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‘Campus Insecurity’ The Columbus Dispatch probes the rise in sexual assaults on college campuses

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From the Editor

Andrew Oppmann

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’m particularly fond of our summer issue each year, as we detail the great journalism being recognized in APME’s annual journalism competition, as well as the honors we bestow for outstanding performance among staff members of The Associated Press. You’ll find a complete listing of this year’s honorees in this issue, along with terrific “How They Did It” features by Autumn Phillips on two of the winners: The Columbus Dispatch and The Detroit News. I also hope you will take time to read a summary of the compelling work by the AP in its

“Seafood from Slaves” investigation, which has resulted in the rescue of more than 800 men who were forced into labor in the Southeast Asian seafood industry. I hope you share the pride we feel at APME News for being affiliated with such compelling and impactful journalism. Finally, please also take note of the recap of our first AP/APME national reporting project, “Fractured Framework,” which launched on Feb. 22. This collaborative project is a great example of how our association does more than just talk about great journalism; it helps make it happen.

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Alan D. Miller: Small-market public service journalism gets a boost Ken Paulson: New survey offers mixed messages for U.S. news media How They Did It: “Surviving through 18 in Detroit” by The Detroit News How They Did It: “Campus Insecurity” by The Columbus Dispatch APME Journalism Excellence Awards: The industry’s best and brightest 2015 Conference Preview: The countdown to Stanford begins Seafood from Slaves: Inside a sobering Associated Press Investigation Great Ideas: Recognizing great work in print, Web or social media Sonny Albarado: Access denied: The First Amendment Report Remembered: Respected journalist Dori Maynard to be lauded at conference Gary Graham: APME Sounding Board all ears for public records access NewsTrain: Attendees enthusiastic after hopping on Orlando NewsTrain Editors in the News: Promotions, appointments, awards and recognition Member Showcase: APME Photo of the Month winners AP Stylebook minute: Defining the role of the definite article in writing

ABOUT THE COVER Alaina Gonville kisses her 3-monthold son, Brandon, at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Hutzel Women’s Hospital in Detroit. Brandon was born premature through an emergency C-section. PHOTO: MAX ORTIZ HOW THEY DID IT PAGE 6

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Andrew Oppmann Adjunct Professor of Journalism Middle Tennessee State University Andrew.Oppmann@mtsu.edu DESIGNER

Steve Massie smassie@crain.com

APME News is the quarterly magazine of the Associated Press Media Editors, a professional, nonprofit organization founded in 1933 in French Lick, Indiana. Its members include senior editors and leaders from news operations in the United States and Canada who are affiliated with The Associated Press, including more than 1,400 newspapers and online sites and about 2,000 broadcast outlets. The group also includes college journalism educators and college student media editors. APME works with AP to support and recognize journalism excellence and the First Amendment. To learn more about APME’s programs and activities, visit apme.com.

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APME NEWS The President’s Corner

Alan D. Miller

Small-market public service journalism gets a boost from Park

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t’s journalism that makes a difference. It changes lives. It even saves lives. But it can’t always happen in small markets if the funding isn’t there to support it — even as little as a few hundred dollars to pay for copies of public records or travel outside routine beat coverage. Public-service journalism is our highest calling. So imagine the frustration of the editor or reporter at a small-market news organization who wants to answer that call but simply can’t afford it. Feeling that frustration, APME established the Community Journalism Public Service Initiative four years ago. It’s a competitive program that provides grants to journalists in small markets who demonstrate a need for the grant and the ability to do the reporting. A single recipient in each of the past three years received a modest $1,000 grant from the APME Foundation to aid the reporting and production of enterprising projects, as well as money for travel expenses to come to the APME conference to receive his or her award and attend conference sessions. That small amount made a huge difference. And we’re thrilled to say that this year and next, the Park Foundation of Ithaca, N.Y., has committed to underwriting and increasing the grants. With Park Foundation’s generous support, we will make two awards of $2,500 each in 2015 and 2016. And the APME Foundation will continue to help with travel expenses for the winners. The 2015 winners will present their work at the joint ASNEAPME Conference Oct. 16-18 at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. The Park Foundation was established in 1966 by the late Roy Hampton Park Sr. — a newsman who was founder, chairman, and chief executive officer of Park Communications Inc. which acquired or built 22 radio stations, 11 television stations, and 144 publications of which 41 were daily newspapers. What drew the Park Foundation’s attention to the APME Community Journalism Public Service Initiative was the lowcost, high-impact nature of the program. In short, the foundation saw results: The first winner of the award, The Daily Citizen, of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, produced the series “Mental Health on Hold,” which examined a lack of funding and services for those who desperately need mental-health care. The Sedalia (Missouri) Democrat won in 2013 for its project “Meth at the Crossroads,” which revealed how deeply the community was affected by growing addiction to methamphetamines. And the Oklahoma newspaper that won last year’s grant used it to reveal potentially life-threatening issues within the poorest parts of its city. The Enid News & Eagle won for its community initiative, “Under Pressure.”

Enid's 13,000-circulation newspaper began looking into the poor east side neighborhoods after the fire marshal said the area was a “pretty significant life safety hazard” because fire hydrants there were useless. The fire department also didn't consider the area safe for new construction. “With miles of water pipes almost a century old, the city knows it has a problem on its hands. Developers without knowledge of the issue have been surprised when city officials require costly changes to construction plans to improve fire safety, a side effect of low fire flow in older and unimproved sectors inside city limits,” wrote Dale Denwalt, the reporter on the story. “This investigation looks at the cost of being under pressure – from the eyes of developers and those who live in these neighborhoods.” News & Eagle staff members found the area is made up of minority populations, and 99 percent of elementary school students are eligible for free or reduced-cost lunches. It also found that many are immigrants from the Marshall Islands, with one of every 20 Marshallese now living in Enid. While other areas are prospering, the east side continues to struggle. “A person only has to cross the railroad tracks to find the forgotten Enid — underdeveloped, poor and largely ignored by years of prosperity.” The Enid newspaper used the grant not only to help free up Denwalt to complete the project, but also to provide for translation of the project into Marshallese and Spanish. It also used social media and mobile video to help tell the story to its community. You can read the series online at http://bit.ly/1NWYULH. The grant is awarded to media companies that have a website and serve a metropolitan area (MSA) of 100,000 or fewer people, with preference given to Associated Press members. The project can use print and/or digital platforms and include social media and/or a mobile strategy. The project should be considered entrepreneurial and should have the potential to be used elsewhere, including by a larger media company. The APME awards committee has determined at times that other projects deserved honorable mentions. Those projects received $500 grants. The outstanding work of smaller news organizations continues to be a priority for APME, and the Park Foundation grant has allowed APME to provide greater funding and increase the impact of public-service journalism that otherwise might never have been done. The APME board of directors is proud to assist in helping small-market journalists answer the call. Alan D. Miller is APME president and interim editor of The Columbus Dispatch. amiller@dispatch.com

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By Ken Paulson

New survey offers mixed messages for America’s news media

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’ll have to admit I rarely see strong reactions to my columns. Writing about the First Amendment and the role of a free press doesn’t typically incite frenzied responses. But a couple of years ago I made the mistake of writing about media bias, which I characterized as a myth. The notion of a partisan press with an agenda is a favorite theme of politicians, but I saw a real commitment to balance and getting things right in my 23 years in newspaper newsrooms. I’m sure most of my colleagues in APME have had similar experiences. If there is a bias, I argued, it’s against people in power, regardless of party. The responses were ugly, unique in their volume and venom. In readers’ views, I was either clueless or calculating, and almost certainly wrong. It turns out those angry readers have a lot of company. According to the new State of the First Amendment Survey from the Newseum Institute’s First Amendment Center, just 24 percent of Americans believe the news media try to report on the news without bias. That marks a 22-point drop from just two years ago. Most disturbing is that the youngest audience trusts us the least, with just 7 percent of 18- to 29 year-olds believing that we try to report without bias. Some of that can be attributed to the nation’s polarized political climate, but I fear that we have brought much of this on ourselves. We so often refer to “the media” as though it were a single institution encompassing every newspaper, broadcast station, website and blog. That takes a toll. I recently reviewed 15 essays written by mass communications students. Every essay referred to media in the singular. The survey results remind us that it’s more important than ever to demonstrate to our readers why we play such an important role in a community. “The media” won’t ask tough questions about the city budget, uncover local government waste or strive daily to fully and fairly reflect your hometown. But the local newspaper will. There are other journalism-related findings in the 2015 survey, some of them encouraging: • About 69 percent of Americans believe that the news media should act as a watchdog on government. • Fully 88 percent of those polled believe that people should be allowed to shoot video of police activities as long as the

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recording does not interfere with law enforcement work. • 83 percent of Americans believe that video from police body cams should be public records. • 60 percent of the public agree that students should be allowed to express their opinions of their teachers and school administrators on social media without facing punishment. • 60 percent of those surveyed say cartoonists should be allowed to publish images of Muhammad even though it might offend some. That noted, it’s a little unsettling that 1 in 3 Americans believe the cartoons should not be allowed. So there are mixed messages in the survey. The public recognizes the valuable role the press plays as a watchdog, but sees the reporting as intrinsically biased. And if there’s cynicism about the news media, there’s also suspicion of other institutions, fueling support for video monitoring of police and student speech about school administrators. In the end, every newspaper has to make its own case, conveying its own ethical standards to the community it serves. Journalistic integrity may not poll well, but it remains at the heart of this profession. Ken Paulson is the president of the Newseum Institute’s First Amendment Center and dean of the College of Media and Entertainment at Middle Tennessee State University.


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HOW THEY DID IT: APME AWARDS THE DETROIT NEWS Darnella Miller, 24, of Detroit is expecting her fourth child. She's taking parenting classes so she can get her three other kids out of foster care.

PHOTOS BY MAX ORTIZ/ THE DETROIT NEWS

PHOTO / HUY MACH

‘Surviving through age 18 in Detroit’

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By Autumn Phillips APME News

he residents of Detroit are so used to the idea that they live in one of the poorest, most dangerous cities in the United States that the horror of high child mortality has stopped getting attention. So, when your readers are numb to the stories of children caught in the crossfire of violence and high infant death rates, how do you tell the story again so that it makes a difference? Reporter Karen Bouffard had an idea. She covers health care for The Detroit News and in 2013, she set out on what would become a year of reporting on how difficult it is to survive to the age of 18 if you live in Detroit. Put together on the page, the statistics everyone had already heard told a story that was hard to stop reading and impossible not to feel an urgency that something should be and could be changed.

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The Detroit News was the winner of APME’s 45th Annual Public Service Award in the 40,000 to 149,999 circulation category for its investigation of Detroit's high infant-mortality rate. “This is tremendous reporting and a compelling story line that carried through the year,” the judges said. “It's impossible to stop reading, and it is the best of a very strong class.”

Bouffard spent six months collecting and studying the data. She partnered with and received two grants from the USC-Annenberg fellowship program to help with the work. She found out about the grant at the 2013 Association of Health Care Journalists. She stopped by the program’s table at the conference and shared her idea of writing about child mortality in Detroit. Fellowship program consultant Martha Shirk, who covered public health for 23 years for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, and Greg Tasker at The Detroit News helped her with her application and final proposal for the project. What gave the project “Surviving through age 18 in >> Continued on next page


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Sunsearae ‘Lo Lo’ Hall, mother of Kenis Green Jr., holds her son's ashes. Kenis was 12 when he was shot and killed on his front porch.

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Detroit” its impact for readers was the comparative data to other U.S. cities. Because the information wasn't readily available, Bouffard had to contact each state health department individually for city-level data. She used the U.S. Census Bureau's American Fact Finder database to get citylevel population data for children by year, which she needed to calculate death rates. “City-level death rates were not available for children in the age range I studied, so I calculated these rates by hand. Then I entered the rates into Excel, which I used for my numerical analysis. I also used Excel to create graphics of state of Michigan data that allowed me to view how Detroit’s child death rates changed over time since 2000,” Bouffard wrote in an email for this story. “Using these graphics, I was able to see that total child death rates, and rates of death by homicide, increased during the recession years. This was important to establish a correlation between economic instability and public health outcomes.” The factors that make Detroit the most dangerous place in the nation to be a child are complex, Bouffard found. For example, literacy rates correlate to survival rates. “Some Detroit parents struggle to understand doctors’ >> Continued on next page

Tanisha Jones checks the blood pressure of Derrick Jenkins, 7, aboard a mobile clinic outside Dixon Elementary School.

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instructions, read prescription labels or measure the correct dosage of medication for their children, because an estimated 47 percent of adults are functionally illiterate,” was the lead of her story “Parents’ illiteracy a challenge.” Literacy is part of the cycle of poverty that starts with violence in the schools. Parents won’t send their children to school, afraid of what might happen. Children are “home schooled,” by parents who didn't get much schooling themselves. Once Bouffard launched her project, The Detroit News was committed to following it through. This wasn’t an easy decision. Bouffard is the sole health care beat reporter at The Detroit News and she was focused on child mortality at the same time that the Affordable Care Act went into effect. “We had to make some tough decisions,” said Gary Miles,

Alaina Gonville kisses her 3-month-old Brandon at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Hutzel Women's Hospital in Detroit. Brandon was born premature through an emergency C-section.

