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Dynamic duo Kentucky newspapers unite to open state childprotection records | PAGE 22 |


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APME NEWS

From the Editor

Andrew Oppmann

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've been editor of APME News for over four years. Even though that sentence is right, it feels so wrong. It’s the “over” thing. I was preparing my final AP style quizzes of the semester when the purveyors of the book eliminated the distinction between “over” and “more than” in such sentences. Countless nit-picking critiques were

swiftly rendered invalid by Sally Jacobsen and her colleagues who edit the AP Stylebook. Lucky for me that AP announced the change, along with others, in time for me to tell my students. Lucky for us the editors of the Stylebook talked with APME News about the reasons behind the changes. See the report starting on Page 5.

inside June 2014

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The President’s Corner: Bold and committed to journalistic excellence Ken Paulson: Protecting the free press rights of our youngest colleagues Re-styled Stylebook: A panel of editors reviews the 2014 AP Stylebook John E. McIntyre: New Stylebook stance: It will never be over June Casagrande: A word, please: Just get over the style change NewsTrain: Workshops vital to evolving newsrooms; may offer onling training Think Fast: ‘Fast-Forward’ is the theme for historic ASNE/APME convention How They Did It: Life in the Boom by the (Minneapolis) Star Tribune Great Ideas: APME features a collection of the industry’s best and brightest Twice is Nice: The Gazette pops Pulitzer champagne cork a second time Medal round: Winners of the 2014 Pulitzer Prizes for Journalism Dynamic Duo: Kentucky newspapers unite to open child-protection records Member Showcase: APME Photo of the Month winners Editors in the news: Promotions, appointments, awards and recognition AP Stylebook minute: 2013 edition alters longstanding White House entry 2014 APME Board of Directors

ABOUT THE COVER

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EDITOR

The (Colorado Springs) Gazette newsroom celebrated earning a Pulitzer Prize in April. The prize for National Reporting was given to David Philipps for expanding the examination of how wounded combat veterans are mistreated.

Andrew Oppmann

PHOTO: MARK REIS / THEGAZETTE

designmass@yahoo.com

Adjunct Professor of Journalism Middle Tennessee State University Andrew.Oppmann@mtsu.edu DESIGNER

Steve Massie

APME News is the quarterly magazine of the Associated Press Media Editors, a professional, nonprofit organization founded in 1933 in French Lick, Ind. Its members include senior editors and leaders from news operations in the United States and Canada that are affiliated with The Associated Press, including more than 1,400 newspapers and online sites and about 2,000 broadcast outlets. The group also includes college journalism educators and college student media editors. APME works with AP to support and recognize journalism excellence and the First Amendment. To learn more about APME’s programs and activities, visit apme.com.

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APME NEWS

The President’s Corner

Debra Adams Simmons

Bold, daring and committed to the pursuit of journalistic excellence

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ssociated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus told a group who gathered in 2005 to celebrate her receipt of the International Women’s Media Foundation Courage in Journalism Award of her commitment to cover the world through her photo lens, inspired by the bravery of those who are suffering to tell their stories. Niedringhaus died on April 4 when an Afghan policeman opened fire while she was sitting in a car with AP reporter Kathy Gannon. She serves as a reminder of the risks to journalists around the world and an icon of the rewards that courageous journalism yields. During a May trip to Germany, Niedringhaus’s presence was everywhere. As I visited Frankfurt and Berlin, Hamburg and Freiburg, news colleagues paid tribute to the native daughter who gave her life to reveal important truths about conflicts around the globe. As American journalists debated the merits of leadership at a premiere American newspaper, Germans and other journalists around the world were talking about the importance of press freedom. American journalists sometimes take for granted our free movement and access to information while many of our colleagues are dying for the same right. Niedringhaus had photographed the fall of the Berlin Wall as a college student. She said she saw great potential to help the world discover countries that had been blocked. She was drawn to conflict but often photographed, unapologetically, a different side: the women and children who shared in the suffering but often we’re overlooked. “I see humanity through my lens,” she told the New York gathering. “I’m not to here to tell you my difficulty covering conflict. I do my job simply to report people’s courage with my camera and with my heart. It is their courage under difficult circumstances that gives me the energy to work in this field.” Niedringhaus pointed out that what set her apart from

other Courage Award recipients that night was that she had chosen to cover conflict while others were forced to confront it. “My life outside of my work is a safe place that many never have a chance to experience.” Anja began her professional photojournalism career in 1990. On her first day in Sarajevo while covering conflict in the Balkans she was hit in her flak jacket. She stayed in the region for a decade. She was not deterred in 1997 when her foot was crushed and broken in three places by a police car while covering demonstrations in Belgrade. That year she became the European Pressphoto Agency’s chief photographer. One year later, she was blown out of a car by a grenade while caught in a crossfire. In 1999, she and colleagues were bombed mistakenly by NATO forces. Anja joined the Associated Press in 2002 and worked largely in the Middle East. She was embedded with the U.S. Marines during the offensive into Fallujah, photographed the bombing of Red Cross headquarters in Baghdad, unrest at Abu Ghraib prison and the 2005 Iraqi elections. She was he only woman of an 11-person AP photo team awarded the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news. To honor the courage and dedication of Niedringhaus, the International Women’s Media Foundation announced the Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award. Created with an initial $1million gift from the Howard Buffet Foundation, the award will be given annually to a woman photojournalist whose work follows in her footsteps. The Associated Press Media Editors joins with the AP and the IWMF in celebrating the courage and bravery of Anja Niedringhaus. A special tribute is planned at the 2014 APME conference Sept. 15-17 in Chicago and at the 2014 IWMF Courage Award ceremony on Oct. 22 in New York. n Adams Simmons is the editor of The Plain Dealer in Cleveland. She can be reached at DASimmons@plaind.com

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APME NEWS By Ken Paulson

Protecting the free press rights of our youngest colleagues

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hen people in power embrace racially insensitive language, there’s bound to be controversy – and sometimes a valuable lesson about the First Amendment. No, I’m not referring to Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling. The only lesson stemming from his self-destructive remarks is that multi-millionaire team owners can make their own rules – and enforce them. The First Amendment does not apply. It’s a far different story when a public school system uses its power to perpetuate the use of a word that many regard as racist – and order students to use it. That is exactly what is happening at Neshaminy High School in Pennsylvania, a school where sports teams are called the “Redskins”. The staff of the Playwickian, the school’s student newspaper, decided not to use the controversial team name in print. The administration responded with a new policy to require students to use “Redskins” in their coverage. According to the Student Press Law Center, the policy states that “Redskins” “ is not to be construed as a racial or ethnic slur.” How nice. Further, the word may not be edited out “where the word is used in a positive manner.” Presumably, racial epitaphs are protected as long as the context is gleeful. The policy also confidently asserts “nothing herein shall be construed to violate the constitutional or legal rights of any person, “ according to the SPLC. That doesn’t make it so. In 1969 in the Tinker case, the U.S. Supreme Court affirmed the free speech rights of students, with Justice Abe Fortas famously noting “it can hardly be argued that either students or teachers shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech or expression at the schoolhouse gate.” Free of the press for students took a giant step back in

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Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier in 1988 when which the U.S. Supreme Court held that public school administrators can censor “student speech that is inconsistent with it basic educational mission.” Of course that begs the question: Does the Neshaminy School District believe that respect for others, a commitment to racial equality and critical thinking skills are not part of their basic educational mission? These students are doing what all professional journalists do; making tough and independent editorial decisions despite pressure from government. The incident serves as a valuable reminder for America’s editors and managing editors that our role is to act as a watchdog whenever anyone’s constitutional rights are violated. Freedom of the press was incorporated into the Bill of Rights to serve as a check on government. We need to firmly support student journalists in our communities and send a clear signal that freedom of the press doesn’t come with an age requirement. We need to think of student journalists less as children and more as colleagues. The voices of news professionals can make a huge difference. Even the Neshaminy proposal is on hold while administrators try to navigate the journalistic backlash. The Neshaminy controversy illustrates another core principle for all of us: The freedom to publish also means the freedom not to publish. The decisions we make daily not to cover certain stories or to edit out content that violates our standards are at the very core of our mission. Our youngest journalists deserve no less. n Paulson is the dean of the College of Mass Communication at Middle Tennessee State University and president of the First Amendment Center in Nashville. He can be reached at ken.paulson@mtsu.edu


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Over, more than and other burning questions for AP Stylebook editors COPY TO COME askjgnsajlkgnlsgnsgnlsdgsss sjlgnslgnlskdgnlksdgnlksnglksnglksnglsknglskgnslks sljkgnslkdgnskldgnlskgnlsknglsnglksnglsknklssss sljkgnsldkgnslkdgnlksnglksnglsnglsnglksnglksg.

