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A Good Read Washington Post’s Pulitzer Prize winner Eli Saslow credits collaborative editing process PAGE 9


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From the Editor

Andrew Oppmann

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he Spring 2015 edition of APME News has a nice blend of new insight and reliable features: • Ken Paulson, dean of the College of Mass Communication at Middle Tennessee State University and president of the First Amendment Center of the Newseum Institute, weighs in on the aftermath of Rolling Stone’s recanted sexual assault story and whether editors are being held properly accountable. • We bring you updates on APME’s efforts in Diversity, First Amendment and outreach to higher education through our new Editor-Educator Exchange program.

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inside May 2015

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• Autumn Phillips’ popular “How They Did It” series visits the St. Louis Post-Dispatch’s coverage of Ferguson and a Pulitzer-winning effort by The Washington Post. • We bring you up to speed on the latest opportunities to catch NewsTrain, APME’s premier training program. • And we give you insight into changes in AP style that will debut in the next edition of the AP Stylebook All that, plus our roundup of Editors in the News and other updates, including a tip of the hat to Jim Simon, managing editor of The Seattle Times, who is set to take the helm of APME in 2018. Happy reading!

Alan D. Miller: How to survive in today’s bureaucratic culture of ‘no’ Ken Paulson: Truth and consequences: The lost lesson at Rolling Stone How They Did It: St. Louis Post-Dispatch covering Ferguson How They Did It: Pulitzer Prize winner credits collaborative editing process Gary Graham: Not a good season of openness around Washington, D.C. Sonny Albarado: The First Amendment Report Great Ideas: Recognizing great work in print, Web or social media See You at Stanford: APME/ASNE 2015 conference preview Bill Church: APME Diversity Report Mark Baldwin: APME Editor-Educator Exchange Leadership Ladder: Jim Simon of The Seattle Times to lead APME in 2018 NewsTrain: Affordable workshops to offer vital digital skills Editors in the News: Promotions, appointments awards and recognition Member Showcase: APME Photo of the Month winners AP Stylebook minute: How to properly handle new ‘suicide’ entry

ABOUT THE COVER Lesley McSpadden is comforted by her husband, Louis Head, after her 18-year-old son was shot and killed by police earlier in the afternoon in Ferguson, Missouri. Read how the St. Louis PostDispatch brought the saga home to its readers. PAGE 6

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EDITOR

Andrew Oppmann Adjunct Professor of Journalism Middle Tennessee State University Andrew.Oppmann@mtsu.edu DESIGNER

Steve Massie smassie@crain.com

APME News is the quarterly magazine of the Associated Press Media Editors, a professional, nonprofit organization founded in 1933 in French Lick, Indiana. Its members include senior editors and leaders from news operations in the United States and Canada that are affiliated with The Associated Press, including more than 1,400 newspapers and online sites and about 2,000 broadcast outlets. The group also includes college journalism educators and college student media editors. APME works with AP to support and recognize journalism excellence and the First Amendment. To learn more about APME’s programs and activities, visit apme.com.

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APME NEWS The President’s Corner

Alan D. Miller

Join APME in battling today’s bureaucratic culture of ‘no’

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e live in a culture of “no.” That’s what officials say with increasing frequency when we ask for records, seek to photograph concerts or take notes at a public meeting. For some, it’s the default position for an initial response: “No.” Often, we can school them on the law and win a favorable outcome. For others, and this is particularly troubling, “no” has become unofficial policy. They argue and stall and conveniently forget, all the while hoping that they will wear us down so that we’ll go away. Sadly, it works in some cases – especially as our newsroom staffing and budgets shrink and we have fewer resources to fight these fights individually. Bullies in the bureaucracy win. The public loses. Reporters and editors crab about this frequently to anyone who will listen, especially to one another. Then we turn around and beat our heads against those same walls hoping for a better outcome and ending up mostly with another headache. So what are we going to do about it? What are we, as an industry, going to do to knock down those barriers to transparency in government? The APME board decided in January that one step is to bring more attention to the problem. We decided to include in our email newsletter a list of recent news stories about roadblocks to transparency. The length of the list in each APME Update has been stunningly long, illustrating just how bad it has gotten. Here are some of the 17 in one week’s worth of headlines on openrecords and freedom of information issues, and these represent only those that reporters wrote about and we spotted: Florida Senate considers shielding video from police body cameras Judge says Oklahoma must explain Lockett record blanks Man's family seeks release of fatal shooting video Court blocks group's plea for radioactivity data on Marcellus Shale drilling ND Legislature exempts body camera images from public record Texas coaches swear, in testimony, they share play calling County refuses to release ambulance rating documents Like many of you, I have pushed reporters and front-line editors in my newsroom to do their best to fight these battles. We urge everyone to learn key points of our state’s Sunshine Laws, and we developed legal experts – reporters and editors – who serve as touchstones for those who need help in specific areas of law.