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The Detroit News managing editor. “We turned to freelancing and relied on the wire more than we otherwise might.” After six months of research, the first set of stories ran over two days at the end of January 2014. Stories followed throughout the year. A story in May looked at the city's abortion rate — one in three pregnancies is terminated. In July, a story looked at maternal death rates— triple what it is in the rest of the nation. In December, Bouffard examined Detroit’s elevated asthma rate. “The bottom line is that health care availability in metro Detroit is pretty good,” Miles said. “There's the Children’s Hospital of Michigan in Detroit, which is well regarded. There is the University of Michigan children’s hospital. “But despite the quality health care available, we still had such high numbers. It was alarming.” >> Continued on next page


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Many families in Detroit must cope with the slaying of a family member. Marcel Jackson was killed while working as a security guard, leaving behind, from left, Tarik, 13; wife Hollie holding Aaliyah, 2; Jala, 16; Najidah, 18; Tamia, 13; and Gwendolyn, 7.

Also, as a result of the project, The Detroit News is workExpanding the conversation ing on a joint story with PBS NewsHour about how high In October, The Detroit News co-hosted a forum with the stress and emotional trauma might be related to the high W.K. Kellogg Foundation to get the community incidents of childhood asthma in Detroit, where involved in the discussion around infant mortal20,000 children suffer from the disease, Bouffard ity in Detroit. said. They invited a keynote speaker, Dr. Michael Lu, associate administrator of maternal and Setting priorities child health for Health Resources and Services Taking the health care reporter out of the Administration of U.S. Department of Health rotation while the Affordable Care Act was being and Human Services. enacted led to a lot of difficult discussions in the A panel of Detroit health leaders discussed newsroom. Miles said it was worth it to ease up how improving the economy and the schools on the need for daily stories — to rely on wire could lead to higher life expectancy for Detroit’s and freelance — in order to dedicate resources children. to something larger. “We brought attention to a problem that the “When you're talking about newsrooms these health industry was aware of, we just made the days, you often hear people talk about declining Detroit News reporter numbers more clear,” Miles said. “What we also resources," Miles said. “We can't do it all and we Karen Bouffard listens during the Detroit Infant offered was perspective, that this is the worst in have to make choices. Mortality roundtable. the country and even comparative to the third “The higher-end enterprise reporting is really world.” what sets newsrooms apart in a way quick hit After Bouffard’s initial stories published, she was invited breaking news stories can’t.” to present the project to the National Institute Health Working Group on Population Health at its meeting at UCAutumn Phillips is editor of The Southern Illinoisan Irvine in September. in Carbondale. She’s on Twitter at @AutumnEdit. >> Continued from previous page

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HOW THEY DID IT: APME AWARDS THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH A stranger sexually assaulted this Ohio State student in May near campus on E. 17th Avenue in May 2014, but OSU did not put out a crime alert to warn others.

DISPATCH PHOTO BY ERIC ALBRECHT

‘Campus Insecurity’ By Autumn Phillips APME News

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hile Rolling Stone magazine was in the headlines for botching an investigation into a campus gang rape, The Columbus Dispatch in Ohio, was approaching a similar story — methodically and accurately. The stories they published put into motion a shift on campuses and in the Ohio Legislature when it comes to the reporting and response to crime. Studying the two projects side-by-side — Rolling Stone’s “A Rape on Campus” and The Columbus Dispatch series “Campus Insecurity” — is a journalism lesson in how to cover a controversial topic, where sources are often anony-

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mous and accusations are difficult to prove. “Campus Insecurity” was a data-driven investigation told, in part, through the lens of the college students who have been victims of sexual assault. “We made sure there was a paper trail, a documented paper trail from official places,” said interim editor Alan Miller. “We really tried to make sure and verify and vet everything. There were salacious details we didn't include, because we couldn’t verify they were true.” And they did something most news organizations avoid when writing about sexual assault. They identified the victims when they gave consent. One woman consented to have her name used in the story and several victims, including one male, agreed to be in photographs. >> Continued on next page


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“We were able to get many victims to allow us to take their photo," Miller said. "We concealed their identity. It was pretty incredible.” Photographer Eric Albrecht took the photos from an angle, using shadows and silhouette to tell the story without showing faces. One victim had been sexually assaulted against the trunk of her car. Albrecht shot a photo of her at the spot where the attack occurred, standing near the car. “You can see her back and her shadow on the car trunk,” Miller said. “It’s a fantastic photo given the goal of not identifying the subject.” Journalism through partnership “Campus Insecurity” was a yearlong project that looked at campus reporting and investigation of violent crime. They found that colleges and universities skewed reports and were light on penalties in order to appear as a safe campus to any parent or prospective student looking up the information.

The Columbus Dispatch and the Student Press Law Center were the winners of the APME First Amendment Award in the 40,000 to 149,000 circulation category for “Campus Insecurity.” The project also received an honorable mention in the 40,000 to 149,000 category of the 45th Annual Public Service Awards. The trend first came to light as Sara Gregory, a fellow at the Student Press Law Center, pulled 12 years’ worth of U.S. Department of Education crime statistics. The data bore out the same way in Ohio and on campuses across the country. She saw that large campuses were reporting few or no sexual assaults. It didn't seem possible. There must be more to the story. The Student Press Law Center knew The Columbus Dispatch was the newspaper to approach to partner on an investigation. The Dispatch has been focused on in-depth, data-driven projects for 15 years. They have a two-member investigations team — Jill Riepenhoff and Mike Wagner — who are given the time and resources needed to work exclusively on this kind of journalism. Frank LoMonte, executive director of the Student Press >> Continued on next page

An Ohio State student who was assaulted at a friend’s apartment on E. 18th Avenue said OSU doesn’t pay enough attention to off-campus crimes.

DISPATCH PHOTO BY ERIC ALBRECHT

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Law Center, approached The Dispatch. Years earlier, The Dispatch exposed how college athletic departments were using the federal student privacy law to cover up wrongdoing by athletes, coaches and boosters. The author of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) told The Dispatch that universities had “bastardized” the law. (Read that project, titled “Secrecy 101” at http://bit.ly/1gjG6MJ. “He knew FERPA was an issue we cared about,” said Riepenhoff. By partnering, The Dispatch had extra help with collecting and sorting data, and the SPLC had a mainstream media megaphone to share its work. Riepenhoff traveled to the SPLC headquarters in Washington, D.C., for a week to go through the data Gregory had collected. Then Gregory flew to Columbus, several times to work with staff and download her data to Dispatch computers. “To start, we built a timeline of everything that has happened with FERPA and the places where FERPA went awry,” Riepenhoff said. The story, “Reports on college crime are deceptively inaccurate," had four bylines — Riepenhoff, Gregory, Wagner and higher education reporter Collin Binkley, who now works for The Associated Press in Boston. “This was a great win for everybody,” Miller said. “SPLC put out records requests and Sara’s data produced this great reservoir of data for our reporting. Together we could cover a lot more ground.” National view on local story Columbus is home to Ohio State University, one of the largest university campuses in the United States with more than 50,000 students. The Dispatch focused on OSU for many of its sources, but also cast a national net for data and document requests. “It was locally focused with a national perspective,” Miller said. It was an approach the paper used before. For “Secrecy 101,” they surveyed 120 Division I football schools. As a result, they were able to share the project to all editors on the Associated Press Media Editors listserv to publish in its entirety, including the page 1 illustration and graphics. Broadening the scope, broadened the impact, Miller said. Expanding data collection from

a local focus to a national one take organization, Riepenhoff said. She put every contact in a spreadsheet. On that spreadsheet, she recorded the day she made the public records request, whether they complied and if there was a fee. “This is standard operating procedure for a massive public records request,” Riepenhoff said. The other complicating factor in a national public records search is that the law differs from state to state. Several Dispatch projects have involved collecting records from around the U.S., including one called Credit Scars, which exposed how Americans were being victimized by the large credit reporting agencies. “For Credit Scars we filed requests in all 50 states with attorney general offices,” Wagner said. “In order to do that you must know the public records law.” In some cases, you have to have someone pick it up who is a resident of that state. Alan (Miller) had to call people he knew in those states to help us.” A year-long project “Campus Insecurity” published in three installments — September, October and December of 2014 — after months of reporting. “The first two or three months were a flat-out brawl with universities,” said Riepenhoff. “Many didn't know the law; some wanted thousands of dollars for records. We had to involve the attorney general of Ohio. Thankfully, he knew the law.” The first installment examined the Clery Act. The Clery >> Continued on next page

This Miami University student says she is suing the Ohio college because it didn’t do enough to address earlier accusations of sexual misconduct against the man who assaulted her. She remains a student at Miami and struggles with the trauma of her assault.

DISPATCH PHOTO BY ERIC ALBRECHT

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Act requires schools to disclose crime in and around campus. The Dispatch reporting showed that schools are allowed to draw their own reporting boundaries, which means they often exclude neighborhoods where students live and where high crime occurs. On paper, campuses look safe because crime stats are obscured. Clery Act numbers are reported to the U.S. Department of Education and are downloadable online (http://1.usa.gov/ 1PbBYu4). Riepenhoff turned to Investigative Reporters and Editors (IRE) for the help that organization offers its members. “They collect the information and make it digestible,” she said. “I did buy the data from them, which made it easier to navigate.” The Clery Act story published Sept. 30, right before the latest federal Clery numbers were released “so readers would know the numbers they were going to see were full of holes,” Miller said. The second installment was published in November over three days. “This is where we unveiled how awful the judicial student review boards can be. They are not fit to be judging felonies,” Wagner said. “They are often giving out soft punishments for severe crimes.” The Dispatch documented several examples of the holes in the judicial review board process. One instance, documented by court records, involved a student admitting she did not understand the significance of a rape kit while she was judging a sexual assault complaint. “We showed how unqualified the students and faculty are to make judgments on these cases,” Wagner said. The stories showed the bias in the system — to protect the reputation of the school rather than the victim. There is an exemption under FERPA allowing schools to release the outcomes of student disciplinary hearings when a student has committed a “crime of violence.” In this context, “crime of violence” ranges in severity from vandalism to homicide. Some states have passed laws to protect these records from being released. But in many states, Ohio included, they are public records. The third installment explored how Title IX has become a new tool to help students force universities to address sexual violence at their schools. Carving out time The commitment to this project — and others at The Dispatch — began at the top. “To me, the most important ingredient in pulling off something like this is the vision — to come up with the idea — and the commitment of an editor and a reporter to pursue the idea,” Miller said. “It may take longer, but the payoff is so big for both readers and the paper and the staff.” Former editor Ben Marrison, Miller and LoMonte all recognized that to do this project justice required a near full-

time effort from Binkley, Gregory, Riepenhoff and Wagner for nearly six months. “The commitment here is extraordinary,” said Wagner, who was an investigative journalist at the Dayton Daily News before joining The Dispatch in 2006. LoMonte extended Gregory’s fellowship for four months to allow her to see the project through to its end. Binkley also juggled a major-breaking news story — the sexualized culture of the Ohio State Marching Band — while working on the project. The Dispatch is increasingly looking for ways to include beat reporters in projects, teaming young reporters with veterans. “Working on a project elevates their game and translates to better work during the routine stories,” Miller said. Wagner and Riepenhoff each landed full-time project reporting jobs because of projects work they did as beat reporters. Wagner offers this advice for beat reporters hoping to tackle something bigger: “You can’t walk into your boss’s office and say, ‘I want to do a story on human trafficking.’ You have to have a plan. Do some pre-reporting and vetting. Find out what data is out there and what records exist. Call some experts. Put together a one-page proposal. That does wonders.” Autumn Phillips is editor of The Southern Illinoisan in Carbondale. She’s on Twitter at @AutumnEdit.