Q

OK, let’s start with the Burning Question: Over/more than. Were you surprised by the reaction to this change? The angst it prompted among purists? The sound of journalism professors tearing up final style exams? We view it as a long overdue amendment, bringing the AP Stylebook into sync with dictionaries, modern grammar and common usage. The Stylebook's references – Webster’s New World College Dictionary, The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language and Concise Oxford English Dictionary – include numerical uses of over, meaning more than, in their definitions of over. Webster’s New World : over (preposition) ... 14. more than, or above, in degree, amount, number, etc. (a moderate increase over his current salary, a gift costing over five dollars). American Heritage: over (preposition) 9. more than in degree, quantity or extent: over ten miles; over a thousand dollars. Concise Oxford: over (prep) 3. higher or more than (a specified number or quantity). Moreover, American Heritage’s usage note describes how the ban came about in U.S. journalism: “While working as a newspaper editor in the late 1800s, William Cullen Bryant forbade the use of ‘over’ in the sense of ‘more than,’ as in ‘These rocks are over 5 million years old.’ Bryant provided no rationale for this injunction, but such was his stature that the stipulation was championed by other American editors, who also felt no reason to offer an explanation ... In point of fact, ‘over’ has been used as a synonym of ‘more than’ since the 1300s. In our 2009 survey, 86 percent of the Usage Panel accepted ‘over’ with the meaning ‘more than.’ This usage is fully standard.” We’re not dictating that over must replace more than in

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all numerical contexts. Instead, over can be a good fit in some cases, more than in other phrasings. We let you, the reporter or editor, be the judge of which works best in a specific case.

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Walk us through the process of how the Stylebook gets changed. How does it begin and who makes the final decision? The dynamic growth of new terms and expressions relevant to journalism is such that AP Stylebook’s

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editors must work year-round to stay abreast of evolving language and usage. We develop ideas for adding words or refining definitions, influenced by proposals that flow in from the AP staff, members of the AP news cooperative, Stylebook subscribers, journalism teachers and students, public relations professionals and fans in social media. The Stylebook editors consider all proposals and reach a consensus – accept, reject or defer – in meetings from September through print deadline in March. In some cases we consult with AP news leadership and AP specialist reporters – such as for the 2013 entry on illegal immigration, which replaced illegal immigrant. For the 2014 decision to spell out U.S. state names with cities within AP stories, we consulted with a cross-section of member publications, stressing that the change would allow conformity in AP stories transmitted nationally and internationally. Some members decided to stick with AP’s state abbreviations; most said the change to full spellings wouldn't be a problem. Most Stylebook updates are incorporated immediately into AP Stylebook Online for AP staff and subscribers, and then added to the printed book published in late May. The Stylebook's goal remains constant: to make AP news written anywhere understandable everywhere.

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Spend a minute talking about how "selfie" got added. Self-portraits tagged “selfie” appeared on photo-sharing websites in 2004. Since then, the phenomenon has engulfed almost everyone with a smartphone – from celebrities, politicians and athletes to teenagers, parents and journalists. Selfies are ubiquitous in social media, and they often make headlines when famous names are pictured. Clearly this is a term that’s here to stay, and merits a Stylebook entry. Our challenge was the spelling – enclosed in quotation marks as an unusual new term, or without quotes as a well-understood term? We opted for the straight up spelling: selfie A self-portrait photo generally taken with a cameraequipped phone or webcam. A photo is most commonly called a selfie when shared over a social network.

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What would you consider the most significant change you've overseen with the Stylebook? It’s difficult to single out one change as the most significant because several got a lot of feedback – pro and con. In the 2010 Stylebook, website became one word, lowercase, reflecting popular usage. However, other terms using

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Web, shorthand for World Wide Web, remain unchanged with two words: e.g., Web page, Web feed. In 2011, email became one word for simplicity, an exception to other electronic terms spelled with hyphens: e.g., e-book and e-commerce. In 2012, the Stylebook amended a longtime entry to accept hopefully as a sentence adverb in line with dictionaries: Hopefully, we’ll be home before dark. In 2013, the Stylebook entry on illegal immigrant was replaced by illegal immigration: illegal refers only to an action, not a person. Also, the 2013 entry on mental illness, with guidelines on usage in stories on violent crime, was another significant update. The entry drew widespread praise from health care and mental health professionals. >> Continued on next page


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We’re regular journalists with a specialty that inevitably causes debates. From our own reporting and editing days, we’re acutely aware that Stylebook changes can complicate lives of newspeople and other Stylebook followers.

The Stylebook is on social media with #APStyleChat on Twitter and a Facebook page. How have those ongoing conversations shaped your thinking? What's it like now to have a conversation with your audience? We have a large, avid group of followers. The monthly APStyleChat on Twitter features AP specialist reporters in various fields – science, food, social media, sports, politics, etc. – assisted by AP Stylebook editors. We field questions from the public and tweet responses, resulting in dozens, sometimes hundreds, of retweets. The Stylebook’s Twitter account has more than 170,000 followers, over 20,000 likes on its Facebook page and about 7,000 members of our LinkedIn group. Another interactive account is Ask the Editor, in which David Minthorn answers writing and usage questions posed by online Stylebook subscribers – about 3,000 a year, or 19,000-plus since the site opened in 2006. All this shows that people are passionate about style and usage. We’re excited to have a voice in this never-ending conversation.

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How many changes are made to the Stylebook in a typical year? And what's the best way for users to keep abreast of what changes from year to year? How does the AP keep the AP current on AP style? The 2013 printed edition had more than 90 new and revised entries. The 2014 edition has more than 200

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new terms or revisions, including a new section on Religion Guidelines with more than 200 entries, the work of religion writer Rachel Zoll. Each printed edition has a separate page up front outlining the changes. Subscribers to AP Stylebook Online – including AP staffers – can receive email alerts when terms are added or revised. All recent additions and changes are summarized on the home page of Stylebook Online, as well. Major changes are preceded by several messages or memos to AP staff, AP members and Stylebook subscribers, such as the May 1 change to writing state names with cities in story texts, but retaining state abbreviations in datelines and some tight-space uses, such as photo captions.

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How does it feel being the editors of a book that thousands of professionals and students live and die by every day? Do you sense folks at AP and elsewhere pause for a second or two before sending a note to the editors of the Stylebook? We don't have the feeling that AP Stylebook users are shy about making suggestions or reacting to updates. Nor should anyone be reluctant to express an opinion. We don't work in an ivory tower. We’re regular journalists with a specialty that inevitably causes debates. From our own reporting and editing days, we’re acutely aware that Stylebook changes can complicate lives of newspeople and other Stylebook followers. Everyone be assured, we don't make changes lightly, but rather out of the necessity of keeping the Stylebook up-to-date and relevant. n

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It will never be over By John E. McIntyre The Baltimore Sun

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eary as you must be about the back-andforth about the Associated Press Stylebook's abandonment of the over/more than distinction, I have found what may be a locus classicus of bad argument in favor of the superstition. At Mahsable, Alex Hazlett and Megan Hess have published a point-counterpoint exchange on the subject, and I want to invite you to look at Ms. Hess's argument in some detail. I do so because her argument illustrates the defective way in which such issues are typically addressed. Thursday was an emotional day. It began with a gchat from a coworker — “whoa” — and a link to the Poynter post

relaying the news that the AP had removed its distinction between “more than” and "over.” Four words in, the first flag goes up. The AP Stylebook makes a minor change in one entry, one that the editors themselves present as being of small consequence, and it is an emotional issue? So we prepare ourselves for an argument marked by exaggeration, lack of proportion. ??Is nothing sacred? I fumed. My college journalism courses were filled with professors drilling the difference into our heads. Style determines what makes something further or farther, an implication or an inference. Without it, the world turns into a Lord of the Flies-esque dystopia. >> Continued on next page

