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From the Editor

Andrew Oppmann

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y sainted mother said this to me, and all of us in the family, over and over: Life is a river, not a pond. Rivers are on the move, flowing and rushing. Pond water stays put, often getting stagnant and tired. We’ll be talking about the river of change upon the people and profession of this industry when we gather in Palo Alto, California, in October for APME’s second joint conference with the American Society of News Editors. This special conference edition of APME News teases the coming attractions we’ll experience when the nation’s top editors meet at Stanford University.

My thanks to Jim Simon, Angie Muhs, Autumn Phillips and Gary Graham for giving our readers a taste of what we’ll be served at the gathering. Our Great Ideas centerspread is a preview of the collection that will debut at the conference – yet another example of how the fellowship of APME editors and journalists returns value to news organizations in the U.S. and Canada. Our Stylebook Moment highlights an interesting change in the AP Stylebook. Check out what David Minthorn as to say about global warming on Page 22. Like a great river, the ideas are flowing in this issue – and the current will pick up speed soon in Palo Alto.

inside October 2015

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3 Alan D. Miller: Conference to satisfy all palates with banquet of fresh ideas 4 Laura Sellers: Incoming APME president will follow amazing line of leaders 6 Ken Paulson: Educators are challenged by constant change. Bring it on. 2015 CONFERENCE PREVIEW 8 Jim Simon: “#3D Digital, Diversity, Disruption:” Welcome back to campus 9 Success Story: Arizona Storytellers Project aims to empower and inspire 11 Steller lineup at Stanford: Top editors, timely sessions on tap 14 Measuring Millennials: Panel to probe next generation news habits 15 Joel Achenbach presents: Science under seige from many sides 12 Great Ideas: Recognizing great work in print, Web or social media

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16 Editors in the News: Promotions, appointments, awards and recognition 19 Member Showcase: APME Photo of the Month winners 22 AP Stylebook minute: Cold hard facts in regard to global climate change ABOUT THE COVER The second joint conference by ASNE, APME and APPM will be hosted on the scenic venue of Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, which embodies the sense of place and a sense of the spirit in which the annual conference was developed.

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EDITOR

Andrew Oppmann Adjunct Professor of Journalism Middle Tennessee State University Andrew.Oppmann@mtsu.edu DESIGNER

Steve Massie smassie@crain.com

APME News is the quarterly magazine of the Associated Press Media Editors, a professional, nonprofit organization founded in 1933 in French Lick, Indiana. Its members include senior editors and leaders from news operations in the United States and Canada who are affiliated with The Associated Press, including more than 1,400 newspapers and online sites and about 2,000 broadcast outlets. The group also includes college journalism educators and college student media editors. APME works with AP to support and recognize journalism excellence and the First Amendment. To learn more about APME’s programs and activities, visit apme.com.

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The President’s Corner

Alan D. Miller

Conference to satisfy every palate with a banquet of fresh ideas

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he menu for the second joint conference by ASNE, APME and APPM is a delicious banquet for all of us seeking a taste of fresh ideas. And my favorite so far, given that we’ll be meeting in California wine country, is one that embodies both a sense of place and a sense of the spirit in which this conference was developed. This break-out session from 3-4 p.m. on Saturday is described as “Wine (not whine) with Butch and Jill.” Butch Ward and Jill Geisler are teachers and mentors, and long-time friends to many of us. And they will lead us in yet another insightful conversation about the joys and challenges of newsroom leadership: “We’ll raise a glass to leading in changing times — sharing problems, solutions and smiles.” Most of us are long on problems and short on solutions — and smiles — these days. It’s not always easy to smile amid budget cuts and staff reductions, but there will be reasons to smile at this conference beyond — starting with journalist and standup comedian Margaret Pittman, who will help us kick off the weekend in Palo Alto. The setting on Stanford University’s campus Oct. 16-18 is another reason. The campus and the buildings offered to us for the conference are simply stunning. SALLY JACOBSEN We’ll ply you with adult beverages at the opening reception and invite you to join in the fun of a live auction to bid on donated artwork, wine, travel packages, jewelry and a host of other intriguing items — all to benefit the good work of APME and ASNE. And then we get to the biggest reason to smile: the ideas that will flow from one session after another packed with some of the most innovative minds in journalism. We came up with the 3-D theme to focus on the need for diversity in our work and workplaces, innovation in the digital space, and to see disruption in the news business as an opportunity rather than an obstacle. We’ll be talking about disruptive ways to engage untapped audiences, the future of drones in news coverage, the latest in covering news in real time, news partnerships in the era of social media and how to tap into the newsconsumption habits of the next generation. And that’s only part of the first day’s line-up. Brainstorming the theme and developing these meaningful sessions was the work of a dedicated committee of vol-

unteers who spent the better part of the past year planning this event and recruiting the many talented panelists. APME board members Jim Simon, managing editor of the Seattle Times; Bill Church, editor of the Sarasota Herald Tribune; and Joe Hight, a former newspaper editor turned bookseller, spent uncounted hours on this project with a number of ASNE leaders, including Robyn Tomlin, formerly a vice president at the Pew Research Center and now managing editor at the Dallas Morning News; and Teri Hayt, the ASNE executive director. And we are blessed to have the support of the John S. Knight Fellowships Program. Managing director Dawn Garcia was involved in conference planning from the start and was integral to putting it all together. We could use the rest of this magazine to thank the many others who have helped plan and will help make this conference a success — our generous sponsors and an army of tireless behind-the-scenes volunteers. And one who is least willing to take credit is among the most deserving. She is an orchestra conductor who draws no attention to herself. She is a mentor and friend who nudges APME presidents and board members toward difficult challenges and wise decisions. She watches the checkbook as if it was her own, and she is an accomplished journalist who is among few in the world who can say they edited the AP Stylebook. Except that she wouldn’t do that, because she is so modest. And she is perhaps the nicest person in journalism today — always quick with a smile and a compliment. This person whose praise I sing is Sally Jacobsen, an Associated Press editor and the APME executive director, who will retire from both AP and APME at the end of this conference. We will raise a glass to Sally in Palo Alto to thank her for bringing so much goodness, passion and enthusiasm to her work. And we’ll remind her that no one really retires from APME. Alan D. Miller is APME president and editor of The Columbus Dispatch. He can be reached at amiller@dispatch.com

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Here are a few of the great leaders who shaped my APME experience. I know I’ve missed names, but sadly the deadline draws nigh.