We win most of our fights that way, and we have avoided legal fees. But, also like you, we find ourselves in these skirmishes far too frequently – several times a week, most weeks. One example: A big-name entertainer came to town, and when we filed for credentials, we received a form for the photographer to sign and take to the concert. Wisely, his editor flagged it and sent it my way. The release, had we signed it, said that the newspaper would give up ownership and copyright claims for all images made during the concert “forever for all uses throughout the world without any extra payment to you and/or royalty thereof. … You may or may not be given credit based on the discretion of the parties using the photographs.” And my favorite: “Photography will not exceed 60 seconds of performance.” Insert laughter here. We pushed back, telling the artist’s public-relations team that that the request was as offensive as if someone asked the artist to perform his best work in a minute. Or that once he performed in a minute, his work would become publicly owned, since he was performing in a publicly owned arena. We proposed a new agreement that allowed us to photograph the first three songs, retain rights, and one-time use in print and online, and we promised that we would not sell our photos. Within three minutes, his handlers approved the new agreement without comment. Sometimes, all we have to do is push back a little. But we live in a culture of “no,” and most of the time, it’s far more challenging than that to win access on behalf of the public. It’s time for us to join forces to push back against the bureaucratic bullies and make them say “yes.” Not so much because it would make our jobs easier, but because the public needs a champion to preserve the rights of all Americans to keep a close eye on our government. That might mean moving out of our comfort zones and doing more than crabbing – or even more than writing stories to publicly shame those who say “no.” We might need to pick a key target and file a lawsuit that will get everyone’s attention. We might need to work as or hire lobbyists. Are there other ways? I’d like to know what you think. APME will soon send out a survey on the topic, so please weigh in. If you want to offer your thoughts sooner, please send me an email. Alan D. Miller is APME president and managing editor/news for The Columbus Dispatch. amiller@dispatch.com M AY 2 0 1 5 y

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By Ken Paulson

Truth and consequences: The lost lesson at Rolling Stone

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hen I walked into the USA Today newsroom in 2004 as the new editor following a scandal involving fabricated stories, I knew several things. I knew that we had to tighten our sourcing policies and establish new safeguards. I knew that nothing like this could ever be allowed to happen again. And I knew that if it did, my job would be gone. For that matter, my career would be gone. After all, countless editors have lost their jobs over the years because of “good stories” that went very bad. As the leader of a newsroom, an editor receives both credit and blame, though not always in proportion to his or her direct participation in a story. Editors establish standards and have a responsibility to enforce them. If a story implodes, there are consequences for everyone involved. At least there once were. Rolling Stone’s now-notorious “A Rape on Campus” by Sabrina Rubin Erdely, was an astonishing example of journalistic failure, defaming the University of Virginia, its staff, a fraternity and by extension, fraternities and sororities everywhere. It relied in large part on a largely uncorroborated and unnamed source who related a horrific story of sexual assault. That tale was the cornerstone and first 15 paragraphs of an article about an increase in sexual assaults on college campuses. It was an article that needed both more skepticism and reporting. The Columbia School of Journalism detailed the journalistic lapses in a comprehensive report that should be mandatory reading in every newsroom and journalism school in the country. All that remained for Rolling Stone was to apologize and take decisive steps to win back its credibility. Instead, magazine Publisher Jann Wenner characterized the article as an aberration in an otherwise sound news operation, calling the alleged victim “a really expert fabulist storyteller,” according to The New York Times. Will Dana, Rolling Stone’s managing editor, told The Times