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At the risk of sounding snobbish, the distinction is one And there it is. The AP Stylebook is not a sacred text. And that distinguishes clean, precise language and attention to if that one minor entry in the stylebook is abandoned, it detail — and serves as a hallmark of a proper journalism threatens a “Lord of the Flies-esque dystopia.” Even allowtraining. It denotes a common ground for people who care ing a degree of exaggeration for rhetorical effect, this is a bit about the rules; “more than” refers to numbers and quantimuch. ties, whereas “over” refers to conceptual amounts and spaSandwiched between the overstatements in this paratial relationships (like “over the finish line”). graph is the curious belief that anything a journalism So, if I disagree, I must number myself among the rabble teacher said that one still remembers must be eternally who do not care about the rules. Never mind that this disvalid. Those college journalism profestinction has a highly questionable claim sors must have been awesome, because to be a "rule" in the first place. the authorities on language who hold By the same token, can’t you argue that One pinpoint leak in the contrary views do not merit her atten“effect” versus “affect” was just an arbidike, and Holland is tion. trary letter choice? Over time, however, Anyone who gets a degree in the scithat difference has accrued meaning to gone. One brick from ences or technical fields expects that new the masses; we shouldn't disregard a the Great Wall of China, information will change what one was century of meaning without a second originally taught, especially as empirical thought. The same holds true for “more and it falls into rubble. evidence is developed. But, as we will see, than” versus “over.” One minor distinction empirical evidence cuts no ice with such The "accrued meaning to the masses" removed from the AP people on points of English usage. is the one mentioned in the previous AP editors said “overwhelming usage” comment: the accepted meaning in stanStylebook, and the of both terms prompted the change. By dard English for centuries. The century whole thing might as that reasoning, why not dump the entire and a half in which this imagined disAP Stylebook in the garbage? There are tinction has been taught in newsrooms well be abandoned, and plenty of style rules that get overlooked (I and journalism classrooms hasn't made we are all lost in that can’t count the number of times I've seen much of a dent with the masses. Neither Hobbesean Lord of the “which” instead of “that"), but that doesshould it. n't mean we should completely disregard But in this case, the update was not Flies-esque dystopia. them. made to keep up with cultural relevancy One pinpoint leak in the dike, and (like the AP's addition of YOLO or selfie, Holland is gone. One brick from the Great Wall of China, as mentioned above). and it falls into rubble. One minor distinction removed from Here we get the inevitable sneer, that the editors of the AP the AP Stylebook, and the whole thing might as well be Stylebook are yielding to slang, trying to be with it. (Have abandoned, and we are all lost in that Hobbesean Lord of you looked at the editors of the stylebook? It would be a the Flies-esque dystopia. struggle to find a group less with it.) Notice the sleight of hand by which “overwhelming It’s a change I just can’t get behind, and I'm not alone. usage,” the key empirical point, is shuffled into the deck, Grammar nerds agree. hidden by the dystopian cards. As many have pointed out, I put it to you that I am as nerdy a grammar nerd as you over in the sense of more than has been common usage in are apt to find in the wild or in captivity, and I emphatically English for centuries, and is recorded as such in major dicdo not agree. And I am in the company of fellow nerds — tionaries; the distinction in an invention of American newslexicographers, linguists, and, yes, newspaper copy editors paper editors, and exists mainly among journalists. — who do not agree. A common feature of these screeds is that the counterIf someone wants to make a case for the over/more than argument and empirical evidence are seldom or never distinction, an argument with less emotion and distortion directly addressed. would carry more weight. n >> Continued from previous page

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It has never been wrong to use “over” to mean “more than.” Instead, Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of English Usage explains, this idea “is a hoary old newspaper tradition.”

A WORD, PLEASE. Just get over the AP style change By June Casagrande JuneTCN@aol.com

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t was the tweet that launched a thousand copy editor groans: The Associated Press Stylebook's longtime snubbing of “over” is over. “New to the stylebook: Over, as well as more than, is acceptable to indicate greater numerical value,” the AP style authorities tweeted recently, revoking a rule that for decades had proved highly effective at enabling people who knew the rule to feel superior to people who didn’t. The uproar, in some circles at least, was ear-splitting. This is a horrible change because the result will be ... it will be ... Well, no one could finish that thought. But that didn’t humble the protesters into silence. n TOPICS n Firearms n The Associated Press They just reached for the reliable old “dumbing-down” argument instead: This rule change is yet another example of dummies dragging the language into the gutter, they argued. A once perfect, once irrefutable truth is true no more, thanks to all the horrible people in the world known as non-editors who just won't stop using the word “over” wrong. But are they wrong? Or can you use “over” to mean “more than?” Before we get to that, some background. The Associated Press Stylebook, which many news outlets use as an editing rule book, has long contained the instructions regarding the word “over,” saying that it “generally refers to spatial relationships. ‘The plane flew over the city.’ ‘More than’ is preferred with numerals. ‘Salaries went up more than $20 a week.’” In most cases, this works out great. Precise words and terms are better than less-precise ones. “Alcoholics” is a better word than “people” for talking about, you know, alcoholics. “Fully automatic machine gun” is better than “item” when talking about, you know, a fully automatic machine gun. And so on. If the word “over” can mean either physically above or greater in quantity, it's ambiguous in some cases. So why not use "more than" and eliminate all potential for confusion? I like that approach, and AP’s example drives it home: To suggest that salaries “went up over” something would be

downright disorienting. There’s no question that in AP’s example sentence and many others, “more than” is preferable to “over.” But in language, there’s a big difference between good advice and rules. The main difference is that rigid rules let pedantic editors play Where’s Waldo? with the word “over” when they should be paying attention to more important problems — like subject-verb agreement and whether the writer has done an adequate job of explaining things. Do the rules allow “over” to be used as a synonym for “more than?” Yup, Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, Webster’s New World and American Heritage agree. Are these dictionaries simply caving in to a dumbing down of the word? Nope. My 1933 Oxford Universal Dictionary says pretty much the same thing. As will just about any other authority you can find going all the way back to the 15th century. It has never been wrong to use “over” to mean “more than.” Instead, Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of English Usage explains, this idea “is a hoary old newspaper tradition.” In a long, unwieldy sentence, “over” can do the job better than “more than” or its cousins “older than,” “bigger than,” “taller than” and so on. A good editor can decide that for himself. That’s his job: to ensure that every word in a written work is well-chosen. So any editor who would prefer to robotically enforce rules rather than use his own judgment seems a little misguided to me. And those who think it’s terrible that AP changed its rule should just get over it. n June Casagrande is the author of “It Was the Best of Sentences, It Was the Worst of Sentences.” She can be reached at JuneTCN@aol.com. Reprinted with permission by The Daily Pilot, Costa Mesa, Calif.

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Austin: NewsTrain vital to evolving newsrooms; may offer online training By Linda Austin NewsTrain Project Director

“Fabulous! Loved it! Lots of good info I can use.” – Jessica Kerr, reporter, Delta Optimist “Great ideas and inspiration I plan to share with my newsroom.” – Greg Knill, editor, Chilliwack Progress AUSTIN “Awesome program! More than met expectations. Would highly recommend.” – Keri Sweet-man, arts & features editor, Edmonton Journal

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hose are just some of the comments from the 96 registrants for APME’s 73rd NewsTrain workshop in Vancouver in April. It was my first NewsTrain workshop as project director, and I came away even more impressed by the critical responsibility NewsTrain has to help you cope with the digital wave roiling newsrooms. NewsTrain’s four annual regional workshops are designed to help meet journalism’s changing demands by arming you with high-quality, low-cost training. As NewsTrain enters its second decade, I am very excited to be its fourth project director, and I owe a huge debt of gratitude to previous directors Lil Swanson, Elaine Kramer and Michael Roberts for the strong program that they’ve

crafted. NewsTrain is a natural fit for me; my commitment and passion for journalism training is longstanding. As executive editor of The News-Sentinel in Fort Wayne, Indiana, I set up a “guerrilla” training team, who organized 18 in-house training sessions and sent 38 staffers to outside training in its first year. Operating with a tiny budget, we took advantage of every free and low-cost opportunity available! In addition to serving as the managing editor of the Greensboro News & Record in North Carolina and editor of the Lexington Herald-Leader in Kentucky, I spent the past five years as executive director of the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism. Based at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, I organized more than 150 sessions – online and around the country – that trained more than 10,500 journalists. As an APME member and NewsTrain attendee, I know how vital its training is. So, I’m thrilled to be working with host committees in Austin, Las Vegas and Columbus, Ohio, to plan workshops this fall to meet their needs. Please stay tuned to APME.com, as well as our Facebook.com/ NewsTrain and Twitter (@NewsTrain) accounts, for news on >> Continued on next page

Laura Sellers-Earl, APME board member (center), works on a NewsTrain exercise with Jeff Nagel, regional reporter for Black Press, and Jenny Lee, business reporter at The Vancouver Sun. Sellers-Earl, managing editor of The Daily Astorian in Oregon, and the others attended the Vancouver workshop, held April 25-26. PHOTO/LINDA AUSTIN

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Outgoing Project Director Michael Roberts (standing) engages with attendees at the Vancouver NewsTrain.

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dates and speakers. I’ve also been asked by the APME leadership to look into offering NewsTrain training online. While at Arizona State, I completed my master’s degree in educational technology, focusing on instructional design for online courses. I’d welcome your ideas on what topics we might want to address via either live webinar or asynchronous online courses. I can be reached at laustin.newstrain@gmail.com or @LindaAustin_. We’d also welcome your financial support. NewsTrain’s low tuition – $75 – is made possible by donors, big and small, who this year included the Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation, the Gannett Foundation, The Associated Press, the APME Foundation, Scripps Howard Foundation, GateHouse Media Inc., The McClatchy Co. and The Seattle Times, as well as APME past and present board members. To help keep NewsTrain training coming to your community, please donate at the big red buttons on APME.com. In addition, I hope to see your applications later this year to host a NewsTrain workshop in your town in 2015. More information is at http://www.apme.com/?page= HostaNewsTrain.

PHOTOS/LINDA AUSTIN

City Editor Mark Iype (left) discusses a question with Arts & Features Editor Keri Sweetman, both of the Edmonton Journal, at the Vancouver NewsTrain.