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Journalism Excellence Awards

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he Miami Herald, The Wall Street Journal and USA Today were among the news organizations that won top honors in the annual Associated Press Media Editors’ Journalism Excellence Awards. APME also announced that the Seattle Times, Alabama Media Group, the Sarasota (Florida) Herald-Tribune and Vermont Public Radio were winners in a new contest category, the Community Engagement Award, which drew a large number of entries.

than 500 children in state care is a tragedy of epic proportions — and criminal,” the judges said in honoring the paper. “The depth of reporting allowed for such strong writing that a reader would be compelled to keep reading. And the government would be compelled to act, as it has. ... This is the epitome of public service reporting.” The Detroit News won in the 40,000 to “It's inspiring to 149,999 circulation category for its investigaread through tion of Detroit's high infant-mortality rate. "This is tremendous reporting and a comthe many pelling story line that carried through the entries in this year,” the judges said. “It’s impossible to stop reading, and it is the best of a very strong year's contest class.” and see not The Desert Sun of Palm Springs, California, was recognized in the small-circulation cateonly great gory for its investigation that found that more journalism but “Challenges in our industry clearly have not Marines from the Twentynine Palms Marine diminished the quality of investigative, watchbase have died back home than in the Middle also the dog reporting in the United States," said Alan East. “Stunning, powerful work by The Desert responses to it.” Sun,” the judges wrote. “Strong reporting and D. Miller, president of APME and interim editor for The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch. “It’s compelling writing makes this entry stand out Alan D. Miller, inspiring to read through the many entries in in a strong category.” president of APME this year's contest and see not only great jourThe Wall and interim editor for nalism but also the responses to it." Street Journal The Columbus (Ohio) “These stories, whether in print or online, won the Tom Dispatch have so affected readers that they have taken Curley First action or pressed public officials to take Amendment Sweepstakes Award for “Medicare action to right wrongs and fix problems that have affected Unmasked,” which forced the federal government to make millions of people,” Miller said. “The world is a better place public Medicare data that had been kept secret for decades. because of the excellent work done by these journalists.” “The newspaper kicked open locked doors and provided The Miami Herald won the 45th Annual Public Service access for all of us — media and the public — to scrutinize Award in the large-circulation category for “Innocents how the government spends taxpayer dollars on health Lost,” its investigation of child deaths because of abuse or care,” the judges said. “This is high-impact journalism that neglect after Florida changed its policy and reduced the made a difference for the entire country.” The award, number of children in state care. The Herald also won the named after AP's former president and CEO, carries a Best of Show award, sponsored by the APME Foundation, $1,000 prize. which carries a $1,500 prize. USA Today’s project “Fugitives Next Door” won the First >> Continued on next page “The death of a child is tragic, but the deaths of more

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“Newtown 100” Amendment Award in the large-circulation category for revealing how law enforcement agencies let fugitives go free. The newspaper “put together an outstanding expose of one of law enforcement's dirty little secrets: Hundreds of thousands of fugitives from justice remain free, often to commit more crimes, because police and courts refuse to retrieve them from other jurisdictions,” the judges said. The Columbus Dispatch and the Student Press Law Center won in the 40,000 to 149,999 circulation category for “Campus Insecurity,” a series of reports on the denial and injustice that hides the truth about the crime on college campuses from parents and students. The newspaper and the Law Center “overcame obfuscation, flawed data and public colleges' willful efforts to hide the facts to produce a stunning and revelatory look at the lack of professionalism in law enforcement and the star-chamber quality of ‘justice’ at the nation's taxpayer-funded universities,” the judges said. The San Bernardino (California) Sun was honored in its circulation category for reporting on the Rialto Unified School District, its administrators and school board members — all of whom showed reluctance to provide public records, and even failed to tell the truth. The judges lauded the work as “dogged pursuit of a dysfunctional public agency entrusted with children's education.” In the new Community Engagement category, the Seattle Times was recognized in the large-circulation entries, for its Education Lab, which used guest columns, live chats, public forums and other engagement forms to create a dialogue with the community about fixing public schools. The Alabama Media Group was a joint winner in that category for bringing together a range of voices to address the long history of problems in the state's prison system. The Sarasota (Florida) Herald-Tribune was cited in the small-circulation category for “Newtown 100: A Legacy of Struggle and Triumph,” a series on an African-American community and its rich history, voices, successes and struggles. The broadcast winner in the Community Engagement category was Vermont Public Radio for its efforts to reach out to the public and let them tell how they had been affected by the state's heroin problem. The Seattle Times' investigation of the Oso, Washington, landslide and The Saginaw (Michigan) News’ series on the city’s population decline were honored in the Al Neuharth Award for Innovation in Investigative Journalism. The

award, sponsored by the Gannett Foundation, provides $2,500 to each winner. APME also announced that the Boston Herald, the Los Angeles News Group and The Oklahoman were finalists for its Innovator of the Year Award. They will compete at APME's joint conference with the American Society of News Editors from Oct. 16 to Oct. 18 at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. The winner will be judged by conference attendees and receive a $1,000 award sponsored by GateHouse Media's Center for News & Design. The Oklahoman in Oklahoma City was cited for the Best Mobile Platform. The newspaper’s efforts included placing a large video screen with targeted content at the corner of its building overlooking a busy intersection; The Oklahoman Radio app, a hands-free daily newspaper; and NewsOK Now, an app and website that lets readers share location specific news content. USA Today’s project on “Fugitives Next Door” was also honored for Digital Storytelling in the large-circulation category. The Sarasota Herald-Tribune won in the 40,000 to 149,999 circulation category for “Home to Havana,” a story about a family's return to Cuba. The Herald-Tribune also won the International Perspectives Award in its circulation category for the Havana story. The Desert Sun was named in the small-circulation category for Digital Storytelling for “How Climate Change Is Altering the Deserts of the Southwest.” The Los Angeles Times won the large-circulation category in the International Perspective Awards for its “Product of Mexico,” the story of poorly paid and badly treated migrant >> Continued on next page

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workers who harvest the produce for America’s tables. Marquette University's student media group in the Diederich College of Communication in Milwaukee was honored with the Innovator of the Year Award for College Students. The group created the Marquette Wire, which delivers news digitally. Judges did not take part in discussions or vote on categories involving entries from their own news organizations. APME is an association of editors and content leaders at newspapers, broadcast outlets and digital newsrooms, as well as journalism educators and student leaders, in the United States and Canada. APME works closely with The Associated Press to foster journalism excellence. Here are the award winners and honorable mentions:

> 45th Annual Public Service Awards • Winner of Public Service Best of Show and $1,500: The Miami Herald • Over 149,000 circulation: Winner: The Miami Herald, “Innocents Lost” Honorable mentions: Arizona Republic, “Scandal at the VA”; The Wall Street Journal, “Medicare Unmasked”; and The Record of northern New Jersey, “Stuck in a Jam” • 40,000 to 149,000 circulation: Winner: The Detroit News, “Surviving through age 18 in Detroit.” Honorable mentions: The Post and Courier, Charleston, South Carolina, “Till Death Do Us Part,” and The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch and Student Press Law Center, “Campus Insecurity.” • Under 40,000 circulation: Winner: The Desert Sun, Palm Springs, California, “Marines in Distress.” Honorable mentions: The Santa Fe New Mexican, “Missteps and secrets” about laboratory officials downplaying waste dangers after a leak, and The San Bernardino (Calif.) Sun, “The Truth Behind Rialto Unified” • Judges: APME President Alan Miller, interim editor of The Columbus Dispatch, chairman; Debra Adams Simmons, vice president of news development, Advance Local; Bob Heisse, editor, The Times Media Co.; and Brian Carovillano, AP managing editor for U.S. news.

> 45th Annual First Amendment Awards and Citations • Winner of the Tom Curley Sweepstakes Award and $1,000: The Wall Street Journal, “Medicare Unmasked” • Over 149,000 circulation: Winner: USA Today, “Fugitives Next Door” Honorable mentions: The Wall Street Journal, “America’s Rap Sheet,” and The Miami Herald, “Cruel and Unusual” • 40,000 to 149,000 circulation: Winner: The Columbus Dispatch and the Student Press Law Center, “Campus Insecurity”

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Honorable mentions: Tulsa (Oklahoma) World, “Fatal Flaws” about problems with Oklahoma’s executions, and The Blade of Toledo, Ohio, for suing the federal government over the military police's detention of a photographer and a reporter and the deletion of photos from the photographer's camera. • Under 40,000 circulation: Winner: The San Bernardino Sun, “The Truth Behind Rialto Unified” Honorable mentions: Saginaw (Michigan) News, for challenging in court a small town’s refusal to make public the names of 100 reserve police officers whose donations fund the 12-member police department. • Judges: Sonny Albarado, projects editor, Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, chairman; Adams Simmons; Miller; Laura Sellers-Earl, editor, the Daily Astorian, Astoria, Oregon; Bill Church, executive editor, Herald-Tribune Media Group, Sarasota, Florida; Jim Simon, managing editor, The Seattle Times; Joe Hight, former editor, The Gazette, Colorado Springs, Colorado; and Brian Barrett, AP corporate counsel.

The Seattle Times’ winning entry: “The Deadly Slope”

> Fifth Annual Al Neuharth Award for Innovation in Investigative Journalism Each winner will receive $2,500. The award is sponsored by the Gannett Foundation: • Above 75,000 circulation: Winner: The Seattle Times, “The Deadly Slope: Examining the Oso, Washington, Disaster” Honorable Mentions: Orange County (California) Register, “Illusion of Safety” and The Los Angeles Times, “The Homicide Report.” • 75,000 circulation and below: Winner: The Saginaw News, “I Used to Live Here,” a series about the factors contributing to Saginaw's rapid population decline between 1960 and 2010. • Judges: Sellers-Earl, chairwoman; Chris Cobler, editor, Victoria (Texas) Advocate; and Kelly Dyer Fry, editor, The Oklahoman.


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and Engagement Team and its focus on metrics, social, mobile, SEO and all platforms. • The Oklahoman, Oklahoma City, for its "Downtown Big Screen" and its content management system, new apps and other website innovations. • Judges: Hight, chairman; David Arkin, vice president of content & audience, GateHouse Media; George Rodrigue, editor, The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer; and Alison Gerber, editor, Chattanooga (Tennessee) Times Free Press.

> Fourth Annual Innovator of the Year Award for College Students • Winner: Marquette University, Milwaukee, student media group in the Diederich College of Communication, Marquette Wire. • Judges: Arkin, chairman; Muhs; and Chris Quinn, vice president of content, Northeast Ohio Media Group. The Saginaw News winning entry: “I Used to Live Here”

> Best Mobile Platform Award

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• Winner: The Oklahoman, for efforts on multiple platforms. • Judges: Autumn Phillips, editor, The Southern Illinoisan, Carbondale, Illinois, chairwoman, and Gary Graham, editor, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Washington.

> Community Engagement Award • 75,000 circulation and above: Winners: The Seattle Times, for its Education Lab, and Alabama Media Group, for problems in the Alabama prison system. Broadcast: Vermont Public Radio, for efforts to reach out to the public for stories about how they had been affected by the state's heroin problem. Honorable mention: WBNS-TV (Channel 10), Columbus, Ohio, for "Maria's Message," about the death of sports anchor Dom Tiberi's daughter in a car accident. "Maria's Message" is aimed at ending distracted driving and providing tools for parents to help their children become defensive drivers. • Under 75,000 circulation: Winner: Sarasota (Florida) Herald-Tribune, for “Newtown 100: A Legacy of Struggle and Triumph,” a series on an African-American community and its rich history, voices, successes and struggles. Honorable mention: Oakland (California) Tribune, for Oakland Voices, which allows a wide range of community voices to be heard through a storytelling project. Honorable mention: MLive Media Group, Ann Arbor, Michigan, for Ballot Bash, which opened up editorial forums for state candidates to the public, with events and webcasts. • Judges: Angie Muhs, executive editor, The State JournalRegister, Springfield, Illinois, chairwoman, and Ray Rivera, editor, The Santa Fe New Mexican.

> Finalists for the Eighth Annual Innovator of the Year Award • Boston Herald, for its innovative platform called Boston Herald Radio that is fully integrated with its print, online and video divisions and has attracted major audiences. • Los Angeles News Group, for its new Audience Growth

> Digital Storytelling Award • 150,000 and above circulation: Winner: USA Today, “Fugitives Next Door” Honorable Mention: The Los Angeles Times, “A Sting in the Desert” • 40,000 to 149,999 circulation: L.A. Times: “A Sting Winner: Sarasota Heraldin the Desert” Tribune, “Home to Havana” Honorable mention: Asbury Park (New Jersey) Press, “The Iron Soldier” • Under 40,000 circulation: Winner: The Desert Sun, “How Climate Change Is Altering the Deserts of the Southwest” • Judges: Thomas Koetting, deputy managing editor, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, chairman, and Jack Lail, director of digital, Knoxville (Tennessee) News Sentinel.

> International Perspective Awards • Over 60,000 circulation: Winner: The Los Angeles Times, “Product of Mexico” Honorable mention: The Seattle Times, “Culture Clash: Europe Confronts Amazon's Reach” • Under 60,000 circulation: Winner: Sarasota Herald-Tribune, “Home to Havana” • Judges: Graham, chairman; John Daniszewski, AP senior managing editor/international news; and Simon.

