Page 1

SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

10:56 AM

Page 1


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

10:56 AM

Page 2

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016 From the Editor

Andrew Oppmann

T

wenty years ago, Bill Church and I were in the Gannett Senior Editors Management Development Program. I thought then that someday I would work for him. Time takes us down unexpected paths. Neither of us are still with Gannett, with Bill now southeast regional editor of GateHouse Media and executive editor of the Sarasota (Florida) Herald-Tribune and me teaching journalism at Middle Tennessee State University. At our Philadelphia convention in September, Bill takes the reins of the Associated Press Media Editors. He will become the latest in a long line of distinguished editors tapped to

serve the journalism industry by serving as president of this great organization. Bill will bring his passion for solid community journalism, First Amendment advocacy, diversity and entrepreneurship to APME. For Exhibit A, I offer this: He’s one of eight Knight Visiting Nieman Fellows studying parttime at Harvard this year. His project? Exploring new models for adaptability and innovation in community-size newsrooms. That’s big stuff, but not too big a topic for Bill to tackle. APME will kick into high gear with his energy. Turns out my prediction 20 years ago was right: Bill asked me to stay on as editor of APME News, so I am working for him.

inside September.2016

8

C O N V E N T I O N 3 4 6 8 10 12 15 18 20 22 23 24 27 30 35

16

27

E D I T I O N

2 0 1 6

The President’s Corner: An ideal time to look back and look ahead Ken Paulson: An unexpected endorsement for local newspapers Full Slate: New Leadership Conference offers tools and takeaways Church Lessons: Get to know incoming APME president Bill Church Changing of the Guard: 2016 APME roster of officers The Finalists: Who will win fifth annual Innovator of the Year? AP Stylebook minute: 2016 edition offers revisions and a redesign Great Ideas: Creative new features, Web projects and social media tools NewsTrain: Top digital journalists to teach on final stop of the year Michael A. Anastasi: Transparency is up to us Q&A with Evelyn Hsu: What it means to win the McGruder Award How They Did It: In Florida, a culture shift from platform to content Member Showcase: APME Photo of the Month winners Editors in the News: Promotions, appointments, awards APME Officers: Roster of APME Board of Directors

EDITOR Andrew Oppmann Adjunct Professor of Journalism Middle Tennessee State University Andrew.Oppmann@mtsu.edu DESIGNER Steve Massie smassie@crain.com

APME News is the quarterly magazine of the Associated Press Media Editors, a professional, nonprofit organization founded in 1933 in French Lick, Indiana. Its members include senior editors and leaders from news operations in the United States and Canada who are affiliated with The Associated Press, including more than 1,400 newspapers and online sites and about 2,000 broadcast outlets. The group also includes college journalism educators and college student media editors. APME works with AP to support and recognize journalism excellence and the First Amendment. To learn more about APME’s programs and activities, visit apme.com.

2

SEPTEMBER 2016

y

APME NEWS


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

10:56 AM

Page 3

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016 The President’s Corner

Laura Sellers-Earl

Looking back, looking ahead #welcometophilly

G

et ready to be inspired and wowed at the 2016 APME-ASNE News Leadership Conference. Convention chairs Bill Church, of The HeraldTribune in Sarasota, Fla., and Nancy Barnes, of the Houston Chronicle, and their crack team have assembled action-packed schedules focused on Leadership, Audience and Journalism with a

Capital J. These four days will be wall to wall with ideas and inspiration you can carry home to your newsrooms, and we promise to have a great time celebrating and reinvigorating the missions that bring us here.

#mygoodfriendbill As I eagerly pass the Associated Press Media Editors’ gavel to incoming President Bill Church, I can’t help but reflect on the many people who not only shaped this organization, but also my life and career, and those of many others. APME does great work in North America training journalists, protecting free speech, celebrating and promoting diversity and innovation and giving newsroom leaders practical tools and ideas to reach the communities they serve. But, truly, it is the peer group that surrounds and supports us that is truly my favorite thing about hanging with the APME crowd. Standing with Bill on the ladder are Jim Simon of The Seattle Times, Angie Muhs of the State Journal-Register in Springfield, Ill., and now Michael Days of the Philadelphia Daily News. The future is bright.

#thanksforeverything Leaving the board in January are three of our strongest advocates and allies — Cate Barron, Gary Graham and Jack Lail. Cate is the vice president of content for PA Media Group, Gary is the editor of The Spokesman Review in Spokane, Wash., and Jack is the director of digital for the Knoxville News Sentinel. All of these news leaders have contributed mightily to the cause in countless ways. Jack has been the backbone of our digital efforts since 2009, including a major website overhaul. His humorous, quiet, unerring demeanor has made him a fundraising and grant-writing champion and a key player at our after-hours gatherings. Gary retired in August and has been a director since 2012. He was the key player of our AP Sounding Board that surveyed AP members about the wire services coverage and issues important to newsroom leaders. He’s simply the bee’s knees. Cate is a force to be reckoned with. She’s a relentless advocate for our exceptional NewsTrain regional training programs and APME’s top-notch fundraiser, ensuring NewsTrain and our conferences are exceptional. She’s also wickedly funny and energizing to be around. Others who left the board earlier this year include David Arkin, former Gatehouse senior vice president for content and product development; Jane Davenport, formerly of the Toronto Star; Kelly Dyer Fry, editor and vice president of news & information at The Oklahoman, and Ray Rivera, editor of the Santa Fe New Mexican. Troopers, all. As we bid these fine journalists, leaders and friends farewell, we know we’ll stay in touch through our APME bonds.

#welcomeaboard The 2017 slate is as robust as any I can recall. Returning for their second three-year terms are Tom Koetting of the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel and Autumn Phillips of the Quad City Times in Davenport, Iowa. Both have been integral to our successes. Autumn is the chair of our marketing, branding and communications committee, which covers elections, membership, students and educators, website and social and this very magazine. Tom chaired APME’s contest committee admirably, which truly requires heavy lifting. After taking the required year off, former directors Dennis Anderson and Mark Baldwin step back on the board. Dennis is executive editor of the Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star and Mark is executive editor of the Rockford (Ill.) Star. These men are the bedrock of what we do: Dennis by serving for several years as our treasurer and hockey guide and Mark with his work with student journalists and planning conferences. Both joined the board in 2009. New to the board are: • Sandra Clark, vice president for news and civic dialogue, WHYY • Katrice Hardy, executive editor, Greenville News and GreenvilleOnline.com • Summer Moore, digital and audience engagement editor, The Times of Northwest Indiana • Alison Gerber, editor and director of content, Chattanooga Times Free Press • Maria Caporizzo, managing editor, digital, The Providence Journal • Matt Christensen, editor, Times-News in Twin Falls, Idaho A salute to an outstanding body of journalists, who, whenever we gather, never fails to remind me of why we do this, inspires me with new ways to move forward and re-energizes my spirit. Laura Sellers is the managing editor of The Daily Astorian in Oregon. She has served on the APME board for 13 years since 2001.

SEPTEMBER 2016 y

APME NEWS

3


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

10:56 AM

Page 4


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

10:56 AM

Page 5

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016 WHERE TO WATCH: https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=bq2_wSsDwkQ

By Ken Paulson

Local newspapers’ unexpected endorsement - and why it matters

U

nless you’re an executive with Tronc, John Oliver’s recent salute to local newspapers was the most heartening television show newspaper editors will see all year. Oliver explained that local newspapers are critical to our democracy in an episode of his “Last Week Tonight” show on HBO. “The media is a food chain which would fall apart without local newspapers,” Oliver said, showing a series of clips from television programs citing local newspapers as their sources on big stories. Though he tweaked some newspaper company owners and meaningless buzzwords (see Tronc), he attested to the core integrity of local journalism. Washington Post media columnist Margaret Sullivan aptly described it as "a pitch-perfect ode to how important newspapers are to their communities, and how troubling it is that they are fading.” So John Oliver likes us. He really, really likes us. But what about the audience that seems unable to distinguish the work of local newspapers from national news outlets and combative cable channels? The Newseum Institute’s First Amendment Center has just released the 2016 State of the First Amendment survey and the results are sobering: When asked how accurate the news media have been in covering the election, 23 percent said “very inaccurate” and 28 percent said it was OLIVER “somewhat inaccurate,” a thumbs-down from a majority. Just 10 percent described the reporting as “very accurate.” A stunning 74 percent said they do not believe that the news media attempt to report without bias. That’s disturbing. Good editors strive to get things right and correct the record when they don’t. And as I’ve written in the past, the real newsroom bias is against whoever happens to be in power. That skepticism is part of being a watchdog on government, a role that thankfully 71 percent of Americans still value, according to the survey. But maybe I’m overreacting. After all, what could go wrong if citizens stop reading and trusting election coverage? Unqualified candidates going unchallenged by local reporters? National special interest groups “buying” local races with overwhelming ad buys? Unchecked corruption in local government? Of course, all of that happens to some extent now, but local newspapers continue to provide a firewall against abuse of the system. As Oliver pointed out, “sooner or later we are either going to have to pay for journalism or we are all going to pay for it.” Local newspapers have been grappling with this disconnect for a long time. Readers value local papers’ watchdog role, but tend to lump them in with far more polarized national news outlets. Many say they want more substance and in-depth reporting, but that’s

Readers value local papers’ watchdog role, but tend to lump them in with far more polarized national news outlets.

not always what web traffic figures suggest. Still, Oliver’s helpful rant drew more than 4 million views in just three days on YouTube. Yes, a 19-minute testimonial to the importance of a free press just went viral and a film about a heroic Boston Globe investigation won the Academy Award for best film of the year. There may be hope after all. Ken Paulson is the president of the Newseum Institute’s First Amendment Center and dean of the College of Media and Entertainment at Middle Tennessee State University.

