breaking news, sports and entertainment. TP Street is in tab-size format and publishes on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. The new publication will cost 75 cents. It will be available at 1,500 locations - newsstands, vending boxes, grocery stores and coffee shops throughout New Orleans, and Jefferson, St. Tammany, St. Charles, St. John the Baptist, St. Bernard and Plaquemines parishes. TP Street will contain breaking local, national and world news, editorial pages, sports, entertainment news, opinion pages, death notices, weather, new puzzles and new comics. It is the latest addition to NOLA Media Group’s growing stable of news products, joining The TimesPicayune’s three days of home-delivered newspapers, the Early Edition available on newsstands Saturday mornings, and the comprehensive 24/7 digital news report of NOLA.com on desktop, mobile and tablet.

Like The Times-Picayune, it is produced by the news staff of NOLA.com/The Times-Picayune. “Our success in delivering more news, sports and entertainment to our readers enables us to create this innovative publication, the latest milestone in our evolution as a multimedia news organization,” said President and Publisher Ricky Mathews. “We promised to invest in our community, and we’re fulfilling that promise.” Together with the home-delivered Wednesday, Friday and Sunday newspapers and the Early Sunday Edition available for sale on Saturday mornings, it marks the return of The Times-Picayune to daily print publication. When we reduced our print frequency last fall, many of you told us that, even if you understood business realities, we were no ordinary business to you. You told us how The Times-Picayune is intertwined with your lives, your routines, the priorities we set for ourselves as a community. Even many of you who live in the digital world and follow us every day on NOLA.com told us >> Continued on page 7

The Times-Picayune’s new TP Street tab-sized publication is produced by the news staff of the Times-Picayune and NOLA.com.

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APME NEWS The Advocate’s New Orleans edition was launched in the fall when The Times-Picayune pared back to a three-day-a-week edition.

The Advocate continues to tweak gap-filling, daily New Orleans edition By Timothy Boone The Advocate (Baton Rouge, La.)

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ew Orleans businessman John Georges, the new owner of The Advocate, said he plans to strengthen the New Orleans edition of the newspaper to better meet the demand of the community. “We have a unique opportunity to grow this newspaper,” Georges, the chief executive officer of Georges Media Group and publisher of The Advocate, said during a meeting with the newspaper’s employees on May 6. “It just happens that there’s a geography to the south that’s dying for quality journalism seven days a week.” While Georges praised The Advocate’s New Orleans edition, which was launched in the fall when The TimesPicayune decided to pare back to a three-day-a-week edition, he said there are ways to improve the publication and increase readership by tailoring the edition to New Orleans readers. The goal is to get the new changes in place by September, he said. Georges completed a deal on May 5 to purchase The Advocate from the Manship family of Baton Rouge. Financial details were not disclosed. The Manships have owned Baton Rouge newspaper properties since 1909. The New Orleans area accounts for about a fifth of The Advocate’s weekday circulation of 98,000. The Sunday circulation is about 125,000. Georges said if The Advocate could double the number of subscribers in New Orleans, the newspaper would “be in great shape.” He said there are opportunities in the city because The Times-Picayune was “wounded and confused.” The Times-Picayune’s decision to reduce the frequency of its print edition generated widespread public outcry in New Orleans. A few hours before it was announced Georges completed the purchase of The Advocate, The TimesPicayune said it will launch a tabloid edition for three of the days on which it ceased publication. But the newspaper will not offer home delivery of those editions. Georges introduced the two veteran Louisiana journalists who will be the new senior executives at The Advocate: Dan Shea and Peter Kovacs. The duo were co-managing editors of The Times-Picayune, but they were laid off last summer when the newspaper let go of nearly one-third of its staff in preparation for its reduced printing schedule. Shea is the chief operating officer and general manager of The Advocate; Kovacs is editor. Both men have “full authority” to do what they want, Georges said. The Advocate has a unique short-term opportunity to

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From left: Peter Kovacs, editor of The Advocate, with Dan Shea, chief operating officer and general manager, and John Georges, publisher and CEO of Georges Media Group.

strengthen its position in Baton Rouge, develop a digital strategy and gain market share in New Orleans, Shea said. But Shea said nothing would be taken away from Baton Rouge to strengthen the New Orleans edition. “We have an opportunity here to be a small, nimble family-owned company that reaches out, that looks for the best ideas and best practices in the industry, that has a stable, local, committed ownership,” he said. “We have been given a gift at a time of shrinking markets that there is another business that is turning away from its customers and not giving them what they want.” Kovacs said The Advocate has a good market position in Baton Rouge and is a well-regarded company. “It would be a mistake to use our well-regarded brand name to fund an experiment,” he said. “We’re trying to give the people of New Orleans a more New Orleanian paper.” Georges said Shea and Kovacs will have the final say about The Advocate’s New Orleans edition. Shea said there is a balancing act that has to go on. “We have to have enough specific metro New Orleans content there to make the paper attractive to get more people to buy it. In turn, that leads to advertising,” he said. Georges said he is “extremely proud” to own Louisiana’s largest daily newspaper and aware of the enormous responsibility he has to the newspaper’s 450 employees and the Baton Rouge community. “Our core business is metro Baton Rouge,” Georges said. “We want to protect the flagship.” n This article is an edited version of a report that appeared in The Advocate on May 6. It is reprinted with permission.


APME NEWS

>> Continued from Page 5

how much you missed holding the printed Times-Picayune in your hands every day over coffee. TP Street responds to that yearning. While it will not be home-delivered, it will also be available to subscribers as an e-edition – an exact online replica of the newspaper that gives you the front-to-back reading experience of a print publication. Subscribers will also have access to an e-edition of the home-delivered paper, giving them daily access to an online replica of a printed Times-Picayune on their desktops or tablets. “In TP Street, we sought to develop a publication that would address our single-copy readers and also respond to a repeated request from our home-delivery subscribers for a front-to-back newspaper reading experience in the e-edition on days we don’t offer home delivery,” said Mathews. In the course of our 176-year history, New Orleanians have read The Times-Picayune in many formats. With TP Street, we’re continuing a long tradition of journalism in New Orleans. Like TP Street, the Jan. 25, 1837, first edition of The Picayune was printed in one section. The size of its pages was nearly identical to Monday's paper. And it was distributed in the streets and stores of the city, as TP Street will be. With the launch of TP Street, here is the complete array of print publications produced by NOLA.com and The TimesPicayune: n Monday – TP Street, only for street sale. 75 cents. Available to subscribers in e-edition. n Tuesday – TP Street, only for street sale. 75 cents. Available to subscribers in e-edition. n Wednesday – The Times-Picayune, home delivered and for street sale, containing the full lineup of news, sports,

editorial pages and entertainment features. 75 cents. Available to subscribers in e-edition. n Thursday – TP Street, only for street sale. 75 cents. Available to subscribers in e-edition. n Friday – The Times-Picayune, home delivered and for street sale, containing full lineup of news, editorials, entertainment features and sports, plus Lagniappe and Inside/Out. 75 cents. Available to subscribers in e-edition. n Saturday – Early Edition of the Sunday Times-Picayune, with Sunday features, distinct breaking news and sports content, advertising inserts and coupons. Only for street sale. $2. Available to subscribers in e-edition. n Sunday – The Times-Picayune. Full Sunday package and special Sunday-only news features, as well as full lineup of news and entertainment features, expanded sports and editorials, advertising inserts and coupons. Home delivered and for street sale. $2. Available to subscribers in e-edition. What began in 1837 continues to this day: a deep and personal connection between The Times-Picayune and its readers. Our devotion to serving you and your loyalty to us have endured through storms and wars that tore at the fabric of this community. After Hurricane Katrina lay waste to metropolitan New Orleans, some prominent voices in this country questioned its future. Our recovery found a voice in the pages of this newspaper and, through our website NOLA.com, in the hearts of people around the world. When we changed our company last October, we promised to be flexible, innovative and attentive to the everchanging needs of our readers. With the launch of TP Street, we believe we continue to fulfill that promise. n This is adapted from reports originally posted April 30 and June 22 on NOLA.com. Reprinted with permission.