Incoming APME President

Laura Sellers

Following in the footsteps of unmatched leadership at APME

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s the incoming president of the Associated Press Media Editors, I’m anxious about living up to the amazing leaders who have gone before me, but eager to try. APME has been a constant companion in my 20 years as a newsroom leader, first in print, then digital and now, all of the above. Beginning with my first conference in 1995 in Indianapolis, the editors I met have left indelible marks on my career and my life: guiding, commiserating, brainstorming, celebrating, advocating and leading by example. I wanted to use this first column to tell some of those editors how much their friendship and advice has meant to me, how just being in their midst recharges me like sometimes only a good stiff drink with your closest chums can. After all, the ideas that sprout up in the bar after the sessions are as valuable as those learned in the meeting hall. Such is the strength and value of APME, and now also with our partnership with the American Society of News Editors, which is in its second year. As I started my list of names, I realized it is far too long, which is a blessing for me and a curse for APME News Editor Andrew Oppmann.

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There are hundreds of stories where my comrades have helped me gain more diverse coverage, start the 1996 Daily Astorian website, solve personnel matters, evolve new coverage areas, balance work and life, spark great ideas, navigate FOI issues, applaud great work, embrace digital and find the laughter and joy in sharing the journey. The beautiful thing is, the stories just keep a’coming. In short, my APME experience isn’t so much about the people I heard speak in sessions, although I learned a lot, it was about the people I met. In the next year, we’ll have NewsTrain regional workshops, a conference with ASNE in Philly, national reporting projects with The Associated Press and a slew of other worthy projects. But a key goal will be to expand this network of peers and extol the benefits of committing great journalism in the company of great journalists. Twenty years ago, I could never have imagined this wild and wonderful ride. Now, I can’t imagine not being on it. Laura Sellers is the managing editor of The Daily Astorian in Oregon. 2015 marks her 12th year on the APME board, beginning in 2001.


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By Ken Paulson

Bring it on: Outracing change in newsrooms, classrooms

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f you’ve been in the newspaper business for a while, you’ll remember the debates between newspaper editors and educators about the relative merits of practical skills and theory. The debate’s over. Now we’re all hanging on for dear life. Just as many newsrooms are now content centers and city editors have been supplanted by engagement managers, the colleges that teach the next generation of journalists have no choice but to reinvent themselves. As a longtime newspaper editor and now the dean of a media college, I’ve been struck by how both the news business and higher education are running on parallel tracks, dealing with digital disruption and making educated guesses about the future. There’s no question that colleges must give students the skills and insights they’ll need to engage, inform and entertain audiences on multiple platforms. That means learning to communicate effectively through words, audio and video. It also means coming to grips with change. The most important traits we can instill in our students is a receptivity to change and a comfort level with technology. While earlier generations left college with a pretty good sense of how their careers would unfold, today’s college students need to be able to say ‘Bring it on.” That will take confidence. And preparation. And a wellrounded education that prepares every student for both a profession and a rewarding life. Every journalism school has the obligation to ensure that it’s teaching for the future. Our graduates will need to remain vibrant contributors for the next 45 years. That means we can’t make assumptions about the media they’ll create or the audiences they’ll serve. In the end, we can only prepare our graduates for the high velocity of change. It’s also critical that we instill an understanding of the role of a free press in a democracy. The newest technology cannot substitute for our oldest values. Over the past half-century of media, we’ve seen the rise and fall of 8-tracks, Laserdiscs, Mini-discs, VCRs, pagers and Pong. But if we’re to embrace and outrace change, colleges need to be as contemporary as possible, incorporating the

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latest technology, encouraging innovation and fostering an entrepreneurial spirit. Change is challenging educators as never before. Bring it on. Ken Paulson is the dean of the College of Media and Entertainment at Middle Tennessee State University. He can be reached at Ken.Paulson@MTSU.edu


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APME

ASNE

AP PHOTO MANAGERS

2015 CONFERENCE

PREVIEW

“#3D: Digital, Diversity, Disruption:” Welcome Back to Campus

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t’s not just great weather, fabulous wine and a California vibe that lured the 2015-2016 ASNE-APME Conference to Stanford University. Stanford and Silicon Valley comprise what Jim Bettinger, director of the John S. Knight Journalism Fellowships, has called “ … the epicenter of the information earthquake that has disrupted journalism.” The digital upheaval born in Silicon Valley remains a powerful force reshaping our audiBy Jim ences, our business models and the way we cover news. That’s what inspired this year’s conference theme: “#3D: Digital, Diversity, Disruption.” We’re hoping the wide-ranging program will provide you with a master class of sorts on newsroom innovation; what’s working and what’s not in attracting new audiences; and finding new opportunities in journalism’s digital future. You’ll hear from fellow editors about ways of developing lasting ties in diverse communities, and trying to deal with eroding journalism standards in the social media era. Startup entrepreneurs will share what they’ve learned about launching innovative media ventures. Storytelling, in myriad forms, also will be a major focus. Presenters include an award-winning CNN journalist whose audience helps select his stories, a reporter who organizes live storytelling events, a columnist who mines data to illuminate his changing city and pioneers in the emerging field of drone journalism. APPM will celebrate the legacy of an extraordinary visual

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storyteller, Washington Post photojournalist Michel du Cille, who died while on assignment covering the plight of Ebola victims. Fittingly, the conference will be bookended with big ideas from outside the world of news. David Kelley, director of Stanford’s renowned Institute of Design, better known as the d-School, will start Friday night with a talk on creativity. Tina Seelig, director of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program, will close the conference Sunday with her insights Simon on imagination in a talk called “Getting ideas out of your head and into the world.” Designing the schedule was a collaborative effort among ASNE, APME and their two conference co-sponsors, the Associated Press Photo Managers (APPM) and the Knight Fellowships at Stanford. “We¹ve pulled together a terrific lineup of speakers who represent many different corners of the news and technology worlds,” said Robyn Tomlin, managing editor of The Dallas Morning News and ASNE’s co-chair of the conference planning committee. “I expect everyone who attends to come away with a wealth of ideas and inspiration that they can take back home with them." This will be the fourth time that APME has held a conference in the Bay Area. The other times were 1951 and 1985 in San Francisco, and then 2005 in San Jose. Jim Simon, managing editor of The Seattle Times, can be reached at jsimon@seattletimes.com.