SEPTEMBER 2016 y

APME NEWS

5


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

10:56 AM

Page 6

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

FULL SLATE

News Leadership Conference will offer tools and takeaways

B

By Bill Church APME News

en Franklin will be in the house. So will Kathleen Carroll. And Marty Baron, too. Here’s the deal. There are reasons beyond cheesesteaks and Rocky steps to attend the 2016 ASNE-APME-APPM News Leadership in Philadelphia. The conference is packed with four days of programming befitting this historic city with a reputation for spurring leadership and change. This is the third year ASNE, APME and APPM have united their conferences in one place. Chicago in 2014 and Palo Alto in 2015 are good indicators of what attendees can expect for the Sept. 11-14 conference at the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, 1201 Market St. in downtown Philly. The Marriott is in the heart of Philadelphia, which Walk Score ranks fourth nationally among pedestrian-friendly cities. The conference hotel can be reached from Jefferson Station and is across the street from the famed Reading Terminal Market and a few blocks from the Liberty Bell and Independence Hall. It’s possible to tour Philly without using Uber. The conference has a new name befitting the ASNE, APME and APPM missions. Organizers agreed that calling this event the News

6

SEPTEMBER 2016

y

APME NEWS

Leadership Conference reflected a commitment to helping thought leaders and newsroom of all sizes navigate the future. “This News Leadership Conference rings the bell for insight, inspiration and ideas. We are celebrating great journalism, applauding innovative solutions. Editors can expect to come home brimming with doable initiatives they can replicate or build on,” said APME President Laura Sellers-Earl. For newsroom leaders debating the value of the conference at a time when budgets remain a juggling act, you’ll find plenty of tools and takeaways to justify the expense. For starters, the conference has an added day of programming with free workshops on Sunday, Sept. 11. in advance of the opening reception. Nationally recognized news leaders and an array of panels and presentations highlight a busy schedule Monday through Wednesday, Sept. 12-14. “We hope our members come away from this year's conference with fresh ideas, renewed enthusiasm to meet the demands of their jobs, and new connections in their contact lists. We've got a great lineup of speakers who have been highly successful at leading transformation and producing high quality coverage. The conference will provide a terrific place to explore and reflect on the important work our members are doing,” said ASNE President Pam Fine. You won’t want to miss an energizing opening reception at 6 p.m. >> Continued on next page


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

10:56 AM

Page 7

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

>> Continued from previous page

Sunday, Sept. 11, at the National Constitution Center. The center is an interactive tribute to freedom with memorable exhibits such as Signers’ Hall, which features 42 life-size statues of the founding fathers. The opening reception includes a visit from one of Philly’s famed Ben Franklin lookalikes and a menu of South Philly favorites, from Italian meats and cheeses to grilled vegetable skewers to cheesesteaks. A popular jazz quartet, featuring vocalist Tanqueray Hayward, will entertain throughout the evening. Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney is expected to welcome attendees when conference programming begins at 9 a.m. Monday, Sept. 12. Kathleen Carroll, executive editor of The Associated Press, then will deliver the first keynote of the conference. Other keynotes will come Tuesday from Pulitzer Prize winners Isabel Wilkerson and Washington Post Executive Editor Marty Baron. Wilkerson, author of The Warmth of Other Suns, KENNEY will speak on the persistence of racial injustice as a national challenge. Past APME President Hollis R. Towns, executive editor and vice president of the Asbury Park Press, will be recognized as winner of the 15th annual Robert G. McGruder Award for Diversity Leadership during the lunch on Tuesday, Sept. 13. The McGruder Award for Diversity Leadership is given annually to individuals, newsrooms or teams of journalists who embody the spirit of McGruder, a former executive editor of the Detroit Free Press, managing editor of The Plain Dealer in Cleveland and a graduate of Kent State University. McGruder, a past APME president, died of cancer in April 2002. The APME Innovator of the Year presentations will be Monday afternoon with moderator Angie Muhs, executive editor/vice president of audience development of The State Journal-Register. Finalists for Innovator of the Year are the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Sarasota Herald-Tribune and The Times of Northwest Indiana. “We all face incredible new pressures from all angles, freedom of information, access, revenue and the glut of information, to name a few. This conference cuts through the chaff and gets to the core of our missions while providing an exceptional peer networking environment and idea exchange,” Sellers-Earl said.

tent stores including Apple News, the iTunes Store and Apple Music, as well as Apple Pay, Siri, Maps, iAd, Apple's iCloud services, and Apple’s productivity and creativity apps. Cue will be interviewed by Eric Ulken, managing editor and vice president of digital content, Philadelphia Media Network. • When: Noon-1:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 12 (ticket required for the lunch)

3

Coffee with Counsel

• Why: Grab a coffee and start Tuesday with an informative session from two of the best First Amendment legal minds in the business. ASNE Legal Counsel Kevin Goldberg with law firm of Fletcher, Heald & Hildreth, P.L.C., and attorney Terry Mutchler with Pepper Hamilton LLC will answer any and all questions that you might have to help you better understand the laws that affect your everyday work. • When: 8-9 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13

4

Access and Accountability: What the next presidency will bring

• Why: No one knows the political landscape like the AP staff. AP reporters and editors will talk about the access and accountability on the campaign trail, and what that says about the governing to come under a new administration. • When: 3-3:50 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 13

5

The Future of Modern News Media • Why: After nearly a decade of upheaval, the future of the media business is ... as murky as ever, and perhaps more interesting than ever. What do the leaders and leading thinkers in news media today see in the years ahead? How are they changing to survive and thrive? How are they preparing their organizations for the future they envision? Mizell Stewart III, vice president for news operations, Gannett and the USA Today Network, moderates this must-hear, must-see panel. • When: 9-10 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 14

Five can’t-miss sessions

1

Google Tools for Your Newsrooms

• Why: Learn about free Google tools that can help your newsroom build interactive charts, maps, visualizations and more. Tools covered include Google Trends, Fusion Tables, MyMaps, Earth, Moon, Google Translate and more. You’ll enjoy the presentation from Mike Reilley, business director, MediaShift.org, and Google News Lab trainer. (Google also can provide free training in your newsroom.) Session materials can be found at: https:// mikereilley.com/google-news- labs/. • When: 1-3 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 11. Email APME Executive Director Sarah Nordgren at snordgren@ap.org to save your seat.

2

A Chat with Apple innovator Eddie Cue

• Why: Eddy Cue, Apple's senior vice president, internet software and services, explores ways to innovate and focuses on privacy issues, dissemination of news content and the value of newspaper media new. Cue oversees Apple's industry-leading con-

SEPTEMBER 2016 y

APME NEWS

7


9/3/2016

10:56 AM

Page 8

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

SEPT15.qxp

“In Bill Church’s newsroom, ideas lead to experiments that lead to sustainable products.”

CHURCH LESSONS Incoming APME president prefers the roads less traveled By Carrie Rasmussen Brand Marketing Manager, Herald-Tribune

W

hen I heard that Bill Church would soon be named to lead APME, the first thought that came to me was: Those lucky people. What’s not to love? He likes to laugh and to learn, he likes sports team mascots, he likes elegant ties and silly socks, and he likes donuts. This is a well-rounded fellow. Bill joined the Herald-Tribune family nearly four years ago. When he arrived in Sarasota, he landed in one of the oldest cities in America – not by its founding but rather by its median age. What role could a newspaper play in this community? Fortunately, a big one and its audience reads the daily paper with high expectations, especially from their executive editor.

8

SEPTEMBER 2016

y

APME NEWS

Bill established a strategy to guide his newsroom: Do journalism with impact; Engage with key audiences; Deliver experiences; Innovate like a startup; and, Be urgent optimists. You will quickly learn that Bill sews those ideas into his work ethic and life’s outlook. He is ready to engage, experience and enjoy. From church pews to opera houses, Bill appeals to a wide audience and knocks the message home: Your newspaper is your community and your community is reflected in your newspaper. Under his leadership, our newsroom continuously embarks on a journey of experiment and faith, throwing every idea on the wall in order to see what sticks. A lot of it does. In Bill Church’s newsroom, ideas lead to experiments that lead to sustainable products. At HeraldTribune.com, you find examples that include: • SPIRE CoLab. A unique partnership between the Herald>> Continued on next page


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

10:56 AM

Page 9

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

Bill Church delivers a keynote at a recent Sarasota chamber event.

>> Continued from previous page

Tribune and a local community foundation dedicated to creating compelling news stories on relevant social issues, currently focused on the importance of grade-level reading. • TheGunWriter.com. An independent site with national reach, dedicated to firearms, the firearms industry and art of sport shooting. • Herald-Tribune TV. A series of newsroomrecorded and – produced web TV series covering everything from high school sports to regional politics to local events. It turns out, some journalists can work both sides of the camera! • Medicaid.HeraldTribune.com. A continuing collection of stories about how Florida Medicaid pits families, doctors and insurance companies against each other at the expense of children's health. • Newtown 100. A year-plus-long series of stories about Sarasota’s historically black Newtown neighborhood, prompted by observance of its 100-year anniversary and reflective on a legacy of struggle and triumph. • Home to Havana. A Herald-Tribune reporter and photojournalist followed two former dancers who defected from Cuba as they return to the land of their birth with their son as he competes in an international ballet competition.

• Insane. Invisible. In Danger. A Pulitzer Prizewinning investigation, reported in partnership with the Tampa Bay Times, about Florida’s state-funded mental hospitals where deep budget cuts left patients and workers unsupervised and unsafe. And that’s just to name a few. If you haven’t picked up on it yet, Bill loves all aspects of journalism. He also loves journalists. When he got news of the pending Pulitzer, I was lucky enough to be in Bill’s company and the moment left an impression. He could have said almost anything — spoke of a career-long ambition or marvel at the well-deserved lauds. Instead, a bit choked up, he looked at me and, in sincere awe, whispered, “This newsroom ….” I work every day in wonder at Bill’s ability to reach for new and also as an example of it. I sit at a desk in the newsroom as a working member of the team … and the Herald-Tribune’s brand marketing manager, a new position to our newsroom and our industry. An active marketing role within the newsroom, another Bill Church innovation. Bill Church could be anything he wanted to be. How lucky is the Herald-Tribune family that he chose to be our editor? Just wait because soon you’ll be able to answer that question yourself as he enters into the role as your president.

SEPTEMBER 2016 y

APME NEWS

9


SEPT15.qxp

9/6/2016

7:49 PM

Page 10

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

DAYS AHEAD

Philadelphia Daily News editor will take APME reins in 2020 tive reporting in 2010. He has also served as managing editor of The Philadelphia Inquirer. ichael Days is becoming an He also has worked at The Wall Street Journal, the expert on presidents. Louisville (Kentucky) Courier-Journal, and the Democrat Days, editor of the Philadelphia & Chronicle in Rochester, N.Y. Daily News, will publish his first He is a member of the National Association of Black book, Obama’s Legacy: What He Journalists, and a former regional director of NABJ. He Accomplished as President, in also serves on the advisory board of the Scripps Howard September. And in 2020, Days is School of Journalism and Communication at Hampton in line to become president of APME. University and the board of visitors at Temple The APME board recently elected Days to the ladder. DAYS: LEADS IN ’20. University’s School of Media and Communication. He He becomes journalism studies chair at the Sept. 11-14 has served as a juror for the Pulitzer Prizes. ASNE-APME News Leadership Conference in Philadelphia, where Days has been honored twice by the Philadelphia Association of APME’s new officers begin their terms. Black Journalists, receiving the President’s Award and the “I fell in love with APME at my first conference almost 20 years Trailblazer Award. ago. I found in APME a kinship: editors primarily interested in He also was honored with the Lillian Award, for outstanding improving their skills and making their newsrooms better. That preservice to journalism, from the Delta Sigma Theta sorority. Days vailing culture will serve us well as we work quickly to meet the received the Robert McGruder Award for Diversity Leadership from needs of our readers in the digital space,” Days said. the Associated Press Media Editors. He joins Bill Church of the Sarasota, Fla., Herald-Tribune (2017 In March, he was selected as one of 125 people of distinction by president), Jim Simon of The Seattle Times (2018) and Angie Muhs his alma mater, Roman Catholic High School, on the occasion of its of the Springfield, Ill., State Journal-Register (2019) as APME offi125th anniversary. cers. He is a graduate of the College of the Holy Cross and the Under his leadership, the Daily News has won numerous nationUniversity of Missouri’s School of Journalism. al, state and local awards, including the Pulitzer Prize for investiga-

APME News staff

M

2016

APME SLATE

THREE-YEAR TERMS

Dennis Anderson Dennis is he executive editor at the Journal Star in Peoria, Illinois. He joined the APME board in 2009 and has served as the organization’s treasurer for the past three years. Prior to joining the Journal Star, Dennis spent seven years as top editor of the Journal-World in Lawrence, Kan. He also spent 10 years with Gannett newspapers, including the Norwich Bulletin in Connecticut from 1999 to 2005 and the Binghamton Press & Sun-Bulletin in New York from 1996-1999. He worked at the Daily Herald in Arlington Heights, Ill., from 1990 to 1996, last serving as a bureau chief.