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May the Indy force be with you

APME CONFERENCE PREVIEW

APME NEWS

Stars are aligning for a memorable APME Conference

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ould it be that Brad Dennison and Mark Baldwin are Jedi Knights disguised as conference planners? No matter your level of Star Wars geekdom – I quit after the first three movies – you’ve got to appreciate the forces that are driving the Oct. 28-30 APME Conference in Indianapolis. Brad (APME’s president) and Mark (two-time chair) have been great mentors in building a conference agenda that recognizes our stellar past and boldly prepares us for the future. The conference is built around its own trilogy – the First Amendment, Audience and Content, and Change Management – to provide editors with the tools to battle this brave, new frontier. The digital revolution has emerged as our new status quo, and only APME offers a cost-effective way to immerse yourself in journalism of this millennium. Plus, you don’t need to book a flight to another galaxy. We’re talking Indy, after all. The conference will have star speakers, out-of-this-world experts and, of course, receptions. Join us. Have a blast.

The Oct. 28 reception and APME Foundation auction will be held at the Indiana Roof Ballroom.

- Bill Church, executive editor, Herald-Tribune Media Group (Sarasota, Fla.) lll

J.W. Marriott

The theme of APME’s 2013 conference, “Content is King,” is a nod to the increased focus and premium newspaper companies have placed on content in recent years. Guest speakers will be announced on APME.com as they are secured. Registration for the event, the association’s 80th annual conference, is $250 for members and $350 for non-members. Register online at APME.com. There will be two host hotels at two price points in the same complex, including the J.W. Marriott, $169, and the SpringHill Suites, $139. The conference will be held just across the street at the Indiana State Museum. In addition, the Oct. 28 reception and APME Foundation auction will be held at the Indiana

Roof Ballroom, and the second night on Oct. 29 will feature a reception at the NCAA Hall of Champions. “Indianapolis is a phenomenal city with easy access, and it's a town built around hosting events,” said APME President Brad Dennison. “This will be a very compact conference, but attendees will get the full Indy experience.” Here’s a sampling of the sessions: n Tuesday, Oct. 29, Audience and content: • Did the Boston bombings change how audiences connect with fast-evolving news stories? Or was it simply >> Continued on next page

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>> Continued from previous page

another wake-up call from a restless audience sounding the alarm on slumbering newsrooms? A special lunch presentation with Kelly McBride of The Poynter Institute on "The New Ethics of Journalism.” Kelly, senior faculty for Poynter, will be the lunchtime speaker on the challenges and realities facing journalism. Kelly’s energy and expertise on journalism ethics make her a sought-after speaker and prominent author on a subject dear to many conference attendees. • Metered content is fast becoming the media standard. But do editors truly understand the evolving habits and expectations of readers? Dare we mention native advertising and what it could mean locally? Greg Swanson, partner and CEO of ITZ Publishing, will lead a panel discussion on metered content that’s guaranteed to provoke and perhaps create cranial discomfort. Greg, an Oregon-based consultant, has an extensive background on research and product development. He has an unapologetic view that many media organizations haven’t gone far enough to tap into varied digital content. n Wednesday, Oct. 30, Change management • We’re saving one of the best for (almost) last. Butch Ward, senior faculty at The Poynter Institute and a longtime friend of APME, brings his wit and wisdom to Indy with a session on change management for conference participants. Butch will examine the impact of change on media organizations and how editors can adapt and benefit from this brave, evolving world. Butch also will be available for free one-onone coaching sessions for participants who sign up for this unique opportunity. n

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Conference schedule Monday, Oct. 28 n Welcome from Indiana Gov. Mike Pence n “Happy 80th Birthday, APME” video n Sports access panel moderated by APSE president Gerry Ahern n First Amendment panel moderated by Gene Policinski of the Freedom Forum’s First Amendment Center

Tuesday, Oct. 29 n Extending the print runway with Bill Day of Frank N. Magid Associates n Butch Ward on change management n Kelly McBride on the new ethics of journalism n Metered content panel moderated by Greg Swanson n Setting priorities in a changing newsroom, moderated by David Arkin

Wednesday, Oct. 30 n CEO keynote by Terry Kroeger BUTCH WARD of the World-Herald Co. n AP news presentation led by Kathleen Carroll n AP/APME awards luncheon >> CONFERENCE SPONSORS on next page


APME NEWS

APME auctions to expand in Indy

APME Conference sponsors Double Platinum: Athlon Sports GateHouse Media Gannett Foundation/The Indianapolis Star National Press Foundation

Platinum: Scripps Foundation

Gold: (Conway, Ark.) Log Cabin Democrat (Peoria, Ill.) Journal Star Portland (Maine) Press Herald Quad Cities (Iowa) Times Rockford (Ill.) Register Star (Salem, Ore.) Statesman Journal (Springfield, Ill.) State Journal-Register (Spokane, Wash.) Spokesman Review The (Canton, Ohio) Repository The Miami (Fla.) Herald The (Nashville) Tennesseean The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer

The Seattle Times Victoria (Tex.) Advocate USA Weekend

Silver: CrowdyNews New York Times ScribbleLive Tansa Systems USA Washington Post Writers Group

Bronze: Accuweather Medicare News Group PG of A Schurz Communications

Support: Brandstand (recharging station) Digital First (recharging station) PARADE (refreshments)

The APME silent and live auctions, held during the Monday night reception at the annual conference, will expand in Indianapolis. In addition to the bidding at the reception, a silent auction will be held during the days of the conference. We're looking for donations of vacation getaways, jewelry, regional food baskets, books, artwork, sports and event tickets, and much more. Proceeds of the auction benefit the APME Foundation, which helps fund APME programs. To donate, contact Bob Heisse, APME Foundation president, at bob.heisse@ SJ-r.com, or Sally Jacobsen at the Associated Press, at sjacobsen@AP.org.

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“We want the Department of Justice to recognize the right of the press to advance notice and a chance to be heard before its records are taken by the government.” Gary Pruitt, AP President and CEO

DOJ tightens guidelines on getting reporters’ phone records and e-mail By Pete Yost Associated Press Writer

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ASHINGTON (AP) - The Justice Department announced that it is toughening its guidelines for subpoenaing reporters’ phone records, and also raising the standard the government needs to meet before it can issue search warrants to gather reporters’ email. The changes, announced July 12, follow disclosures that the Justice Department secretly subpoenaed almost two months of telephone records for 21 phone lines used by reporters and editors for The Associated Press and secretly used a warrant to obtain some emails of a Fox News journalist. After a barrage of criticism from lawmakers, the news media and civil liberties groups, Obama ordered Attorney General Eric Holder to review the Justice Department’s policy on obtaining such material, and set July 12 as the deadline. In announcing the changes, the Justice Department said it will create a News Media Review Committee to advise its top officials when the department seeks media-related records in investigations. Under one of the changes being made, the government must give advance notice to the news media about subpoena requests for reporters’ phone records unless the attorney general determines that “for compelling reasons,” such notice would pose a clear and substantial threat to the integrity of the investigation. That's a change from the current procedure, which puts the decision in the hands of the assistant attorney general for the criminal division, with review by the attorney general. “It is expected that only the rare case would present the attorney general with the requisite compelling reasons to justify a delayed notification,” the report said. In another change, the government will issue search warrants directed at a reporter's email only when that member of the news media is the focus of a criminal investigation for conduct not connected to ordinary newsgathering activities. “Under this revised policy, the department would not seek search warrants ... if the sole purpose is the investigation of a person other than the member of the news media,” the report stated. The report also said the department would revise current

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AP/CHARLES DHARAPAK

At the National Press Club, AP CEO Gary Pruitt offered five measures to ensure press freedom during a speech on June 19. See next page for details.

policy to elevate to the attorney general the approval requirements for all search warrants directed at members of the news media. In the AP story that triggered one of the leak probes, the news organization reported that U.S. intelligence had learned that al-Qaida’s Yemen branch hoped to launch a spectacular attack using a new, nearly undetectable bomb aboard a U.S.-bound airliner around the anniversary of Osama bin Laden's death. In the Fox News story, reporter James Rosen reported that U.S. intelligence officials had warned Obama and senior U.S. officials that North Korea would respond to a United Nations Security Council resolution condemning nuclear tests with another nuclear test. Holder and the Justice Department have said repeatedly that there was never any intention of charging Rosen with a crime, although an FBI agent referred to the reporter as a co-conspirator when filing an application for an affidavit. The only charges filed have been against the alleged leaker in the case. “It appears that they are recognizing that the very broad >> Continued on next page