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APME

ASNE

AP PHOTO MANAGERS

2015 CONFERENCE

PREVIEW By Jim Simon APME News

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hat journalists can learn from Silicon Valley. Data storytelling. Navigating the shifting media ethics of the digital age. Drone journalism. Creating a real-time news desk. That’s just part of what’s on the agenda for the 2015-16 ASNE-APME Conference Oct. 16-18 at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. The conference theme is “3-D: Digital, Diversity, Disruption. “During this time of transition in the industry, we're excited about holding this year's conference in Silicon Valley, where sunshine and great ideas shine brightly," said Alan Miller, interim editor of The Columbus Dispatch and president of Associated Press Media Editors. The John S. Knight Journalism Fellowships at Stanford is working closely with the American Society of News Editors and APME in organizing the conference. AP Photo Managers (APPM) is also a conference partner. After months of planning, the schedule is starting to take shape. On Friday evening, the conference will kick off with a talk on creativity by David Kelley, founder of the renowned Institute of Design at Stanford and a creator of the Apple mouse. That will be followed by an outdoor reception, where you can sip some California wine with friends, listen to a bit of stand-up comedy and bid on auction items. Highlighting Saturday and Sunday will be several keynote sessions: • Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute will get

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Saturday morning rolling with his popular “What’s new, what’s next” session, looking at what the future has in store for the news industry and efforts to attract new audiences. • “The War on Science: what journalists need to know” program later Saturday will explore why millions of Americans reject what science says about topics like global warming and vaccinations • “Startup Stories: What journalists can learn from Silicon Valley,” on Sunday will feature entrepreneurs sharing their experiences starting innovative new media ventures. • Davan Maharaj, editor of the Los Angeles Times, will be the keynote speaker at lunch on Sunday. Tina Seelig, director of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program, will close the conference Sunday with a talk on fostering innovation and >> Continued on next page


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“Stanford and Silicon Valley are the epicenter of the information earthquake that has disrupted journalism. That makes it a perfect place for APME and ASNE to meet.”

Journalism at the University of Maryland. creating breakthrough ideas. Representatives of major social media and Breakout sessions will cover a lot of terrain, tech companies will talk about emerging partas well. nerships with newsrooms. One of the biggest challenges facing tradiJill Geisler and Butch Ward will once again tional news organizations — how to reach be on hand to share some shoptalk — and younger and more diverse audiences — will be wine — with editors in a free-flowing conversaa major focus. tion about newsroom leadership. They will A panel of researchers and top editors will also be available for one-on-one sessions with dig into the latest research on millennials and editors. their news habits. A session on engaging The ASNE-APME awards luncheon will celediverse communities will include facilitated, brate the past year’s best in journalism on small-group conversations on topics such as Saturday, while voting for the annual Innovator lessons learned from Ferguson, Missouri, and of the Year award take place on Sunday morning. Muslims in America. And Sunday afternoon, they’ll be a chance to Other sessions will offer guidance on creatwander through the “Digital Showcase” checkJim Bettinger, ing a real-time news desk, data storytelling, ing out demos of cool new things from jourdirector of the John confronting growing challenges to media nalism organizations, vendors, start-ups and S. Knight Journalism access, and where journalism ethics are headothers. Fellowships at ed in the age of instant, often unsubstantiated For those who need a bit more enticement, Stanford information. here’s one other detail about the 2015 ASNEAPPM will host a session exploring the APME conference: The average October daypotential of drone journalism. time high in Palo Alto is 74 degrees. A discussion on the tightrope journalists face covering See you at Stanford. terrorism will feature Dana Priest, the Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter for The Washington Post, and Jim Simon, managing editor of The Seattle Times, can be Lucy Daglish, dean of the Philip Merrill College of reached at jsimon@seattletimes.com >> Continued from previous page

The registration fee is $275 for members of APME and ASNE and $375 for nonmembers. A group rate for hotel rooms is available at the Sheraton Palo Alto until Sept. 15 for only $169/night for Friday, Saturday and Sunday To register for the conference or get information about hotel bookings, go to www.apme.com or www.asne.org.

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Burmese fishermen raise their hands as they are asked who among them want to go home at the compound of Pusaka Benjina Resources fishing company in Benjina, Aru Islands, Indonesia.

AP PHOTO / DITA ALANGKARA

AN ASSOCIATED PRESS INVESTIGATION

Seafood from Slaves

tion, arrests, business commitments from retailers and distributors and, most importantly, the rescue of the men. The story started in 2014 with Mason and McDowell’s ou were sold, and no one is ever coming to frustration that forced labor within the Thai seafood indusrescue you.” try persists as an open secret, and their determination to That brutal condemnation from a Thai fishfollow the fish to consumers. ing captain resonated with Myanmar migrant “Impossible,” one expert told them — citing the Myint Naing for 22 years, after he was murkiness of the Thai industry: the transfer of fish tricked into slavery. Myint, 40, along with between boats at sea, improper documentation on more than 800 others to date, has now land, and the mixing-up of the product at major been rescued after an Associated Press investigation seafood markets. into forced labor in the Southeast Asian seafood While researching, the reporters heard about a industry. company on a tiny, remote island in Indonesia that Veteran AP journalists Robin McDowell in was using forced labor. When McDowell got there, Myanmar, Margie Mason in Jakarta and Martha MENDOZA the desperation of the men stood out. Mendoza in the Silicon Valley tracked slave-caught “It was truly shocking. The second the men knew we were fish to the supply chains of some of America’s biggest food journalists they started pouring out their story. They all sellers, such as Wal-Mart, Sysco and Kroger, and popular wanted to get messages to their families that they were brands of canned pet food, including Fancy Feast, Meow alive, scribbling down the names of their parents or their Mix and Iams. The expose and follow-ups in all formats

‘‘Y

By Martha Mendoza The Associated Press

have prompted congressional hearings, new federal legisla-

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AP PHOTO / GEMUNU AMARASINGHE

villages back in Burma so that we could go tell them,” said McDowell, who helped launch the first all-format international bureau in Yangon. The fishermen — from Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos and Thailand – were working as much as 20- to 22-hour shifts, seven days a week, out at sea. Burmese fishermen prepare to board They were beaten by their Thai capa boat during a rescue operation. tains, and many saw slaves who were Indonesian officials investigating killed or simply jumped overboard in abuses offered to take them out of despair. concern for the men's safety. Using a hand-held camera, McDowAP PHOTO / DITA ALANGKARA ell and her Burmese-fluent colleague, Esther Htusan, interviewed men on the ships and the dock, and captured both still and video images. Htusan gave the camera to a dockworker, a former slave himself, who took up-close footage of eight slaves imprisoned in a cage — images that would lead both the text and video stories. Once back home, McDowell and Mason tracked the slave-caught fish on a giant refrigerated cargo ship by satellite to the Thai port of Samut Sakhon. They then went there to watch the shipment unloaded over four nights and follow the trucks on to factories. The reporters had to MASON keep their heads low to avoid notice — millions of dollars and criminal charges were at stake, and the Thai seafood industry has a dangerous reputation. Bangkok reporter Thanyarat Doksone and Mendoza then worked to establish connections to specific companies. Doksone talked to security guards and workers in Samut Sakhon. And Mendoza used U.S. Customs records to document shipments from the Benjina load to dozens of different businesses. She also went to supermarkets to confirm that the particular brands and types of food the AP was tracking were there. When Mendoza asked the companies for response, she found most already knew there was slavery in the Thai seafood industry. Days after the story broke, Indonesian officials visited In this May 2015 photo, former slave fisherman Myint Naing and Benjina to investigate. his mother, Khin Than, cry as they are reunited after 22 years at As AP reported that morning in Apri: “At first the men filtheir village in Mon State, Myanmar. Myint, 40, is among huntered in by twos and threes, hearing whispers of a possible dreds of former slave fishermen who returned to Myanmar folrescue. Then, as the news rippled around the island, hunlowing an Associated Press investigation into the use of forced dreds of weathered former and current slaves with long, labor in Southeast Asia's seafood industry. greasy hair and tattoos streamed from their trawlers, down the hills, even out of the jungle, running toward what they “Myint Naing’s story shows how badly we need to step up had only dreamed of for years: Freedom.” efforts to monitor our supply chains,” said U.S. Rep. Sean The reporting team, led by AP International Enterprise Malone, D-N.Y. “The AP is playing an essential role in bringEditor Mary Rajkumar, is still tenaciously pursuing all ing stories like this to light. If Americans knew that slave angles. The latest story came in June, when Myint Naing labor was being used to make products they consume, they returned to his village and his mother, AP at his side. would stop buying those products and demand change.”

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2014 APME/ASNE CHICAGO CONFERENCE

great ideas

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ave you launched a great new feature, page or Web project, or used a social media tool in a great new way? Well, we want to recognize your great idea. Associated Press Media Editors recognizes a Great Idea every month on APME.com and we showcased monthly winners in our popular annual Great Ideas book, which will be released

at our next conference in October. This is a chance for your newspaper to show off great work and to help fellow editors by providing ideas that might work in their markets. It’s simple to submit your Great Idea. Just go to the Great Ideas page at APME.com, fill out the online form and attach an image or submit a link.

VETERANS PROJECT Herald-Tribune, Sarasota, Florida Bill Church WHAT THEY DID:The Patterson Foundation, a Sarasota-based nonprofit that has tackled a variety of national issues, provided $12 million and an endowment to build the first privately backed amphitheater and art display at a national veterans cemetery. The HeraldTribune’s coverage of the opening went beyond balloons and band music. A four-page pullout section offered rich context on a project with roots back to President Lincoln. The project generated reprint requests and much praise from print readers and veteran organizations. Herald Tribune.com also created a veterans niche site to serve as a community archive of ongoing coverage and resources for veterans.

SEARCHABLE DATABASE LISTS The Columbus Dispatch, Columbus, Ohio Alan Miller WHAT THEY DID: When it’s time to cut Christmas trees, you can use a handy list on Dispatch.com to find a farm. Want to pick your own strawberries? Looking for sweet corn? Go to Dispatch.com for a searchable database that shows those nearest you by address and on a map. These lists can be tedious to compile, but they are wildly popular on The Columbus Dispatch’s website.

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GREAT IDEAS

THE MUSICAL UNMASKED

WALL STREET JOURNAL BOOK CLUB The Wall Street Journal, New York Rubina Fillion WHAT THEY DID: The Wall Street Journal book club is an online group that has more than 5,600 members around the world. It’s a way for readers to ask questions, discuss books and talk to prominent authors regardless of where they live. The author-led book club has included hosts Neil Gaiman, Khaled Hosseini, Elizabeth Gilbert and Gillian Flynn. They select books that inspired their own work to share with readers. We sent a weekly email to members with updates and discussion questions. Readers can respond to them on Twitter (with hashtag #WSJbookclub), WSJ.com or on theWSJ Book Club Facebook group, which has more than 1,200 members. We post interviews with the author and weekly discussion questions online at WSJ.com/bookclub. In many cases, the authors themselves are the ones coming up with the questions. As readers finish the book, they have the opportunity to ask the author questions during a live video chat on Spreecast.com. We also collect the questions beforehand on Facebook, Twitter and Google Form.

Binghamton Press & Sun, Binghamton, New York Neil Borowski WHAT THEY DID: We all spend a lot of time, paper and Web screens covering high school athletics. What about the other stuff? We decided to follow the making of a high school musical from auditions to cleanup after the last performance. We did this over a fourmonth period with several stories. This forged a great connection with the Union-Endicott school community and also with students and parents across our region who are active in school but are not athletes. We wrote the series largely in narrative form and, as it turned out, there were some great human stories (the leads were best friends since elementary school).

FLASHBACK MIAMI.com Miami Herald, Miami, Florida Amy Driscoll WHAT THEY DID: We built a website to showcase the Miami Herald’s newly digitized photo archives. By sharing curated weekly posts, we allow the public to view and buy copies of the outstanding and sometimes historically significant work of the Herald through the decades. We documented Miami from the streets and the halls of power, capturing everything from Elvis’ visit to Miami in 1960 to the race riots of the '80s.

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R E M E M B E R I N G

DORI MAYNARD

Respected journanist to be lauded at APME-ASNE conference

“Dori Maynard changed lives in newsrooms and communities across the country,” said Alan D. Miller, APME president. “Thousands of journalists learned to think differently, to be more inclusive, and to make sure that we represent the diversity of our communities in our news coverage and our newsrooms. “Her words will long ring in our ears, and our readers can be grateful for that. She was the epitome of diversity leadership and left us too soon. We are privileged to honor her and her legacy with the 2015 McGruder Award.” The institute’s website remembers Dori Maynard this way: “Maynard advocated tirelessly for the future of the institute and its programs, reminding all that the work of bringing the diverse voices of America into news and public discourse is more vital than ever. Under her leadership, the Institute has trained some of the top journalists in the country and helped newsrooms tell more inclusive and nuanced stories.” Maynard received several nominations for the McGruder Award for Diversity Leadership. Wrote Kevin Merida, managing editor of The Washington Post, “To the very end, she was a passionate warrior for diversity in journalism, committed to telling stories that had not been told — or told well — in communities of color across this nation. She had an innovator’s spirit, and an egalitarian desire to work with everyone. She wanted to change minds and hearts. She was fearless, and also someone to fear if you ran a news organization and didn’t believe that all lives matter.”