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the embarrassing report was enough punishment and no one would be fired or suspended because there was no pattern of similar negligence. Even Erdely will continue to write for the magazine. Sean Woods, the article’s editor, said “We were too deferential to our rape victim.” In other words, Rolling Stone meant well. When Rolling Stone announced that no one would face consequences for its horrendous reporting, a number of prominent journalists posted or tweeted their outrage. I felt similarly, but held back. It felt a little unseemly to demand that people be fired. Yet it troubled me. Not imposing penalties on a staff that did so much damage tells us Rolling Stone views this as an unpleasant experience, not a journalistic crime. Jon Stewart compared the Columbia report to a conviction without a sentencing. “Someone’s gotta go,” he said, to loud audience applause. Like the readers of this magazine, I’ve worked many years as a newspaper editor. I now teach young men and women who I hope will one day occupy that important role. “Journalism is important and noble work,” I told a class last week after we spent our morning dissecting the Rolling Stone article. I wanted them to understand that making a mistake is a very big deal. A price must be paid for reporting recklessly and unfairly damaging reputations. Predictably, the Rolling Stone fiasco led to news accounts about journalism’s credibility taking another big hit. It’s now a standard observation any time the news media embarrass themselves. But in the end, it’s not the botched stories that undermine support for a free press. It’s not learning from them that does the real damage. Ken Paulson is dean of the College of Mass Communication at Middle Tennessee State University and president of the Newseum Institute’s First Amendment Center. Ken.Paulson@mtsu.edu


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Lesley McSpadden is comforted by her husband, Louis Head, after her 18year-old son was shot and killed by police earlier in the afternoon in Ferguson, Missouri. Head is the stepfather.

HOW THEY DID IT: ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Covering Ferguson: The long game PHOTO / HUY MACH

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By Autumn Phillips APME News

he national spotlight shone hot on Ferguson in 2014. On some days, there were almost as many reporters, cameramen and photographers as there were protesters in the streets. One by one, those reporters started going home, only returning for the large moments. What was left for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch was the long game. Ferguson was their community, their readers, their coverage area. Until Michael Brown was shot to death in the street by a Ferguson police officer, the large suburban community was covered by stringers attending meetings and by reporters covering it as part of the surrounding St. Louis County. “We have a number of staff members who live there – designers, reporters,” said Adam Goodman, Post-Dispatch deputy managing editor. “I’ve said this before. Of all the communities we cover, Ferguson would not have been the place I thought this would happen. They’ve done a lot to redevelop their downtown and it’s more integrated than other areas.” The biggest challenge for the Post-Dispatch news team was how to balance the breaking news – which continued 24 hours a day for weeks – with the enterprise and >> Continued on next page

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PHOTO / DAVID CARSON

Ebony Williams, 22, from St. Louis, chants with other protesters before the start of Ferguson’s October march in downtown St. Louis. Thousands of people took part in the march down Market Street and rally in Kiener Plaza. “I'm tired of these police killing us and thinking they can get away with it,” Williams said.


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Lesley McSpadden (center) drops rose petals on the blood stains from her son who was shot by police in the middle of the street earlier in the afternoon in Ferguson. PHOTO / HUY MACH

The Post-Dispatch had a few bulletproof vests and helinvestigative pieces that needed to be done to give readers mets from sending journalists to Iraq and Afghanistan, but context for what was happening. they were old, heavy and very visible, which potentially “I don’t think we have ever faced any type of story like made reporters a target. The last time they purchased gas Ferguson in my 30 some years in this business,” Goodman masks was after 9/11. said. “It was so complex and so surreal.” “This was the danger factor,” Goodman said. “There were The story unfolded, exploded and changed over and over so many reporters and photographers getting tear-gassed, again during the day and through the night. maced and assaulted.” “There were many evenings where we had to They invested in new gas masks carried in backtear up the front page or change the headline packs, bulletproof vests and bump helmets, “which because things were peaceful and suddenly is basically a baseball cap with a hard liner if somechanged,” he said. one hits you on the head.” For several weeks, the Post-Dispatch newsroom The Post-Dispatch newsroom is home to a lot of covered little else. They dedicated nearly all metro veteran journalists, but covering Ferguson was a and business reporters to coverage. Because of the new experience for everyone. impact on the greater St. Louis area, stories “At some points, our reporters were tweeting and seemed to come back to Ferguson – even in Sports filing stories online and they were the only GOODMAN and Features. reporters on the scene,” Goodman said. “Some Shifts were staggered so there was a full staff available in the nights the TV trucks were targets and they were forced out, evenings to cover “the violence and the threat of violence.” out of fear. We could stay because we weren’t as obvious as a TV truck. Unbudgeted Expenses “One of our reporters took a photo of someone throwing Coverage strained the budget as reporters and photograa brick and she hadn’t walked far enough away to post the phers logged significant amounts of overtime. photo,” he said. “He saw her and put her in a strangle hold “It made for some long days,” Goodman said. and tried to take her phone. She was able to get loose and The other large expense was the purchase of safety equipaway from him. >> Continued on next page ment, and First-Aid and SWAT training for everyone. >> Continued from previous page