APME NEWS

subpoena of the AP's phone records was too aggressive,” said Lucy Dalglish, dean of the journalism school at the University of Maryland who until recently was head of the Reporters' Committee for Freedom of the Press. “They also recognized that they are not going to prosecute a reporter for basic newsgathering activities unless they have reason to believe the reporter is involved in the alleged breaking of the law. That has not been all that clear in the past.” She added: “The devil will be in the details. They left themselves a little bit of wiggle room.” David Schulz, an attorney who represented the AP in the case, called the new guidelines “a major positive development.” “Just about everything the attorney general can do unilaterally to tighten these guidelines, he has," Schulz said. Erin Madigan White, the AP’s senior media relations manager, said the news cooperative “is gratified that the Department of Justice took our concerns seriously. The description of the new guidelines … indicates they will result in meaningful, additional protection for journalists. We’ll obviously be reviewing them more closely when the actual language of the guidelines is released, but we are heartened by this step.” Holder met with Obama in the Oval Office to discuss the changes, and White House spokesman Matt Lehrich said the president agrees with Holder’s recommendations and considers the report an important step toward the proper balance between national security and press freedoms. Lehrich said Obama had directed his team to explore alternative approaches to cracking down on leaks, such as revoking security clearances or other punishments. “Pursuing a criminal investigation and prosecution is not always the most efficient and effective way to address leaks of classified information," he said. Holder also endorsed the proposal for a shield law that would protect reporters. "While these reforms will make a meaningful difference, there are additional protections that only Congress can provide," he said. "For that reason, we continue to support the passage of media shield legislation." n

AP CEO lays out 5 measures to ensure press freedom AP President and CEO Gary Pruitt, a First Amendment lawyer by training, outlined in a June 19 speech five steps that are “imperative to give meaning to the powers spelled out” in the Constitution to safeguard press freedom: n “First: We want the Department of Justice to recognize the right of the press to advance notice and a chance to be heard before its records are taken by the government. This would have given AP the chance to point out the many failings of the subpoena. We believe notice was required under existing regulations; if the DOJ sees it differently, then regulations must be strengthened to remove any doubt. n “Second: We want judicial oversight. We need to ensure that proper checks and balances are maintained. In the AP phone records case, the Justice Department determined, on its own, that advance notice could be skipped, with no checks from any other branch of government. Denying constitutional rights by executive fiat is not how this government should work. n “Third: We want the DOJ guidelines updated to bring them into the 21st century. The guidelines were created before the Internet era. They didn’t foresee emails or text. The guidelines need to ensure that the protections afforded journalists from the forced disclosure of information encompass all forms of communication. n “Fourth: We want a federal shield law enacted with teeth in it that will protect reporters from such unilateral and secret government action. n “Fifth: We want the Department to formally institutionalize what Attorney General Holder has said: that the Justice Department will not prosecute any reporter for doing his or her job. “The Department should not criminalize — or threaten to criminalize — journalists for doing their jobs, such as by calling them co-conspirators under the Espionage Act, as they did Fox reporter James Rosen. This needs to be part of an established directive, not only limited to the current administration.” n

>> Continued from previous page

We want the DOJ guidelines updated to bring them into the 21st century. The guidelines were created before the Internet era. They didn’t foresee emails or text. The guidelines need to ensure that the protections afforded journalists from the forced disclosure of information encompass all forms of communication. Gary Pruitt, AP President and CEO

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Ken Paulson

The five First Amendment freedoms: United they stand

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It appears that fear can lead literally millions of ur very first question to the attendees at last Americans to change their mind about how free we can be. fall's APME Conference in Nashville was also Over the years, our standard question about identifying the easiest. the five freedoms has been an icebreaker and conversation “What are the five freedoms of the First starter. But Americans' illiteracy about the First AmendAmendment?” It’s not surprising that a ment is both disquieting and dangerous. majority of the assembled editors, educators Unless society fully understands the potency of the First and students were able to name all five, although later quesAmendment, giving us freedom of conscience, expression tions about the national motto and Betsy Ross proved to be and individuality, these freedoms are too easy to give up. In more problematic. sharp contrast to the reaction when legislation is introduced John Seigenthaler, the founder of the First Amendment to curb gun ownership, there’s a relatively muted public Center, and I posed similar questions to journalists and response to First Amendment encroachments. Sure, many other news media professionals for years as part of a long find government subpoenas or surveillance running partnership with the American of reporters unsettling, or provisions of the Press Institute. Over a span of 15 years, we Unless society fully Patriot Act disturbing, but a surprising found that journalists tend to know more understands the number are willing to make concessions if about the First Amendment than the potency of the First it provides them with additional security. general public, but not quite as much as Those who work in the news media have they should. Amendment, giving us a special obligation to communicate clearly In sharp to contrast to the journalists, freedom of conscience, to their readers and viewers just how essenwho know the First Amendment in part expression and tial and intertwined the five freedoms are. because it fuels their profession, most There are those who embrace freedom of Americans know very little about these core individuality, these religion, but have disdain for a free press. freedoms. In our just-released 2013 State of freedoms are too easy There are many who love freedom of the First Amendment survey, 36 percent of to give up. speech, but would like to limit offensive respondents said they couldn’t name a sinprotestors. It doesn’t work that way. If one gle freedom in the First Amendment. Just freedom in the First Amendment is diminished, they all are. four percent could name all five. The tally of those who can Which brings us to one more question from our annual name specific freedoms: n Freedom of speech – 59 percent polling: we asked respondents whether they agreed with n Freedom of religion – 24 percent this statement: “It is important for our democracy that the n Freedom of the press – 14 percent news media act as a watchdog on government.” For the first n The right of assembly – 11 percent time in the history of the poll, a full 80 percent said they n The right to petition – 4 percent look to the news media as a check on government. Our survey asks a follow-up question, explaining in detail That’s a mandate. The members of APME and all who what the First Amendment says and then simply asks gather news and information have a special obligation to “whether the First Amendment goes too far in the rights in guard against assaults on our core liberties. If some guarantees.” Last year, just 13 percent of respondents said Americans are silent because they don’t fully understand there’s too much freedom in the First Amendment. the importance of the First Amendment, it’s critical that our But not this year. voices be that much louder, raising awareness, and when The survey happened to take place weeks after the Boston necessary, raising hell. n Marathon bombing. The number of Americans who believe there is too much freedom almost tripled to 34 percent. It’s Ken Paulson is the president of the First Amendment Center a jump we’ve seen just one other time. That number rose to and dean of the College of Mass Communication at Middle 49 percent following the horrific attacks of 9/11. Tennessee State University.

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Bob Heisse HOW THEY DID IT

GateHouse Illinois papers unite on the Deadbeat beat

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eek after week since January, the story of Illinois withholding payments to vendors has been told one chapter at a time in The State Journal-Register and other GateHouse Illinois newspapers. Each Monday readers learn about the impact somewhere. While the details differ, the theme is repeated over and over. Here are some of the headlines for the stories published so far in our Deadbeat Illinois series: “State lags in payments to training center.” “Central Illinois seniors suffer as state delays payments.” “Schoolchildren lose out with lack of state aid.” “Community college students suffer.” “Agency turns away addicts as state funding falls short.” “Ambulance services suffer as state delays payments.” “IOUs ripple through municipalities.” “State falling behind on burial expenses, too.” You can find these stories — and the rest of our series to date — at http://www.sj-r.com/deadbeatillinois. APME board members Mark Baldwin, executive editor of The Rockford Register Star, Dennis Anderson, executive editor of The Journal Star in Peoria, and I planned the series during a meeting in Peoria in November 2012. We wanted to further explore the practice of Illinois’ government paying bills late, and doing so for years. How best to do that? We decided on weekly stories showing the impact. Tom Martin, executive editor of The Register-Mail in Galesburg, joined us, and each paper has produced a story every fourth week. These stories have been shared with smaller GateHouse papers throughout Illinois. The phrase Deadbeat Illinois came out of a project by Illinois newspapers and The Associated Press in 2011 as part of the APAPME broken budgets national reporting initiative. Many papers including our GateHouse papers participated in the reporting and ran the series for several days in the fall of 2011. The SJ-R published a front-page editorial demanding that state leaders start paying bills on time. Nothing changed. Paying bills late is part of the budget strategy at the capital. And at this point about $6 billion is being kept out of the state’s economy.