Mark Baldwin Mark was appointed executive editor of the Rockford Register Star in 2012 after previously working for newspapers in Wisconsin, Kansas, Florida and Chicago. In Rockford, he led the movement to get news literacy training into public and parochial classrooms and introduced structured public dialogues to address the tough local

10

SEPTEMBER 2016

y

APME NEWS

issues raised by the newspaper's coverage. A member of the APME board from 2009 to 2015, he helped lead APME’s outreach to college journalism programs and served as APME conference program chair in 2012 and 2013. A native of Chicago, he holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in journalism from Northwestern University, though he likes to point out he was a student there long before the Wildcats became a football power. He's passionate about good craft beer — especially when it's enjoyed in the company of fellow APME editors — and his family: his wife, Sydney, and three grown daughters, one of whom followed dad into journalism.

Sandra Clark Sandra is the new vice president for news and civic dialogue at WHYY, overseeing all news gathering for radio, television and digital for the Philadelphia region's largest public media outlet and responsible for engaging the public in discussion of current issues. Sandra previously was managing editor for Arts & Entertainment and Operations at Philadelphia Media Network, publisher of the Philadelphia Inquirer, Daily News and Philly.com. Clark served on the newsroom senior leadership team and PMN’s executive committee, where she helped develop the short- and long-term strategic vision for its publications. Under Sandra’s leadership, her department was awarded a >> Continued on next page


SEPT15.qxp

9/6/2016

7:49 PM

Page 11

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

>> Continued from previous page

Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 2014 and won Top Three features sections in America by the Society for Features Journalism. Sandra’s accomplishments also include implementing two of PMN’s most successful reader-engagement initiatives: My Daughter’s Kitchen, a healthy-cooking program now in 35 schools, and the personalessays series “Black History: What I Wish I Knew.” Sandra is immediate past board president of the Pennsylvania Associated Press Managing Editors and currently serves on the board of the University of Kansas William Allen White School of Journalism. She earned her B.S. in Journalism at the University of Kansas and an M.B.A. from Arcadia University in 2014.

Katrice Hardy Katrice will soon be the Executive Editor of the Greenville News and GreenvilleOnline. com, a Gannett Co. Inc. company and part of the USA TODAY NETWORK, and she will serve as the Southeast Regional Editor responsible for Asheville Citizen-Times, The Anderson Independent Mail, and The News Leader, Staunton. She is currently the Managing Editor at The Virginian-Pilot based in Norfolk, Va. She's been with the news organization almost 21 years. Her many jobs there have included a number of watchdog and enterprise beats and metro editing positions. Under her leadership, the newspaper has won a myriad of awards from numerous organizations, including the Mayborn Literacy Nonfiction Writers Conference and the national Education Writer's Association. Other honors include state FOIA and Virginia Press Association awards.

Thomas Koetting Thomas is deputy managing editor at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, overseeing all news coverage and working across departments in coordinating enterprise work. He has been the primary editor on numerous national award-winning efforts – both breaking news and project work. He also has been a key figure in the digital transformation of the Journal Sentinel newsroom, and its current integration into Gannett Co. Koetting is passionate about mentoring other journalists – particularly those who are young or struggling – and providing thoughtful leadership during a time of great change. Those interests blend perfectly with APME and its commitment to empower journalists, nurture newsroom leaders, cultivate innovation and promote great work. He joined the APME board in 2013, and heads the Awards Committee and the National Reporting Project. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire, and his master’s degree – as a Kiplinger Fellow – from Ohio State University. Prior to joining the Journal Sentinel in 1997, he worked at the St. Paul Pioneer Press and The Wichita Eagle.

Summer Moore Summer is the digital and audience engagement editor for The Times of Northwest Indiana. Since joining the times in April of 2015,Summer has led the newsroom through a digital transformation, focusing on social and community partnerships. The changes have increased traffic by a monthly average of 30 percent. Before The Times, Summer was the lifestyles and entertainment

editor at The Repository in Canton, Ohio, where she transformed the weekly entertainment tab. Previously, she was the crime and punishment reporter for The (Augusta) Chronicle. Summer got her break when she was hired as an assistant at The Associated Press in New York.

Autum Phillips Autumn is the executive editor of the Quad-City Times in Davenport, Iowa. She formerly served as editor of The Southern Illinoisan in Carbondale, Illinois, the TimesNews in Twin Falls, Idaho, and the HeraldZeitung in New Braunfels, Texas. She has served as the Marketing Committee chairwoman for the last three years, in addition to writing features each edition of APME News.

TWO-YEAR TERMS

Alison Gerber Alison is editor and director of content for the Chattanooga Times Free Press. She joined the Times Free Press in 2003 as an assistant metro editor. She was promoted to metro editor and managing editor in the years that followed. She has been editor of the newspaper since 2011. As editor, she manages a newsroom of 85 people that produces a daily newspaper, three magazines, five weekly community newspapers and multiple special sections. The Times Free Press has been recognized with awards that include SPJ’s Sigma Delta Chi award and the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism. In two of the last four years, the newspaper has been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. It was recognized as one of Editor & Publisher’s 10 Newspapers That Do It Right in 2014; and for the past three years has received the Tennessee Press Association’s top honor, the General Excellence award. Alison is a member of the Tennessee Coalition for Open Government’s board and is a graduate of the Southern Newspaper Publishers’ Association’s NEX GEN mentor program. Before joining the Times Free Press, Alison was a reporter in Florida. She covered city hall, crime, the environment and education at the Naples Daily News and the Fort Myers News-Press. Alison is married with an 11-year- old daughter.

ONE-YEAR TERMS

Maria Caporizzo As managing editor, digital, at The Providence Journal, Maria is responsible for The Journal’s online report – from breaking news to long-term projects – across all platforms: desktop, tablet and mobile, our app, and increasingly importantly, social. She is a member of the Journal team that developed and very recently launched RhodeIsland.com, a things-to-do website aimed at growing audience and revenue. She also been part of two key efforts to push GateHouse and its news organizations further into digital: a team of 18 across the country that worked with a consultant to redesign the template on which hundreds of GateHouse websites are based; and a 10-member ‘digital transformation’ team that tests new tools, >> Continued on next page

SEPTEMBER 2016 y

APME NEWS

11


SEPT15.qxp

9/6/2016

7:49 PM

Page 12

THE FINALISTS

2016 marks the 10th year of the Innovator of the Year award

A

By Jack D. Lail APME News

benefit of going to APME/ASNE conferences is coming back with a list of “actionable” items that can be tried - or at least discussed-in your newsroom. Finding out what colleagues are doing new and innovative only spurs the creative push the expand boundaries and find new ways to connect with readers in your own newsroom. APME's Innovator of the Year Award, now in its 10th year, is a showcase for excellence in execution of the best new ideas. APME defines an innovation as “a new, creative and forwardthinking concept that has long-lasting effects and attracts new audiences or dollars. It can be a product, a technique or a new structure, but it must be able to show how it met a specific goal over a period of time. It should have potential to become an industry standard over a period of time.” APME's judges vet the Innovator of the Year entries and select three finalists for the awad. You get a chance on Monday, from 1:452:45 p.m., at the conference to see in-depth presentations on the three finalists and to ask questions. And you can always catch the presenters in the hallways for follow-up information. Here are this year's finalists and what the judges said:

“Community Civility Counts” The Times of Northwest Indiana “Beautiful in its simplicity. And the paper certainly has a lot of

>> Continued from previous page

troubleshoots common challenges and shares successes, with an eye toward scaling more widely. Previously, Maria has worked as an editor and producer for breaking news, multimedia and video. Our year-long public service project for 2015, Race in Rhode Island, was recently recognized as Best of GateHouse Best Web Project in our division. She holds a bachelor's degree from Carleton College, and lives in East Providence, R.I., with her partner, Deborah, and their 16-yearold border collie.

12

SEPTEMBER 2016

y

APME NEWS

organizations on board. The turnout in the hundreds for the “Civility Day” was impressive, and the event received a lot of coverage. We loved the anti-bullying videos from students. Some of them were quite powerful."

“Precious Lives: Kids, guns and how we can stop the violence” Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and media partners (WUWM and WNOV radio, Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism, and 371 Productions) “Breaking down each shooting, talking to the people it touched, is so important in a culture that treats them as normal. The partnership with radio is a great idea, especially making sure to pick two stations that reach a greater audience. The podcasts are terrific. Precious Lives clearly is having impact ... which is its purpose. We love the app idea, which has a very strong public service element. It could save lives.” >> Continued on next page

Matt Christensen Matt is editor of the Times-News in Twin Falls, Idaho. A graduate of Iowa State University’s Greenlee School of Journalism, Matt began his career as a reporter for the Twin Falls newspaper covering environmental issues. He’s served as city editor for papers in Minnesota and Wisconsin, and is the former editor of The Montana Standard in Butte. He returned to Idaho in 2015 to oversee news operations at the Times-News. Matt won top honors this year from the Idaho Press Club for column and editorial writing. He is married and a proud father of two young daughters.


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:15 AM

Page 13

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

>> Continued from previous page

“Unravel� Sarasota Herald-Tribune "unRavel.us is a great idea. A news app developed by and for young professionals is something that is needed in the industry. The stories that are clearly for this brand have a very strong voice. The potential for this kind of app moving forward is huge. Any newsroom can take this idea and cater it to their community, which is a big part of this competition." In a unique twist, the attendees at the conference vote to select the Innovator of the Year winner from the three finalists. It is only category of the APME journalism awards where the winner is picked by conference vote. Good luck to this year's finalists!

Innovator of the Year Winners: 2015: The Boston Herald 2014: The Wall Street Journal 2013: AZ, Digital Magazine from The Arizona Republic 2012: The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel 2011: The Register Citizen of Torrington, Conn. 2010: The Seattle Times 2009: The Oklahoman of Oklahoma City 2008: The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel 2007: The News-Press of Fort Myers, Fla. Jack D. Lail is digital director of the Knoxville News Sentinel and serves on the APME and the Tennessee APME board of directors.