Thanks for the opportunity to serve you as project director for NewsTrain, and I hope to see you at an upcoming training! n Linda Austin is the project director for NewsTrain. Contact her at laustin.newstrain@gmail.com or @LindaAustin_.

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‘Fast-Forward’ is the theme for historic September ASNE/APME convention in Chicago

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ou know the fast-forward button, the double-triangle icon on your remote that immediately says click once and get to the good part. Click it again. “Fast Forward” also is the theme for the first ASNE-APME-APPM joint conference. Instead of dwelling on the past, the conference program sprints ahead to show you how journalism’s future is happening now. Join a talented lineup of industry leaders for the Sept. 1517 conference at the Hyatt Regency in downtown Chicago. The historic three-day gathering of top editors promises takeaways that you’ll want to bring back to the newsroom. Plus, we promise fun. The conference offers many of the amenities of past APME events along with new programs that appeal to leaders of all news organizations. Conference planners are still lining up key speakers, but expect three busy, worthwhile days: n The conference opens Monday, Sept. 15, with presentations and panels focused on leadership. The “What’s New/What’s Next” presentation features Tom Rosentiel, executive director of the American Press Institute, and Amy Webb, CEO of Webbmedia Group, in what should be a dynamic discussion of digital trends.

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n The first day also features ever-popular Jill Geisler and Butch Ward of The Poynter Institute with a leadership chat focused on the challenges facing editors. n Toolkit Tuesday on Sept. 16 starts with finalists for APME Innovator of the Year making their pitch. The general sessions Tuesday morning are part of the conference’s innovation/creativity block and feature prominent digital news leaders. n After the ASNE/APME Awards lunch on Tuesday, conference attendees will have a choice of four sessions focused on engaging and growing audiences. Topics include interactive story telling, mobile-first strategies, winning partnerships, and engaging diverse audiences and communities. n On Wednesday, expect a variety of sessions focused on journalistic values and courage. The opening reception/auction. will take place at the Tribune Tower on Monday. Bring your thirst (and wallet) to help a great cause. On Tuesday, you can fast forward to fun by cruising the Chicago River or catching the Cincinnati Reds vs. Chicago Cubs at historic Wrigley Field. Go to www.APME.com for the latest details on the conference. n


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STAR TRIBUNE/JIM GEHRZ

HOW THEY DID IT

LIFE IN THE BOOM STAR TRIBUNE By Autumn Phillips Twin Falls Times-News

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he oil boom happening in North Dakota was a 10 hour drive away, but the editors at the (Minneapolis) Star Tribune saw it as a local story. Thousands of workers from Minnesota travel to the oil fields of North Dakota, leaving behind home and family. North Dakota now produces more than 911,000 barrels a day. The state’s populations was shrinking for decades. Suddenly, it’s growing faster than any other state. The idea for an in-depth reporting project on the oil boom and the modern migration it sparked came from editors Nancy Barnes (now editor of the Houston Chronicle)

Floor hand Ray Gerrish worked to make repairs on a drilling rig as the sun rose over the site outside Watford City, N.D. The night sky is light up by the bright, orange glow of flares burning off natural gas.

and Rene Sanchez. Initially, the editors offered to send photographer Jim Gehrz and reporter Curt Brown to North Dakota for a month. After discussion, Brown and Gehrz decided to visit North Dakota four times, for a week each time. “We drove, 10 hours each way. Driving allowed me to bring all my equipment and doing it a week at a time let us show a progression of time,” Gehrz said. The Star Tribune published their report in six installments during the fall of 2013. The project, “Life in the Boom” won the Community Service Photojournalism Award from the American Society of News Editors (ASNE) and Cliff Edom’s “New America Award” from National Press Photographers >> Continued on next page

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Association (NPPA). “I’m a city guy from St. Paul,” Gehrz said. “North Dakota was visually explosive for me. Everything was new.” Gehrz used the word “overwhelming” several times to describe the oil boom in Bakken, STAR TRIBUNE/JIM GEHRZ N.D. “It’s certainly crowded. The traffic was alarming. Large trucks Traffic related to servicing the oil boom has increased dramatically, taxing roads that were not designed to carry such a heavy load. These trucks were lined up along a road near Watford City. traveling on two-lane roads, While many have migrated to the Bakken oil fields in search of fortune and adventure, others everyone doing 65 miles an hour. have chosen to leave the region as traffic and change in the landscape have taken their toll. “It’s taming down a little. the end of the project and still hadn’t been on an oil rig. Initially, the oil companies moved in fast and municipalities “It got to the point where we had all this anecdotal, had to figure it out with ordinances and housing had to peripheral stuff, but we were worried that we had this huge catch up.” hole in our story,” he said. Gehrz and Brown had to learn the landscape and the Larger companies denied their requests to photograph in industry as they reported. the field, but on their fourth trip they were invited on a rig “As you’re interviewing people, you’re looking for stories by a small local company. They arrived at sun up. and learning the fabric of the thing, but you also need to “It was intimidating,” he said. “It’s a dance for them. They educate yourself to understand what you’re looking at. all know their place. It’s slippery. It’s loud. You’ve really got “We went to a museum and looked at replicas of equipto pay attention. They’re athletic. They know where to be. ment. That helped.” They read each other and you just have to stay out of their The other hard part to doing a remote project, Gehrz said, way as an observer.” was gaining trust and getting access. They were almost to Staying organized is the key to success in a project of this scale, Gehrz said. By the end, he had 27,000 files – photo, audio and video. He edited at night in the hotel, creating files organized by day and then by subject. He moved copies into the folders and kept the originals, deleting nothing. He traveled with several hard drives. Gehrz stood on the rig with several camera bodies, lenses and audio equipment hanging from his neck and shoulders. “I had a sore back after that,” he said. “It hurts. I tried to cut back, but each of those situations, it’s a once in a lifetime shot.” n

STAR TRIBUNE/JIM GEHRZ

Sonya Adams enjoyed an evening out at a Williston tavern between work shifts. Adams, 40, left a divorce and 9-year-old son back in southern Idaho to drive an asphalt truck in the Bakken.

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Autumn Phillips is the editor of the Twin Falls (Idaho) Times-News. She can be reached at aphillips@magicvalley.com


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2013 APME INDIANAPOLIS CONFERENCE

great ideas

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ave you launched a great new feature, page or web project, or used a social media tool in a great new way? Well, we want to recognize your great idea. Associated Press Media Editors recognizes a Great Idea every month on APME.com and we showcased monthly winners in our popular annual Great Ideas book, which was released at

our conference last October. This is a chance for your newspaper to show off great work and to help fellow editors by providing ideas that might work in their markets. It’s simple to submit your Great Idea. Just go to the Great Ideas page at APME.com, fill out the online form and attach an image or submit a link.

PERSONAL JOURNEYS The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Atlanta Ken Foskett WHAT THEY DID: Personal Journeys is a weekly narrative in Sunday Living & Arts. It features a compelling narrative arc, strong writing and arresting photography. The pieces look and feel like a magazine article, with large cover presence spilling to one to three inside pages. Readers LOVE this feature! It’s resulted in new subscriptions, renewed subscriptions and great community buzz. Staff love the opportunity to stretch writing and reporting skills, and write deeply about a subject. Most exciting addition to the AJC in years.

SUMMER FUN GUIDE The Gazette, Colorado Springs, Colo. Nathan Van Dyne WHAT THEY DID: The newsroom’s idea of creating a special guide with recommendations from its columnists, staff members and readers had success not only as a great read but in advertising sponsorship. The first year of the section was a tremendous success financially. Now we’re planning a Winter Fun Guide for November.

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GREAT IDEAS

NOSTALGIC RESTAURANTS

100 AGES: A CENTURY OF VOICES Columbia Missourian, Columbia, Mo. Brian Kratzer WHAT THEY DID: Photograph 100 Boone County residents, each person representing a different age. Let them tell their stories through studio video. The result? A century of voices. Each offered a glimpse of the past, present and future of our community. It’s a capsule of our time and place: The 14-year-old who talks about life as a “glass child” as sister to an autistic child; the 77-yearold who remembers the day presidential candidates Dwight D. Eisenhower and Adlai Stevenson visited her father’s farm. A special splash page online was created with all 100 faces linked to the videos. Portraits ran in a double truck in print and a separate section in the tablet edition was created.

SUMMER DARES The Kansas City Star, Kansas City, Mo. Sharon Hoffman WHAT THEY DID: Our department was asked to create a one-time-only special section with an upcharge, something with a summer theme but not the usual events guide. We asked every staffer to write about Summer Dares, ways to step out of their comfort zone and help readers break out of their summertime rut. Inspiration for our readers and fun for the staff.

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The Baltimore Sun, Baltimore Anne Talbot WHAT THEY DID: Baltimoreans love nostalgia, and for some time The Sun has maintained a gallery of dearly departed restaurants. The reopening of a restaurant at one of these sites prompted lots of coverage – including a more nuanced rumination from our dining critic on the city’s most beloved restaurants of the past, and what’s become of them today.