Of course, Illinois is struggling with a pension shortfall of $96 billion and its leaders still have not acted to reform the five pension systems. This has led to declines its credit rating, sending Illinois below California as the state with the lowest credit rating. It’s easy to blame pensions for everything, but unpaid bills are contributing to Illinois’ financial woes and must be addressed. As this series has been unfolding in 2013, it sparked a natural question: When did this all start? That question was answered in a special report in May by SJ-R Statehouse reporter Doug Finke. The report, “Not enough people listened,” was published by all of the papers. As the story pointed out, the first warning was sounded at the capital by former Illinois Comptroller Dan Hynes in 2002. That’s a long time and many billions ago. It was ignored by legislators and governors. As bad as the unpaid bill backlog is now, it could be worse — an estimated $16 billion without the recent state income tax increase. A lot of people are hurting over this. Many agencies are like KCCDD, formerly the Knox County Council for Developmental Disabilities, the subject of one of our weekly stories. About $2 million of the Galesburg agency’s $5 million budget is held up at the state level. “We have cut everywhere we can,” said Mark Rudolph, who heads KCCDD. “When we have wrung everything out of the towel, we try it again to see if another drop of water comes out. There is no water left.” Similar concerns have been repeated weekly in this series. Yet legislators have been tackling topics like speed limits, puppy lemon laws, smoking on college campuses and more. Anything but paying bills. Our Deadbeat Illinois series will keep the impact of this front and center at the Statehouse and among readers, who have been talking about these stories in letters, posted comments online and on Facebook where our Deadbeat Illinois page has more than 1,100 likes. At some point Illinois’ leaders will realize that paying bills will help the state’s economy. We only hope it’s soon. n Bob Heisse, executive editor of The State Journal-Register in Springfield, is president of the APME Foundation and immediate past president of APME. He can be reached at bob.heisse@sj-r.com.

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2012 APME NASHVILLE CONFERENCE

great ideas H

ave you launched a great new feature, page or web project, or used a social media tool in a great new way? Well, we want to recognize your great idea. Associated Press Media Editors recognizes a Great Idea every month on APME.com and we'll showcase monthly winners in our popular annual Great Ideas book, which will be released at our

conference in October. This is a chance for your newspaper to show off great work and to help fellow editors by providing ideas that might work in their markets. It's simple to submit your Great Idea. Just go to the Great Ideas page at APME.com, fill out the online form and attach an image or submit a link.

ANNIVERSARY OF THE ATTICA PRISON RIOT Democrat and Chronicle Rochester, N.Y. Dick Moss Director of Local Content/Days rlmoss@democratandchronicle.com To mark the 40th anniversary of the Attica prison riot, we worked with our sister Gannett TV station in Buffalo to put together an online site of historic photos, video and current interviews with survivors. We paired that with a print package focusing on how many records of the riot’s bloody end are still unavailable to the public. READ IT ONLINE

www.democratandchronicle.com/section/attica

TOMATO-TASTING CONTEST Winston-Salem Journal Winston-Salem, N.C. Carol Hanner Managing editor channer@wsjournal.com Our food editor and gardening columnist do a tomato-tasting event at a Friday night gallery hop in the arts district in which readers and tomato growers bring their varieties of tomatoes to be cut up and available to visitors to sample and vote on. They also taste tomato recipes prepared by half a dozen restaurants. The event is very popular and produces a food page centerpiece on the winners, as well as good marketing promotion of the newspaper. FIND MORE ONLINE

www2.journalnow.com


GREAT IDEAS

DETROIT SELF-PORTRAIT PROJECT

OUR TOWN PHOTO CONTEST Vallejo Times Herald Vallejo, Calif. Mario Sevilla Online editor msevilla@bayareanewsgroup.com Staff reporter Lanz Banes leads the Vallejo Times Herald staff in an effort to capitalize on a popular digital photo-capturing trend: 30 photos in 30 days. In this contest, Lanz and the

VTH crew designed a calendar filled with daily challenges asking readers to snap pictures of local landmarks, events, activities, etc. Submissions are posted the next day in a photo slideshow; editors chose winners for the August 30/30 contest at the end of the month. MORE PHOTOS ONLINE

http://tinyurl.com/9z6yrxc

OLD STYLE LOOK FOR HISTORIC MILESTONE The Patriot Ledger Quincy, Mass. Chazy Dowaliby Editor chazy@ledger.com To celebrate 175 years of publishing, the staff produced an edition as it looked back in the 1800s; using an early-edition to copy the nameplate of The Quincy Patriot, the predecessor to The Patriot Ledger. READ MORE ONLINE

www.patriotledger.com/175

Detroit Free Press Detroit Nancy Andrews Managing editor for Digital Media nandrews@freepress.com Detroit Self-Portrait project is a space for metro Detroiters to share their views of our city. Inspired by the Detroit Institute of Arts’ “Detroit Revealed” photography exhibit and wanting to provide a place for Detroiters and those connected to Detroit to publish their own portrait of the city, we are partnered with the DIA to share Detroit’s self-portrait. Many journalists and photographers travel to Detroit to photograph our ruins, but this display has resonated here with the community. More than 2,700 pictures have been published by more than 700 people.We’ve had selections shown at public events and in digital displays at the DIA and the Detroit Public Library. The project is ongoing — as long as it touches people, we’ll keep sharing it, too. VIEW THE GALLERY ONLINE

www.freep.com/portrait/


APME NEWS

Teri Hayt HOW THEY DID IT

Renaissance in Ohio sparks launch of business journal

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ortheast Ohio is the headquarters for several Fortune 500 companies, and home to many other businesses that support the major industrial players in our area. In recent years, the business community in our region has experienced a renaissance, due in part to the gas and oil boom, and the number of new companies that have moved into our area to support the energy business. In response to this increasing activity, we realized the need for a more comprehensive business news report and published our first edition of Stark Business Journal in early June. The idea for a separate business publication was hatched last fall when we began a major reporting project on the affects of the gas and oil business on our regional economy. SBJ is the result of many conversations and collaboration between the newsroom and advertising department. We had been hearing from readers and local business owners for some time about stories they felt we were overlooking when we cut back on space for business news several years ago. After talking with the staff, readers and advertisers, we realized we needed to do a better job with our business reporting and made it one of our franchise issues. This is our promise to our readers and community: We will be the source for business news; we will own it, in print and online. We made several reporting and editing changes to form our business team. Our advertising and marketing departments played a key role in helping shape our coverage and provided the advertising support to insure a successful launch for our new venture. We decided a bi-weekly tab offered us the opportunity to take a magazine format and structure deeper dives into specific topics. The bi-weekly publication schedule offered us flexibility with our staffing and workflow. Our goal is to offer in-depth enterprise reporting on all types of businesses, from agriculture to oil and gas, to startup businesses to major corporations. What does it take to go

In response to a business renaissance in Northeast Ohio, GateHouse Ohio Newspapers launched Stark Business Journal in June. The publication is a bi-weekly tab format.

from local to regional and beyond in today’s business world? These are just a few of the issues we will examine in coming editions. In our first edition, we reported on the local business climate and economy and how businesses, large and small, interact with each other in a business ecosystem. The response was immediate and overwhelmingly positive from readers and businesses. n Teri Hayt is the executive editor of GateHouse Ohio Newspapers. She can be reached at teri.hayt@cantonrep.com, or on Twitter at: @thaytREP.

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The centerpiece of the Register’s new space is the digitally focused “Mission Control,” where section editors, multimedia producers, social media editors and other digital staffers collaborate, plan, analyze real-time website analytics and monitor competitors’ digital sites and broadcasts.

Turning the page As news organizations adapt to changing business models and evolving content demands, editors and publishers are rethinking the layout and design of newsroom spaces. The old, open rooms served newspapers well in the 20th century. But, in these multiplatform and streamlined environments, such spaces are often no longer in sync with the jobs that need to be done. Editors of two newspapers – The Des Moines Register and the Miami Herald – recently unveiled their news headquarters. APME News asked them to give our members a tour of their new digs. State-of-the-art facilities in Miami.


APME NEWS

A key strategy at Capital Square was creating collaborative areas where teams could work together in a bright, new surroundings.