SEPTEMBER 2016 y

APME NEWS

13


9/3/2016

11:15 AM

Page 14

SEPT15.qxp

“ ‘MAJOR FORCE’

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

“If AP were a sports team, we would be retiring Kathleen’s number” Gary Pruitt, AP president and CEO

Beloved veteran Kathleen Carroll to leave AP at end of year

T

mats from AP journalists based in more than 260 locations he Associated Press announced July 20 that in 106 countries. She is an industry leader on government Senior Vice President and Executive Editor challenges to press freedom and on vital security issues for Kathleen Carroll has decided to leave AP at journalists in war zones and other hostile environments. the end of the year. During her tenure the AP has significantly deepened its A search for the next executive editor will begin commitment to investigative and accountability reporting, immediately, starting with the strong talent at AP. A expanded its footprint by establishing bureaus in North successor is expected to be in place by Jan. 1. Korea, Myanmar and Saudi Arabia, transformed the newsCarroll, who has led AP’s global news operations for 14 room from analog to digital, modernized video operations years, is announcing her decision now to offer sufficient to high definition and pioneered the use of automation to time for that search. free journalists for more substantive work. She said her plans after leaving AP include some longShe pushed for modernity of the AP Stylebook, which postponed trips with her husband and joining in the family went online, became a more flexible tool with new sections, events leading up to their son’s college graduation in the such as fashion and food, and expanded spring. “Plus, sleeping in on weekdays for a with a valuable Spanish Stylebook. while,” she added. Innovation on her watch extended to staff During her tenure, Carroll has led news development as well. coverage of conflicts across the Middle Early on, Carroll established Beat of the East, a wrenching global recession and its Week competitions that continue to allow aftermath, four U.S. presidential elections, talented AP journalists to share ideas for countless natural disasters as well as tales being competitive and innovative. She of human folly and endurance. Under her notably shifted the career development path leadership AP journalists have won numerfor journalists outside the United States by ous awards, among them five Pulitzer moving AP away from an expatriate-manPrizes, including the Pulitzer for Public agement structure to one that includes talService, six George Polk Awards and 15 ented local leaders as well as opportunities Overseas Press Club Awards. for people to lead outside their native for“If AP were a sports team, we would be mats of text, photos or video. retiring Kathleen’s number,” said AP She currently serves as vice-chair of the President and CEO Gary Pruitt. “She has Committee to Protect Journalists and in July been a major force in shaping the modern 2013 was the first journalist to address the AP as a global, multiformat news leader. CARROLL: TIRELESS FIGHTER United Nations Security Council about jourUnder Kathleen’s direction, AP produced nalist safety, an issue that was brought close to home too not just the most comprehensive breaking news report in many times during her tenure. Nine AP journalists were the world but also increasingly distinctive, investigative killed on the job during that time, three were badly injured journalism.” and numerous others were jailed, beaten and harassed simPruitt added: “Kathleen held herself and AP to the highest ply for doing their jobs. ethical standards, and she fought tirelessly for the safety of Carroll worked for the AP three different times over her all journalists. I respect Kathleen’s decision to step down. career, most recently joining AP from Knight Ridder, where Her desire to help AP work through the news leadership she was chief of the Washington and international bureaus. transition is testimony to her commitment to the AP. We Before that she was an editor in AP’s Washington bureau, at will miss Kathleen’s many talents and wish her the best in the San Jose Mercury News and at the International Herald the next chapter of her life.” Tribune, and a journalist for the AP in Texas, New Jersey and “It is an extraordinary privilege to work with AP’s talented California. journalists who dedicate themselves to bringing unbiased Carroll began her career at The Dallas Morning News, truth to the world,” Carroll said. “They work tirelessly to where she cut her teeth on the tough Dallas police beat uncover secrets, give voice to the voiceless and deliver comwhile still an undergraduate at the University of Texas at pelling words and images from every corner of the globe. Arlington. The AP is strong because of their devotion to our mission — She is a member of Associated Press Media Editors and essential independent journalism — and I look forward to American Society of News Editors and served on the Pulitzer cheering for them and their next editor.” Prize Board from 2003 to 2012, the last year as co-chair. Carroll has been responsible for news content in all for-

14

SEPTEMBER 2016

y

APME NEWS


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:15 AM

Page 15

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

By David Minthorn

AP Stylebook minute

2016 edition released boasting revisions and redesigned interior

T

he Associated Press released the 2016 edition of The Associated Press Stylebook and Briefing on Media Law, which includes nearly 250 new or revised entries and the first interior page redesign in decades. Stylebook editors announced their intention to lowercase internet and web in all instances during the American Copy Editors Society convention in April. There are 36 new and updated entries in the food chapter, from arctic char to whisky/whiskey, and eight new and updated entries in the fashion chapter, including normcore and Uniqlo. The changes to the 2016 Stylebook also include: • 50 new and updated technology terms, including emoji, emoticon and metadata • New entries discouraging the use of child prostitute and mistress; restricting spree to shopping or revelry, not killing; and using the number of firefighters or quantity of equipment sent to a fire, not the number of alarms. • DJ is now allowed on first reference, and spokesperson is recognized, in addition to spokesman and spokeswoman • New guidance on the terms marijuana, cannabis and pot; cross dresser and transvestite; accident and crash; notorious and notoriety; • A new entry on data journalism The interior page redesign features new typography to make entries easier to find and read and the addition of navigational tabs on the sides of pages. At about 600 pages, the AP Stylebook is widely used as a writing and editing reference in newsrooms, classrooms and corporate offices worldwide. Updated regularly since its initial publication in 1953, the AP Stylebook provides fundamental guidelines for spelling, language, punctuation, usage and journalistic style. It is the definitive resource for journalists. The AP Stylebook is available in print and digital formats. The subscription-based AP Stylebook Online is updated throughout the year with the new and revised entries. It includes all Stylebook listings, plus an Ask the Editor feature with more than twice as many entries as the book itself, a pronunciation guide with phonetic spellings and audio pronouncers, and topical style guides about news events. Users can add their own entries, make notes and get notifications throughout the year when AP's editors add or update listings. AP Stylebook & Webster's New World Online adds 185,000 definitions from Stylebook's primary dictionary to Stylebook Online's subscription website. A single search delivers results from both and clearly identifies the source of each entry. Today subscribers get exclusive access to the 2016 Webster’s New World College Dictionary updated content; the new printed dictionary goes on sale this summer. The 2016 print edition costs $18.35 for AP member news organizations and college bookstores and $22.95 retail. AP Stylebook Online prices are $26 for individual subscribers for one year and $20.80 for news organizations that are AP members. Prices for

online site licenses are based on the number of users, starting at $210 for 10 users for a year. The new print edition and digital subscriptions can be ordered online at www.apstylebook.com. The AP Stylebook is also available as an e-book. The 2015 edition remains available on all major e-book platforms and the 2016 edition is expected to launch soon. n On the web: www.apstylebook.com n On Twitter: www.twitter.com/apstylebook n On Facebook: www.facebook.com/apstylebook

SEPTEMBER 2016 y

APME NEWS

15


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:15 AM

Page 16

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

Fifth anniversary of APME initiative to honor two smaller newspapers

T

he fifth anniversary of the Associated Press Media Editors’ Community Journalism Public Service Initiative will celebrate the work of two smaller newspapers, one of which has won the grant initiative for the second straight year. The Journal-Standard of Freeport, Ill, was named a winner in last year’s competition and won again this year for its “Freeport Fish Tank” project on its crumbling downtown. The other winner is The Daily Item of Sunbury, PA, which won for its project on heroin and prescription drug abuse crisis in its community. “While several news organizations have tackled projects on similar issues, we felt both The JournalStandard and The Daily Item showed fresh approaches to the projects,” said Joe Hight, chairman of APME judging panel. “We also were impressed by their records of project development and depth. We felt they were both examples to all news organization of how important these types of projects are to their communities.” Because of generous grants from the Park and APME foundations, the initiative will award grants of $2,500 to each newspaper, plus expenses for representatives to attend the upcoming ASNEAPME conference in Philadelphia. The Park Foundation of Ithaca, NY, also funded last year’s $2,500 grants that will help the news organizations to finish their projects. The grants are awarded to media companies that have a website and serve a metropolitan area (MSA) of 100,000 or fewer people. The project can use print and/or digital platforms and include social media and/or a mobile strategy. It should be considered entrepreneurial and should have the potential to be used elsewhere, including by a larger media company. Last year, The Journal-Standard was selected for its series analyzing the dramatic effect of a series of shootings on the 24,000 people who live in Freeport. The Journal-Standard won this year for creating a unique engagement opportunity, modeled after the TV show “Shark Tank.” Local Editor Jillian Duchnowski will represent The Journal-Standard again at this year’s conference. “The Journal-Standard is ambitiously looking at community engagement in a new way,” wrote judge Summer Moore, digital and audience engagement editor for The Times of Northwest Indiana. “By inserting themselves in a community project such as this, they are letting Freeport know they will be more than observers in the redevelopment of their downtown.” In an effort to help Freeport’s downtown blight left by big box stores, the newspaper has teamed up with local community leaders

16

SEPTEMBER 2016

y

APME NEWS

The Daily Item of Sudbury, Pa., earned praise for its project on heroin and prescription drug abuse in its community.

to start the “Freeport Fish Tank.” They have partnered with local economic development leaders and bankers to develop a program to support entrepreneurs through mentors and prize packages. The money from the grant will help cover costs for the event, support social media advertising to bring in new audiences and support freelance work to cover the daily stories while reporters are working on this project. The Daily Item, winner of the second grant, will be represented by Editor Dennis M. Lyons at the conference. He wrote the grant will be used to train the newspaper’s seven reporters in data mining and multimedia presentations for a major project on the local heroin/prescription drug abuse epidemic. It will also fund travel to places already implementing successful programs in line with The Item’s strong emphasis on public service. The grant application also linked to several ambitious projects The Daily Item has completed in the past nine months focusing on serious community issues, including homelessness, government spending and the area's lack of public transportation. The newspaper also spent thousands of dollars in an open records fight for documents from a police department's internal investigation. “This small newsroom is impressively ‘punching above its weight,’ ” wrote judge Cate Barron, vice president of content for PA Media Group. “The citizens of Sunbury are fortunate to have such a fierce watchdog.” Besides The Journal-Standard, other previous grant winners have been the Star-Tribune of Terre Haute, Ind., for its project, “A City on the Brink: Terre Haute’s Financial Crisis;” The Enid, Okla., News & Eagle for "Under Pressure" about the city’s lack of services for poor parts of its city; The Sedalia (Mo.) Democrat for “Meth at the Crossroads"; and The Daily Citizen of Beaver Dam, Wis., for "Mental Health on Hold."