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SUCCESS STORY

Arizona Storytellers Project 125 Anniversary featuring Arizona Republic writer Megan Finnerty. ROB SCHUMACHER THE ARIZONA REPUBLIC

Arizona Storytellers Project aims at inspire, empower staffers By Autumn Phillips APME News he story of the Arizona Storytellers Project is one of a newsroom employee who felt empowered to pursue a vision above and beyond the daily assignment. “Do you have a newsroom structure where someone can follow their dream?” said Megan Finnerty of The Arizona Republic. “If the answer is no, if you are only thinking about getting the paper out, then you have a newsroom that can’t grow.” In 2011, Finnerty saw an opportunity. She had been in the Republic newsroom for nine years. She knew there was a huge untapped audience among creative professional mil-

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lenials who “have taste and a tiny bit of money to go out” and she had an idea. She wanted to host a series of community storytelling events at venues like inexpensive, hip bars and restaurantscasual, creative spaces that would attract the demographic she had in mind. “I did my due diligence and then pitched the idea,” she said. “Management basically said, don’t stop doing anything you are doing. Don’t lose money. There’s no budget for it, so the events have to pay for themselves. And don’t embarrass us.” And that was enough runway for Finnerty to launch the >> Continued on next page

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Megan Finnerty hosts an Arizona Storytellers Project event at the Newton in Phoenix. PAT SHANNAHAN THE ARIZONA REPUBLIC

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Arizona Storytellers Project, which is now in its fourth year and about to be reproduced in nine Gannett markets, including Louisville, Nashville, Indianapolis and Palm Springs. Her best advice for newsroom employees who want to run with an idea - treat it like a story. She said journalists don't give up on a story because they don't get a call back. They find another way. “Did you make three phone calls for your last story and then give up when you hit a wall? No. The same applies to this,” she said. Her advice to editors who want to inspire staff to conceive and pursue community engagement projects is to create trust. In each newsroom, Finnerty estimated, there’s only a certain percentage of the staff that will be aggressive about launching new initiatives or events because they’re personally ambitious in that way.

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“Figure out how to empower those people. And know that you'll have to give something up in order to squeeze that new thing in. Have an honest conversation about who you can take off their plate.” Finnerty said her bosses were supportive. Randy Lovely, senior vice president, news & audience development at the Arizona Republic, came to the first night and continues to aThese days, the storytelling nights are a well-oiled machine. People who want to participate go four to five hours of training via the newsroom and expert storytelling coaches from the South Mountain Community College Storytelling Institute. There’s a theme, an introductory email with best practices and Finnerty has a 30-minute meeting with the person to make sure they are emotionally ready to share the story they have chosen. Participants must come in for a practice session. Finnerty >> Continued on next page


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times them on her iPhone and gives feedback. If they don't come to the practice, they can't get on stage during the event. The Arizona Storytelling Project continues to grow. These days, the paper is partnering with major events like Phoenix Startup Week, Modern Phoenix Week and Arizona Cocktail Week in February, which in years past, has hosted a four-course storytelling dinner, where the storytellers were chefs and bartenders. The ticket price was $100 each. “(The attendees) are people with money who care about our city,” she said. “Not all of our events are that expensive, of course, but this one was pretty fancy.” A corporate sponsor covered the cost of the event and ticket sales proceeds went to the Careers through Culinary Arts Program, which awards culinary scholarships to high school students. Megan Finnerty will join a panel discussion “Tell Me a Story,” from 3-4 p.m. Sunday in Berg C, with John Sutter of CNN Digital, this year's Batten Medal winner. This session explores ways that storytellers are innovating and making their mark in this new world and how editors can tap into the power of the story. The moderator is Pam Fine, Knight Chair in News, Leadership and Community, University of Kansas. Autumn Phillips is editor of The Southern Illinoisan in Carbondale. She’s on Twitter at @AutumnEdit

Arizona Cocktail Week

Top editors, timely sessions on tap

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he nation’s top editors will be at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, for the 2015 ASNE-APME Conference on Oct. 16-18. The Associated Press Photo Managers (APPM) is also a conference partner. The conference will open with an evening reception Friday, Oct. 16, at the Frances C. Arrillaga Alumni Center. Join your colleagues under beautiful October skies for a taste of California wine and music and an intimate conversation with David Kelley. A creator of the Apple mouse and founder of the groundbreaking d.school at Stanford, Kelley will share his thoughts on how each of us can find joy in our creative endeavors. We will have conference sessions Saturday, Oct. 17, and Sunday, Oct. 18, at the Li Ka Shing Center for Learning and Knowledge at Stanford University School of Medicine. The conference hotel is the Sheraton Palo Alto at 625 El Camino Real. The lively and topical sessions will focus on: • Digital transformation and the innovative use of tech-

nology in the newsroom; • Diversity in the newsroom and in reaching new audiences; • First Amendment and access issues; • Newsroom leadership. APPM will focus on using analytics and research to better utilize visual journalism, as well as innovative approaches to increase the impact of visual reporting. Other highlights: • We will celebrate the winners of the ASNE Awards and APME Journalism Excellence Awards at a Saturday luncheon. On Sunday, we will meet again for a special lunch. Tickets to both lunches can be purchased when you register. • The opening reception Friday night will also include an auction at the alumni center. • The silent and live auctions will offer one-of-a-kind items, such as sports tickets, vacation retreats, jewelry, autographed books and much more. • The conference will feature high-profile speakers from the tech and journalism industries.

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2015 APME/ASNE STANFORD CONFERENCE

great ideas

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ave you launched a great new feature, page or Web project, or used a social media tool in a great new way? Well, we want to recognize your great

idea. Associated Press Media Editors recognizes a Great Idea every month on APME.com and we will showcase monthly winners in our popular

annual Great Ideas book, This year’s book will be released at our conference in Palo Alto. This is a chance for your newspaper to show off great work and to help fellow editors by providing ideas that might work in their markets. It’s simple to submit your Great Idea. Just go to the Great Ideas page at APME.com, fill out the online form and attach an image or submit link.

FANTASY FOOTBALL The Patriot-News, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania Cate Barron WHAT THEY DID: Reporter Dustin Hockensmith developed a fantasy football beat that has done extremely well online. The newspaper wanted to get in on the action and published a guide to drafting strategy for this season.

100 DAYS OF TACOS Arizona Daily Star, Tucson) Jill Jorden Spitz WHAT THEY DID: Tucson isn’t exactly a one-taco town. Everywhere you look, someone is putting something intriguing and altogether wonderful inside a tortilla. The Arizona Daily Star decided to celebrate that tradition with, “100 Days of Tacos.” Every day all summer, digital food writer Andi Berlin ate a taco — in every part of town, at every price point and at every type of restaurant. She brought readers along with regular videos and a gallery (including a cool tidbit about each restaurant or taco truck) that she added to every day.