By Rick Green Editor/Vice President/News, Des Moines Register

Des Moines

Remembering its rich roots, the Register’s gleaming new complex offers more collaboration and unleashed creativity

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he downtown Des Moines map says just three city blocks separate Capital Square, the new home of Register Media, and our former offices for 95 years at 715 Locust St. Yet, it's a mighty leap in so many ways. For nearly 100 years - and in the face of an unprecedented wave of global innovation - the Des Moines Register and other aspects of our business toiled in a 13-story office complex that could no longer meet the changing demands of our media busiGREEN ness. Did we produce great journalism there? You bet. Meaningful work that yielded countless awards, including 16 Pulitzer Prizes, unfolded in that newsroom. Did we forge incredibly close ties to our advertisers at 715 Locust? Undoubtedly. Creative campaigns targeting our farreaching audience allowed us to build strategic partnerships with thousands of Iowa companies and clients. Did we embrace our role as an influential community leader in those offices? Unequivocally. On countless issues

The Register’s new space is in the heart of downtown, overlooking Des Moines’ civic center and a city park that is being renovated. It also is just blocks from Iowa’s state capital.

and endeavors, the Register - from its editorial pages to the publisher’s office - demonstrated an unflinching commitment to serving the greater good of Iowa. As we settle into our gleaming new space inside 400 Locust St., it's important for you to know that our generations-old commitment to journalistic excellence, helping our clients grow their business and being a catalyst for posi >> Continued on next page

The entry into the Register’s newsroom includes seven historic Page Ones and then several TV screens that display the staff’s videos, breaking news stories and other digital content. The space opened in mid-June.

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tive change in metro Des Moines and throughout our state is unwavering. Our offices moved, but our legacy of serving our readers and advertisers remains stronger than ever. Like countless companies before us, Register Media and the other divisions that are part of our parent, Gannett Co., needed a different work environment to accomplish our mission in this multi-faceted digital age. Quite simply: New space was needed for us to do new things for the audiences we serve. Collaboration is key for us, but it was virtually impossible at 715 Locust St. Here at Capital Square, key departments are closer together. Conversations unfold and creativity is unleashed. Staffers work side-by-side in open areas that leverage our skills, talents and passion. There are informal brainstorming areas, surrounded by white boards and top-of-the-line audiovisual equipment, for us to devise new ad campaigns, marketing strategies or story approaches. We have two studios filled with nearly 300 top-notch designers and artists who create dynamic ads or produce high-impact news pages for Gannett media sites (newspapers and digital sites) around the country. The focal point of our sleek newsroom is an area called “Mission Control,” a NASA-like setting where more than a dozen digital producers, content editors and multimedia creators handle stories, photos, videos and graphics for

A favorite corner in the new space for the 525 Register Media and Gannett employees is “Innovation Café.”

DesMoinesRegister.com and the print editions. It’s a new way of delivering more information than ever before on devices and in digital channels that we couldn't have imagined just three years ago - and never could have accomplished in the limited confines of our former building. At day’s end, buildings are just that - bricks, mortar, columns and walls. They can provide the space to do great things, but it is the people that make a difference in any organization. More than 525 staffers comprise Register Media, the Des Moines Register and Gannett Imaging and Ad Design Center. We are proud to call 400 Locust St. our new home. Our traditions might be on the move, but our purpose to actively influence and impact a better quality of life in Iowa is unwavering. Thanks for reading us - on all platforms. n Follow Rick Green on Twitter: @IowaRAG.

The greatest challenge for the Register: Sifting through nearly a century’s worth of clips and photo files and transporting the most essential ones three blocks east to Capital Square.

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Photos, videos and content are discussed during the daily 3 p.m. news conference, held in the middle of the Continuous News Desk.

By Aminda Marques Gonzalez Executive Editor and Vice President, Miami Herald

Miami

CARL JUSTE

Herald journalists are using the latest technology and a new, state-of-the-art newsroom to get news to millions of readers

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s I unpacked the last of my moving boxes in our everything they need to do in real time - Tweet from a live news event, post a photo to Facebook, shoot a quick video new, modern newsroom, I couldn’t help but think to post online or record an interview to air on WLRN/Miami back on my early career at the Miami Herald. Herald news radio. I worked as a night time general assignment Every now and then, a reporter must resort to writing and reporter on the city desk, which often meant filing a story using a cellphone, as Haiti corresponchasing police calls. dent Jacqueline Charles did - with her trademark At the time, cellphones were in their infancy and we had about half a dozen in the newsroom. When I inch-long nails - while reporting Haiti's 2010 went out on assignment, my editor would give me earthquake. one to take on the road. It was almost as big as a As we find ourselves at the crossroads of an evolutoolbox and it was like toting a bag of bricks. tion in modern journalism, the Miami Herald and el On the scene, I’d scrawl the story on a notepad, Nuevo Herald are perfectly positioned for today MARQUES then call the newsroom to dictate the story. You had and the future - in our new headquarters. GONZALEZ to talk fast before the cellphone died. We have built a streamlined printing plant Now, thanks to advances in technology, the smartphones because we know that our newspapers are going to be our reporters use today are the Swiss army knife of journalaround for years to come. The print editions of the Miami ism. Herald and El Nuevo Herald combined reach 1.3 million Armed with an iPhone, Miami Herald journalists can do >> Continued on next page

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>> Continued from previous page

adults in South Florida. With our own presses, we retain control of deadlines, which allows us to provide readers the most up-to-date information possible in the morning paper. That has been critical during the Heat’s run in the NBA finals. We also have built a state-of-the-art newsroom designed to deliver news and information with the speed required by today's news cycle. Our Continuous News Desk, at the center of the Miami Herald and el Nuevo newsrooms, is like an air traffic control tower for news, information, photos and videos. It’s where we disseminate news, whether through social media, through a digital news flash or an in-depth story in the newspaper. We are reaching millions of new readers and we continue to experiment with new ways as technology changes. Our websites - MiamiHerald.com, elNuevo.com, Miami.com and MomsMiami.com - reach more than 8 million readers each month. We have 20 news and sports apps for both Android and Apple. Soon, we will have two more apps for Windows 8 mobile phone and desktop. We also have four iPad apps for the Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald - and we are on e-readers like Kindle and the Sony Reader.

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Both papers - combined with our reporters and photographers - have tens of thousands of followers and fans on Twitter and Facebook. You can watch one of our video shows online or listen to our radio reports on WLRN/Miami Herald News. And when you have something to say, you can still write a letter to the editor, comment on one of our stories online or join our Public Insight Network, which is part of a national database of readers who share their expertise and opinions. We are in a new location after 50 years in our bayside home in downtown Miami. Our address has changed. What remains the same is our 110-year tradition of journalism excellence in chronicling this community. We will continue to cover politics, education, business, the arts and culture, sports and crime - local coverage that the Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald are uniquely positioned to provide. Our role has never been more important as readers seek trusted, impartial news and information amid the chaos of uninformed voices. n Aminda Marqués Gonzalez can be reached at 305-376-3429 or amarques@MiamiHerald.com., or on Twitter @MindyMarques.


APME NEWS HOW THEY DID IT

The Blade’s four-part series showed there are more than 2,000 known gang members in the city.

BATTLE LINES: GANGS OF TOLEDO

Gang violence in Toledo rose significantly in the summer of 2012, with eight people shot, two fatally, in a 24-hour period. The Blade covered each and every shooting, but the paper dug deeper. Crime reporter Taylor Dungjen heard police had created a map of gang territories in the Toledo, but they refused to hand it over, saying it was an investigative record and not a public record. The Blade filed suit against the city. With the suit bogged down in depositions and gang violence rising, the newspaper decided not to wait for the courts. Blade editors sent Dungjen and photojournalist Amy Voigt into some of the city's toughest neighborhoods to interview the people who knew more about gangs than the police — the gang members themselves. Using colored pencils, gang members and police sources worked with Dungjen and Voigt to help create a gang map

that tells where gang activity is most dangerous. The result was a map of gang territories in Toledo that law enforcement sources say is better than the city's map. The Blade’s series, “Battle Lines: Gangs of Toledo,” also showed there are more than 2,000 known gang members in Toledo and 25 to 40 “big major gangs.” Some, including an unnamed member of the Manor Boyz, joined the gang as young children. Others are in so deep that the only way out is death. Some end up spending most of their lives in prison. For the first day of The Blade’s four-part series, we asked Taylor to give readers a first-person account on how she got the stories and she gathered the information for the newspaper’s gang map. -Kurt Franck, Executive Editor The (Toledo) Blade

Their story: How two Blade staffers overcame obstacles to cover the story By Taylor Dungjen Blade Staff Writer

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he first days were the worst. It was freezing, and I couldn’t find my gloves. There was snow on the ground, and nobody was interested in helping Blade photographer Amy E. Voigt and me put together a map of gang territories in Toledo. East Toledo seemed like a logical place to start. We walked around the Weiler Homes, stopping residents to ask if they knew anything about gangs in the area. Silence. We learned later that the silence was probably more about survival than not wanting to cooperate. No snitching. We spent two days doing this — driving around the city trying to find people and community organizations willing to help. “We can’t help you.” “We won't help you.” “Are you crazy?” “I don't know what you’re talking about.” >> Continued on next page

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The people we talked to — active and former gang members, frustrated mothers and fathers, young Toledoans trying to make a difference for themselves, their families and their city — were kind. They were welcoming, they were gracious.