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APME NEWS By Joe Hight

HOW THEY DID IT

Editor, The Gazette, Colorado Springs, Colo.

Twice is nice: The Gazette pops champagne cork a second time

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efore The Gazette could move from its 55-yearold building to downtown Colorado Springs in late December, Connie Steele had to complete a task, one of utmost importance to the newsroom: The ceiling tile slightly damaged when a champagne cork dented it more than two decades ago had to be removed and taken with us. The tarnished metal plaque on it read simply: CHAMPAGNE CORK MEMORIAL. PULITZER PRIZE CELEBRATION. APRIL 12, 1990. A flying champagne cork was illustrated on it. The Pulitzer for Feature Writing seemed so long ago, and, for a newsroom now the size of The Gazette, it seemed like an once-in-a-lifetime occurrence. I hoped when I arrived a year earlier that wouldn't be the case, even as I was told the story about the plaque over and over again. As we cleared out the building, newsroom administrator Connie had secured the ceiling tile, along with other

mementos of more than a half-century of newsroom collections that could be squeezed into the much nicer, but smaller facility. Connie would sometimes let out a loud sigh when I brought something else into her office. The move culminated a tumultuous year for The Gazette. After an ownership change in late 2012, we immediately implemented a series of major changes: more than 30 pages added to The Gazette each week; reorganization of the newsroom; and redesigns of both The Gazette and Gazette.com. All coming within weeks and months of each other, so quick decisions had to be made and then implemented. Through all of the changes, investigative reporter Dave Philipps pushed a project that demanded our attention and, most importantly, a focus. He had found that the Army was kicking out soldiers who had served multiple deployments overseas but had returned home with traumatic brain >> Continued on next page

THE GAZETTE/MARK REIS

The Gazette newsroom celebrated it's second-ever Pulitzer Prize in April. The prize for National Reporting was awarded to David Philipps of the Gazette for expanding the examination of how wounded combat veterans are mistreated, focusing on loss of benefits for life after discharge by the Army for minor offenses.

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injuries and post-traumatic stress disorder. These soldiers had been getting into trouble: some with minor and others with major infractions, but all had been kicked out without benefits and left without support when they needed it the most. Dave had returned to The Gazette just before I became editor in December 2012; already a Pulitzer finalist and Livingston THE GAZETTE/MARK REIS winner, Dave has the skills, drive and passion to turn any complex situation into a compelling story. And this one was certainly complex. We also had an outstanding editor working with Dave whom I had also promoted. Managing Editor Joanna Bean was left in charge of Dave’s work so we could continue the focus on the soldiers and the story about them, and she became a vital link in not only the editing but the coordination of the overall project. He had also attached himself to a talented intern, Michael Ciaglo, who spent countless hours with the soldiers taking photos and shooting video. They seemed almost inseparable at times. I later successfully pushed for Michael to become a full-time photographer/videographer for The Gazette. However, The Gazette needed more of a team to bring together the story, photos, video, interactive graphics and key documents for its print and online platforms, not only for this story but for all of our work. I named Dena Rosen-berry Presentation director and promoted Josh Swearngin to news editor. Tulsa World Web Editor Jason Collington had told me about a web editor who had moved to Colorado Springs but was still consulting with the World on its website redesign. So I connected with Chris Hickerson, and we eventually hired him as a newsroom web developer. Stephanie

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Colorado Springs Gazette managing editor Joanna Bean, is hugged by local editor Barry Noreen after receiving the news that reporter David Philipps had won a Pulitzer Prize. Bean was Philipps’ editor on the project.

Swearngin, a former Page 1 designer for the St. Petersburg, Fla., Times (now the Tampa Bay Times), had indicated that she might want to return. We hired her along with other talented designers. These moves complemented the already talented journalists in The Gazette’s newsroom. By the time we had completed the personnel moves, Dave had found three soldiers to focus a series about the issues faced by them at a time when the Army was going through a historic period and pressure to downsize their ranks. With now all the parts in place, we decided to name the series “Other Than Honorable.” Chris started working with Dave, Joanna and Online Director Jerry Herman on a web design and social media strategy. Stephanie worked with Dena and Josh on the print package. Photo/Video Director Mark Reis and Senior Military Editor Tom Roeder provided expertise. We seemed to have everything in place for an outstanding investigative project, a special one that would make a difference. >> Continued on next page


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As we neared closer to publication, I and others in the newsroom started to receive complaints and concerns about what Dave was finding. These concerns seemed to indicate certain people knew details that only newsroom staff members should know. I ordered the series pulled offline just to make sure. We had to protect the series and our focus. Then, even nearer to publication, we pushed Dave to turn this into a national story, and he found compelling statistics showing a nationwide trend on the increasing numbers of less than honorable discharges without benefits. As work continued on the series and its many implications, we maintained the focus: the stories about those wounded soldiers. Statistics and those noble individuals and groups defending them backed up the premise; the soldiers themselves made people care. We constantly talked about them as if they were there with us in the newsroom. Today, The Gazette holds the 2014 Pulitzer Prize in National Reporting - the smallest news organization to win one this year - because of an impassioned reporter and a dedicated team of staff members who knew how to photograph, videotape, edit, design and fight for a story that deserves this country's attention. Dave's first story after the Pulitzer announcement was on what was being done for

Reporter David Philipps, left, pops the cork during a Pulitzer Prize celebration in the Gazette newsroom.

these soldiers, showing again our focus was always on them. As we celebrated the night of the Pulitzer announcement, Dave shook a champagne bottle over and over as he prepared to pop it. A tradition had to be fulfilled, one of utmost importance to the newsroom. The cork flew into the ceiling, and we all stared and swore that a new dent had been created. A new plaque will be ordered, and journalists of the future will tell the story of how it came to be. However, the celebration can't be fulfilled entirely until the coveted journalistic prize awarded to ”Other Than Honorable” propels more of a national focus that goes well beyond a news organization. The focus must continue to be on the soldiers. n Joe Hight is the editor of The Gazette of Colorado Springs, Colo. He can be reached at joehight@gazette.com

Winners of the 2014 Pulitzer Prizes for Journalism By The Associated Press

> PUBLIC SERVICE The Guardian US and The Washington Post Four reporters for the two publications won for revealing massive U.S. government surveillance based on thousands of documents from Edward Snowden and first published last June. The winning entries about the NSA’s spy programs revealed that the government has collected information about millions of Americans' phone calls and emails based on its classified interpretation of laws passed after the Sept. 11 attacks. Revealing the documents “created one of the most significant debates of this century,” Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger said. “It’s the job of a journalist to create and stimulate a debate, and we feel this is a public service,” he added. “It would be difficult to deny that a rich and passionate debate has been stimulated by the coverage of what Snowden revealed.”

> BREAKING NEWS REPORTING The Boston Globe staff The paper was lauded for its “exhaustive and empathetic coverage of the Boston Marathon bombings and the ensuing manhunt that enveloped the city, using photography and a range of digital tools to capture the full impact of the >> Continued on next page

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“It’s the job of a journalist to create and stimulate a debate, and we feel this is a public service.” Alan Rusbridger, Guardian editor

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tragedy." After the paper’s win was announced, editor Brian McGrory asked the staff to observe a moment of “quiet reflection and remembrance” for those affected by the bombing.

> INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING Chris Hamby of The Center for Public Integrity, Washington, D.C. Hamby’s reports showed “how some lawyers and doctors rigged a system to deny benefits to coal miners stricken with black lung disease, resulting in remedial legislative efforts,” the Pulitzer judges wrote.

> EXPLANATORY REPORTING Eli Saslow of The Washington Post Saslow was honored for “his unsettling and nuanced reporting on the prevalence of food stamps in post-recession America, forcing readers to grapple with issues of poverty and dependency.”

The Gazette series found that more than 13,000 veterans have been discharged since 2006 under a provision that allows for resignation in lieu of prosecution. “I hope that the new exposure causes Congress to take another look at this issue,” Philipps said.

> INTERNATIONAL REPORTING Jason Szep and Andrew R.C. Marshall of Reuters The pair’s “courageous reports” shed light on "the violent persecution of the Rohingya, a Muslim minority in Myanmar that, in efforts to flee the country, often falls victim to predatory human-trafficking networks.” “For two years, Reuters reporters have tirelessly investigated terrible human-rights abuses in a forgotten corner of the Muslim world, bringing the international dimensions of the oppressed Rohingya of Myanmar to global attention,” Editor-in-Chief Stephen J. Adler said in a statement. “We are immensely proud that this high-impact series was selected as Reuters’ first-ever Pulitzer Prize win for text reporting.”

> FEATURE WRITING (No award)

> LOCAL REPORTING

> COMMENTARY

Will Hobson and Michael LaForgia of the Tampa Bay Times, Florida. Hobson and LaForgia discovered that county officials were paying millions of dollars to slumlords to house the homeless. In one case, the reporters revealed the county sent sick and dying homeless to an assisted living facility so dangerous the state had taken its license. SAFFRON “These reporters faced long odds. They had to visit dicey neighborhoods late at night, they had to encourage county officials to be courageous and come forth with records and in the end what they were ultimately doing was standing up for people who had no champion and no advocate,” said Neil Brown, the Tampa Bay Times' editor and vice president. "These were people who trusted the county to help them in the worst of circumstances but instead the county was letting them down."