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THE SCORE MAGAZINE

101 THINGS THAT PLAY IN PEORIA Journal Star, Peoria, Illinois Dennis Anderson WHAT THEY DID: Series that are centered on community lists aren’t new. But some of the features we added to our 101 Things That Play in Peoria series made it unique. We worked closely with our advertising department to identify five sponsors, with one ad accompanying each story. Online, each Thing had a video, which was produced using Tout, a program that’s easy to produce and edit short videos. Lastly, because of the increased community interest in the series, we produced a full-color paperback book.

CITY BEAUTIFUL Winnipeg Free Press, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada Julie Carl WHAT THEY DID: Our City Beautiful project tells the story of Winnipeg through the city’s iconic architecture. It is truly a multimedia project which uses all media from words to video to heritage photos to fresh photography. But what really put it over the top was video, shot from a drone, of the Golden Boy statue atop the provincial legislature building, as well as overhead shots of various landmarks. The law still dictates extremely restrictive use of drones by the media. We contracted a drone enthusiast to shoot the video for us, thus giving Winnipeg Free Press readers their first glimpse of a new angle on their city.

The Repository, Canton, Ohio Jess Bennett WHAT THEY DID: Stark County sports fans have something to cheer about with the launch of The Score magazine this fall. On newsstands quarterly, the glossy, 68-page magazine features articles on area high school and college athletes, teams, coaches and more. The magazine was created to capitalize on the Hall of Fame City’s (and surrounding region’s) passion for sports—especially high school sports. Readers can dive into columns and in-depth profiles written by The Repository’s award-winning sports staff. Each issue will cover all the local athletic action, along with fun stories on post-game activities, tailgate ideas, healthy recipes, interviews and previews of the coming season. Each issue also includes a full calendar of the season’s games, matches, meets and events. The Score is a must-read for athletes, parents and all Stark County sports fans. A full digital experience is available at www. thescorestark.com and a social media presence is in development.

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“This isn't a generation that sits down in the morning with coffee and the paper for 45 minutes. It’s a more transient way of consuming the news.”

2015

Jennifer Maerz

CONFERENCE

PREVIEW

Conference panel to probe next generation news habits By Angie Muhs APME News illennials. You know they’re reading, but are they coming to your news organization's site to find news? And if not, what can editors do to get them there? The “Next Generation News Habits” panel, which will be held at 3 p.m. Sunday, will tackle the questions surrounding the different ways in which millennial audiences consume news. The group will talk about the best ways to engage this group of younger, voracious news consumers and highlight current research and some success stories. Panel members include Tony Elkins, assistant managing editor/innovation at the Sarasota Herald-Tribune; Tran Ha, Media Experiments Project lead, Institute of Design, d.school, at Stanford University; Jesse Holcomb, associate director of journalism research, Pew Research Center; and Jennifer Maerz, former editor-in-chief, Gannett’s new media project The Bold Italic. The moderator will be Jim Brady, CEO of Billy Penn.

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Millennial audiences are consuming news, Maerz said. But they're doing so through a different “ecosystem of gadgets” and in a less structured way. “This isn't a generation that sits down in the morning with coffee and the paper for 45 minutes,” Maerz said. “It’s a more transient way of consuming the news.” For instance, these readers are not necessarily coming to a site through a home page, she said. They also have high expectations for user experience on mobile devices. “These are people who grew up tethered to technology,” Maerz said. But at the same time, focusing on technology “isn’t the only answer” in developing a strategy for attracting millennial readers, Ha cautioned. In other words, just because you have a mobile strategy, that's not enough to assume you’ll engage younger readers, she said. “It’s not the wrong thing to do, but it's not the only thing to do,” she said. Both Maerz and Ha agreed that the stereotype of younger >> Continued on next page


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Link to the National Geographic article: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2015/03/ science-doubters/achenbach-text

Science under siege from many sides By Gary Graham now. There are more ways to get information, what he calls a APME News “radical democratization of communication and news.” he late U.S. Sen. Daniel Moynihan is still quotIn his National Geographic article earlier this year titled, ed as saying everyone is entitled to his own “Why Do Many Reasonable People Doubt Science?,” opinion, but not his own set of facts, a comment Achenbach wrote, “We live in an age when all manner of that seems very germane in this time when science scientific knowledge - from the safety of fluoride and vacis under siege from many sides. cines to the reality of climate change - faces organized and Joel Achenbach, one of the presenters for the often furious opposition. Empowered by their own sources War on Science panel, puts it bluntly: “On almost of information and their own interpretations of any issue, there are those who don’t accept the sciresearch, doubters have declared war on the consenence.” He describes them as “wrong and loud.” sus of experts.” Achenbach writes on science and politics for the Achenbach has several ideas about how journalists Washington Post’s national desk and is the author of should cover science and how they can help their several books. He has regularly contributed science audience understand complex but critical issues. For articles to National Geographic since 1998, writing example, when journalists write about climate ACHENBACH on such topics as dinosaurs, particle physics, earthchange, “Don’t overplay the maverick scientists’ views. quakes and extraterrestrial life. There will always be cranks, apostates, deniers.” Achenbach did not start out to become expert at writing Everyone needs to know how science works a little better, about science. His early work as a reporter at the Miami Achenbach said. “Research is not done on the obvious stuff, Herald included a weekly column titled “Why Things Are,” but the difficult issues. And it is not abnormal for science to which he wrote from 1988 to 1996. “I got used to interviewchange its mind.” ing scientists, how they thought, how they spoke,” he said in Reporters need to know who has ‘skin’ in the game when a recent interview. Achenbach found there was an advanwriting about the results of a study, he said. Achenbach tage to avoid pretending he was smarter than he was. “I was always asks who funded the research. transparent about my own ignorance,” he said, a technique, Achenbach, a 1982 graduate of Princeton with a degree in which often prompted scientists to take more time explainpolitics, urges journalists to educate themselves about ing the basics. developments in science. “Read the science journals,” he “People have tremendous respect for science and believe said. “A lot of what we do is just translation.” science is the path to the truth,” Achenbach said. The polarization comes when two sides or more have their own firmlyGary Graham is editor of The Spokesman-Review in Spokane, Washington. He can be reached at held views. In addition, Achenbach said, the advent of the garyg@spokesman.com. Internet has meant there are fewer gatekeepers to knowledge