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Frustrated, we gave up for the week (it was a Friday). I left work thinking there was no way this map would ever happen. The police couldn’t help — not really. “Be careful,” officers cautioned as I explained why I wouldn't be around the Safety Building for a while. "You can't trust these guys." Eventually, by some saving grace and a few decent ideas, we met people such as Willie Knighten, Jr., Roshawn Jones, Shawn Mahone, and other people we can’t mention by name. Each of these men knew something about gangs and works with young people now. They were our connection to the inside. They were great sources for information, background and understanding. They put up with a lot of phone calls and numerous followups and connected us to other people — including the gangs — who could help. Without them, we might still be working on this project. Everyone thinks I’m a cop. Ten weeks and an estimated 900 hours later (between Amy and me), we produced a print map and companion digital interactive map complete with videos of interviews with gang members. You can see the digital map at toledoblade.com/toledogangmap. I am a better reporter now than I was when we started this project in mid-January. The Blade, I think, is a better newspaper for taking on the task. People expected Amy and me to be scared of the assignment. Send two women into neighborhoods that are oftentimes not known for anything other than violence? “You don't want to talk to these guys. They're going to set you up and rob you.” “You’re going to be in danger and taken advantage of.” Once during the assignment, there was a rush of adrenaline. In the moment — the “riot” outside Scott High School after students were pepper-sprayed by sheriff's deputies — adults and youths threatened Amy. One kid took a swing at her while she was recording video and taking pictures. We left rattled, but after a few minutes to stop, breathe and sit down, we were fine. Otherwise, I never felt like we were in danger. No one threatened me, made me feel insecure or uncomfortable. No one tried to intimidate me. The people we talked to — active and former gang members, frustrated mothers and fathers, young Toledoans trying to make a difference for themselves, their families, and their city — were kind. They were welcoming, they were gracious. I guess I'm a little frustrated I even need to explain that. We had the great fortune of meeting people who were willing to trust us and open up to share their stories and their secrets. I think the Toledo community will be better for reading

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the stories, seeing the photos, and watching the videos. I imagine people will be upset by the information that is here; some might not believe it’s accurate. It’s not something that's been widely available before. Former Toledo Mayor Jack Ford said he hopes the map is a catalyst for a candid community conversation. Me too. One of the most frustrating parts of reporting this series was finding out there’s no real end in sight. If the young men and women who are involved in gangs don't see it, how can I? I want to be optimistic. There are a lot of programs that offer help to troubled youth and convicted people who want to do better with a second or third chance. Sometimes that wake-up call takes a little longer for some. The young men and women we talked to — most of them were my age — said violence only ends with prison or more violence. But even then violence begets violence. Retaliation. On the streets, it’s survival of the fittest, and that can mean a lot of different things. One of the things that struck me most during our conversations with gang members came during an interview with “Chaos,” a 28-year-old gang member from the south side. A Folk. He said, basically, what he does on the streets he does for his family — he is making a reputation for himself so that his cousins, brothers, nieces, nephews — whoever — has an easier time in the future. Sounds a lot like what my parents told me when I was a kid. “Taylor, our goal is for you to be more successful than we are.” At some point, probably before I was even a teenager, my mom told me that. Didn't make a lot of sense then, but it does now. Same principle, different application. And, at this point, I feel like I understand where the gang members I interviewed are coming from — I kind of get the gang culture and lifestyle. “Chaos” explained that the culture and the lifestyle are not the same thing. Gangs don’t have to be bad. The culture is the idea of solidarity and community. The lifestyle — drugs, guns, violence — that's what some gang members adopt and what gets them in trouble. But really, when it comes down to it, I don’t understand at all. And no matter how many months Amy and I could have spent on this project, we would never fully understand. But we’re doing our best to get it, to understand, to tell stories that might otherwise go untold. I hope people will keep sharing. My ears are open. n Contact Taylor Dungjen at: tdungjen@theblade.com, or on Twitter @taylordungjen.


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member

showcase

APME recognizes contributions to the AP photo report through the Showcase Photo of the Month Award. The competition is judged by AP and member photo editors. The monthly winners are displayed at the annual conference and a Showcase Photo of the Year Award is presented.

FEBRUARY AP Photo/ The Journal Times

Scott Anderson April Malvasio, Nick Sprasky, Jordan Ganther (hidden) and Reid Heinart go airborne in a kayak as they careen down the sledding hill at Lockwood Park on a snow day on Friday, February 8, 2013 in Racine, Wis.

MARCH AP Photo/ The Kansas City Star

Jill Toyoshiba Tomas Young, a paralyzed Iraq vet who became an outspoken critic against the war and subject of the documentary “Body of War,� is in hospice. He has chosen to stop nourishment and water soon. One of his last acts was to issue an open letter accusing Bush and Cheney of war crimes. Claudia Cuellar, Young's wife and caregiver, sits with him in their Kansas City, North, home Wednesday, Mar. 20, 2013.

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member showcase

APRIL AP Photo/ The Boston Globe

John Tlumacki Bill Iffrig, 78, lies on the ground as police officers react to a second explosion at the finish line of the Boston Marathon in Boston, Monday, April 15, 2013. Iffrig, of Lake Stevens, Wash., was running his third Boston Marathon and near the finish line when he was knocked down by one of two bomb blasts.

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editors in the news

Industry’s promotions, appointments, awards and recognition Sun-Times shuffles management posts Jim Kirk, editor-in-chief of the

that also includes new positions for Lauren Gustus, the current senior editor for sports and features, and James Ku, current senior editor of digital.

Chicago Sun-Times, has been named publisher of the newspaper in a reorganization of management. Robert K. Elder has been appointed editor in chief of the STM Local suburban news- Jim Kirk papers. They include the Pioneer Press publications, the Naperville Sun and the daily papers in Aurora, Elgin and Lake County. Jim Hickey is the STM Local general manager. Paul Pham has been appointed CST Group senior vice president. Timothy Knight continues as chief executive of SunTimes parent Wrapports LLC.

Former USA Today editor Ken Paulson has been named dean of the College of Mass Communication at Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro. Paulson, president and chief executive officer of the First Amendment Center at Vanderbilt University in Nashville and at the Newseum in Washington, D.C., replaced Roy Moore, dean of the college since 2008, who will remain with the college as a professor.

Haven takes new AP editor position

Baker promoted to chief of bureau

Paul Haven, who has covered Cuba since 2009 as The Associated Press bureau chief in Havana, has been named deputy Latin America and Caribbean editor for the news cooperative. Haven succeeds Trish Wilson, recently named International Investigations Editor based in Washington, D.C. (see Wilson’s appointment at bottom right).

Mark Baker, photographer and acting bureau chief for The Associated Press in Kuala Lumpur, has been promoted to chief of bureau for Malaysia and Singapore. The appointment was announced by Brian Carovillano, the AP’s AsiaPacific news director. Baker joined the AP in 2003 in Sydney as chief photographer responsible for photo coverage for Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific.