Stephen Henderson of the Detroit Free Press His columns on his hometown's financial crisis were “written with passion and a stirring sense of place, sparing no one in their critique,” the prize panel noted.

> CRITICISM Inga Saffron of The Philadelphia Inquirer Saffron's criticism of architecture “blends expertise, civic passion and sheer readability.” “Every one of these faceless garage doors is like a dagger in the body of the city,” she wrote in May. “It’s nice to be honored by your colleagues, but you still have to go out and make the case for good planning and good urbanism,” she said, expressing shock and gratitude. “There are still a lot of big battles to be fought in this city.”

> EDITORIAL WRITING

> REPORTING David Philipps of The Gazette, Colorado Springs, Colo. Philipps' investigation found that the U.S. Army has discharged escalating numbers of traumatized combat veterans who commit crimes at home — and in ways that make them ineligible for Veterans Administration benefits that include treatment for combat-related psychiatric disorders.

The Editorial Staff of The Oregonian, Portland The paper was cited for “lucid editorials that explain the urgent but complex issue of rising pension costs.” "The editorials were very straightforward, informative, enlightening and pointed at times, as editorials should be," Oregonian Media Group president N. Christian Anderson III. >> Continued on next page

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> EDITORIAL CARTOONING Kevin Siers of The Charlotte Observer, North Carolina In an August cartoon, Siers depicts “Tonight Show” host Jay Leno urging President Barack Obama to “say something hilarious!” The president replies, “We don't have a domestic spying program!”

> BREAKING NEWS PHOTOGRAPHY Tyler Hicks of The New York Times He was cited for “skill and bravery” while photographing the dayslong, deadly Kenya mall attack: a woman sheltering children, a plainclothes officer pointing a gun on an escalator and a victim on a blood-soaked floor next to a gun-toting man in camouflage.

“He manages to make amazing, penetrating images that are also historical and aesthetically amazing, while under fire,” said Michele McNally, the assistant managing editor for photography at the Times.

> FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHY Josh Haner of The New York Times Haner documented a Boston bombing victim’s struggles and progress: painful treatments and rehabilitation; touching moments — sharing a joke with his girlfriend from his hospital bed and a reassuring embrace from his mother; a close-up of him touching his amputated leg. Haner is “tireless. He's committed. And he has a wonderful personality. If anyone could get someone to open up to them over a period of time, he can,” McNally said. n

2014 Pulitzer Prize Finalists > PUBLIC SERVICE

> FEATURE WRITING

n Newsday, Long Island, N.Y.

n Scott Farwell of The Dallas Morning News n Christopher Goffard of the Los Angeles Times n Mark Johnson of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

> BREAKING NEWS REPORTING Breaking News Reporting n The Arizona Republic Staff n The Washington Post Staff

> INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING n Megan Twohey of Reuters n Cynthia Hubert and Phillip Reese of The Sacramento Bee Explanatory Reporting n Dennis Overbye of The New York Times n Les Zaitz of The Oregonian, Portland

> LOCAL REPORTING n Joan Garrett McClane, Todd South, Doug Strickland and Mary Helen Miller of the Chattanooga Times Free Press n Rebecca D. O'Brien and Thomas Mashberg of The Record, Woodland Park, N.J.:

> NATIONAL REPORTING n John Emshwiller and Jeremy Singer-Vine of The Wall Street Journal n Jon Hilsenrath of The Wall Street Journal International Reporting n Rukmini Callimachi of The Associated Press n Raja Abdulrahim and Patrick McDonnell of the Los Angeles Times

> COMMENTARY n Kevin Cullen of The Boston Globe n Lisa Falkenberg of the Houston Chronicle Criticism n Mary McNamara of the Los Angeles Times n Jen Graves of The Stranger, a Seattle weekly

> EDITORIAL WRITING n Dante Ramos of The Boston Globe n Andie Dominick of The Des Moines Register

> EDITORIAL CARTOONING n David Horsey of the Los Angeles Times n Pat Bagley of The Salt Lake Tribune

> BREAKING NEWS PHOTOGRAPHY n John Tlumacki and David L. Ryan of The Boston Globe n Goran Tomasevic of Reuters

> FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHY n Lacy Atkins of the San Francisco Chronicle n Michael Williamson of The Washington Post

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By Peter Baniak

By Neil Budde

Editor of the Lexington Herald-Leader

Executive Editor of The Courier Journal

Kentucky newspapers unite to open state child-protection records

‘‘W

hile it should go without saying, it perhaps must be spelled out in the context of this case: It is not unwarranted for the public, and the press, to want to know what happened when a 20-month-old child in the care and legal custody of the Commonwealth of Kentucky winds up dead after drinking toxic substances in a meth lab …” – Franklin (Ky.) Circuit Court Judge Phillip Shepherd, May 2010, in a decision ordering the state of Kentucky to release documents related to the death of 20-month-old Kayden Branham. “The entrenched habits of a government bureaucracy die hard.” – Judge Shepherd, Dec. 2013, in a ruling that fined the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services $756,000 for making a “mockery” of the state Open Records Act by withholding information about the deaths and near-deaths of abused and neglected children. “The deeds of the Cabinet in these cases … demonstrate that the fortress of secrecy built by the Cabinet is consistently used to cover up the Cabinet’s own malfeasance and its failure to protect our most vulnerable children.” – Judge Shepherd, March 2014, while ordering the state of Kentucky to pay the Lexington Herald-Leader and The Courier-Journal of Louisville more than $300,000 in legal fees and costs. For nearly 5 years, Kentucky’s two largest newspapers — the Lexington Herald-Leader and The Courier-Journal of Louisville — have waged a legal battle against the state’s Cabinet for Health and Family Services over access to public records about children who died or nearly died as a result of abuse or neglect. Normally, our two newspapers are competi>> Continued on next page

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The news articles about such cases and repeated rulings for openness have led to positive changes in Kentucky’s child-protection system...

tors when it comes to reporting on statewide issues. But we have worked together since 2009 to force more disclosure about and public accountability over the state’s social service system and its interactions with Kentucky’s most vulnerable children. We’ve fought for access to these records on the strong belief that more public scrutiny of the child-protection system is needed — and one of the best ways to make sure the system is adequately protecting children who most need protecting. The cooperative effort has included a legal fight that wound its ways through state courts, into federal court, up to the Kentucky Supreme Court and back. And it has included sustained reporting over 5 years by both newspapers on cases where the system failed to protect abused or neglected kids, often despite clear warning signs. That reporting, and the ensuing legal battle, began in earnest back in May 2009, with the case of Kayden Branham, also known as Kayden Daniels, a 20-month-old boy who died after he drank from a cup filled with drain cleaner that had allegedly been used to make meth in the rural home where Kayden and his 14-year-old mother were staying. Beginning with an order to release state records in the Branham case, the courts have repeatedly ruled in favor of the newspapers, ordering disclosure of case files and records about the cases of hundreds of abused and neglected children over several years. At each step, the state cabinet has resisted, arguing in appeals that disclosure would violate privacy or other laws, and redacting huge amounts of information (some of it already public) in the case files it did release – despite the judge’s orders. Other Kentucky newspapers have also joined the fight to open records in these cases, most notably the Todd County Standard, which sued the state for access to records in the 2011 case of Amy Dye, a 9-year-old girl who was beaten to death by her adoptive brother. In that case, the judge ruled that the cabinet misled the Standard by saying it had no records in the case,

when in fact it did. Those records showed that Amy was killed even though a school nurse and others had raised warnings for years about how she was being treated at home. The news articles about such cases and repeated rulings for openness have led to positive changes in Kentucky’s child-protection system, including a decision by state lawmakers to create an independent panel to review child fatalities and near-fatalities. And the court case over child-protection records may be entering its final stages. In December, Judge Phillip Shepherd fined the state cabinet $756,000 — quite possibly the biggest such fine under Kentucky’s Open Records Act — for its continued violation of the records law. He followed up that ruling in March by ordering the state to pay The Courier-Journal and the Herald-Leader legal fees and costs in excess of $300,000. The state has appealed those rulings. But the judge made clear in both decisions that it is past time for the cabinet to comply with the law and open its files. “This rule of public disclosure in this narrow class of cases involving child fatalities and near-fatalities has been enacted not to assign blame, not to satisfy some unhealthy curiosity, not to sensationalize and not to gratuitously invade the privacy of mourning families,” the judge wrote in his December ruling. “It has been enacted for a single, overriding purpose: to ensure both the cabinet and the public do everything possible to prevent the repeat of such tragedies in the future. There can be no effective prevention when there is no public examination of the underlying facts.” n Peter Baniak is the editor of the Lexington Herald-Leader. Neil Budde is the executive editor of The Courier-Journal.