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:15 AM

Page 17

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

Conference

sponsors

SEPTEMBER 2016 y

APME NEWS

17


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:15 AM

Page 18

APME NEWS

2016 APME/ASNE PHILADELPHIA CONFERENCE

great ideas

H

ave you launched a great new feature, page or Web project, or used a social media tool in a great new way? Well, we want to recognize your great

idea. Associated Press Media Editors recognizes a Great Idea every month on APME.com and we will showcase monthly winners in our popular

annual Great Ideas book, This year’s book will be released at our conference in Philadelphia. This is a chance for your publication or station to show off great work and to help fellow editors by providing ideas that might work in their markets. It’s simple to submit your Great Idea. Just go to the Great Ideas page at APME.com, fill out the online form and attach an image or submit link.

MONDAY MEMORIES The Blade Toledo, Ohio Luann Sharp WHAT THEY DID: Recognizing the popularity of Facebook’s Throwback Thursday, The Blade decided to give that idea a twist, and showcase some of its photographers' great work from over the years. The feature is called Monday Memories. Originally planned for just the website, it was decided that the feature would also run in the print edition. Monday was selected as a way to provide local copy for what is typically a slow copy day. A large staff-produced photo - almost always a black and white shot - is selected from The Blade’s archives to run online and in the features section of the newspaper. Accompanying the photo is a short story, usually 8-12 inches, to describe the story behind the photo, the date the photo was taken, and the name of the photographer who shot it. At the end of the story is a refer line that tells readers how they can purchase a copy of the photo, or any of the photos previously featured. Most of the orders for photo reprints are handled by MyCapture, an outside vendor who will also mail the photos to the customers. We also will do a fee-based page reprint that includes the photo and the article, if the reader requests it. In terms of purchases, our most successful sales have been photos of breaking news events, such as major floods, storms or fires; photos of famous politicians, sports figures or entertainers who visited or performed in Toledo; and, quirky slice-of-life photos such as those that showcase animals or road issues, such as potholes, sink holes, or weird traffic accidents. The feature is often among our top 5 stories on our web-

18

SEPTEMBER 2016

y

APME NEWS

site every Monday. We sell about 10 of these photos a month, but sometimes they lead to larger opportunities. For example, a new law firm opening in downtown Toledo wanted to display some old photos of the downtown area - they got they idea from a Monday Memories photo - and purchased a total of 10 different large frame-able reprints for their office.


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:15 AM

Page 19

GREAT IDEAS

UNDER OUR SKIN The Seattle Times, Seattle Linda Shaw WHAT THEY DID: Under Our Skin is an interactive video project that grew out of conversations at The Seattle Times about how we are covering race at a time when national and local events - the furor over police shootings, the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement, protests on college campuses and charged campaign rhetoric dominate headlines. Coming together from all corners of the newsroom, a group of videographers, developers, editors, reporters, photographers and designers decided to examine 12 words and phrases that we noticed people using and interpreting very differently - terms like “microaggression,” “safe space” and “white privilege.” We invited 18 people who represent a mix of ages, backgrounds and perspectives to talk about what those expressions mean to them. Those conversations, which often lasted several hours, were insightful, thought-provoking, honest, at times funny - and sometimes uncomfortable. Since the project was published, we’ve had about 650 people respond through comments and guest essays. Many others have used it in classrooms and trainings. We’ve been invited to share it at community festivals and journalism conferences, and the requests continue to come in.

MEDIA DAY Penn Live/The Patroit-News, Harrisburg, PA. Cate Barron WHAT THEY DID: We're in our second year of hosting Media Days for high school sports. Area media outlets get to interview players and coaches from every team but we also want the kids to enjoy themselves. For football, we held trike races, throwing contests and - most popular - best coach impersonations. NFL prizes come courtesy the Eagles, Steelers and Ravens. We cover heavily on our site and social with posts, videos, and loads of photos we'll use throughout the season. This year we added cheerleaders and two high school drum lines!

WINDOW ON THE WORLD The Columbus Dispatch, Columbus, Ohio Alan Miller WHAT THEY DID: We invite singers, songwriters, bands and interview subjects to sit in an informal studio in the storefront window of our building for a performance or interview. We put speakers on the front of the building to pipe the sound to passers-by; we livestream them via Facebook Live; and we also record a higher-quality video for our website. It has brought us thousands of hits online, and more important, it has help liven up the neighborhood and put us in front of a younger demographic online. We call it The Dispatch Window on the World.

SEPTEMBER 2016 y

APME NEWS

19


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:15 AM

Page 20

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

Veteran digital journalists to teach at Murfreesboro NewsTrain

F

By Linda Austin APME News

our accomplished digital journalists are set to teach at APME’s Murfreesboro NewsTrain Sept. 30-Oct. 1 in Tennessee. They are: • Emma Carew Grovum is the assistant managing editor at The Daily Beast. She will teach social media reporting, digital storytelling, and self-editing. • Tony Gonzalez is an enterprise reporter for Nashville Public Radio. He will teach writing for mobile, and mobile newsgathering. • John Duchneskie is the assistant managing editor for design and graphics at The Philadelphia Inquirer. He will teach data-driven enterprise, and data visualization. • Val Hoeppner is the director of the Center for Innovation in Media at Middle Tennessee State University. She will teach shooting shareable smartphone video, and using Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook Live and Periscope to build audiences. For only $85 ($75 for students), you can get two full days of digital training, including meals, at Middle Tennessee State University, 39 miles south of the Nashville airport. Attendees regularly rate NewsTrain’s training as 4.5 or higher, with 5 as highly effective and highly useful. “This is the best hands-on collection of practical sessions with knowledgeable ‘in-the-field’ DUCHNESKIE instructors I’ve experienced,” wrote reporter Kelly Shiers about the last workshop in Halifax, Nova Scotia, in May. Find more info and register for the Murfreesboro workshop – NewsTrain’s last stop in 2016 – at bit.ly/MurfreesboroNewsTrain. Other NewsTrains this year were in Lexington, Kentucky, and Lincoln, Nebraska. Slides and handouts from past NewsTrain workshops are at HOEPPNER http://www.slideshare.net/newstrain.

Apply by Oct. 1 to bring NewsTrain to your town in 2017

SEPTEMBER 2016

y

APME NEWS

Why host a NewsTrain? Past hosts cite training’s quality, affordability

You can bring the learning, morale boost and fun of a NewsTrain workshop to your town in 2017. Just put together a tentative host committee of representatives from local journalism organizations, and apply by Oct. 1 at bit.ly/HostNewsTrain. We are looking for enthusiastic host committees who will aggressively market the workshop to members of their organizations and others. We are also looking for geographic diversity in the sites. Successful host committees will work hand-in-glove with the NewsTrain staff over six months to plan and promote their workshops. The committee’s financial obligation includes supplying food for either a one-day or two-day workshop attracting 100. It should seek local sponsors to cover that cost, which can run $1,500 to $3,000. The host committee also identifies local training needs, markets the workshop regionally, makes copies and secures a venue, usually a university site. The payback is smarter, more engaged and enthusiastic journalists, journalism students and journalism educators in your region.

20

Chandra Thomas Whitfield, a journalist from Denver working for NBCNews.com/NBCBLK, attended NewsTrain in Halifax, Nova Scotia, in May.

Thinking about applying to host a NewsTrain in 2017? These host-committee chairs from recent NewsTrains explain what’s in it for you and the journalists in your region.

“Hosting a NewsTrain gives you the opportunity to tailor high-quality training that will be accessible and affordable for your staff. It’s worth the investment of your time and effort.” – Angie Muhs, executive editor, State Journal-Register; APME board member; and chair in DeKalb, Illinois, in 2015

“It’s simply the best training ever. APME has a winning formula, combining the ‘workshop-in-a-box’ format with a customized training approach to meet the needs of the host region …. Novice reporters and senior management alike leave feeling inspired and rejuvenated about their profession …. The organization, program development and execution of NewsTrains are top-notch.”

– Tina Ongkeko, managing director for member services, Newspapers Canada, and chair in Toronto in 2012, Vancouver in 2014 and Halifax in 2016 >> Continued on next page


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:15 AM

Page 21

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

>> Continued from previous page

We “were able to expose 100-plus journalists and future journalists to a day of just focusing on developing quality work on multiple platforms, using the latest technology. Thank you, APME, for making this commitment to our future.”

– Kathy Spurlock, general manager and executive editor, The News-Star, and chair in Monroe, Louisiana, in 2015

“NewsTrain has the experience to match your training goals with top trainers from around the country.” – Sue Burzynski Bullard, associate journalism professor, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and chair in Lincoln in 2016

“Journalists everywhere expect (implicitly or explicitly) training from their news organization. NewsTrain meets that expectation with timely, effective and efficient instruction in key skill demands.” – Gil Thelen, executive director, Florida Society of News Editors, and chair in Orlando in 2015

“In today’s changing news industry, it is important to make connections and learn from the best. NewsTrain achieves both goals, and its benefits extend well beyond participation in the sessions.” – Nancy Nussbaum, director of training and engagement, The Associated Press, and chair in Columbus, Ohio, in 2014

Trina Creighton, associate professor of journalism at the University of NebraskaLincoln, attended NewsTrain in Lincoln, Nebraska, in April.

“The reviews of the speakers and the programs were outstanding, and given the opportunity in the future, Kentucky will gladly host another APME NewsTrain.” – David T. Thompson, executive director, Kentucky Press Association, and co-chair in Lexington in 2016 Thank you to NewsTrain’s generous donors; join them and keep NewsTrain helping journalists NewsTrain’s high-quality training and low tuition – $85 ($75 for early birds) – is made possible by donors, big and small, who in 2016 include: n Dennis M. Anderson n The APME Foundation n The Associated Press n Linda Austin n Mark Baldwin n Catherine A. Barron n Anne Brennan n Bill Church n Jane R. Davenport n GateHouse Media LLC

PHOTOS BY LINDA AUSTIN

n Gary Graham n Bob Heisse n Thomas B. Koetting n Jack Lail n Levine Sullivan Koch & Schulz LLP n Christopher Wayne McGuinness n Alan Miller n Angie Muhs n Samuel I. Newhouse Foundation n Pepper Hamilton LLP n Autumn Phillips n George P. Rodrigue n Deanna Sands n Scripps Howard Foundation n Laura Sellers-Earl n Jim Simon We’d also welcome your financial support. Since 2003, NewsTrain has produced 83 workshops in the United States and Canada, training more than 6,000 journalists. To keep NewsTrain on the road, please make a tax-deductible donation at bit.ly/NewsTraindonation. Linda Austin is the project director for APME’s NewsTrain. She can be reached at laustin.newstrain@gmail.com and @LindaAustin_.

SEPTEMBER 2016

y

APME NEWS

21


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:15 AM

Page 22

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

By Michael A. Anastasi Executive Editor, The Tennessean

As access to information is threatened, transparency is up to us

T

his summer our country celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Freedom of Information Act, arguably at a time when access to information has never been under greater assault. Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email account is welldocumented and controversy refuses to abate with a federal judge recently ordering Clinton’s written testimony under oath. Also well-documented has been the Obama Administration’s aggressive prosecution of whistleblowers, its naming of a reporter as a co-conspirator in violation of the Espionage Act, and its curtailing of White House press access. Less known was the Administration’s decision last year that its Office of Administration – the department that provides back-office support, including the archiving of emails – would no longer even be subject to the Freedom of Information Act itself. That decision – which officially ended 40 years of transparency under presidents of both parties, though the movement to withhold documents from this office began under President Bush – now shields most of the White House from having to disclose email that has nothing to do with national security. Donald Trump, well, he’s been pretty plain-spoken about his disdain for the press. So, at the outset of the general election season, as media leaders, where do we find ourselves? What do we do? We have the ability to make the First Amendment, press freedom and transparency a topic of the national conversation, a topic of state conversation, a topic of local conversation.