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ori Maynard, a nationally respected journalism educator and thought leader on diversity issues, will be honored posthumously as recipient of the 15th annual Robert G. McGruder Award for Diversity Leadership, awarded by the Associated Press Media Editors in partnership with the American Society of News Editors. Maynard, 56, served as president of the Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education. She died of lung cancer on Feb. 24. Maynard will be remembered and honored during the annual awards luncheon of the ASNE-APME conference, to be held Oct. 16-18 on the Stanford University campus in Palo Alto, California. The McGruder Award for Diversity Leadership is given annually to individuals, news organizations or teams of journalists who embody the spirit of McGruder, a former executive editor of the Detroit Free Press, managing editor of The Plain Dealer in Cleveland and a graduate of Kent State University. McGruder died of cancer in April 2002. A past president of APME and a former member of the board of directors of ASNE, McGruder was a relentless diversity champion. Maynard will be remembered for the numerous initiatives she championed through the years. The Maynard institute is named after her father, who was editor and then owner of The Oakland Tribune. He and Dori both were Nieman scholars.

“Dori Maynard changed lives in newsrooms and communities across the country. Thousands of journalists learned to think differently, to be more inclusive, and to make sure that we represent the diversity of our communities in our news coverage and our newsrooms.” Alan D. Miller, APME president

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But is there something specific in the broad arena of access that APME can own, can make a centerpiece of its service to its members and the public?

By Sonny Albarado The First Amendment Report

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he city of McKinney, Texas, sends Gawker a cost estimate of $79,000 to fulfill the news site’s Freedom of Information Act request for records concerning the police officer who pointed his gun at a group of teenagers at a pool party. The Metropolitan Housing Alliance of Little Rock, Ark., sends the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette a cost estimate of more than $16,000 to provide copies of work orders going back five years. Rapid social media response critical of the Texas price tag on public records results in city officials saying the cost estimate was a mistake. In Little Rock, the newspaper filed a criminal complaint in October 2014 against the housing agency’s executive director for violating Arkansas’ Freedom of Information Act, a misdemeanor. After a bench trial in May, a district judge found the housing director guilty in June and fined him $100 plus $140 in court costs. The judge said she could not order the housing agency to produce the requested records because it was beyond the scope of her authority in the case. The housing agency provided the records on its own, but filed a request for a declaratory judgment in circuit court regarding the state FOIA’s provisions regarding the fees an agency may charge in fulfilling public records requests. These seemingly unrelated public records fights have one thing in common: they represent the growing struggle to keep access to government records open. On the surface, the surfeit of publicly available government data online might lead the casual observer to think we’re in a golden age of access. But the reality on the ground, especially when it comes to local and state government records, belies the first-glance conclusion. At its June meeting, the APME Board spent much of its second meeting day discussing access and what can be done about the perceived closing of access to public records and government employees and officials. APME President Alan Miller has made access a key element of his tenure. To that end, APME’s Sounding Board survey in May asked members about access problems they face. Sounding Board chairman Gary Graham of Spokane’s Spokesman-Review reported in June that the most common

APME’s First Amendment Committee encourages APME members to contact us if you know of situations that would benefit from exposure to sunshine. Contact committee chairman Sonny Albarado at salbarado@arkansasonline.com or 501-344-4321 or on Twitter: @salbarado. Other committee members are Ray Rivera (rrivera@sfnewmexican.com), Jean Hodges (jhodges@gatehousemedia.com) and Mark Baldwin (mbaldwin@rrstar.com).

complaint among respondents dealt with access to police reports. His full report on the survey results can be found on Page 30 in this magazine. The discussion in June centered on steps APME can or should take to call attention to access problems and to give journalists tools that can help them fight access battles. Obviously, other journalism organizations also make access part of their mission, and APME likely can partner with some of them to drive home to the public – and government officials – the importance of openness to a free and democratic society. But is there something specific in the broad arena of access that APME can own, can make a centerpiece of its service to its members and the public? That’s the question that was asked most often during the board’s discussion in June. Is it enough to collect and broadcast the horror stories, the tales of intransigent officials and increasingly redacted information? Or is there an action plan we can develop on a focused element of access? For example, this spring saw many local and state governments grappling with how and when police body camera video should be publicly available. The First Amendment Committee is interested in finding out how police body camera video is treated in your communities. And if you have other suggestions on how APME can make access a vital part of its mission, let us know. Contact First Amendment Committee chair Sonny Albarado at salbarado@arkansasonline.com, or call 501-244-4321.

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Editor’s note: Media coverage of an attempt to quietly change Wisconsin’s open records laws helped prompt officials to drop the measure. APME News asked George Stanley, editor of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, to share the column his newspaper published on July 4 on the matter.

By George Stanley The First Amendment Report

Citizens step up to defend open and honest government in Wisconsin

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his was to be a Fourth of July column, an essay of gratitude for being among the sliver of humans in history fortunate enough to live where freedom, justice and equality under the law are the rule rather than the exception; where a great many people can be trusted a good deal of the time; and where honest people can generally live their lives in peace. Then 12 leaders of the Wisconsin Legislature pulled a fast one. And now, after a whirlwind weekend, this has evolved into a story of appreciation for the citizens of this state who contacted their elected representatives and demanded open, honest government. In an act of brazen cynicism Thursday night, the Legislature's powerful Joint Finance Committee sneaked into the state budget bill a group of fundamental policy changes that would have blown up Wisconsin's long, proud history of open government and access to public records. They tried to rewrite state law so the public could no longer see their communications while writing legislation. They tried to exempt from public view a host of GOV. SCOTT WALKER records created by the governor's administration, state agencies and local governments, and put new limits on public access to information about dismissed criminal charges. They tried to grant themselves broad new special legal privileges that would allow them to refrain from releasing records when they were sued, and to bar current and former staff members from disclosing information. They tried to wall off Wisconsin records behind a cloak of legal privilege and operational secrecy beyond what any other state in America allows. They did this all without warning, after the last workday before a long holiday weekend — a classic ploy for politicians unable to achieve their goals, as our nation's founders intended, through full disclosure and open debate.

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Their party (Republican) controls every branch of state government: Gov. Scott Walker's administration, the Senate and Assembly, and the conservative justices the GOP backs on the state Supreme Court. Given that authority by the voters, they have been able to reshape state law in myriad ways. They passed Act 10, right to work, tuition freezes, tax cuts, concealed carry, voter ID. They replaced a liberal chief justice with a conservative one. They changed the Commerce Department into the Wisconsin Economic Development Corp. They redrew the lines of legislative districts to virtually ensure they will stay in power for years to come. Our open records laws did not hinder them. Still, it wasn't enough. They wanted to strike future deals in private, where no one could stop them or hold them accountable. >> Continued on next page


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They calculated that we would all be too busy this weekend visiting family and friends, enjoying cookouts and fireworks, to be paying any attention. That was their mistake. The citizens of Wisconsin responded to this assault on open government by letting their elected representatives know, loudly and clearly, just who works for whom. By the afternoon of Independence Day, Gov. Scott Walker and the Republican leaders of the Legislature announced: "We have agreed that the provisions relating to any changes in the state's open records law will be removed from the budget in its entirety." Now it is our job to see they are true to their word, and strip every change to our open records law from the budget bill before it is passed and signed. These are the Republican lawmakers who voted Thursday to keep you in the dark about the public's business: Sen. Alberta Darling of River Hills; Rep. John Nygren of Marinette, Sen. Leah Vukmir of Wauwatosa; Rep. Dale Kooyenga of Brookfield; Sen. Sheila Harsdorf of River Falls; Sen. Howard Marklein of Spring Green; Sen. Luther Olsen of Ripon; Sen. Tom Tiffany of Hazelhurst; Rep. Mary Czaja of Irma; Rep. Dean Knudson of Hudson; Rep. Amy Loudenbeck of Clinton; and Rep. Michael Schraa of Oshkosh. Fortunately, there were only 12 of them and many more of you. You reminded them of that. Our nation's founders built checks and balances into our system of government for a reason. This was one of those key moments to use the levers they gave us. So, this began last week as a column about the blessings brought to us by Independence Day and now, thanks to

you, that is also how it will end. I had collected some quotes that strike me as more appropriate than ever now: The liberties of people never were nor ever will be secure when the transactions of their rulers may be concealed from them. —Patrick Henry Educate and inform the whole mass of the people...They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty. —Thomas Jefferson The greatness of America lies not in being more enlightened than any other nation, but rather in her ability to repair her faults. —Alexis de Tocqueville Only a free and unrestrained press can effectively expose deception in government. —Hugo Black The only security of all is in a free press. The force of public opinion cannot be resisted when permitted freely to be expressed. The agitation it produces must be submitted to. It is necessary, to keep the waters pure. — Thomas Jefferson A popular government without popular information, or the means of acquiring it, is but a prologue to a farce or a tragedy, or perhaps both. Knowledge will forever govern ignorance: And a people who mean to be their own governors must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives. —James Madison Let us raise a standard to which the wise and honest can repair; the rest is in the hands of God. —George Washington George Stanley is the editor of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. He can be reached via email at gstanley@ journalsentinel.com and followed on Twitter @geostanley

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By Gary Graham APME Sounding Board

Editors discuss solutions for easier public records access

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ewspaper editors are finding it increasingly difficult to obtain access to public records with local law enforcement departments often cited as the most resistance to records requests. A recent online survey about public access conducted by the Associated Press Media Editors Sounding Board drew responses from 40 news organizations, mostly daily newspapers. Many of the editors suggested the solution to access problems encountered by their reporters is to initiate legal action more aggressively and consistently. Nineteen of the editors who participated in a survey during May and early June listed law enforcement records as the ones their reporters routinely have the most difficulty getting. Editors said reporters are often told that cases are under investigation and the records are withheld because of that. Some editors reported that getting copies of such documents as detailed traffic accident reports, arrests and basic incident response records are frequently hard to obtain. While issues with law enforcement records were the most commonly listed by the editors, a variety of other public agencies at the state and local level were also cited. One editor said city and county governments "seem to drag their feet on just about any records request." Editors listed a number of types of public records that are often difficult to obtain in a timely fashion, including: • Community college and university records, such as financial and budget documents • Local school district records, salaries and terminations • State prisons bureau records • Decisions made in executive sessions Some of the editors reported that they frequently use lawyers versed in First Amendment issues to pursue records when public agencies and their employees refuse to provide the requested documents or fail to handle the requests in a timely fashion. Seventy-five percent of the editors acknowledged that newsroom budget limitations affect how often they use legal counsel in responding to denials of access. One editor said media lawyers are consulted three to four times a month, while one does rarely and another said never. Only a few newspapers reported having access to a lawyer on staff at the local or corporate level. Editors expressed considerable support for pursuing legal

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action more frequently. Some editors said taking agencies to court would draw more attention from the public and perhaps elicit support. While many favor court action, a number also said a key to better access is more education for the agencies and employees who routinely receive and review records requests from the media and the public. Bill Morlin, an award-winning investigative reporter for The Spokesman-Review in Spokane, Wash., and who is now retired, cited two main reasons for the typical delay in obtaining police records: unwarranted concern for privacy on behalf of crime victims and the threat of litigation over the release of information. Morlin said victims often want to tell their stories to reporters but their names are either redacted from the reports or they are instructed by officers not to talk to the media. Morlin, who began his 37-year-career as a reporter with The Associated Press, recalled in an interview in July that when he began reporting, the relationships with police officers were much more spontaneous. "Now, everything is filtered by public information officers." Access to official records is important, said Morlin, because “the press is the public eyes and ears for everyone.” Morlin also said access rules need to be enhanced, uniform and consistently enforced. “The public needs to know this information in a timely manner,” Morlin said. Another veteran reporter, Doug Schneider of the Green Bay Press-Gazette in Wisconsin, expressed similar concerns about delays in obtaining records. “What the public doesn't know CAN hurt them, financially, and perhaps physically,” said Schneider in an email interview. Schneider, who has worked for five daily newspapers in his 25-year career, is government watchdog reporter for the Green Bay daily and is also the USA Today Wisconsin correspondent. Survey respondents represented all regions of the country. Fifty-five percent of the respondents work for newspapers of circulation under 50,000, while 45 percent of them work for papers of 50,000 to 250,000 circulation. Graham is editor of The Spokesman-Review in Spokane, Washington, and chairman of the APME Sounding Board Committee. He can be reached at garyg@spokesman.com.