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“For our younger reporters it was a real maturing and awakening. Our hardened reporters and photographers, some who have been in war zones, said it was every bit as scary, if not more so.” The story was all hands on deck, but journalists had a choice whether or not they wanted to be out on the street. “We didn’t make anyone do it. We knew it was dangerous, but we had plenty of volunteers.” There was little rest for Post-Dispatch journalists for months. When word came down that a decision on the indictment would be announced the week of Thanksgiving, all vacations were canceled. A decision of no indictment came down and the calm was over. “It was tough on morale,” Goodman said. “People managed it in different ways. All of us were exhausted and exhilarated at the same time. It took time for people to recover. For some people, that continues even now.”

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> MORE ONLINE Ferguson in Pictures: bit.ly/1m8DI8a Ferguson Story Collection: bit.ly/1DSRozV

And the newspaper's reporters asked, “Why did it happen in Ferguson?” They looked at the history of public housing in the area and examined infrastructure and the subtle ways it keeps people living in poverty. “We interviewed a woman who worked at Burger King who had to walk two miles with no sidewalks on the median of a six-lane highway to get to her job,” Goodman said. They examined the municipal court system in a county that has 90 municipalities. The questions kept coming and with each excavated layer, there was another one beneath. And with each layer, they began to understand the frustration that led to the anger on the streets of Ferguson. They looked at traffic tickets and the use of bench warrants. “If you don’t show up in court or can’t pay, you’re arrested. And if you can’t pay, there are more fines,” Goodman said. “It’s become a kind of debtors’ prison.”

Advice for Smaller Newsrooms Enterprise and Investigation As they kept up with breaking news, they planned enterprise and Sunday stories to look into the issues behind the news. They asked why Michael Brown’s body was left on the street for four and a half hours. They looked at the balance of minorities on the Ferguson police force, asking why it did not reflect the diversity of the community. And then they looked at diverse police forces to see if it makes a difference. They tried to look at police shootings across the nation and learned that it’s not something that is tracked. “They report every sort of category of crime that occurs, but justifiable homicides are optional to report,” Goodman said.

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When the national media shows up on your doorstep, Goodman said, remember it’s your community. Don’t get caught up in the story everyone else is telling. Tell the story only you can tell. “Don’t get whipsawed by other media,” he said. “It doesn’t matter what your size is, look for things in your community where you already have sources.” A good example was an interview the Post-Dispatch did with an 80-year-old man who was part of the first AfricanAmerican family to move into Ferguson. He was living in an assisted-living facility. They took him back to his old neighborhood and he showed them around. “That was a wonderful story,” Goodman said.


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HOW THEY DID IT: WASHINGTON POST

Pulitzer Prize winner Saslow credits editing throughout reporting process

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By Autumn Phillips APME News

ulitzer Prize-winning reporter Eli Saslow has this advice for editors: The best editing happens alongside the reporting. The best editing is collaborative. “I have a really close relationship with my editor at The (Washington) Post,” Saslow said. “Everyone is so busy that the editing process often happens at the beginning, when the story is assigned, and at the very end. But the most valuable editing happens in between, talking about what you’ve seen and how to frame the piece.” Saslow won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting for a series of six stories reported throughout 2013 on the rise in food stamp use, despite the improving economy. The idea came as he noticed the trend mentioned within other stories, and the data backed it up. He boiled down the month-by-month numbers, state by state, over a decade and noticed that Rhode Island’s food stamp enrollment had gone up every month for 75 months in a row.