22

SEPTEMBER 2016

y

APME NEWS

Let’s call not only on national debate moderators to ask an FOIrelated question of the presidential candidates, let us commit to doing so in congressional, state and local elections -- where often our own journalists are the ones asking the questions. Let’s do so in our local editorial questionnaires; let’s do so on the statewide campaign trail and at local forums. Let’s do so in our social media. We can effect action within communities we serve by making judicious but pointed First Amendment-related questions a staple of the campaign trail. We can evangelize making transparency a forefront issue for editorial boards. We have the opportunity to explain the intention of the First Amendment, the Freedom of Information Act and our local laws, and how they are interpreted and applied today. We can demonstrate how the world, or at least our little pieces of it, has been changed for the better by transparency. The Freedom of Information Act was the work of a California congressman, John Moss, who championed the legislation for years. Before he died in in 1997, he was asked by a biographer whether the Act was all that he had hoped for. “If you ask me if we are better off now than before we passed it,” he told Michael Lemov, “I would definitely say yes. If you ask me are we where we should be on open government, I would say, not by a long shot.” It’s in our hands now. Michael A. Anastasi is executive editor of The Tennessean in Nashville and vice president of news for the USA TODAY NETWORK–Tennessee.


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:15 AM

Page 23

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

& QA

with Evelyn Hsu

C

arlos Sanchez, executive editor of The Monitor, had a Q&A with Evelyn Hsu of the Maynard Institute on the diversity, the direction of her organization and the McGruder Award.

Q: As you know, Dori J. Maynard last year was honored posthumously as a recipient of the Robert G. McGruder Award for Diversity Leadership. What would that honor have meant to her? A: Anything related to the late Bob McGruder is meaningful and it goes without saying that Dori would have been thrilled with the honor. Dori spent part of her reporting career in Detroit at The Free Press, where Bob was an editor, so this would have had a special meaning for her.

Q: What does such an honor mean to the Maynard Institute? A: We love awards! In a more serious vein, we appreciate the acknowledgement of our work and our contributions to the craft. Also, it underscores that the work of the Maynard Institute is Dori's legacy, as we work to find new ways to help advance diversity in American journalism. Q: Following Dori Maynard’s death, the Maynard Institute began a process of self-examination regarding future direction. What is the future of the Maynard Institute? A: Yes, we are undertaking a strategic examination of our mission. I don't want to get ahead of our board of directors, which has to consider our final plans, but I can say we believe that our mission - to promote diversity in the media - is still essential. We are asking ourselves how we can best serve both traditional newsrooms and digital media, and we are looking at how to spread to a wider audience our message of the importance of diversity in both hiring and coverage. Q: What is the state of diversity in newsrooms in America? A: The numbers tell one part of the story: according to the annual ASNE census, the percentage of journalists of color in newspapers has been in the 12 to 14 percent range for more than a decade, even

Maynard Institute

as the percentage of people of color in the general population has grown to 37 percent. Another disappointing statistic: the 2015 census reported a 3 percent drop in one year in the number of journalists of color who are newsroom leaders. There have been individual milestones with the ascension of Dean Baquet at the New York Times and Lester Holt at NBC News. But the pipeline that helped journalists of color advance by providing training and mentorship needs to be rebuilt. Q: How have the industry’s economic challenges affected the goal of diversity in America’s newsrooms? A: It's logical that staff cutbacks and hiring freezes made it difficult to expand workforce diversity. From our perspective as a training organization we saw severe cutbacks in training budgets and management involvement in diversity. Now there is renewed concern across the country about how to discuss issues of race and inequality. In the past year we've seen tremendous interest in our Fault Lines training, which focuses on diversity in news judgment. A lot of newsrooms, after a couple of years of focusing just on the bottom line, now see the need to address the disconnect between the demographics of their workforce and the diversity of their communities. Q: What are the best opportunities for newsroom leaders to engage with communities on issues of diversity? A: There are excellent suggestions in the report "Educate, Empathize, Engage: Twelve Ways for Editors to Reach and Relate to Untapped Communities" that came out of the ASNE/APME convention last fall. Q: What is the importance of such awards as the McGruder Diversity Award in highlighting the need for diversity in newsrooms? A: We all need good role models. Who better than the late Bob McGruder?


9/3/2016

11:15 AM

Page 24

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

SEPT15.qxp

“There will be another platform in the future we haven’t thought of yet.” Howard Saltz, publisher and editor-in-chief, South Florida Sun Sentinel

The host of the entertainment webcast “Rod With a Twist” isn’t someone from the broadcasting world. It’s Rod Hagwood (left, at the bar), the Sun Sentinel’s longtime entertainment writer and columnist. Here he interviews the rap artist Luther Campbell (right, at the bar.) Behind the lens are Director of Photography Sarah Dussault and photo/video editor Dylan Bouscher. Not all reporters and columnists have Hagwood’s ability to host a TV-caliber web show, but everyone is moving toward that. All 15 members of the photo staff are — after years of training — fully adept at shooting, editing and posting video and still photos.

South Florida Sun Sentinel cultural shift from platform to content: “It’s about job duties, which isn’t sexy.”

HOW THEY DID IT By Autumn Phillips Quad-City Times executive editor

D

eciding to be “digital first” is just a new way of making an old mistake. Instead, many editors are turning to the phrase “platform agnostic,” like South Florida Sun Sentinel Publisher and Editor-in-Chief Howard Saltz. “I understand the short hand,” Saltz said. “We had a print first mentality for 100 years. … But if we’re focused on just print and digital, whatever is coming after digital will catch us off guard. We’re just doubling down on what we know now. “There will be another platform in the future we haven’t thought of yet. If we don’t think of our processes as platform agnostic, we’ll be as ill-prepared as we were for digital.”

24

SEPTEMBER 2016

y

APME NEWS

In 2014, the Sun Sentinel changed the workflow for everyone in the newsroom with the goal of rising above platforms and thinking only about content. Two years later, the culture shift is now routine, and the woman who engineered much of the transformation – former Sun Sentinel managing editor Anne Vasquez – has been promoted to Chief Digital Officer to spread the concept across the company, now called Tronc. Saltz said the process “liberated” the content creators – reporters and photographers. “They are now free to write what needs to be written or photographed in the format that makes the most sense for the type of content. “It’s not just length. It’s more nuanced. Maybe a story is best told as a series of tweets – then do that if that’s what best serves the reader.” >> Continued on next page


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:15 AM

Page 25

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

>> Continued from previous page

Step 1: New budgets There were a few key moves that led to the cultural shift. The first step involved the news budgets and the structure of what some call the Page 1 meeting. The Sun Sentinel still has news budgets, but content is recorded by topic, not by where it will go. “Under this model, communication becomes more important than ever,” Saltz said. “That becomes the primary purpose of the budget, to communicate among the various departments, not the creation of the print product.”

Step 2: Print production desk The next piece of the puzzle was somewhat counter-intuitive. In order to focus on the future, the Sun Sentinel newsroom needed to turn to the past. They created a print desk. The desk is run by the copy desk chief. He or she is informed how things performed on the website all day and comes up with a page 1 lineup.

“You don’t need your metro or business editor attending these meetings,” Saltz said. “Dan Hayes will send out the lineup by email and someone like me will look it over. What we found, the decisions that are made by an experienced person are the same decisions we would have made. “For 100 years, we’ve been wasting time in those meetings. The business editor’s time is better spent worrying about what his staff will cover that day, that week, that minute. He runs a content creation desk.” The print production desk produces the print product. The rest of the newsroom produces content – free of print deadline or space concerns. “How much time do you want senior editors debating the local report,” Saltz said. “What does it really matter? Ninety-five percent is sold through home delivery anyway. “It’s not like the days of the guys hawking on the streets. We spend so much time splitting hairs over what goes on the top of page 3. Delegate it down to smart people.”

South Florida Sun Sentinel 3:30 p.m. print news meeting. Before The New Digital, editors sat at a conference-room table for 30 minutes to debate Page One. Now, editors involved in print production gather informally for a 10-minute rundown. They don’t go to a conference room. They usually don’t bother sitting. The meeting is run by News Editor David Hayes (shown at the right, in the black shirt, back toward camera.)

>> Continued on next page

SEPTEMBER 2016

y

APME NEWS

25


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:15 AM

Page 26

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

>> Continued from previous page

Step 3: Staggered deadlines Every piece of content has a deadline. Deadlines are happening all day, rolling stories that are filed throughout the course of the day. The best way to describe the Sun Sentinel’s approach to deadlines is to look at a wire service – the write-thrus that the AP publishes as news is gathered. “We had already been doing some of this,” Saltz said. “It didn’t happen overnight and that’s an important point. This was evolutionary, not revolutionary. We were able to do this in 2014, because we already had a culture of filing early, when it’s ready.”

Is it still working?

Step 4: No weird titles The public understands the titles “reporter” and “editor.” So, Saltz decided not to change titles. “When I go to a cocktail party, I say that I’m the editor of the paper. I even say paper. My mom understands what that means,” he said. The culture shift, instead, came in the job descriptions. For example, there is no longer an arts and entertainment editor and a Web editor. Those roles are blended, with a focus on producing content all day.

Step 5: Training The weeks before the launch of the new roles and new workflow

That’s not a producer manning the website. It’s Assistant Metro Editor Doug Phillips. Assignment editors like Phillips “own” their content in digital products.

26

SEPTEMBER 2016 y

felt like preparing for a theater production. There were meetings and rehearsals. Those in charge of the content creation desk met regularly to discuss; editors met with reporters and walked them through what their day would be like. “We had weekly planning, long-term planning. It was very well communicated,” Saltz said. “As with anything new we had problems. We probably did not prepare the print production desk well enough. There was some bumpy ground for a couple weeks around how and when copy reached them. They were not fully prepared for it. It wasn’t a flaw in the plan; it was an under-communication. “If I could do it again, we would have done a couple dry runs with them.”

APME NEWS

The side benefit of the new workflow is more content. Working toward the print product subliminally pushed people to write to fit and stop. This was especially the case for columnists. “But if you’re a content creator and you have no idea where it’s going to be, you don’t stop. You cover the beat. Nobody stops because of newshole and so our site is more robust and it improved out print product.” Saltz said, if he could do it again, he would “think of a really cool name for it.” “People are calling it the ‘new digital.’ That’s a lousy name,” he said. “What else do you call it? This has to do with workflow and job descriptions, stuff that’s kind of boring if you tell people about it. “It’s about job duties. That ain’t sexy.”