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Community newspapers win $2,500 public service grant from APME

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wo community newspapers in Illinois and Indiana were selected by the Associated Press Media Editors for $2,500 grants to help complete public service projects. The Park Foundation of Ithaca, New York, agreed to sponsor, for the first time, the Community Journalism Public Service Initiative awards for the Journal-Standard of Freeport, Illinois, and the Tribune-Star of Terre Haute, Indiana, said APME President Alan D. Miller. The award, now in its fourth year, is open to media companies that have a website and serve a metropolitan area of 100,000 or fewer people. “We’re thrilled to announce that this year and next, the Park Foundation has committed to underwriting and increasing the grants,” Miller said. “With the Park Foundation’s generous support, we will make two awards of $2,500 each in 2015 and 2016.” A $1,000 award had previously been given to only one news organization annually. “Public service journalism is our highest calling,” said Miller, interim editor of The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch. “The APME board is grateful for the Park Foundation’s support and proud to help eager journalists answer the call.” The Journal-Standard will use its $2,500 grant to analyze the effect of the dramatic increase in shootings on Freeport’s 24,000 residents. The money will help the newspaper organize community discussions and forums on the issue. The Tribune-Star plans to use its $2,500 grant for in-depth reporting on the city’s financial crisis. It also intends to produce podcasts, short video documentaries and interactive graphics to go with the project, and to host digital town hall forums. In addition, Miller said the APME Foundation will provide travel expenses for newspaper representatives to attend the ASNE-APME conference Oct. 16-18 at Stanford University. The St. Augustine (Florida) Record was cited as an honorable mention and will receive a $500 grant to complete its reporting on how the city is spending public funds in preparation for a weeklong celebration of its 450th anniversary in September. “I have been amazed by the dedicated investigative and project work accomplished by smaller community news organizations in this country,” said Joe Hight, chairman of the APME committee that selected the winners. “They prove what can be accomplished with relatively few people. They show why community journalism is now more important than ever.” In selecting the Journal-Standard, George Rodrigue, editor of The Plain Dealer of Cleveland, said the newspaper’s project was “public service at the highest level.”

He said the newspaper “identified an issue of life-anddeath importance. It used a full range of tools to share stories, facts, and analytical work with its subscribers. Then it decided to sponsor a series of community conversations to ensure that the message got out to the citizens who most needed to hear it.” In Terre Haute, the Tribune-Star plans to use the grant to hire an independent consultant to help reporters research the city’s financial problems and explain what it means to the city and its taxpayers today and in the future. “The project, ‘A City on the Brink: Terre Haute’s Financial Crisis,’ would seek to explain how the city’s municipal government got into the financial situation, dig into the operational areas most affected by the rapidly decreasing city budget and explore how the lack of money has affected infrastructure and public safety needs,” said Alison Gerber, editor of the Chattanooga (Tennessee) Times Free Press. “It also would examine potential solutions.” The St. Augustine newspaper has already obtained thousands of documents in public records requests. Linda Negro, retired managing editor of the Evansville (Indiana) Courier & Press, said the work “is exactly the kind of watchdog journalism news agencies of all sizes should do.” Under grant guidelines, the winning projects can use print or digital platforms and include social media or a mobile strategy. They should be considered entrepreneurial and should have the potential to be used elsewhere, including by larger media companies. As part of the grant, the winners will travel to the APMEASNE conference in Palo Alto, Calif., to present on their projects. The conference is Oct. 16-18. More information is at http://bit.ly/1MaRXsq Previous grant winners have been: • The Enid News & Eagle for its project "Under Pressure" about the city’s lack of services for poor parts of the northern Oklahoma city. • The Sedalia (Missouri) Democrat for "Meth at the Crossroads." • The Daily Citizen of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, for its series “Mental Health on Hold.” The Park Foundation primarily supports scholarships in higher education, quality media that heightens public awareness of critical issues and protection of the environment. APME is an association of editors and content leaders at newspapers, broadcast outlets and digital newsrooms as well as journalism educators and student leaders in the United States and Canada. APME works closely with The Associated Press to foster journalism excellence.

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Attendees enthusiastic after hopping on Orlando NewsTrain

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ighty-four journalists, educators and students attended the Orlando NewsTrain May 15-16, and they left the University of Central Florida enthusiastic about the training they received. Here’s a sample of their tweets:

“#NewsTrain was amazing! I learned so much from other journalists ... Great two-day workshop.” – Ailin Le Bellot, University of Central Florida student “What a productive use of time. Thanks for a fantastic two days of training and education, #NewsTrain.” – Caitlin Dineen, Orlando Sentinel reporter “So stoked to put into practice what I learned at #NewsTrain conference. HUGE THANKS!” – Brenda Barbosa, Charlotte Sun staff writer On feedback forms, attendees rated the presentations an average of 4.6 on a 5-point scale, with 5 being “very useful and very effective.” A big thanks goes to our trainers and to the host committee chair, Gil Thelen, executive director of the Florida Society of News Editors, and our campus liaison, Rick Brunson, associate journalism instructor at the University of Central Florida. Trainers were Linda Austin, NewsTrain project director; Michelle Guido, former WESH-TV managing editor; Kathy Kieliszewski, Detroit Free Press visuals director; Ron Nixon, New York Times Washington correspondent; and Karen Workman, New York Times senior staff editor.

Apply to bring a NewsTrain to your town in 2016 Apply by Oct. 1 to bring a NewsTrain to your town in 2016. Hosting NewsTrain brings home affordable training in the skills that matter most to journalists in your area. We are seeking sites for three NewsTrains in 2016 to follow our workshop in Lexington, Kentucky, on Jan. 21. NewsTrain staffers work closely with successful applicants and their host committee of local journalists to determine critical training needs. Then, NewsTrain finds and pays topflight trainers to address those needs. Attendees’ $75 registration fee is retained by APME. The host committee’s obligation includes supplying a light breakfast, lunch and snacks for either a one-day or

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two-day workshop attracting 100 journalists, journalism students and journalism educators. It should seek local sponsors to cover that cost, which can run $1,500 to $3,000, depending on the length of the workshop and catering costs. The host committee also markets the workshop regionally and secures a venue, usually a free or low-cost university site. Details on how to apply are at http://bit.ly/HostNewsTrain. Questions? Email Project Director Linda Austin at laustin.newstrain@gmail.com.

Four affordable NewsTrain workshops offer digital skills nationwide NewsTrain is bound for four more cities, delivering training in the digital skills identified by local journalists as vital to their success. Here are the locations, dates and skills that will be taught: • Monroe, Louisiana, Oct. 15-16: social media, mobile newsgathering, data-driven enterprise reporting, mobile-first breaking news coverage, journalism ethics in the digital age. http://bit.ly/MonroeNewsTrain • DeKalb, Illinois (65 miles west of Chicago), Oct. 29-30: social media, smartphone video, audience analytics, data-driven enterprise reporting, beat mapping, creative local features coverage. http://bit.ly/DeKalbNewsTrain • Philadelphia, Nov. 13-14: a digital-storytelling boot camp including social media, data-driven enterprise reporting, smartphone video and photos, writing news for mobile. http://bit.ly/PhillyNewsTrain • Lexington, Kentucky, Jan. 21: social media, smartphone video, data-driven enterprise reporting. http://bit.ly/LexingtonNewsTrain The skills taught are chosen by a committee of local journalists in each town who conduct an assessment of the needs in their newsrooms. We’d welcome your financial support. To help keep NewsTrain training coming to your community, please donate at the big red buttons on APME.com. For updates on NewsTrain’s next stops, follow us on Twitter @NewsTrain or like us at Facebook.com/NewsTrain. Linda Austin is the project director for NewsTrain. Contact her at laustin.newstrain@gmail.com or @LindaAustin_.


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“This project touches us all on many levels.” Alan D. Miller

National Reporting Project: Pushing all the right buttons By Thomas Koetting APME News

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hen readers of the Sun Herald in BiloxiGulfport picked up their Sunday newspaper the last weekend in June, a striking package examining traffic congestion blanketed the front page. Five headlines stacked at the top flowed into a local column on riding a bus to work; a regional story on urban Mississippi commutes; a national story on the future of freeways; a graphic showing road conditions state-bystate; a local photo of a passenger boarding a bus; and headlines highlighting how Mississippians fit into the discussion. The same morning in Rhode Island, an in-depth package on the same topic greeted readers of the Providence Journal. Their front page: a powerful story on how Providence-Warwick workers face the worst commutes in the country for communities their size; a national story predicting a grim future of clogged roads; focused headlines that drove home the issue; and two local photos of commuters jostling for position – one shot at an express bus stop, the other at a train escalator. Much, much more was found inside. Both papers focused on the same issue. Both brought critical national perspective home to their readers. Both had a sense of place. And neither front page overlapped – not one paragraph, not one line. That flexibility is at the heart of the national reporting project undertaken this year in a combined effort of APME and the Associated Press. The intent specifically for 2015 was to take an important issue – in this case, the nation’s crumbling infrastructure – and put it under a microscope through quarterly installments. The larger intent, though, was to develop a model for doing projects of a national scope, with layers of information – reporting, photography, graphics, data – that could be tailored by member news organizations and regional AP bureaus to particular audiences.

“We were looking for a topic that affects virtually everyone, and this one pushed all of the buttons,” said Alan D. Miller, interim editor of The Columbus Dispatch and president of APME. “This project touches us all on many levels. It also has been the most popular APAPME collaborative project we’ve ever done in terms of member participation and use of the stories.” The first installment in February focused on the lack of funding and planning for highway improvements. That was followed by June’s deep dive into worsening traffic congestion in ever-denser cities and suburbs. Upcoming efforts will focus on drinking water and the nation’s energy future, including the vulnerability of its power grid. Each topic affects the daily lives of most Americans, but in different ways, depending on where they live. Brian Carovillano, AP vice president for U.S. news, is supervising the yearlong project. Tom Verdin, AP’s enterprise editor for state government coverage, is in charge of pulling all the pieces together and making it happen. The first two installments received strong play by news organizations across the country. Many – perhaps most – took advantage of the ability to add local touches. “We are committed to providing explanatory journalism to our readers in Rhode Island, and, most of the time, we are able to do that with our own talented reporting staff,” said Karen Bordeleau, senior vice president and executive editor of The Providence Journal. “However, there are times when we just can't add one more reporting project to our work load. So when the AP came along with the relevant topic of commuting/infrastructure, we were grateful. It is a terrific example of a quality project that we have used to supplement our own work.” Key to the success has been ample planning time. “Advance notification was baked into the initiative as a key ingredient allowing members to make each package relevant to their audiences,” Verdin said. “AP has promised to >> Continued on next page

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deliver a full description of the package one month ahead of the publication date, data that can be used for localization purposes three weeks ahead of publication and embargoed versions of the stories a week ahead. Videos and interactive graphics also are a priority.” One example of how that timeline has paid off: When data was released for the first installment, the Wisconsin State Journal had the time to create a 50-state graphic – and agreed to share it will all AP members. The lead time “has allowed members to report stories, assign photos and create charts tailored to their own audiences, save space for the various components in weekend newspaper editions, and plan for video and interactive displays on their websites,” Verdin said. There have been some lessons and improvement along the way – smoothing out the distribution of all the different elements, providing more help with data analysis. After the first installment, it became clear that members would embrace more options. As a result, the second installment had four data sets, six sidebars (one based on a national poll), and interactive graphics. The project also has highlighted the importance of local data in the relationship between AP and its members. “It's a whole new way the AP can provide value to its members that is local and national in scope at the same time,” Carovillano said. “And with so many news organizations intensely focused on local coverage, it's a great example of AP’s relationship with members evolving in the way that it always has to meet the challenges we all face.” And that circles back to the experiences in Biloxi, Providence and others. “I suspect a lot of editors appreciate someone giving us an overview with a big project like examining our infrastructure, and then in our local communities we can tailor it, putting ourselves in that universe in the way that our readers do every day,” said Stan Tiner, executive editor and vice president of the Sun Herald and sunherald.com. “It’s a great project – I hope to see more of it.” Thomas Koetting is the deputy managing editor/news and enterprise for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. He can be reached at thomas.koetting@jrn.com.