Butler named to AP post in Turkey Desmond Butler, an AP foreign affairs reporter based in Washington, has been named chief correspondent in Istanbul, Turkey, for The Associated Press. Prior to joining the AP, Butler was a Berlin-based reporter for The New York Times, investigating European cells of al-Qaida following the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

Scott takes promotion in Reno Kelly Ann Scott, a senior editor at the Reno Gazette-

Journal and a 14-year veteran of Gannett Co. Inc., has been named the newspaper's new executive editor, president and publisher John Maher announced. She succeeds Beryl Love, who left in May to become executive editor of the Gannett Global News Desk at the Virginia-based media company, which owns the Gazette-Journal. Maher announced the appointment as part of a reorganization of the RGJMedia information center’s management structure

MTSU announces Paulson appointment

Graham named editor in Memphis Louis Graham has been promoted to editor of The Commercial Appeal of Memphis, Tenn. Graham, 59, who was managing editor, replaces Chris Peck, who retired from the Memphis daily newspaper in March. He began his journalism career as a reporter at The Commercial Appeal in 1979.

Wilson takes on new role at AP Trish Wilson, deputy Latin America and Caribbean editor for The Associated Press, has been named to the new position of international investigations editor for the news cooperative. Wilson will work with reporters abroad and in Washington to develop in-depth and investigative projects to both break news and explain the world we live in. >> Continued on next page

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APME NEWS

editors in the news

>> Continued from previous page

McLaughlin new editor in Bowling Green Jan Larson McLaughlin, a reporter at the Sentinel-

Tribune in Bowling Green, Ohio, for 29 years, has been named the newspaper’s editor. McLaughlin's appointment follows the death of editor David C. Miller on May 18. Miller began his career at the Sentinel-Tribune in 1971.

Carroll accepts promotion in Denver Deputy editorial page editor Vincent Carroll was named editor of The Denver Post editorial page, where he will oversee print and online content for the daily opinion pages and the Sunday Perspective section. He will replace Curtis Hubbard, who announced he is leaving The Post to become a partner with OnSight Public Affairs.

Post names digital strategy editor The Washington Post has named a digital strategy editor as the newspaper's managing editor in charge of digital initiatives and multimedia operations. Emilio Garcia-Ruiz was named managing editor on Friday, May 24. He will work with Kevin Merida, the managing editor in charge of news and features coverage.

Bassing new M.E. in Greenville, Miss. Tom Bassing has been named managing editor of the Greenville, Miss., Delta Democrat Times. He most recently worked on the copy desk at the Birmingham News after a stint as a reporter with the Birmingham Business Journal.

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Lester joins AP in Springfield, Ill. Kerry Lester, an award-winning political reporter in Illinois, has been named Supervisory Correspondent for The Associated Press in Springfield, Ill. Lester, 30, joins the AP from the Daily Herald of Arlington Heights, Ill.

The New Mexican editor to retire The editor of The New Mexican, of Santa Fe, N.M., says he plans to retire after more than 21 years of guiding Santa Fe’s daily newspaper. The New Mexican reported that Rob Dean told the newsroom staff on May 8 that his last day on the job will be July 3. He says he intends to stay in Santa Fe but has no immediate career plans.

Johnston new M.E. at Opelika-Auburn The Opelika-Auburn (Ala.) News named Patrick Johnston as its new managing editor. Johnston previously worked as managing editor of the Eufaula Tribune.

Pohl new publisher in New Hampshire The Telegraph of Nashua, N.H., has a new publisher. Gregory J. Pohl, formerly a regional manager for Ogden Newspapers, succeeds Terrence Williams, who was pub-

lisher for 19 years. Pohl’s start comes with a formal change in ownership for The Telegraph. The Ogden Newspapers Inc., a family-owned company, acquired the paper from Independent Publications Inc., which owned The Telegraph since 1977. n


APME NEWS

briefs APME seeking McGruder nominations

The Associated Press Media Editors association is accepting nominations for 12th Annual Robert G. McGruder Awards for Diversity Leadership. Two awards are given annually: one for newspapers with a circulation up to 75,000; one for newspapers with more than 75,000 circulation. The awards go to individuals, news organizations or related journalistic organizations or teams of journalists who embody the spirit of Robert G. McGruder, a former executive editor of the Detroit Free Press, former managing editor of The Plain Dealer in Cleveland, graduate of Kent State University and relentless diversity champion. McGruder died of cancer in April 2002. This year, the awards are being sponsored by the Free Press, The Plain Dealer, Kent State University and the Chips Quinn Scholars program of the Newseum Institute. Jurors will be looking for nominees who have made a significant contribution during a given year or over a number of years toward furthering diversity in news content and in recruiting, developing and retaining a diverse workforce. Announcement of the winners will be made at the annual APME conference Oct. 28-30 in Indianapolis. The recognized honorees each receive $2,500 and a leadership trophy. n Deadline: Material must be received by close of business Monday, Aug. 5, 2013. Send material to: Sally Jacobsen (email: SJacobsen@ap.org) The Associated Press 450 West 33rd St. New York, NY 10001

Become a lifetime member of APME For the first time and in recognition of its 80th anniversary in 2013, APME is offering lifetime memberships for a limited time. You can join this elite group of news industry leaders for just $800 - already, seven members have made this commitment to APME. Renew your membership for a year or a lifetime by going to www.apme.com.

NewsTrain ambassador campaign seeks alumni and supporters Ten years ago, APME introduced NewsTrain to provide top-level, on-site training at a low cost for journalists. So much has changed in our business over the last decade, but NewsTrain has maintained its mission and has become even stronger. Directed by industry-leading trainer Michael Roberts, who previously served as deputy managing editor for staff development at The Arizona Republic, the program attracts top trainers and each year reaches hundreds of print, online and broadcast journalists, as well as college students and educators. Last year, the three NewsTrain sites – Phoenix, Miami and Toronto – exceeded 100 participants each. This year, workshops are planned for Springfield, Ill.; New York City; Colorado Springs; and Seattle. NewsTrain remains affordable at only $75 for up to two days of training, but it’s driven by donations from The Associated Press, other media companies, foundations and individuals. For NewsTrain's 10th year, the Associated Press Media Editors is reaching out to journalists in the United States and Canada who have attended a NewsTrain workshop, or who have sent staffers who have benefited. This is the year to give back to NewsTrain, and we hope that you'll help in the 2013 NewsTrain Ambassador Campaign. Make a donation of $100 or more and become a NewsTrain Ambassador. You'll be recognized online and in the APME News magazine, as well as the national conference Oct. 28-30 in Indianapolis. If you can't give that level, consider a gift of $10 or more in this 10th anniversary year. All donations are appreciated. APME is a nonprofit, so gifts are taxdeductible. Please make your check out to the Associated Press Media Editors and mark it for NewsTrain. Send it to: APME/NewsTrain, c/o Sally Jacobsen, Associated Press, 450 W. 33rd St. New York, NY 10001. You can also donate online at http://www.apme.com/donations/fund.asp?id=7259. We need NewsTrain to continue making stops in the U.S. and Canada for years to come. Please help us do that. n

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NewsTrain schedules autumn stops in Colorado Springs, Seattle Colorado Springs y Sept. 27-28

Seattle y Oct. 3-4

NewsTrain will be in Colorado Springs, Colo., for a twoday workshop. NewsTrain is sponsored by APME and this workshop is hosted by the Colorado Press Association and the Colorado Springs Gazette. Other members of the planning committee include the Greeley Tribune, the Grand Junction Sentinel, Fort Collins Coloradoan, Evergreen Newspapers, The Associated Press Denver Bureau, the University of Colorado, Colorado State University, Society of Professional Journalists, the Steamboat Pilot & Today (Steamboat Springs), and Adams State College.

NewsTrain will be in Seattle, Wash., for a two-day workshop at the Seattle Public Library. NewsTrain is sponsored by APME and this workshop is hosted by the Seattle Times, Spokane Spokesman-Review, Tacoma News Tribune, Puget Sound Business Journal, KUOW public radio, The Seattle Globalist, EO Media Group, Crosscut.com, The Associated Press,University of Washington and Washington State University journalism programs.

n Location: University of Colorado-Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, Colo. n Registration: Cost is $75 for the workshop and food service. Register at www.apme.com n Questions: Contact Michael Roberts, NewsTrain Project Director, mroberts.newstrain@gmail.com. Samantha Johnston, Colorado Press Association, sjohnston@colopress.net.