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:15 AM

Page 27

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

member

showcase

APME recognizes contributions to the AP photo report through the Showcase Photo of the Month Award. The competition is judged by AP and member photo editors. The monthly winners are displayed at the annual conference and a Showcase Photo of the Year Award is presented.

FEBRUARY AP Photo Star Tribune

Aaron Lavinsky Attendees of the Luminary Loppet night on Lake of the Isles gathered near an illuminated pyramid Saturday, Feb. 6, 2016 at Lake of the Isles in Minneapolis. Here is what the judges Dan Marschka, Vinny Tennis and LNP photo staff had to say about the winning image: “The complimentary elements of people, composition, color and light work together to make a memorable photograph.�

MARCH AP Photo Los Angeles Daily News

David Crane Graham, center, and Lena Kelly, rear, Lexi's foster aunt and uncle, break down on the street after family services came to take Lexi away from her foster family in Santa Clarita, Calif., Monday, March 21, 2016. Lexi, who spent most of her life with California foster parents, was removed from her home on Monday under a court order that concluded her native American blood requires her placement with relatives in Utah.

SEPTEMBER 2016 y

APME NEWS

27


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:15 AM

Page 28

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

member

showcase APRIL AP Photo Houston Chronicle

Mark Mulligan Justin Nelzen, in red vest, joins others as they work to rescue horses along Cypresswood Drive near Humble along Cypress Creek, Monday, April 18, 2016, in Houston. More than a foot of rain fell Monday in parts of Houston, submerging scores of subdivisions and several major interstate highways, forcing the closure of schools and knocking out power to thousands of residents who were urged to shelter in place.

MAY AP Photo The Flint Journal

Jake May Alaysia Carr, 9, spins around as she dances under a fountainlike spray of water coming from a busted open fire hydrant as dozens of neighborhood children and families flock to cool off as the temperature rose to 88 degrees, Friday, May 27, 2016 at the intersection of E. Holbrook and Martin Luther King Avenues on the northside of Flint, Mich.

28

SEPTEMBER 2016

y

APME NEWS


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:15 AM

Page 29

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

member

showcase JUNE AP Photo The Palm Beach Post

Greg Lovett An aerial photo shows bluegreen algae enveloping an area along the St. Lucie River in Stuart, Fla., Wednesday, June 29, 2016 Officials want federal action along the stretch of Florida's Atlantic coast where the governor has declared a state of emergency over algae blooms. The Martin County Commission is inviting the president to view deteriorating water conditions that local officials blame on freshwater being released from the lake, according to a statement.

JULY AP Photo The Gazette

Stacie Scott Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump holds baby cousins Evelyn Kate Keane, 6months-old, and Kellen Campbell, 3-months-old, following his speech at the Gallogly Events Center at University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, Friday, July 29, 2016 in Colorado Springs, Colo.

SEPTEMBER 2016 y

APME NEWS

29


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:15 AM

Page 30

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

editors in the news

Industry’s promotions, appointments, awards and recognition

Julie Beer named editor of Goshen (Indiana) News

New Salt Lake Tribune owner replaces top editor with former staffer

Julie Beer has been named editor of The Goshen (Indiana) News. Beer, who had been the education reporter for the paper since 2014 and writes under the byline Julie Crothers Beer, was named this week to replace Michael Wanbaugh. Wanbaugh recently left the position to take a newsroom job at The South Bend Tribune. Beer is the first female editor of The News.

The new owner of The Salt Lake Tribune has made his first major editorial staffing move, replacing longtime Editor Terry Orme with Jennifer Napier-Pearce, a former staffer who had recently left for a university political institute. Paul Huntsman said in a statement that Napier-Pearce, who worked at the paper as a multimedia journalist, will help strengthen digital offerings that he called a “crucial lifeline” to the newspaper's future.

Prast named the Idaho Statesman’s new executive editor Rhonda Prast has been named executive editor at the Idaho Statesman, where she replaces Vicki Gowler, who retired in March after a decade at the paper’s helm. This is Prast’s first executive editor position. She previously worked at a variety of papers, including the Miami Herald, Seattle Times, Minneapolis Star Tribune and The Kansas City Star.

PRAST

York (Pennsylvania) Daily editor takes on added regional role for Gannett The editor of the York (Pennsylvania) Daily Record/Sunday News is taking on an additional editing role. Gannett Co. has tapped Jim McClure as regional editor for the Atlantic Group of its USA Today network. In that position, he will coordinate regional coverage among six Gannett newsrooms, in Pennsylvania; Wilmington, Delaware; and Salisbury, Maryland.

Perryman to retire from The Messenger in Madisonville, Kentucky After spending more than a decade wearing a number of hats in newsroom of The Messenger in Madisonville, Kentucky, Managing Editor Don Perryman is hanging them all on the rack. Perryman said in August he would retire later this month from a 13-year career of bringing local news to Hopkins County. He has been on medical leave since March.

Daily Hampshire Gazette hires investigative reporter as managing editor Dan Crowley, a long-time reporter for the Daily Hampshire Gazette, has been named the Gazette’s new managing editor. The paper is published in Northampton, Massachusetts. Crowley, 45, joined the Gazette’s staff on Sept. 11, 2001, and has covered a range of beats for the paper. His work has been recognized by the New England Newspaper and Press Association.

NASH

Des Moines Register executive editor named to new position at Gannett The executive editor of The Des Moines Register has been promoted to a new position with Gannett. The Register announced that Amalie Nash, its executive editor and vice president for news and engagement, has been named Gannett's west region executive editor. Nash will oversee about 50 news organizations in the Midwest and West.

McClatchy promotes news executive Tim Grieve McClatchy named Tim Grieve, who currently leads the company’s digital readership efforts, its vice president of news. Grieve will replace Anders Gyllenhaal effective Oct. 4. Gyllenhaal, 64, is stepping into a new role as senior editor GRIEVE and director of leadership and development. McClatchy owns The Sacramento Bee and 28 other daily newspapers.

Seguin (Texas) Gazette names new managing editor Travis Webb is the new managing editor of the Seguin (Texas) >> Continued on next page

30

SEPTEMBER 2016

y

APME NEWS


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:15 AM

Page 31

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

>> Continued from previous page

Gazette. The 34-year-old Webb comes to Seguin from the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung, where he was the assistant managing editor under former Gazette managing editor Chris Lykins. Webb replaces Kuhn, who was named the assistant managing editor of The Facts, after a little more than a year at the Gazette.

Snow named Murray (Kentucky) Ledger & Times managing editor David Snow is the new managing editor of the Murray Ledger & Times. Snow comes back to Murray after serving as the editor and reporter for The Eagle Post of Oak Grove, a subsidiary weekly newspaper of the Kentucky New Era of Hopkinsville. Snow covered news in south Christian County, including military news from the nearby Fort Campbell Army post.

New editor Curley named at Spokane’s Spokesman-Review Rob Curley has been named the new editor of The Spokesman-Review in Spokane, Washington. Curley will replace editor Gary Graham who is retiring in the fall. Curley, 45, most recently worked at the Orange County Register and previously worked at the Las Vegas Sun and The Washington Post. He's also developed websites at several newspapers.

Jennifer P. Brown, the New Era’s opinion editor, will handle day-today operations in the newsroom.

Sawyer leaving Illinois paper for Iowa State University position Gary Sawyer, editor and general manager of the Herald & Review of Decatur, Illinois, has accepted a position as lecturer in the Iowa State University Journalism and Mass Communication Department, beginning with the fall semester. Sawyer, 60, has been editor of the Herald & Review for the past 15 years and has worked for the organization’s parent company, Lee Enterprises Inc., for 35 years.

Terri Likens named Herald-Citizen managing editor Longtime community newspaper journalist Terri Likens has been named managing editor of the Herald-Citizen in Cookeville, Tennessee. The 58-year-old Likens comes to the paper after working the past few months as editor-at-large for Landmark Communications Inc. in Shelbyville, Kentucky. Likens previously worked 13 years as editor of the Roane County News in Kingston, Tennessee.

Coffman named executive editor of The Wichita Eagle

Northfield News Associate Editor Brad Phenow has been named Rice County Regional Editor for APG Media of Southern Minnesota, replacing Jerry Smith. Smith resigned to pursue a job opportunity on the East Coast.

Steve Coffman is the new executive editor of The Wichita Eagle. Coffman, 52, comes from the Jackson Sun in Jackson, Tennessee, where was executive editor and director of content and audience development since 2006. He succeeds COFFMAN Sherry Chisenhall, who is to become managing editor of the Charlotte (North Carolina) Observer.

Award-winning journalist hired as Missoulian city editor

New York Times names Marc Lacey as national editor

Gwen Florio has returned to the Missoulian as its city editor, where she will help direct coverage of news throughout the region. Florio, who has been both a reporter and editor since joining the Missoulian in 2007, won the Lee FLORIO Enterprises President’s Award for her coverage of the way police, prosecutors and the University of Montana handled rape allegations in Missoula in 2012.

The New York Times has named Marc Lacey national editor. Lacey, a former correspondent in Nairobi, Mexico City and Phoenix, was most recently associate managing editor for weekends at the newspaper. Lacey replaces Alison Mitchell, who was recently named senior editor for news at The Times.

Phenow named regional editor for APG Media of Southern Minnesota

A Philadelphia Inquirer editor tapped to head WHYY news A managing editor at The Philadelphia Inquirer is leaving to become the top news executive at public radio station WHYY in Philadelphia. The station said Sandra Clark will be replacing Chris Satullo, also a former CLARK Inquirer editor. He left the station in September. Clark has been the Inquirer’s managing editor for features, operation and digital.

Pace leaves Kentucky New Era editor’s job Eli Pace, who joined the Kentucky New Era in Hopkinsville as editor in September 2011, has resigned from his position with the newspaper, Publisher Taylor Wood Hayes said. Hayes said

LACEY

Carrie Budoff Brown named Politico editor Politico Managing Editor Carrie Budoff Brown, who oversees the company's European newsroom, has been named Politico’s next editor. Brown worked as a staff writer at the Hartford Courant and the Philadelphia Inquirer before joining Politico ahead of its 2007 launch. Between 2009 and 2014, she was Politico’s White House correspondent. Brown replaces Susan Glasser as editor.

Plain Dealer Rodrigue adds GM title, names Tim Warsinskey managing editor George Rodrigue, the editor of The Plain Dealer in Cleveland, Ohio, since January 2015, will now have the additional title of General Manager. The new role means he will be responsible for local circulation, production, human resources, and financial operations. Rodrigue also announced that he has appointed Timothy Warsinskey as The Plain Dealer’s managing editor. >> Continued on next page

SEPTEMBER 2016 y

APME NEWS

31


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:16 AM

Page 32

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

Michalski, managing editor for digital, will serve as interim editor in chief while the national newspaper, owned by Gannett Inc., conducts a nationwide search for a permanent successor.