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readers being only interested in “fluff” content is just that a misleading stereotype. “Every newsroom needs to think about their particular market and the young people within that market,” Ha said. “My big piece of advice to newsrooms is to figure out what differentiates themselves, and not try to chase a national perspective, like Buzzfeed.” The panel also will discuss success strategies and bright spots in the industry. Newsroom culture is a big factor, Maerz said, and a key component is valuing younger staff members’ insights and being willing to let them experiment. “Who really knows how Snapchat or Vine or Periscope

works?” she said. “Give people who are natives on these platforms some leadership and go for it.” Ha, a former editor of the Chicago Tribune’s millennialoriented RedEye, said she sees bright spots in newsroom that have created standalone products with a different voice. One example is Charlotte Five, which came out of the Charlotte Observer, she said. “What I hope people will take away from the panel is that it’s not a monolithic audience,” she said. Angie Muhs is executive editor of the State Journal-Register in Springfield, Illinois. She can be reached at angie.muhs@sj-r.com.

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editors in the news

Industry’s promotions, appointments, awards and recognition Touney retires as Quad-City Times executive editor Retiring Quad-City Times Executive Editor Jan Touney of Bettendorf, Iowa, doesn’t say “I” very much. Instead, when she talks about her newspaper career in Davenport, Iowa, she refers to “we” and TOUNEY “journalists” in general. When Touney’s name disappears from the masthead of the Quad-City Times, she will leave behind a journalism career of 40 years. Touney, a Chicago native, became managing editor of the Quad-City Times in 2003. In 2009, she was promoted to executive editor. She is a former APME Treasurer and board member.

Julie Wright named AP news editor for Missouri and Kansas Julie Wright, an editor who has held senior newsroom management positions in Kansas, Alaska, Minnesota and Tennessee over a three-decade journalism career, has been named news editor for The Associated Press in Missouri and Kansas. The appointment was announced Thursday, Sept. 10, by Tom Berman, the AP’s Central regional editor. Based in Kansas City, Missouri, Wright will oversee the AP's reporting efforts throughout Kansas and Missouri, with an emphasis on leading AP’s reporters in breaking exclusive stories across formats.

Lorando now leads NOLA.com; Amoss takes new role with Advance Digital State/metro editor Mark Lorando was named vice president of content and editor of NOLA.com/The TimesPicayune, Nola Media Group President Ricky Mathews announced Sept. 3. Editor Jim Amoss will remain on the editorial board into the fall, when he will become editor at large for Advance Digital, an affiliate of the news organization.

Compston-Strough named managing editor Jennifer Compston-Strough, a community journalist with nearly two decades of reporting and editing experience, has been named managing editor of The Times Leader of Martins Ferry, Ohio. Perry Nardo, regional manager of The Times Leader, The Intelligencer and

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Wheeling News-Register, made the announcement. In her new role, Compston-Strough will oversee the newspaper’s newsgathering operation in Eastern Ohio. She will direct a staff of reporters covering news events and writing features about life in Belmont County.

Veteran AP journalist tabbed to lead Sun-Star in Merced, California Michelle Morgante, an accomplished journalist and San Joaquin Valley native with experience in reporting and editing jobs across the United States and Latin America, has been named managing editor of the Merced (California) Sun-Star. Morgante, who has served in various news and management roles with The Associated Press since the early 1990s, joined the paper Sept. 8. Morgante, 47, relocated to Merced from Mexico City, where she serves as editor of the AP’s Latin America desk.

New leadership at American News in Aberdeen, South Dakota Scott Waltman, a longtime staff member of the American News in Aberdeen, South Dakota, has been promoted to managing editor. He oversees the day-to-day operations of the news staff and news products. Waltman was named assistant managing editor in 2014. A graduate of Roncalli High School and South Dakota State University, he began at the paper as a reporter in 2000. He replaces John Papendick, who retired in July.

Kaplan named editor of the Sun Herald in Biloxi, Mississippi Blake Kaplan has been named vice president/editor of the Sun Herald on the Mississippi Gulf Coast. The 49-yearold Kaplan has worked at the newspaper 21 years, starting as a reporter and becoming city editor seven years ago. Kaplan succeeded Stan Tiner, who retired Sept. 1 after 15 years as editor. Tiner led the Sun Herald to share the 2006 Pulitzer Prize for public service journalism, for coverage of Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath in 2005. Kaplan led a team of editors who produced the Sun Herald from Columbus, Georgia, after Katrina hit. >> Continued on next page


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Managing editor named at Beaver County Times in Beaver, Pennsylvania Patrick O’Shea was named managing editor of the Beaver County Times in Beaver, Pennsylvania, taking over the role after former Managing Editor Lisa Micco was promoted to executive editor. O’Shea has worn several hats and been part of many changes in his two decades at The Times, including the revitalization of the newspaper in the community.

Pennsylvania paper names new managing editor A veteran editor of community newspapers has been named managing editor of The Progress in Clearfield, Pennsylvania. Julie Benamati describes herself as a coal miner’s daughter who is committed to local news. She had joined a sister Community Media Group publication, The Courier-Express in Dubois, in January. Before that, Benamati served as editor of Pennsylvania Business Central and Marcellus Business Central in State College. The appointment was announced by Progress Publisher Pat Patterson.

New editor named at The Vicksburg Post Jan Griffey has been named editor of The Vicksburg (Mississippi) Post and affiliated publications. Griffey, a Natchez native, most recently worked as associate publisher and editor of The Natchez Democrat.

Hillyer named news editor at the Natchez (Mississippi) Democrat Ben Hillyer has been named news editor of The Natchez (Mississippi) Democrat, natchezdemocrat.com and affiliate publications. Kevin Cooper, the newspaper’s publisher, says they're fortunate to have Hillyer on their team and leading their newsroom. The newspaper reports that Hillyer has a long history with The Democrat, having worked as photographer, creative director and, most recently, design editor.

Former reporter named Burlington County Times news director Danielle Camilli, a longtime news reporter with the Burlington County Times in Willingboro, New Jersey, was promoted to the job of news director. She spent the last 18 months as a copy editor for the BCT and its sister papers, the Bucks County Courier Times and The Intelligencer. She was promoted to the position of news director by Shane Fitzgerald, executive editor of the three newspapers.