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member

showcase

APME recognizes contributions to the AP photo report through the Showcase Photo of the Month Award. The competition is judged by AP and member photo editors. The monthly winners are displayed at the annual conference and a Showcase Photo of the Year Award is presented.

FEBRUARY AP Photo/ The Miami Herald

Al Diaz Pamela Rauseo, 37, performs CPR on her nephew, five-monthold Sebastian de la Cruz, after pulling her SUV over on the side of the road on Feb. 20. At right is Lucila Godoy who stopped her car to assist in the rescue. Later that day, Sebastian was in stable condition at a hospital.

MARCH AP Photo/ The Dallas Morning News

Louis DeLuca Vintage planes from the Cavanaugh Flight Museum flyover Globe Life Park during opening day ceremonies before a baseball game between the Texas Rangers and Philadelphia Phillies in Arlington, Texas, on March 31,

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editors in the news

Industry’s promotions, appointments, awards and recognition

Former NY Times editor: Leading newsroom was honor

Top Springfield News-Leader editor stepping down

In her first public appearance since her dismissal from The New York Times, former executive editor Jill Abramson compared herself to a new college graduate: “scared but also a little excited.” “What's next for me? I don't know. So I’m in exactly the same boat as many of you,” Abramson told the Class of 2014 at Wake Forest University's graduation ceremony on Monday, May 19, ABRAMSON to laughs and applause. The Times announced that Abramson was being replaced by managing editor Dean Baquet.

The top editor at one of Missouri’s largest newspapers has announced he is stepping down and moving to Wisconsin to be closer to friends and family. Springfield News-Leader executive editor David Stoeffler made the announcement four years after taking the position.

Journalist, foundation leader Marsh retires Longtime journalist and Freedom Forum executive Jack Marsh has retired. He most recently was president of the Al Neuharth Media Center at the University of South Dakota in Vermillion. Marsh turned 65 in April and will continue to live with his family in Sioux Falls. Marsh worked as a reporter, editor and publisher at six Gannett newspapers, including six years as executive editor of the Argus Leader in Sioux Falls. He left Gannett in 1998 and joined the Freedom Forum, a non-partisan foundation based at the Newseum in Washington.

Seigenthaler honored by city of Nashville The city of Nashville and a victims’ rights group have honored John Seigenthaler, chairman emeritus of The Tennessean, for his lifelong commitment to victims' causes. The city of Nashville renamed the downtown Shelby Avenue pedestrian bridge that spans the SEIGENTHALER Cumberland for Seigenthaler, who prevented a suicidal man from jumping off the bridge 60 years ago, when he was a Tennessean reporter.

New publisher named in Fairbanks A newspaper veteran has been selected as the new publisher of the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. William Dean Singleton, whose family has owned the newspaper since 1992, announced that Marta “Marti” Buscaglia as publisher. The 61-year-old Buscaglia has been the vice president of advertising for the Anchorage Daily News for the last two years.

Lee promotes Nebraska publisher The publisher of the Lincoln Journal Star in Nebraska has been promoted to group publisher for Lee Enterprises. Lee says Julie Bechtel will be president and publisher of The Pantagraph in Bloomington, Illinois, and the Herald & Review in Decatur, Illinois. Bechtel also will oversee operations at Lee’s media companies in eastern Nebraska and Illinois.

D. Lee Carlson named president of PA Media Group A sales and marketing leader with more than 40 years of experience in the media industry is the new President of PA Media Group. D. Lee Carlson had been serving as interim president while also managing the Advance Central Services Pennsylvania operation after John Kirkpatrick's departure in October

AP names veteran Scott political editor David Scott, who leads news coverage in 14 states for The Associated Press as a regional editor, was named political editor to direct the news agency’s national political reporting. Scott, 37, who currently works in Chicago overseeing the AP’s Central Region, will be based in Washington and report to Washington Bureau Chief Sally Buzbee.

AP names Arrillaga U.S. enterprise editor Pauline Arrillaga, an award-winning national reporter for The Associated Press and an experienced trainer and writing coach, has been promoted to the new position of U.S. enterprise editor, overseeing AP’s enterprise journalism from across the 50 states.

Longtime reporter Mark Gillispie joins AP Ohio Mark L. Gillispie, a veteran northeast Ohio journalist who covered courts, crime and government for The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer, has been hired as a reporter in the Cleveland bureau of The Associated Press. >> Continued on next page

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Tom Berman named deputy for AP’s Central Region Tom Berman, a veteran editor and leader at The Associated Press who has directed coverage of stories ranging from air disasters, terror attacks and the ongoing unrest in Ukraine, has been named the cooperative’s new deputy editor for the U.S. Central Region, overseeing the AP’s journalism in 14 states in middle America.

AP names Foster Klug to top South Korea editorial position The Associated Press has named Seoul news editor Foster Klug as its chief of bureau for South Korea. Klug, who has covered Asia for nearly a decade, will manage AP’s operations from Seoul, reporting on South Korea’s emergence as a regional economic, political and cultural power.

Heisse named editor of Northwest Indiana Times Bob Heisse has been named editor of The Times Media Co. in Northwest Indiana. Heiss is a former president of APME. He had been the editor of The State Journal-Register in Springfield, Ill., since March 2012. Heisse also served as regional editor of GateHouse Media in Illinois.

HEISSE

Karam named AP bureau chief in Beirut Zeina Karam, a reporter in the Middle East since 1996, has been named Beirut bureau chief for The Associated Press, leading text coverage for the news organization in both Lebanon and Syria.

AP names news editor for Pennsylvania and New Jersey A veteran news leader and innovative newsroom manager for The Associated Press has been named news editor for both Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Larry Rosenthal will be based in Philadelphia and have primary responsibility for leading pursuit of breaking news and developing enterprise across formats in Pennsylvania. He'll also work closely with the New Jersey news editor to ensure both states have competitive and creative coverage.

Murphy named AP news editor for Tennessee and Kentucky Brian Murphy, a longtime AP foreign correspondent who has covered and directed stories from bases in Europe and the Middle East, has been named The Associated Press news editor for Tennessee and Kentucky.

Plain Dealer newspaper editor Adams Simmons named to new post The editor of The Plain Dealer newspaper in Cleveland, Ohio, has been appointed to a new position with Advance Local. Debra Adams Simmons, president of the Associated Press Media Editors,

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is now become vice president of news development for Advance Local, which is part of Advance Publications Inc., owner of The Plain Dealer and about 30 other newspapers and websites across the nation. Advance Local oversees local newspapers and websites.

Daily Astorian names Laura Sellers new managing editor The Daily Astorian and dailyastorian.com, of Oregon, have a new newsroom leader. Editor and Publisher Steve Forrester announced Laura Sellers is the newspaper's managing editor. She succeeds Patrick Webb, who held the position for 13 years. The managing editor is responsible for directing the newspaper’s reporting and manages newsroom personnel. Sellers is one the board of the Associated Press Media Editors and will be its president in 2017.

Foss named AP’s deputy business editor Brad Foss, an assistant business editor who has helped direct the AP’s coverage of the global economy for the past five years, has been promoted to deputy business editor.

Boggs named editor of Tribune-Herald Steve Boggs, an Oklahoma native with 29 years in the news business, has been named editor of the Waco, Tex., Tribune-Herald. Boggs most recently was publisher of The Saline Courier in Benton, Ark.

Star Tribune names Suki Dardarian senior managing editor The Star Tribune of Minneapolis has named Suki Dardarian senior managing editor and vice president. Dardarian succeeds Rene Sanchez, who held the position until he was named executive editor in October. Dardarian joins the Star Tribune after a 14-year career at The Seattle Times. Dardarian is a past president of the Associated Press Media Editors. She starts her new job April 21.

DARDARIAN

AP names Linderman reporter in Baltimore Juliet Linderman, a federal courts reporter at The TimesPicayune in New Orleans, has joined The Associated Press in Baltimore. Linderman, 27, will be covering urban issues and education in the Mid-Atlantic region

Craig named AP video journalist in Houston Jill Craig, a video producer at The Associated Press, is joining the cooperative’s bureau in Houston as a video journalist. As a video journalist, Craig will report primarily for the AP’s video and television report, working closely with Dallas-based video journalist John Mone.

Reporter Sisak joins AP team in NYC Michael Sisak, a multi-format journalist for The Citizens' Voice >> Continued on next page


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newspaper won four Pulitzer Prizes during his two decades.

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in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., has been hired by The Associated Press as a general news reporter in New York City. Sisak has spent the last year as The Citizens' Voice city/investigations editor and before that was a senior writer for five years

Anthony named Asia-Pacific news director

AP appoints correspondent in Gainesville

Ted Anthony, an award-winning journalist who has reported from 20 countries and pioneered innovative cross-platform storytelling at The Associated Press, has been named Asia-Pacific news director for the news cooperative.