>> Continued from previous page

Cody (Wyoming) Enterprise names Peabody as new editor Amber Peabody took over editor of the Cody (Wyoming) Enterprise. Peabody follows Vin Cappiello, who left to teach at Powell High School in the fall after running the newsroom for a year. Peabody has worked at the Enterprise since 2005, first as a reporter and later as special sections editor and news editor.

PEABODY

Carlsbad Current-Argus welcomes new managing editor Jessica Onsurez Senior reporter Jessica Onsurez is the new managing editor at the Carlsbad Current-Argus in Carlsbad, New Mexico. Onsurez succeeds Aaron Bracamontes, who is taking on the newly created role of audience analyst and content strategist for members of the Texas-New Mexico Newspapers Partnership.

SHELTON

Don Shelton named Seattle Times editor Don Shelton, sports editor of The Seattle Times, has been named the publication’s new editor. Shelton became sports editor in 2009. During his tenure, the section won 11 “top 10” awards at the Associated Press Sports Editors contest. Shelton has worked at The Times for 29 years. Former editor Kathy Best is now editor of the Missoulian in Missoula, Montana, and the Ravalli Republic in Hamilton, Montana

Indiana’s News and Tribune taps new editor

Dave Bohrer named editor of Meridian (Mississippi) Star

Jerrod Ferrari takes over Westport (Connecticut) News

The Meridian (Mississippi) Star has named Dave Bohrer as the paper’s new editor. Bohrer comes to Meridian from the Star-Gazette in Elmira, New York. During his 38-year career, he has also held positions at other newspapers in the New York area, including the Ithaca Journal.

Jerrod Ferrari, an award-winning Connecticut journalist with extensive experience in Fairfield County, has been named editor of the Westport News in Westport, Connecticut. Ferrari was co-managing editor of The Hour, the daily newspaper in Norwalk, and its sibling publication, the weekly Wilton Villager.

AP’s Phillips, Daniszewski get new posts The Associated Press announced Ian Phillips as its vice president for international news and his predecessor, John Daniszewski, as editor at large for standards. Phillips, currently AP’s Middle East news director, will be responsible for all of AP’s editors, reporters, photographers and video journalists outside the United States. Phillips will take over from Daniszewski, who will be in charge of addressing questions on ethics and standards involved in daily news coverage.

Tom Bray named senior editor of the Press-Telegram in Long Beach, California Veteran editor Tom Bray has been named senior editor of the Long Beach (California) Press-Telegram. Bray, who most recently served as managing editor of The Press-Enterprise in Riverside, will also serve as managing editor of news for the Southern California News Group, which includes the Press-Telegram.

Dave Callaway leaving USA TODAY for TheStreet Inc. USA TODAY Editor in Chief Dave Callaway stepped down July 1 to become CEO of financial news company TheStreet Inc. Patty

32

SEPTEMBER 2016

y

APME NEWS

The News and Tribune in Jeffersonville, Indiana, has named Susan Duncan, a longtime community newspaper executive, as editor. Duncan has worked in several newsroom roles during her 28-year journalism career, including most recently assistant editor of the Terre Haute Tribune-Star, also owned by the News and Tribune’s parent company, Community Newspaper Holdings Inc.

Denver Post names first woman editor in the newspaper’s 124-year history Lee Ann Colacioppo was named editor of The Denver Post, becoming the first woman to hold the position in the newspaper's nearly 124-year history. Colacioppo has worked in several roles during her 17-year tenure, including city editor, investigations editor and news editor. She succeeds Gregory L. Moore, who resigned in April after 14 years as editor.

The Baltimore Sun names Sam Davis managing editor The Baltimore Sun has named its first African-American managing editor. Fifty-six-year-old Sam Davis is a Baltimore native who >> Continued on next page


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:16 AM

Page 33

APME NEWS CONVENTION EDITION 2016

>> Continued from previous page

started at the Sun 36 years ago as a clerk in the sports department. He's been an assistant managing editor for the past three years.

New York Times announces Spayd as new public editor

SPAYD

Elizabeth Spayd, the editor in chief and publisher of The Columbia Journalism Review and a longtime editor at The Washington Post, will become the next public editor at The New York Times, the company announced. She succeeds Margaret Sullivan, who held the post from 2012 until her departure.

Morning Call’s publisher, editor-in-chief, retiring David Erdman, a journalist who over a 35-year career at The Morning Call in Allentown, Pennsylvania, rose through the ranks of the newspaper to become its top editor and publisher, announced his retirement in May. Erdman, 56, said his decision was mainly driven by the need to deal with a recently diagnosed esophageal condition.

Janet Santostefano named publisher of Centre Daily Times The McClatchy Company has promoted Janet Santostefano to the post of publisher at the Centre Daily Times in State College, Pennsylvania. She joined the Centre Daily Times in 2007 as an ad account executive and moved up the ranks, becoming vice president of advertising and marketing in 2014. She replaces Debra Leithauser, who became publisher at the Idaho Statesman in Boise, Idaho.

The Mountain Press in Sevierville, Tenn., appoints new editor Rhonda Bletner is the new editor of The Mountain Press. Bletner has worked for publications throughout Ohio during her nearly 20-year career in newspapers. Most recently, she was managing editor of the digital daily paper the Richland Source in Mansfield, Ohio. She replaced Jason Davis, who left to become director of Keep Sevier Beautiful.

Longtime executive editor to leave The Newport Daily News Executive editor Sheila L. Mullowney announced in April she was leaving The Newport (Rhode Island) Daily News after 15 years at the helm. The 46-year-old Mullowney started working for the paper as a copy editor in 1999. She’s been executive editor of the Edward A. Sherman Publishing Co. since 2006. Mullowney will be a communications specialist for ICI Services Corp., in Middletown.

Neil Chase Named Bay Area News Group Executive Editor The Bay Area News Group named Neil Chase, a veteran journalist and marketer with deep experience in print and digital news, as its executive editor. Chase will oversee a group that includes the East Bay Times and EastBayTimes.com, The Mercury News and MercuryNews.com, and 30 weekly print publications.

Peter Prengaman appointed AP news director for Brazil Peter Prengaman, a cross-format journalist and news manager who has reported from more than a dozen countries for The Associated Press, was named news director for Brazil. Based in Rio de Janeiro, Prengaman leads video, text and photo operations for the AP in Latin America's most populous nation.

Ex-Telegraph staffer returns to become managing editor A former staff member returned to become the top editor at The North Platte (Nebraska) Telegraph. Joan von Kampen replaced Job Vigil as managing editor April 4. Vigil announced in January that he’d volunteered to become a reporter, making way for Von Kampen. Von Kampen held several editing posts while working for the Telegraph from 1995 to 1997.

Jonathan Fahey named Associated Press global health editor Jonathan Fahey, a veteran business reporter and editor, was named global health editor for The Associated Press, overseeing a team of journalists to cover medicine, public health, the health care business and consumer health issues.

AP appoints Mitch Stacy hybrid sports-news reporter in Ohio Mitch Stacy, an award-winning AP journalist who has reported from Florida, Georgia and Ohio, was named a hybrid sports and news reporter in Columbus, Ohio.

Terrance Harris named AP sports, news reporter in Orlando Terrance Harris, a veteran sportswriter who has covered the NFL, NBA and college sports, including the Saints and Notre Dame, was hired as a hybrid sports and news journalist for The Associated Press in Orlando, Florida.

Paul Haven named AP news director for Latin America and Caribbean Paul Haven, a veteran foreign correspondent and news manager who has led Associated Press bureaus in South Asia, Europe and Latin America, was named the cooperative's first all-format News Director for Latin America and the Caribbean.

CBS News hires Josh Elliott for online news service CBS News has hired former “Good Morning America” personality Josh Elliott to be an anchor on the network's CBSN online news service, and an occasional contributor to CBS News television ELLIOTT broadcasts. CBS launched the digital news service in November 2014.

SEPTEMBER 2016 y

APME NEWS

33


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:16 AM

Page 34


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:16 AM

Page 35

APME NEWS

2015 2016

APME BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Officers

Directors

n President: Laura Sellers-Earl, The Daily Astorian, Astoria, Oregon, @lsellersearl n Vice President: Bill Church, Herald-Tribune Media Group, Sarasota, Florida, @BillChurchMedia n Secretary: Jim Simon, The Seattle Times, @jsimon88 n Journalism Studies Chair: Angie Muhs, State Journal-Register, Springfield, Illinois, @amuhs n Treasurer: Dennis Anderson, Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star, @dennisedit

(Terms expiring in 2016) n Autumn Phillips, Quad-City Times, Davenport, Iowa, @AutumnEdit n Thomas Koetting, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, @tkoetting n Cate Barron, Patriot-News, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, @catebarron n Jack Lail, Knoxville (Tenn.) News Sentinel, @jacklail

Executive Committee (officers above plus) n Past President: Alan D. Miller, The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch, @amiller78 n AP Senior Vice President/Executive Editor: Kathleen Carroll, New York, @kathleenatap n AP Managing Editor: Brian Carovillano, New York, @bcarovillano n Program Chair: Bill Church, Herald-Tribune Media Group, Sarasota, Florida, @BillChurchMedia n Program Co-Chair: Michael Days, Philadelphia Daily News, Philadelphia, @mikedays n Marketing Chair: Autumn Phillips, The Quad City Times, Davenport, Iowa @AutumnEdit n Marketing Co-Chair: George Rodrigue, The Plain Dealer, Cleveland, @gprodrigue3

Our communication vehicles n www.apme.com n www.facebook.com/APMEnews n www.twitter.com/APME n www.facebook.com/NewsTrain n https://twitter.com/NewsTrain and, APME Update: n www.apme.com/?page=Newsletters

(Terms expiring in 2017) n Michael Days, Philadelphia Daily News, Philadelphia, @mikedays n Gary Graham, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Washington, @GLgraham n Eric Ludgood, Fox 5 News, Atlanta n Kelly Dyer Fry, The Oklahoman, @kelfry n George Rodrigue, The Plain Dealer, Cleveland, @gprodrigue3 n Kurt Franck, The Blade, Toledo, Ohio, @KGFranck_Blade (Terms expiring in 2018) n Carlos Sanchez, The Monitor, McAllen, Texas, @CarlosASanchez n Michael Anastasi, The Tennessean, @ma_anastasi n Traci Bauer, The Journal News, New York, @tbauer n Anne Brennan, Cape Cod Times, Maine @AnneBrennanCCT n Ronnie Agnew, Mississippi Public Broadcasting, @ronagnew n Tom Arviso, Navajo Times, Window Rock, Arizona

APME News Editor n Andrew Oppmann, Middle Tennessee State University @aoppmann

SEPTEMBER 2016 y

APME NEWS

35


SEPT15.qxp

9/3/2016

11:16 AM

Page 36

Fall 2016 APME News – Conference Edition  
Fall 2016 APME News – Conference Edition  

Get ready to be inspired and wowed at the 2016 APME-ASNE News Leadership Conference. Convention chairs Bill Church, of The Herald-Tribune in...

Advertisement