Matthew Bunk named editor of Missoulian Matthew Bunk is the new editor of the Missoulian newspaper in Missoula, Montana. As editor, Bunk leads a newsroom of 25 reporters, photographers and editors covering news and sports throughout western Montana. He also is editor of the Ravalli Republic newspaper in Hamilton. Bunk succeeds Sherry Devlin, BUNK who has served as editor of the Missoulian since 2004. Devlin was a reporter at the Missoulian, Spokesman-Review and Associated Press for 25 years before that, and will continue at the Missoulian as an associate editor.

Denver Post news director Kevin Dale to lead Arizona PBS The Denver Post’s news director is taking a new role leading ASU students. Kevin Dale, a senior editor who helped lead The Denver Post to a Pulitzer Prize and drive the newspaper’s digital transformation, DALE has been named executive editor of Cronkite News at Arizona PBS, a multiplatform daily news operation and innovation hub operated by the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University. Dale will oversee the roughly 120 students and 15 full-time editors/professors involved with the program.

Alan Miller named Columbus Dispatch editor after interim appointment A veteran editor at The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch has been appointed to lead the newspaper. Alan D. Miller, president of the Associated Press Media Editors, had been interim editor. He succeeds Benjamin Marrison, who stepped aside as editor after the newspaper was sold. The 55-year-old Miller has worked for the Dispatch for three decades and has been managing editor since 2004.

Digital First, Bay Area News Group Editor David J. Butler to retire David J. Butler, the top editor at Digital First Media and its San Jose (California) Mercury News and Bay Area News Group, announced that he will retire this fall. Butler, 65, is executive vice president and editor-in-chief of parent Digital First Media as well as editor and senior vice president of the San Jose Mercury News and its sister BANG newspapers, the Contra Costa Times and Oakland Tribune.

GateHouse Ohio Media appoints Desrosiers as executive editor GateHouse Ohio Media has appointed a new executive editor for its Ohio publications. Rich Desrosiers had been metro editor since 2008 at the Akron Beacon Journal. >> Continued on next page

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The appointment brings him back to The Repository in Canton, where he began his career 30 years ago. The 51year-old Desrosiers will lead The Repository, The Independent in Massillon and The Times-Reporter of DoverNew Philadelphia. He succeeds Therese D. Hayt, who became executive editor of the American Society of News Editors.

Stephanie Murray resigns as editor of The Tennessean newspaper Stefanie Murray, the vice president and executive editor of The Tennessean, has resigned from the Nashville newspaper. The Tennessean reported that Murray is leaving for personal reasons. Murray came to the paper in 2014 after serving as assistant managing editor for digital media at the Detroit Free Press and as community director at AnnArbor.com.

MURRAY

Graczyk to step down as managing editor of Daily News in Batavia, New York Mark Graczyk, who has served as managing editor of The Daily News in Batavia, New York, since 1992, will step down this fall. Graczyk worked as a reporter for several weekly newspapers before joining the Daily News in 1988 as a features editor.

HUSCHKA

Detroit Free Press names Robert Huschka executive editor The Detroit Free Press has named Robert Huschka to its top newsroom position.The newspaper reports that Huschka was named executive editor. He was named managing director in March and interim executive editor for about two months during a search. Huschka has worked at the Free Press for more than 16 years. His wife, Amy, is the newspaper’s social media editor. He replaces Paul Anger, who retired in May after 10 years with the newspaper.

Carolina Garcia, LANG managing editor for enterprise, to retire Carolina Garcia, managing editor for enterprise and projects for the Los Angeles Newspaper Group’s nine publications, told staffers she is retiring. The departure marks the end of a career in journalism that spanned more than three decades and in three states — nearly half of that time in California. She addressed the staff at the Los Angeles Daily News office in Woodland Hills. The 61-year-old joined the organization in 2008, taking over as senior editor of the Los Angeles Daily News — LANG’s flagship paper — after the departure of Editor Ron Kaye.

John D. Smith Jr. named managing editor of Cumberland paper John D. Smith Jr. has been named managing editor of The Cumberland Times-News in Cumberland, Maryland. Smith joined the newspaper in 1989, and has been the news editor, overseeing page design and production, since 1992. He succeeds Jan Alderton, who retired in June.

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New editor named for The Cincinnati Enquirer The Cincinnati Enquirer has named a journalism center director and Pulitzer Prize-winning editor to lead the Ohio newspaper. Peter Bhatia previously directed the Reynolds National Center for BHATIA Business Journalism at Arizona State’s Cronkite School of Journalism. He became editor and vice president of audience engagement at Enquirer Media on Aug. 17. The 62-year-old Bhatia helped lead newsrooms that won nine Pulitzers, including six at The Oregonian in Portland. He has been an editor at The Fresno Bee, The Sacramento Bee, the Dallas Times Herald and the San Francisco Examiner.

Jim Ellis named editor at News-Record in Miami, Oklahoma The Miami (Oklahoma) News-Record has named veteran sports editor Jim Ellis as its new managing editor, replacing Patrick Richardson who is now serving as managing editor in Pittsburg, Kansas. Ellis began his career at the News-Record 38 years ago.

New executive editor at Beaver County Times in Beaver, Pennsylvania Lisa Micco, the new executive editor at the Beaver County Times in Beaver, Pennsylvania, has spent nearly 30 years in journalism, including two years as managing editor at The Times. Micco came to The Times in September 2011 after more than 20 years at the NewCastle News, where she was a reporter, copy editor, page designer and section editor.


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member

showcase

APME recognizes contributions to the AP photo report through the Showcase Photo of the Month Award. The competition is judged by AP and member photo editors. The monthly winners are displayed at the annual conference and a Showcase Photo of the Year Award is presented.

JUNE AP Photo/The Post and Courier

Grace Beahm Parents of Tywanza Sanders, Tyrone Sanders and Felicia Sanders comfort each other at the graveside of their son at Emanuel AME Cemetery in Charleston, S.C. According to a pamphlet given at the funeral, Sanders died trying to protect Susie Jackson, his aunt, and Felicia Sanders, his mother who survived the shooting.

JULY AP Photo/The Commercial Appeal

Jim Weber Cousins Ann Claire Schenkel, left, and Greer Shenkel dance around Aurora Circle in the spray of a fire hose after a fourth of July parade in High Point Terrace, July 4. Neighborhood residents gathered for their 66th annual parade the longest standing Independence Day Parade in Memphis which ended with the traditional dousing compliments of the Memphis Fire Department.