WORKSHOP AGENDA n Reporting with Data: A primer in how to start working with data and databases as a regular part of good beat work and as a source of strong watchdog / enterprise packages. n Diving Deeper with Data: How (and where) to assemble bodies of the latest data on a community, a topic, or an issue. n Five Stages of a Story: A five-step process for developing and delivering high quality stories. n How to Shoot Video: A how-to session on skills and techniques for capturing “usable” video footage, primarily with a focus on short news / feature video that is posted quickly. n Video Storytelling Skills: Video can be used to tell a variety of stories, short or long, on your web site. This session explains the choices and skills, including the concepts of “lo-fi” and “hi-fi” video and how both fill needs on newspaper websites on over smartphone apps. n Social Media Best Practices 2.0: This session offers tactics and tips to improve your comfort on social media, establish your brand, encourage audience engagement, and measure how well your social media efforts are working over time. n Social Media as Reporting Tool: How reporters and editors can use social media as a reporting tool when faced with breaking news or enterprise projects. n Colorado FOI Update: An overview on the latest developments in Colorado FOI and sunshine laws, with advice on framing effective FOI letters and how to deal with events or confrontations that appear to violate Colorado FOI law.

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n Location: The Seattle Public Library, Central Branch, 1000 Fourth Avenue, Seattle, Wash. n Registration: Cost is $75 for the workshop and food service. Register at www.APME.com. n Questions: Contact Michael Roberts, NewsTrain Project Director, mroberts.newstrain@gmail.com or Jim Simon, Seattle Times, jsimon@seattletimes.com.

WORKSHOP AGENDA n Finding the Best Stories in Data: Given a fairly structured data set, how do journalists find "actionable intelligence” or the best storylines. n Mining for Data: Data and documents help reporters covering government, business, public safety or most any beat shift the balance of power. How? This session explains how to grow a data-and-document mindset, using the example of one specific town in Washington state. n Digital Storytelling: How to approach the development and presentation of breaking news and enterprise packages with both print and online platforms in mind. n Data Visualization: Many new tools have created a surge in data visualization, the presentation of data in visual and interactive forms online. n Planning & Coaching Content Across Platforms: How to frame clear standards and workflows for new digital media in a rapidly changing media environment. n Continuous Coverage: Once your set of online tools is in place, how to plan and manage continuous news coverage across digital and print platforms, and create content specifically for the web and print. n Social Media Reporting Tools: Social media platforms contain powerful reporting tools that can be valuable when reporters are faced with big breaking news stories or enterprise projects. n Maximize Your Social Media: So you're a journalist on social media, but not so sure you're taking the right approach? n Smartphones for Journalists: A guide to the best apps, web sites, and other tools for reporters working in the field.


APME NEWS

AP Stylebook Moment Publication marks 60 years with dozens of updates, revisions

T

he AP Stylebook is marking its 60th anniversary with the 2013 print edition, which includes more than 90 new or updated entries and broadens the guidelines on social media. At about 500 pages, the AP Stylebook is widely used in newsrooms, classrooms and corporate offices worldwide. More than a dozen of the new entries are in the sections on food (such as Benedictine and Grand Marnier, madeleine and upside-down cake) and fashion (chichi and froufrou). The numerals entries have been updated and consolidated for easier understanding and searching. The four-page section adopts numerals as the preferred usage for all distances and dimensions and provides, alphabetically by topic, almost 200 examples of when to use figures and when to spell them out. The new entry on mental illness gives guidelines on when references are relevant, particularly in stories involving violent crime, and how they should be reported. The entry on illegal immigration, widely reported when it was announced in April, prohibits use of the term illegal immigrant, except in direct quotations essential to a story. Use of the word illegal is limited to an action, not a person. The section on social media has been expanded with additional terms and definitions, including circles, flash mob and Google Hangout. Also broadened is information on how to secure, authenticate, attribute and reference user-generated content for text, photo captions and video scripts. The weapons section spells out differences between assault rifle and assault weapon, magazine and clip, and pistol and revolver, and adds entries on bolt-action and lever-action rifles. Among other new and revised entries are: Advent, Alaska Native, Asperger’s syndrome, athletic trainers in Sports Guidelines, disabled/handicapped, doughnut, dumpster, ethnic cleansing, homicide/murder/manslaughter, moped, populist, rack/wrack, red carpet, swag, underway, wacky and wildfires. The 2013 edition consolidates a number of changes made since the 2012 volume was published. Stylebook Online is updated throughout the year, as AP editors make additions or changes.

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New this year is a package of AP style quizzes compiled by David Minthorn, one of the editors of the AP Stylebook. The quizzes feature automated scoring and information on the relevant style rules. AP Style Quizzes will sell for $6.95 for one year of access, or $3.95 when purchased with any other Stylebook product on apstylebook.com. Also new are two special offers for book customers: When you buy the 2013 Stylebook, you can get Stylebook Online at half price; and when you sign up for automatic delivery of the new book each spring, you save 20 percent off the list price. The subscription-based Stylebook Online includes all Stylebook listings, plus an Ask the Editor feature with more than twice as many entries as the Stylebook itself, a pronunciation guide with phonetic spellings and audio pronouncers, and topical style guides about news events such as the papal succession and U.S. elections. Users can add their own entries, make notes and get notifications throughout the year when AP’s editors add or update listings. Stylebook Online’s website uses responsive design to automatically adapt to the user’s computer, tablet or smartphone screen size. Stylebook Mobile contains all the content from the spiral-bound Stylebook, with the ability to search, add personalized listings or notes and mark your favorite listings for easy reference. The universal iOS app is optimized for iPhone and iPad. The 2013 Stylebook Mobile app was scheduled for release shortly after the book, in mid June. The new print edition and online subscriptions can be ordered online. Stylebook Mobile is sold via iTunes. The new spiral-bound Stylebook costs $16.75 for member news organizations and college bookstores and $20.95 retail. Stylebook Online prices are $26 for individual subscribers for one year and $16 for news organizations that are AP members. Prices for Stylebook Online site licenses are based on the number of users. None of the Stylebook product prices have increased this year. AP works with two technology companies to provide electronic checking of AP style, and both products are being updated to reflect the latest guidance in the 2013 edition. Tansa offers an AP Stylebook module for its proofing tools, which work with newsroom production systems. n


APME NEWS

2013

APME BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Officers

Directors

n President: Brad Dennison, GateHouse Media, Fairport, N.Y. n Vice President: Debra Adams Simmons, The Plain Dealer, Cleveland n Secretary: Teri Hayt, The (Canton, Ohio) Repository n Journalism Studies Chair: Alan D. Miller, The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch n Treasurer: Jan Touney, Quad City Times, Davenport, Iowa

(Terms expiring in 2013) n J.B. Bittner, Elk City (Okla.) Daily News n Jack Lail, Knoxville (Tenn.) News Sentinel n Jan Touney, Quad City Times, Davenport, Iowa

Executive Committee (officers above plus) n Past President: Bob Heisse, State Journal-Register, Springfield, Ill. n AP Senior Vice President/Executive Editor: Kathleen Carroll, New York n AP Vice President/Senior Managing Editor: Mike Oreskes, New York n Conference Program: Mark Baldwin, Rockford (Ill.) Register Star and Bill Church, Sarasota (Fla.) HeraldTribune

Our communications vehicles n apme.com Officers n http://www.facebook.com/APMEnews n https://twitter.com/APME n http://apmeblog.blogspot.com/ n http://www.facebook.com/NewsTrain n https://twitter.com/NewsTrain and, APME Update: n http://www.apme.com/?page=Newsletters

(Terms expiring in 2014) n Bill Church, Sarasota (Fla.) Herald-Tribune n Michael Days, Philadelphia Daily News n Alan English, The Log Cabin Democrat, Conway, Ark. n Kurt Franck, The Blade, Toledo, Ohio n Gary Graham, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash. n Joe Hight, The Oklahoman, Oklahoma City n Laura Kessel, The News-Herald, Whilloughby, Ohio n Eric Ludgood, WGCL/CBS, Atlanta News n Aminda Marques Gonzalez, Miami Herald n Martin G. Reynolds, The Oakland Tribune n Monica R. Richardson, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (Terms expiring in 2015) n Dennis Anderson, Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star n Mark Baldwin, Rockford (Ill.) Register Star n Chris Cobler, Victoria (Texas) Advocate n Angie Muhs, Portland (Maine) Press Herald n Laura Sellers-Earl, EO Media Group, Salem, Ore. n Jim Simon, The Seattle Times n Elbert Tucker, WBNS-10TV, Columbus, Ohio

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APME News: Summer 2013  
APME News: Summer 2013  

APME has prided itself on being a source of great ideas for our member newsrooms. We' ve devoted considerable space and attention in APME Ne...

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