Setting the Scene His first piece took a month to research, write and report – all the while “earning his leash” by turning in daily stories. That story, “Hungering for a new month to begin,” showed a day in the life of Woonsocket, Rhode Island, where 40 percent of residents rely on food stamps to eat. The government designated Woonsocket a “highly distressed community” in 2012 Food stamps are distributed on the first of each month, and that’s when the town comes to life. “Delivery trucks were moving down river roads, and stores were extending their hours. The bus company was warning riders to anticipate “heavy traffic.” A community bank, soon to experience a surge in deposits, was rolling a message across its electronic marquee on the night of Feb. 28: “Happy shopping! Enjoy the 1st,” he wrote. He spent four days in the town – bracketing the first of the month. He sat in kitchens watching the family dynamics around food and money, and stood in the aisles of a small international meat market for hours as people shopped.

The Post’s Eli Saslow: Collaborative editing is the best editing.

During those four days in Woonsocket, he called his editor twice. They had lengthy phone conversations about what he was learning and brainstormed how to shape it into a story. “I think big projects can feel isolating as a reporter,” Saslow said. “You’re off on your own, but if you stay in steady touch with an editor, someone to talk to, to test out your material, it makes the process way less lonely.” Saslow wrote “Hungering for a new month to begin” in chronological order. The story starts the day before the first of the month. He introduces the readers to his characters. He shows us the empty cupboards and the stocking of the shelves in preparation for the big day, once a month, when everyone can afford food. His writing weaves lives with data. Before he ever arrived in Woonsocket, he had his sources lined up. He knew he wanted a grocery store, but couldn’t get permission from the big chains. The owner of the International Meat Market invited him in, and it turned out >> Continued on next page

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to be the perfect setting to tell the story of a national trend. The four days he spent in Woonsocket were full. “I try to spend all the time with the people in my story, waking up when they woke up for work, walking to work with him, seeing things they see, staying close by, staying as long as they can take it,” Saslow said. Saslow walked to work with one of his subjects, which led to this paragraph in the story: “He had neither a driver’s license nor a car, so he always walked the mile to work. He headed out of their apartment building in a hooded sweatshirt and turned down Privilege Street. His feet crunched against the snow, and his head steamed in the cold air. He passed a U-Save Liquors, a CheapO Tires and an Instant Payday Loans. He passed four stores with signs advertising that they accepted SNAP.” Some of it – like Privilege Street – he wrote in his notebook as they walked. Some of it, he pulled from photographer Michael Williamson’s images. The rest of it, he got – sitting at his desk back at The Washington Post – moving his mouse through Woonsocket, retracing his steps with Google Maps. “It’s kind of a weird thing to ask for – I want to walk with you to work, I want to go grocery shopping with you – but my pitch is always the same. If I’m going to write about something, I want to get it right,” he said. “You get a lot more from doing that than from a 30 minute or even twohour conversation. “Usually people get it. It’s empowering for people to see that you care enough to get it right.”

Finding the Faces Saslow uses creative nonfiction techniques to frame his stories – characters, setting, plot arc – and in this way, people read easily through pages of numbers. “It’s so important to get the right people when writing a big narrative story,” he said. “At the beginning, I’m not just looking for people, but people who represent the heart of what I’m trying to write about.” Before arriving in Woonsocket, he reached out to a community action organization for advice on where to find people, and when he got there, he hung out at those places. He stood in line at the food pantries, interviewing anyone who would talk to him. “It can seem like wasted work,” he said. “I’ll talk to 10 people for every one who is going to end up in the story.”

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> READ THE STORIES http://www.pulitzer.org/works/2014-Explanatory-Reporting

Mining the Data While the faces and the personal stories are the thing that make “Hungering for a new month to begin” so enjoyable, it’s the data – and the weeks Saslow spent mining the data – that make the story important. Looking through data is the “underrated part of reporting,” he said. “Before I got to Woonsocket, I knew a lot about the food stamp program. I knew I’d come to the right place.” Since he was writing about a federal program, so much of the data he needed for this project was online. He “hit The Washington Post with some serious printing costs” and pulled out his highlighter. He started looking at 10-year trends, state-by-state, of how many people were getting food stamps. Then he chose five states and pulled countyby-county data. “I became a reporter because I’m not good at math,” he said. “Looking at charts of numbers is not my favorite part of the job, but it’s so essential.” “The narrative – the close-up story about people’s lives – doesn’t resonate unless there’s something important you’re revealing. The story (of the people in Woonsocket) is more powerful because it’s happening across the country. It’s tens of millions of people across the country going through the same cycle every month.”