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news&notes NewsTrain workshops offer digital training

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our NewsTrain workshops will offer training in the digital skills identified by local journalists as vital to their success: • Monroe, Louisiana, Oct. 15-16, 2015, social media, mobile newsgathering, data-driven enterprise reporting, mobile-first breaking news coverage, journalism ethics in the digital age. • DeKalb, Illinois, (65 miles west of Chicago) Oct. 29-30, 2015, social media, smartphone video, audience analytics, data-driven enterprise reporting, beat mapping, creative local features coverage. • Philadelphia, Nov. 13-14, 2015, a digital-storytelling boot camp including social media, data-driven enterprise reporting, smartphone video and photos, writing news for mobile. • Lexington, Kentucky, Jan. 21, 2016, social media, smartphone video, data-driven enterprise reporting. Registration fee at each site is $75. Go to www.apme.com for more information or contact Linda Austin, project director for NewsTrain, at laustin.newstrain@gmail.com or @LindaAustin.

Apply by Oct. 1 to host NewsTrain in 2016 Hosting NewsTrain brings home affordable training in the skills that matter most to journalists in your area We are seeking sites for three NewsTrains in 2016 to follow our workshop in Lexington, Kentucky, on Jan. 21. NewsTrain staffers work closely with successful applicants and their host committee of local journalists to determine critical training needs. Then, NewsTrain finds and pays top-flight trainers to address those needs. Attendees’ $75 registration fee is retained by APME. The host committee’s obligation includes supplying a light breakfast, lunch and snacks for either a one-day or two-day workshop attracting 100 journalists, journalism students and journalism educators. It should seek local sponsors to cover that cost, which can run $1,500 to $3,000, depending on the length of the workshop and catering costs. The host committee also markets the workshop regionally and secures a venue, usually a free or low-cost university site. Details on how to apply are at http://bit.ly/HostNewsTrain. Questions? Email Project Director Linda Austin at laustin.newstrain@gmail.com.

AP Stylebook offering interactive e-book

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he Associated Press Stylebook and Briefing on Media Law is available for the first time as an interactive e-book, making the nation’s leading resource for newsroom style easier to use. AP is releasing the 2015 AP Stylebook e-book with Basic Books, a division of The Perseus Books Group, which also publishes the perfect-bound print AP Stylebook sold in retail outlets. Stylebook fans have asked for an e-book version for years, tweeting AP Stylebook On Twitter to suggest adding an e-book to Stylebook’s digital product suite. While AP has offered a digital edition in PDF form on Google Play, Chegg eTextbooks and Follett’s BryteWave, this is the first time the AP Stylebook is available as an interactive e-book on platforms including Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, Barnes & Noble Nook and Kobo. At more than 5,000 entries, the 2015 AP Stylebook is the biggest edition in its more than six decades of publication.

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The e-book makes it faster and easier to find a relevant style rule. Now journalists, students, public relations professionals and other writers and editors will have style guidance at the ready at all times. The 2015 AP Stylebook includes about 300 new or revised entries. The Sports chapter is updated with terms on baseball, basketball, football, horse racing, soccer and winter sports. An 85-page dynamic index helps users quickly find words and definitions, supplementing the e-book’s search with concepts and themes users might look for. The AP Stylebook, edited by David Minthorn, Sally Jacobsen and Paula Froke, is widely used as a writing and editing reference in newsrooms, classrooms and corporate offices worldwide. Updated regularly since its initial publication in 1953, the AP Stylebook is a must-have reference for writers, editors, students and professionals. It provides fundamental guidelines for spelling, language, punctuation, usage and journalistic style.


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news&notes

AP to move world headquarters in early 2017

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he Associated Press plans to move its global headquarters from Manhattan’s far west side to a smaller space across the street from the World Trade Center site, the news cooperative’s president said Aug. 26. The move, planned for early 2017, would bring the AP to 200 Liberty St., which is across the street from the Sept. 11 memorial. At the time of the 9/11 attacks, the building was known as One World Financial Center. “I think this is a very positive development for AP and for AP’s employees,” said Gary Pruitt, AP president and CEO. The building would be the 11th corporate address in New York for the AP since it was founded 1846 by a group of newspapers that wanted to share the costs of covering the Mexican War. PRUITT At about 172,000 square feet, the new space would be about 40 percent smaller than the AP’s current headquarters at 450 W. 33rd St., on Manhattan’s far west side, which it has occupied since 2004. The AP had a lease for 291,000 square feet in that building through 2019 — far more than it needs based on the current size of its headquarters staff. Rent in the building was also expected to rise substantially in the years ahead amid the Hudson Yards project, a major remaking of the neighborhood from an industrial outpost to a new center for office and apartment towers. Ken Dale, AP’s chief financial officer, said if the AP stayed put, it would wind up paying more money for less space. The AP had various offices in downtown Manhattan

before moving to midtown in 1925. From 1938 to 2004, the AP had its world headquarters in New York City’s Rockefeller Center, a glamorous and prestigious address but one that became excessively pricey during New York City's economic boom. When the AP moved into its current headquarters on 33rd Street, part of the motivation was a desire for more space. The AP had 950 employees working at the new headquarters when it opened in 2004. A subsequent reorganization, however, slimmed down the central staff in favor of regional editing hubs in the U.S. and around the world. The AP also implemented a plan in 2010 to cut its worldwide payroll while trying to reduce fees for newspapers and broadcasters. About 600 AP employees will make the move to the new offices, company spokesman Paul Colford said. Both the AP’s new headquarters and its old one are owned by Brookfield Properties. The new Liberty Street headquarters will be in a 40-story tower built as part of the Battery Park City development in the mid-1980s, Falling debris from the World Trade Center smashed windows and covered the building with debris during the Sept. 11 attacks, but the skyscraper has since been fully restored. The once-shattered district around the trade center site has experienced a remarkable rebirth since 2001 — progress interrupted only slightly when parts of lower Manhattan flooded during Superstorm Sandy.

briefly...