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overage of the grand jury's decision not to indict a Ferguson, Missouri, police officer in the shooting death of Michael Brown won honors for deadline reporting in this year's Associated Press Media Editors awards for journalism excellence by AP staffers. An investigation of Duke Energy, the nation's largest electricity company, after a coal ash spill in North Carolina was honored in the enterprise category, and a profile of a drug-addicted prisoner who became a hospice nurse won the feature writing award. Jake Pearson of the New York City bureau won two awards for his investigation of the deaths of prisoners at Riots in Ferguson, Mo. Rikers Island, a 10-jail complex in New York's East River. accuracy on deadline, for the speed “The AP staff did excellent work with which it reported fresh news in producing enterprising, in-depth stothe aftermath of the decision, and for ries and hundreds of compelling the evenhanded treatment of an issue photos in the past year, making it difwhere stakeholder emotions ran high.” ficult to pick only a few to honor," North Carolina staffers Michael said APME President Alan D. Miller, Biesecker and Mitch Weiss, who interim editor of The Columbus detailed the cozy relationship between (Ohio) Dispatch. “Those receiving Duke Energy and the administration APME awards are exceptionally of Gov. Pat McCrory, were honored for strong and represent some of the best Mudslide in Oso, Wash. enterprise work by the judges. "The of journalism in America - to the degree of difficulty in getting this benefit of readers around the world." important story elevated this entry to the top. The AP staff ... Photographs of the protests in Baltimore over the death of had to dig hard, but the payoff was staggering and the outFreddie Gray while in police custody and the conflict in rage factor high," they said. Ukraine won the spot news categories, while photos from a Matt Sedensky, correspondent in West Palm Beach, refugee camp in Chad and a series on coal miners in Florida, won the feature writing award for "One Death Too Appalachia won the feature categories. Many," the tale of Jay Westbrook, a troubled man who found Coverage of the Oso, Washington, mudslide was selected his calling as a hospice nurse until death came too close. as the Best Use of Video by the judges, and a series of inter"The writer takes you on a journey that is inspiring and actives on Ebola garnered Best Use of Multimedia honors. haunting," the judges said. "Your outlook on life and love In selecting the deadline reporting winner, the judges will be changed." praised the staff work in covering the grand jury decision Pearson was honored with the Charles Rowe Award for not to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in Brown's shooting. “The AP team's coverage stood out for its >> Continued on next page

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distinguished state reporting for his investigative work on Rikers Island, which detailed three deaths over five years in which inmates were alleged to have been fatally beaten by guards. He also won the John L. Dougherty prize for exemplary work by an AP staff member who is 30 years old or younger. “His dogged reporting, source building in the corrections system and extensive document and data work yielded both exclusive stories and prompted action from city officials,” the judges said. Baltimore photographer Patrick Semansky won the News Single Photo award for what the judges called his “iconic image" from the Baltimore protests. “The smoke from burning stores, the long row of police in riot gear and the gas mask on a young, black man raising his fist in protest, are images that define a moment and a new age of racial tension in the United States,” they said. Photographer Evgeniy Maloletka, based in Ukraine, was honored with the News Story Photo award for his series on the conflict in Ukraine. The judges said the images “show pretty scenes - a field full of bright yellow sunflowers, a grassy meadow, an apartment with lace curtains - all marred by the jarring, graphic evidence of war. ... These chilling images show the surreal impact of war in modern society and in places we wouldn't expect to see it." Photographer Jerome Delay, based in South Africa, won the Feature Single Photo award for his image of two young refugee girls from the Central African Republic walking together in a refugee camp in Chad. “Once again, we see innocent children amid conflict,” the judges said. “But we also see hope. We see that even amid bleak circumstances, friendship blooms.” David Goldman, a photographer based in Atlanta, won the Feature Story Photo award for his collection of images of coal miners in Harlan County, Kentucky. The photos “showed us the effects on families and community as King Coal loses its influence on this Appalachian region.” Peter Santilli, Youyou Zhou, Peter Hamlin and Heidi Morrow, all based in New York, and Shawn Chen, in Chicago, were awarded the Best Use of Multimedia for their interactives on the Ebola outbreak. The series traced the progress of the disease from Africa to the U.S.; followed the final days of Thomas Eric Duncan, Ebola's first U.S. victim; and examined the work of treatment centers. The judges described the interactive on Duncan's last days as “an especially powerful” presentation. Videographer Bill Gorman of Washington won the Best Use of Video award for “Scars, Memories Remain after Oso Mudslide,” which the judges described as a “powerful, emotion-filled and compelling story. ... Gorman makes expert use of the tools at his disposal.” APME is an association of editors and content leaders at newspapers, broadcast outlets and digital newsrooms as well as journalism educators and student leaders in the

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United States and Canada. APME works closely with The Associated Press to foster journalism excellence. Here are the award winners and honorable mentions:

> DEADLINE REPORTING: • Winner: coverage of the grand jury’s decision not to indict Ferguson, Missouri, police officer Darren Wilson in the fatal shooting of Michael Brown. • Honorable mention: coverage of Israel's fighting with Hamas in Gaza. “AP's team responded with lightning speed to each new development in the story, adding depth and detail each day in a manner that illuminated an incredibly complicated conflict,” the judges said. • Judges: Mark Baldwin, executive editor, Rockford Register Star, chairman; Ray Rivera, editor, The Santa Fe New Mexican; and Cate Barron, vice president of content, PA Media Group.

> ENTERPRISE REPORTING: • Winner: investigation by North Carolina staffers Michael Biesecker and Mitch Weiss of Duke Energy, the nation's largest electricity company, after a coal ash spill in North Carolina. They detailed the cozy relationship between the company and the administration of Gov. Pat McCrory. • Honorable mention: Alberto Arce, based in Mexico City, for his coverage of the violence in Central America, which the judges described as “remarkable reporting and writing.” • Judges: Chris Cobler, editor, Victoria (Texas) Advocate, chairman; Chris Quinn, vice president of content, Northeast Ohio Media Group; and Laura Sellers-Earl, editor, The Daily Astorian, Astoria, Oregon.

> JOHN L. DOUGHERTY AWARD: • Winner: Jake Pearson, based in New York City, for his investigative work on Rikers Island, which detailed three deaths over five years in which inmates were alleged to have been fatally beaten by guards. • Honorable mention: Esther Htusan, based in Yangon, Myanmar, for her coverage of the country. The judges said Htusan “displayed extraordinary courage and ingenuity in ferreting out painful stories of persecution and its repercussions, infusing her stories with agonizing details of fleeing Rohingya minorities.” • Honorable mention: Youkyung Lee, technology writer in Seoul, South Korea, was cited by the judges for her “strong reporting instincts (which) led her to a surviving crew member and key information about how the Seoul ferry tragedy transpired.” • Judges: Jim Simon, deputy managing editor, The Seattle Times, chairman; Rivera; and Sonny Albarado, projects editor, Arkansas Democrat-Gazette.

> FEATURE WRITING: • Winner: Matt Sedensky, correspondent in West Palm >> Continued on next page


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Koetting, deputy managing editor, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

Beach, Florida, for “One Death Too Many,” the tale of Jay Westbrook, a troubled man who found his calling as a hospice nurse until death came too close. • Honorable mention: Martha Mendoza, based in San Jose, California, for “Leaving the Jungle,” the journey of a homeless woman as she reluctantly moves from one of the poorest areas of Silicon Valley to her own apartment. • Judges: Bill Church, executive editor, Herald-Tribune Media Group, Sarasota, Florida, chairman; Kelly Dyer Fry, editor, The Oklahoman; and Dennis Anderson, executive editor, Peoria (Illinois) Journal Star.

• Winner: Bill Gorman, Washington videographer, for “Scars, mMemories Remain After Oso Mudslide.” • Honorable Mention: “D-Day: AP Marks 70 Years since Allied Invasion in Normandy.” “Great use of video to tell stories of human emotion,” the judges said. • Judges: Jack Lail, director of digital, Knoxville (Tennessee) News Sentinel, chairman; and Eric Ludgood, assistant news director, WAGA-TV, Atlanta.

> BEST USE OF MULTIMEDIA

> NEWS SINGLE PHOTO

• Winner: Peter Santilli, Youyou Zhou, Shawn Chen, Peter Hamlin and Heidi Morrow were awarded the Best Use of Multimedia for their interactives on the Ebola outbreak. • Honorable mention: “The Goal of Life,” a bilingual feature offering a child's-eye view of the daily brutality for a majority of children growing up in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, and exploring how the discipline of soccer can provide an alternative to criminal gangs. "Emotionally compelling storytelling," the judges said. • Judges: Barron, chairwoman; George Rodrigue, editor, The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer; and Fry.

• Winner: Patrick Semansky, based in Baltimore, for protests in Baltimore over the death of Freddie Gray • Honorable mention: Single Photo: Khalil Hamra, based in Gaza, for a child treated in Gaza. • Judges: Miller, Sellers-Earl and Barron.

> CHARLES ROWE AWARD • Winner: Jake Pearson, based in New York City, for his investigative work on Rikers Island, which detailed three deaths over five years in which inmates were alleged to have been fatally beaten by guards. • Judges: Anderson, chairman; Cobler; and Thomas

> BEST USE OF VIDEO

> NEWS STORY PHOTO • Winner: Evgeniy Maloletka, based in Ukraine, for a series on the conflict in Ukraine.

> FEATURE SINGLE PHOTO • Winner: Winner: Jerome Delay, based in South Africa, for two refugee girls from the Central African Republic walking together in a refugee camp in Chad.

> FEATURE STORY PHOTO • Winner: David Goldman, based in Atlanta, for a collection of images of coal miners in Harlan County, Kentucky.

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News Literary Project teaches unwavering journalistic tenets By Mark Baldwin APME News ou don’t have to spend much time in a newsroom to understand that certain qualities are part of every successful journalist’s DNA. A skeptical attitude toward authority, particularly as wielded by government. A strong belief that more information, not less, is essential to feeding and watering our democracy. An ironclad commitment to accuracy, achieved through verification. A devotion to fairness. An ability to sift through reams of information, some of it contradictory, to separate facts from their lesser cousins: rumors, urban legends and outright lies, to name just a few. So, what would happen if the general public — the folks who read and use our products — learned to consume news using the same sorts of skills that are hardwired into journalists from their first day on the job? That, in a nutshell, is the goal of the News Literacy Project, a national educational program that teaches students in middle and high school how to distinguish verified information from spin, opinion and propaganda. It’s an urgent challenge at a time when digital technology has made more information available in more forms than at any time in history, and urban legends can whip around the world in a nanosecond. Not every drop from the digital fire hose is as important as every other. That’s the thinking behind the News Literacy Project. If you’re interested in bringing the program to your community, submit an information request at thenewsliteracyproject.org. Two avenues exist for editors looking to get involved in the movement. First, talk to your local schools. In Rockford, we’ve put together a consortium comprising our public school district (the second-largest public system in Illinois) and two parochial institutions with the goal of introducing a news literacy curriculum within the next year or two.

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The educators are eager partners — they see students struggle every day to make sense of huge volumes of digital information. Plus, news literacy, with its emphasis on verified information, nicely complements the common core, which stresses evidence-based argument. By working with journalists, “educators gain authentic, realworld subject matter experts, which is an extremely important part of a 21st century education,” Peter Adams, senior vice president of the News Literacy Project, said in an email. “They get to address a topic that is extremely important and foundational for their students (both in and out of the classroom); they get strategies, ideas and the momentum to spark substantive civic engagement in the classroom; and as an ancillary benefit they get mentors and role models for their students.” For news professionals, Adams said, participation in news literacy programming offers “the chance to explain what distinguishes quality journalism from the wide and dynamic variety of information in the 21st century information landscape” — and an excellent means of connecting with the community. You can also get involved in the National Community and News Literacy Roundtables Project, a partnership of the American Society of News Editors, the News Literacy Project and the American Press Institute. The national project will work with communities around the country to identify a challenging local topic and bring together community leaders, activists and ordinary residents to learn more about the topic and use the techniques of news literacy to separate fact from fiction and develop a common understanding of the issue. The project needs local media and educational partners. If you’re interested, contact Project Director Clair Lorell at clorell@asne.org. Mark Baldwin is executive editor of the Rockford (Illinois) Register Star. He can be reached at mbaldwin@rrstar.com.


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editors in the news

Industry’s promotions, appointments, awards and recognition Seattle Times names Simon as new managing editor In a move designed to integrate digital planning from story inception, Seattle Times Editor Kathy Best has named Jim Simon the newsroom’s managing editor and Michele Matassa Flores its deputy SIMON managing editor. Simon will oversee the newsroom’s digital, metro, business, enterprise and investigations teams. Matassa Flores will have responsibility for visuals, sports, features and the news desk. In 2018, Simon will become president of the Associated Press Media Editors, where he now serves as an officer.

Oxford names Rebman as its new editor Stephanie Rebman has been named editor of The Oxford Eagle in Oxford, Mississippi. Rebman’s hiring was announced by publisher Tim Phillips. She succeeds Don Whitten, who is retiring after 38 years with the newspaper and 10 years as editor. Rebman, who is 34, previously worked for nine years at the Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal in Tupelo.

Sun Herald executive editor retiring Sept. 1 Stan Tiner, who has served as executive editor of The Sun Herald, of Gulfport, Mississippi, for 15 years, will retire Sept. 1. Tiner led the newsroom during coverage of 2005’s Hurricane Katrina, which earned the paper a Pulitzer Gold Medal for Public Service.

John Ross named managing editor in Ky. The Times-Tribune in Corbin, Kentucky, has named staff writer John L. Ross as managing editor. The daily newspaper in southern Kentucky reports that Ross began serving in the position recently. Former editor Becky Killian left the paper on June 30.

Tennessee editor Jones to step down Greeneville (Tennessee) Sun Editor John M. Jones Jr. plans to step down from that position later this year, he was quoted as saying. Jones, who turned 73 in June, has headed the Sun's news and editorial operations since July 14, 1986.