Jason Dearen, an environmental reporter for The Associated Press, has been appointed correspondent based in Gainesville, Fla., where he will focus on northeast Florida and the environment beat.

Doyle named managing editor of News & Record of Greensboro

Veteran Wyoming reporter Barron retires Joan Barron, 85, who had a front seat to Wyoming history for 48 years, will retire at the end of March. She covered murders, grand juries, new state agencies, a groundbreaking public meetings law and 50 legislative sessions for the Casper Star-Tribune, where she has been a staff writer since 1966.

AP names new deputy editor for U.S. West Anna Johnson, an award-winning journalist with extensive experience working in the U.S. and the Middle East, has been named the AP’s deputy editor for the U.S. West, overseeing coverage from 13 states.

AP names David Klepper to New York statehouse reporting team

Steven L. Doyle, a Kentucky native and a long-time editor, is the new managing editor of the News & Record of Greensboro. Since 2008, Doyle has been the editor of The Sentinel-News, a threetimes-a-week newspaper in his hometown of Shelbyville, Ky.

Greenville News chooses Fox as M.E. The Greenville, S.C., News has named newsroom veteran William Fox as managing editor. Fox has been interim managing editor of the newspaper since Chris Weston retired in December.

Schmall named Fort Worth correspondent Emily Schmall, a former international freelancer for The Associated Press, will join the cooperative’s Fort Worth bureau as a correspondent focused on business and economic development.

Galván named AP Tucson correspondent

David Klepper, an experienced government reporter who excels at accountability journalism, has been named to the New York statehouse team in Albany for The Associated Press. Klepper has spent the past three years as the AP’s statehouse correspondent in Providence, R.I.

The Associated Press has named Astrid Galván as its border and immigration correspondent based in Tucson, Ariz. Galván worked as a reporter at the Arizona Republic and Albuquerque Journal from 2008 to 2013.

Oregonian editor Bhatia leaving to teach

Mike Cronin is joining The Associated Press to report on Minnesota government and politics in St. Paul. Cronin, 44, has most recently worked at Minnesota Public Radio, where he has been part of the team covering the clergy abuse scandal in the St.

Peter Bhatia is leaving his job as editor of The Oregonian newspaper to take a teaching job at Arizona State University. Bhatia joined Oregon's largest newspaper in 1993 and was managing editor and executive editor before becoming editor on Jan. 1, 2010. The

Veteran Cronin joins AP Statehouse team

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Paul-Minneapolis Catholic Archdiocese.

Beam named AP Statehouse correspondent in Kentucky Adam Beam, an award-winning government and politics writer at The State newspaper in Columbia, S.C., is joining The Associated Press as its lead Statehouse reporter in Kentucky. Beam, 31, will be based at the Statehouse bureau in Frankfort.

AP boosts staff for Fla. legislative session Steve Miller, a veteran investigative reporter has been hired by The Associated Press to help cover Florida’s 2014 legislative session. Miller, 56, has 20 years of journalism experience, including stints at the Texas Watchdog, the Washington Times and the Dallas Morning News.

APME briefs

>>

How you can help with the convention auction in Chicago

APME and ASNE are joining forces for a live and silent auction to benefit both organizations during their joint conference Sept. 15-17 in Chicago. An annual conference auction is a staple for APME and benefits the APME Foundation, which helps fund NewsTrain and other programs. ASNE will share the stage for perhaps the biggest auction to fund journalism initia-

Wood joins AP to cover N.D. oil boom Josh Wood is joining The Associated Press to report from North Dakota on the oil boom that is transforming the state and the U.S. energy sector. Wood, 26, has worked as a freelance journalist in the Middle East since 2009, based in Beirut.

Angie Muhs named SJ-R editor Angie Muhs has been named as executive editor/vice president of editorial for The State Journal-Register. The announcement came Wednesday afternoon from Clarissa Williams, president and publisher of the SJ-R. Muhs comes from the Portland (Maine) Press Herald, where she has held various positions for nearly a decade. Most recently, she has been the Press Herald’s director of audience development. n

tives in recent years. The live auction – featuring vacation getaways and more – will be held during the opening night reception at the Tribune Tower. A small silent auction also will take place that night. A larger silent auction – featuring donated books, regional gifts, jewelry, sports and event tickets and more – will be held during the conference at the Hyatt Regency, the conference headquarters. How can you help now? We're looking for donations that will stand out. To donate, download the pledge form. Bob Heisse of the APME Foundation and George Stanley of ASNE are coordinating the auction. You can contact either of them at bob.heisse@sj-r.com or gstanley@jm.com. You also can contact Sally Jacobsen of APME at sjacobsen@AP.org and Arnie Robbins of ASNE at arobbins@asne.org.

Limited-time special 2-for-1 APME membership offer in June Special offer: Join APME at our $150 rate in June and add another editor or broadcast news leader free. The 2-for-1 offer is a limited-time special good until June 30. This is a great time to join APME. The Associated Press Media Editors remains the practical voice for news leaders. For the $150 cost of membership, you'll receive a substantial discount for the first joint conference with the American Society of News Editors and the Associated Press Photo Managers Sept. 15-17 at the Hyatt Regency in downtown Chicago. Sign up now at: www.apme.com n

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AP Stylebook minute Ask the Editor offers up a prescription for the use of ‘doctor’

A

t a large gathering in a public auditorium, the master of ceremonies shouted, “Is there a doctor in the house?” Immediately, a dozen hands shot up from the crowd. Was it a medical emergency for a physician? Or an impromptu headcount of Ph.D.s? Neither. Just an AP Stylebook ruling in need of illustration. The Stylebook’s entry for doctor says to use Dr. on first reference as a formal title before the name of an individual who holds a doctor’s degree in medicine or osteopathic medicine, dentistry, optometry, podiatry or veterinary medicine. But what about the holders of Ph.D.s? Aren't they also doctors, we’re often asked. If appropriate in the context, the entry says, Dr. may also be used on first reference before the names of individuals who hold other types of doctoral degrees. What are examples of appropriate context, queried a reader to the Stylebook's online help site. “Certain religious and academic leaders, such as university presidents, who use Dr. in their professional lives, including Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.” Ask the Editor responded. The Stylebook’s Ph.D., Ph.D.s entry says the preferred form is to say a person holds a doctorate and name the individual's area of specialty - history, psychology, chemistry, etc. Another reader said, “I checked the doctor entry but still wasn't sure if the title Dr. is appropriate for someone who received her doctorate at a chiropractic school.” Ask the Editor responded: AP does not use the title Dr. for chiropractors. Because the public frequently identifies Dr. only with physicians, make sure to name the specialty on first or second reference, the doctor entry advises. Use the Dr. title only once, not on subsequent references. Do not use Dr. before the names of individuals who hold only honorary doctorates. n

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2014

APME BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Officers n President: Debra Adams Simmons, The Plain Dealer, Cleveland n Vice President: Alan D. Miller, The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch n Secretary: Teri Hayt, The (Canton, Ohio) Repository n Journalism Studies Chair: Laura Sellers-Earl, EO Media Group., Salem, Ore. n Treasurer: Dennis Anderson, Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star

Executive Committee (officers above plus) n Past President: Brad Dennison, GateHouse Media, Fairport, N.Y. n AP Senior Vice President/Executive Editor: Kathleen Carroll, New York n AP Vice President/Senior Managing Editor: Mike Oreskes, New York n Conference Program: Bill Church, Herald-Tribune Media Group, Sarasota, Fla.; Jim Simon, Seattle Times

APME News Editor n Andrew Oppmann, Middle Tennessee State University

(Terms expiring in 2014) n Bill Church, Herald-Tribune Media Group, Sarasota, Fla. n Michael Days, Philadelphia Daily News n Alan English, The Times, Shreveport, La. n Kurt Franck, The Blade, Toledo, Ohio n Gary Graham, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash. n Joe Hight, The Gazette, Colorado Springs n Eric Ludgood, Fox 5 News, Atlanta n Aminda Marques Gonzalez, Miami Herald n Martin G. Reynolds, The Oakland Tribune n Monica R. Richardson, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (Terms expiring in 2015) n Dennis Anderson, Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star n Mark Baldwin, Rockford (Ill.) Register Star n Chris Cobler, Victoria (Texas) Advocate n Angie Muhs, Portland (Maine) Press Herald n Jim Simon, The Seattle Times (Terms expiring in 2016) n David Arkin, GateHouse Media n Autumn Phillips, The Twin Falls Times-News, Twin Falls, Idaho n Meg Downey n Thomas Koetting, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel

Our communication vehicles n apme.com

Directors n http://www.facebook.com/APMEnews n https://twitter.com/APME n http://apmeblog.blogspot.com/ n http://www.facebook.com/NewsTrain n https://twitter.com/NewsTrain and, APME Update: n http://www.apme.com/?page=Newsletters

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Summer 2014 APME News magazine  
Summer 2014 APME News magazine  

This month: • Ken Paulson: Protecting the free press rights of our youngest colleagues • Re-styled Stylebook: A panel of editors reviews th...

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