AP puts historical footage on YouTube

APME accepting Editor Exchange applications APME is accepting applications for the 2015-2016 Editor Educator Exchange, a partnership that puts editors in college classrooms and journalism educators in the newsrooms of APME members. The goal is to help journalism programs stay abreast of the rapid changes occurring in U.S. newsrooms. Each semester, one editor will visit one college journalism program, and a faculty member will make a return visit to the editor’s news organization. The first exchange, in March, sent former APME president Bob Heisse, executive editor of The Times of Northwest Indiana, to Ball State University. Ball State faculty member Juli Metzger followed up with a visit to Heisse’s newsroom in Munster. Submit your application to Mark Baldwin at mbaldwin@rrstar.com

LONDON — The Associated Press and British Movietone, one of the world's most comprehensive newsreel archives, are together bringing more than 1 million minutes of digitized film footage to YouTube. Showcasing the moments, people and events that shape the world, it will be the largest upload of historical news content on the video-sharing platform to date. The two channels will act as a view-on-demand visual encyclopedia, offering a unique perspective on the most significant moments of modern history. Available for all to explore, the channels will also be powerful educational tools and a source of inspiration for history enthusiasts and documentary filmmakers. The YouTube channels will include more than 550,000 video stories dating from 1895 to the present day. For example, viewers can see video from the San Francisco earthquake in 1906, exclusive footage of the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941, Marilyn Monroe captured on film in London in the 1950s and Twiggy modeling the fashions of the 1960s.

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By David Minthorn

AP Stylebook minute Are there cold, hard facts in regard to global climate change?

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e recently reviewed our entry on global warming as part of our efforts to continually update the Stylebook to reflect language usage and accuracy. We are adding a brief description of those who don’t accept climate science or dispute the world is warming from man-made forces: Our guidance is to use climate change doubters or those who reject mainstream climate science and to avoid the use of skeptics or deniers. Some background on the change: Scientists who consider themselves real skeptics – who debunk mysticism, ESP and other pseudoscience, such as those who are part of the Center for Skeptical Inquiry – complain that non-scientists who reject mainstream climate science have usurped the phrase skeptic. They say they aren’t skeptics because “proper skepticism promotes scientific inquiry, critical investigation and the use of reason in examining controversial and extraordinary claims.” That group prefers the phrase “climate change deniers” for those who reject accepted global warming data and theory. But those who reject climate science say the phrase denier has the pejorative ring of Holocaust denier so The Associated Press prefers climate change doubter or someone who rejects mainstream science.

Here’s the addition and the full entry below. To describe those who don’t accept climate science or dispute the world is warming from man-made forces, use climate change doubters or those who reject mainstream climate science. Avoid use of skeptics or deniers. Some ask how we make changes to the Stylebook. Such changes - whether they involve adding a new term or amending an existing definition - are driven by their relevancy to reporting the news. The overriding factor is to help our reporters and editors present the news accurately, concisely and clearly, no matter what the topic or where it happens. Keeping the Stylebook up-to-date is a year-round process,

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and we tap into many resources for advice and guidance. No change is made lightly. With the flow of daily news, word coinages and spellings in politics, business, technology, science, sports, entertainment and other realms come to the fore almost every week. Some new terms have a short life and fade away; other terms enter common speech and writing. A major task is to decide what new definitions and spellings merit inclusion for reporting the news. When we get a suggestion for a new entry or a revision, we consult with other editors by phone or email to weigh whether it is needed, is correctly spelled and has the proper definition. Topics deemed highly relevant to breaking news coverage may be added to the online Stylebook immediately and then incorporated into the annual printed edition. We consult with AP news leaders for some major changes, as we did in 2013, when “illegal immigrant” was dropped in favor of phrases such as living in or entering a country illegally or without legal permission. We may also seek outside expertise for specialized topics, as we did in 2013-14, when weapons and mental health entries were added or revised. An advisory panel of outside editors and journalism teachers also offers a sounding board.


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2014 2015

APME BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Officers

Directors

n President: Alan D. Miller, The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch n Vice President: Laura Sellers-Earl, The Daily Astorian, Astoria, Oregon n Secretary: Bill Church, Herald-Tribune Media Group, Sarasota, Florida n Journalism Studies Chair: Jim Simon, The Seattle Times n Treasurer: Dennis Anderson, Peoria (Illinois) Journal Star

(Terms expiring in 2015) n Dennis Anderson, Peoria (Illinois) Journal Star n Mark Baldwin, Rockford (Illinois) Register Star n Chris Cobler, Victoria (Texas) Advocate n Angie Muhs, State Journal-Register, Springfield, Illinois

Executive Committee (officers above plus) n Past President: Debra Adams Simmons, Advance Publications n AP Senior Vice President/Executive Editor: Kathleen Carroll, New York n AP Vice President/Managing Editor U.S. News: Brian Carovillano n Marketing Chairwoman: Angie Muhs, State Journal-Register, Springfield, Illinois n Conference Program: Jim Simon, Seattle Times; Joe Hight, Oklahoma City

(Terms expiring in 2016) n David Arkin, GateHouse Media n Sonny Albarado, Arkansas Democrat Gazette n Jack Lail, Knoxville News Sentinel n Autumn Phillips, The Southern Illinoisan, Carbondale n Thomas Koetting, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel n Russ Mitchell, WKYC-TV, Cleveland n Cate Barron, Patriot-News, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania (Terms expiring in 2017) n Gary Graham, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Washington n Joe Hight, Oklahoma City n Eric Ludgood, Fox 5 News, Atlanta n Kelly Dyer Fry, The Oklahoman n Chris Quinn, Northeast Ohio Media Group n George Rodrigue, The Plain Dealer, Cleveland n Ray Rivera, Santa Fe New Mexican

Our communication vehicles

APME News Editor

n www.apme.com n www.facebook.com/APMEnews n www.twitter.com/APME n www.facebook.com/NewsTrain n https://twitter.com/NewsTrain and, APME Update: n www.apme.com/?page=Newsletters

n Andrew Oppmann, Middle Tennessee State University

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Get on board!

4 stops: NewsTrain workshops offer digital training Four NewsTrain workshops will offer training in the digital skills identified by local journalists as vital to their success:

> Monroe, Louisiana Oct. 15-16, 2015 Social media, mobile newsgathering, data-driven enterprise reporting, mobile-first breaking news coverage, journalism ethics in the digital age.

> DeKalb, Illinois Oct. 29-30, 2015 Social media, smartphone video, audience analytics, datadriven enterprise reporting, beat mapping, creative local features coverage.

> Philadelphia Nov. 13-14, 2015 A digital-storytelling boot camp including social media, datadriven enterprise reporting, smartphone video and photos, writing news for mobile.

> Lexington, Kentucky Jan. 21, 2016 Social media, smartphone video, data-driven enterprise reporting.

Registration fee at each site is $75. Go to www.apme.com for more information or contact Linda Austin, project director for NewsTrain, at laustin.newstrain@gmail.com or @LindaAustin

2015 Conference edition of APME News  
2015 Conference edition of APME News  

We’ ll be talking about the river of change upon the people and profession of this industry when we gather in Palo Alto, California, in Octo...

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