Dreeszen named managing editor for news at Sioux City (Iowa) Journal Dave Dreeszen, longtime business editor of the Sioux City Journal, has been promoted to managing editor for news. He replaces Jackie Kaczmarek who was earlier named managing editor for features. The transitions were announced by editor Bruce Miller. Dreeszen, a native of Auburn, Iowa, joined the Journal as a political reporter and general assignment reporter in 1989.

MARRISON

Marrison steps down as Dispatch editor; Alan D. Miller named interim editor After 16 years of leading The Dispatch newsroom, Benjamin J. Marrison stepped down as editor on June 19. “I’ve long believed that when a newspaper changes publishers, the editor should step aside to allow the new publisher complete freedom to implement his or her vision,” he said. The Dispatch Printing Co. recently completed the sale of The Dispatch and its other print assets to New Media Investment Group. New Media, the holding company for GateHouse Media, bought The Dispatch for $47 million. Alan D. Miller, a 31-year Dispatch veteran, was named interim editor by Kirk Davis, GateHouse Media CEO. >> Continued on next page

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Miller has been managing editor/news since 2004. Miller, 55, started at the paper as a reporter in 1984 and has covered regional news, urban affairs, Columbus City Hall, and higher education. He was an assistant city editor, state editor and assistant managing editor before becoming managing editor in 2004. He teaches journalism at Denison University in Granville and is president of the national Associated Press Media Editors association.

Greg Moore, AP West editor, named Milwaukee correspondent Greg Moore, an editor on The Associated Press’ West regional desk, has been named supervisory correspondent in the cooperative’s Milwaukee bureau. Moore, 36, joined AP in 2011 on the West regional editing desk, where he has frequently handled top stories such as gay marriage, the health care overhaul, the resignation of Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber and the debate over childhood vaccines.

Baker retiring as Times Leader news editor The Times Leader in Princeton, Kentucky, says that News Editor Anita Baker is retiring after a 39-year career in local media. The newspaper is part of the Kentucky New Era Media Group, based in Hopkinsville.

David Emke named editor of The Journal in Martinsburg, West Virgina David M. Emke has been named the new editor of The Journal in Martinsburg, West Virginia. Emke has been with The Journal since May 2012 as the newspaper's regional editor. Prior to coming to Martinsburg, Emke worked at The Post-Journal in Jamestown,New York.

Guajardo new Journal editor in Mississippi The Daily Journal in Tupelo, Mississippi, reports that 26year-old Rod Guajardo will succeed Lloyd Gray, who's been editor for 23 years. Guajardo had been a reporter for local government and politics. Gray is leaving to become executive director of The Phil Hardin Foundation in Meridian. Guajardo grew up in Birmingham, Alabama, and was news editor of The Natchez Democrat before joining the Tupelo newspaper. Daily Journal publisher and CEO Clay Foster announced his appointment.

Schaneman named editor in Scottsbluff At the Star-Herald in Scottsbluff, Nebraska, longtime Editor Steve Frederick was replaced by Bart Schaneman, the present assistant editor. Maunette Loeks, who has been in charge of the Star-Herald’s digital media, was promoted to digital news editor. Frederick remains with the paper as special projects editor.

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Frederick (Maryland) News-Post picks news veteran Pexton to serve as top editor A veteran journalist and former Washington Post ombudsman will serve as The Frederick (Maryland) NewsPost’s top editor. The company announced that 60-year-old Patrick Pexton of Chevy Chase will oversee the newspaper's editorial staff. The Los Angeles native began his journalism career in the 1980s covering two Connecticut towns and later worked at The Montgomery Journal and The Navy Times. He served as a managing editor and deputy editor of The National Journal and became The Washington Post’s ombudsman in 2011.

New editor takes helm in Harlingen, Texas Lisa Seiser has been named editor at the Valley Morning Star in Harlingen, Texas. She had spent the past three years at the Daily Union in Junction City, Kansas. Seiser has been in the newspaper industry for more than 20 years, starting as a sports reporter, reporter, assistant editor and eventually rising to the position of managing editor at multiple communication companies in Wisconsin and, most recently, in Kansas.

Burton named managing editor in Casper Jason Adrians, publisher and editor of the Casper StarTribune in Casper, Wyoming, announced that opinion editor Mandy Burton is new managing editor for the paper. Burton, 29, joined the Star-Tribune in February 2014 as news production manager, supervising the copy and design desk as well as being a member of the editorial board.

Mayberry named North Iowa editor David Mayberry, 40, content editor of the Casper (Wyoming) Star-Tribune newsroom, has been named editor/managing editor of the North Iowa Media Group, which includes the Globe Gazette in Mason City, Iowa. He succeeded Jane Reynolds, who is retiring. Mayberry will oversee news gathering operations of the Globe Gazette and its three weekly affiliates, the Britt News-Tribune, Forest City Summit and Mitchell County Press-News.

Sports editor to become managing editor at Times Observer in Warren, Pa. The (Warren) Times Observer in Warren, Pennsylvania, has promoted sports editor Jon Sitler to managing editor. Sitler was hired as a part-time sports writer in 1996, then worked as a news reporter before being named sports editor in 2003.

Dean Lehman resigns as Times-Call editor Dean Lehman, editor and publisher of the Longmont Times-Call and publisher of the Loveland Reporter-Herald, >> Continued on next page


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has announced his resignation from the Colorado newspaper company. The Times-Call reported that Lehman's resignation closes a 35-year career with Lehman Communications Corp. He will take on the title of publisher emeritus

Phillip Lucas appointed AP reporter in Birmingham, Alabama Phillip Lucas, a journalist who has helped The Associated Press coordinate and cover significant stories across the South and beyond, has been hired to work as a reporter for the news cooperative in Birmingham, Alabama.

Marjorie Miller promoted to new leadership role at AP Marjorie Miller, a veteran journalist and newsroom leader, has been promoted to Director of Global News and

Enterprise for The Associated Press. Miller has been the AP’s regional editor in Latin America since late 2010. In the new position, she will be responsible for several departments, including the Nerve Center, which crafts the daily news report from the flow of breaking news and a regular selection of AP-generated investigative and enterprise stories.

Gunn named editor of The Virginia-Pilot Virginia's largest newspaper has named Steve Gunn as its top editor. Gunn was the editor of The Capital Gazette in Annapolis, Maryland. Before coming to Annapolis in 2013, Gunn worked at The Charlotte Observer in North Carolina for 18 years. Gunn held several positions at the Observer, including metro editor and director of audience development and strategic products. He has also previously worked at New York Newsday, the Dallas Times Herald and the Kansas City Times and Star.

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member

showcase

APME recognizes contributions to the AP photo report through the Showcase Photo of the Month Award. The competition is judged by AP and member photo editors. The monthly winners are displayed at the annual conference and a Showcase Photo of the Year Award is presented.

FEBRUARY AP Photo/The Idaho Statesman

Kyle Green In February, members of the Eagle Rock Dance Platinum team stretch in a stairway before their audition for America's Got Talent at Taco Bell Arena in Boise, Idaho. The group drove from Idaho Falls to audition for the show, joining thousands of other hopefuls who also auditioned.

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MARCH AP Photo/Star Tribune via AP

Aaron Lavinsky In this March 28, photo, Yamah Collins, center, faints during a prayer service marking the tenth day since the disappearance of her stepson, 10-year-old Barway Collins, in Crystal, Minn. At left is Barway's father, Pierre Collins.

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APRIL AP Photo/The Orange County Register

Mindy Schauer Hundreds of family and friends, including Samual Milner, front, take part in the memorial services for the late televangelist Rev. Robert H. Schuller on April 20, in Garden Grove, Calif. Schuller who founded the Crystal Cathedral was 88 when he died on April 2 after a battle with esophageal cancer.

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MAY AP Photo/The Gazette via AP

Michael Ciaglo Capt. Debbie Tuttle, of the California State Military Reserve, touches her son Pfc. Keith Williams’ name during the Mountain Post Warrior Memorial Ceremony at the Global War on Terrorism Fallen Soldiers’ Memorial, May 21, in Colorado Springs, Colo. Williams was honored along with six other Fort Carson soldiers during the ceremony. The seven Fort Carson soldiers died while deployed in 2014. AUGUST 2015

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By David Minthorn

AP Stylebook minute Defining the role of the definite article in writing

I

n AP Stylebook usage, “the” is definitely a challenge. What’s the role of the definite article in writing? “The” restricts or particularizes a term; it helps specify a particular thing or indicates a noun that stands as a typical example of its class, says the American Heritage Guide to Contemporary Usage and Style. In AP news stories, “the” is often spelled lowercase with proper nouns or names, governed by the Stylebook’s primary rule on capitalization: In general, avoid unnecessary capital letters. The “down” guidance covers buildings, landmarks, political parties, geographical locations, teams, religious references, sports, musical groups and other many terms preceded by “the.” Some examples: the Capitol, the Oval Office, the Democratic Party, the Republican Party, the Badlands, the Southside, the Great Lakes, the Colosseum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Rev. Billy Graham, the Bible, the Last Supper, the New York Giants, the Derby, the Series, the Masters, the Beatles, the Rolling Stones. But in some entries in the Stylebook, the definite article used with a name is capitalized. “The” as part of a formal company name should be included uppercase. For example: The Proctor & Gamble Co., The Walt Disney Co. This guidance also applies to news media names on first reference, if that's the way the publication prefers to be known: e.g., The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and The Associated Press. But on follow-up references, media names are usually shortened with “the” spelled lowercase: the Times, the Journal, the AP. If a story mentions several newspapers, some of which use "the" and some that don't, lowercase “the” before the series: e.g., ... as reported in the Washington Post, Dallas Morning News and Los Angeles Times. AP guidance differs with universities that capitalize the

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definite article in their names and news releases. AP news stories don't include capitalized definite articles if schools use “The” in the name. It’s Ohio State University in our reporting, rather than The Ohio State University. Same for University of Texas, George Washington University and others. In AP sports stories, school names are typically even shorter without an article because they are well-known to fans: Texas, Ohio State and George Washington. The “composition titles” entry specifies a significant exception: “The” is uppercase as the first word of book titles, computer game titles, movie titles, opera titles, play titles, poem titles, album and song titles, radio and television program titles, and the titles of lectures, speeches and works of art. It’s the same for the indefinite articles “a” and “an” starting a title. Some examples: “The Star-Spangled Banner," “The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich,” “The Mary Tyler Moore Show,” Mozart's “The Marriage of Figaro.” On the other hand, country names using the definite article are spelled with “the” lowercase in AP news stories: the Netherlands, the Philippines. But there’s always an exception: it’s The Hague with a capital T for the Dutch city. When news questions arise about how to handle the definite article, consult the AP Stylebook or the online help site, Ask the Editor.


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2015

APME BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Officers

Directors

n President: Alan D. Miller, The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch n Vice President: Laura Sellers-Earl, The Daily Astorian, Astoria, Oregon n Secretary: Bill Church, Herald-Tribune Media Group, Sarasota, Florida n Journalism Studies Chair: Jim Simon, The Seattle Times n Treasurer: Dennis Anderson, Peoria (Illinois) Journal Star

(Terms expiring in 2015) n Dennis Anderson, Peoria (Illinois) Journal Star n Mark Baldwin, Rockford (Illinois) Register Star n Chris Cobler, Victoria (Texas) Advocate n Angie Muhs, State Journal-Register, Springfield, Illinois

Executive Committee (officers above plus) n Past President: Debra Adams Simmons, Advance Publications n AP Senior Vice President/Executive Editor: Kathleen Carroll, New York n AP Vice President/Managing Editor U.S. News: Brian Carovillano n Marketing Chairwoman: Angie Muhs, State Journal-Register, Springfield, Illinois n Conference Program: Jim Simon, Seattle Times; Joe Hight, Oklahoma City

(Terms expiring in 2016) n David Arkin, GateHouse Media n Sonny Albarado, Arkansas Democrat Gazette n Jack Lail, Knoxville News Sentinel n Autumn Phillips, The Southern Illinoisan, Carbondale n Thomas Koetting, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel n Russ Mitchell, WKYC-TV, Cleveland n Cate Barron, Patriot-News, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania (Terms expiring in 2017) n Gary Graham, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Washington n Joe Hight, Oklahoma City n Eric Ludgood, Fox 5 News, Atlanta n Kelly Dyer Fry, The Oklahoman n Chris Quinn, Northeast Ohio Media Group n George Rodrigue, The Plain Dealer, Cleveland n Ray Rivera, Santa Fe New Mexican

Our communication vehicles

APME News Editor

n apme.com n http://www.facebook.com/APMEnews n https://twitter.com/APME n http://www.facebook.com/NewsTrain n https://twitter.com/NewsTrain and, APME Update: n http://www.apme.com/?page=Newsletters

n Andrew Oppmann, Middle Tennessee State University

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Late Summer 2015 APME News magazine  
Late Summer 2015 APME News magazine  

The Associated Press Media Editors detail the great journalism being recognized in APME 's annual journalismcompetition, as well as the hono...

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