2015 Pulitzer Prizes in Journalism PUBLIC SERVICE: The Post and Courier, Charleston, S.C. BREAKING NEWS REPORTING: The Seattle Times Staff INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING: Two Prizes: Eric Lipton of The

New York Times and The Wall Street Journal Staff EXPLANATORY REPORTING: Zachary R. Mider of Bloomberg News LOCAL REPORTING: Rob Kuznia, Rebecca Kimitch and Frank Suraci of the Daily Breeze, Torrance, Calif. NATIONAL REPORTING: Carol D. Leonnig of The Washington Post INTERNATIONAL REPORTING: The New York Times Staff FEATURE WRITING: Diana Marcum of the Los Angeles Times COMMENTARY: Lisa Falkenberg of the Houston Chronicle CRITICISM: Mary McNamara of the Los Angeles Times EDITORIAL WRITING: Kathleen Kingsbury of The Boston Globe EDITORIAL CARTOONING: Adam Zyglis of The Buffalo News BREAKING NEWS PHOTOGRAPHY: St. Louis Post-Dispatch Photography Staff FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHY: Daniel Berehulak , freelance photographer, The New York Times


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By Gary Graham

Around Washington, D.C., not a good season for openness

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arch was a not stellar month for the public’s right to know about what the federal government does in Washington, D.C. First, came the revelations that Hillary Clinton used her own private email system while serving as secretary of state, meaning the public and historians will have a difficult time determining how State Department business was conducted under her watch. The House of Representatives immediately called for explanations and files. More to come on that in the weeks and months ahead. Then, the White House announced it will be excluding the president's Office of Administration from rules that require compliance with the Freedom of Information Act. The information act, typically referred to as FOIA, exists to allow the public access to federal documents. A federal appeals court ruled in 2009 that the Office of Administration is exempt from FOIA and the White House decided it was time to enact that approach. Mind you, the White House is not required to exempt the Office of Administration from FOIA, but it chose to nonetheless because it has the courtapproved authority to do that. The office is not considered an agency as it mainly provides a range of administrative services, such as information technology, mail, research and graphics development. The timing of the White House announcement came at an inauspicious moment because it occurred in the middle of Sunshine Week, a national week-long effort to promote a more open government and greater compliance with FOIA. President Obama vowed during his initial presidential campaign to promote a more open and transparent government, but there have been ample examples of where the administration has done just the opposite when dealing with requests for information. Case in point: the following opening paragraphs from an Associated Press story recently: “The Obama administration set a record again for censoring government files or outright denying access to them last year under the U.S. Freedom of Information Act, according to a new analysis of federal data by The Associated Press. “The government took longer to turn over files when it provided any, said more regularly that it couldn’t find documents and refused a record number of times to turn over files quickly that might be especially newsworthy.

“It also acknowledged in nearly 1 in 3 cases that its initial decisions to withhold or censor records were improper under the law — but only when it was challenged. “Its backlog of unanswered requests at year’s end grew remarkably by 55 percent to more than 200,000. It also cut by 375, or about 9 percent, the number of full-time employees across government paid to look for records. That was the fewest number of employees working on the issue in five years. “The government’s new figures, published Tuesday, covered all requests to 100 federal agencies during fiscal 2014 under the Freedom of Information law, which is heralded globally as a model for transparent government. They showed that despite disappointments and failed promises by the White House to make meaningful improvements in the way it releases records, the law was more popular than ever. Citizens, journalists, businesses and others made a record 714,231 requests for information. The U.S. spent a record $434 million trying to keep up. It also spent about $28 million on lawyers’ fees to keep records secret. Following publication of AP story, the organization’s senior vice president and executive editor, Kathleen Carroll, posted a tart comment on Facebook: “Locking cabinets and buying blackout ink by the ton...the Obama administration sets a new record for denying and censoring records that actually belong to the people. This isn't an issue for journalists alone. You have the right to know ... and to see ... what the government you pay for is doing on your behalf." As if adding subtle insult to injury, the day after the White House announced the FOIA exclusion, the official White House blog posted the president's NCAA tournament bracket, complete with his handwritten changes. I am as fond of March Madness as the next person. I was born in Indiana, where basketball has a storied history. But really, Mr. President, the importance of your bracket pales by comparison to the information that the public has a right to know. Gary Graham is editor of The Spokesman-Review in Spokane, Washington. garyg@spokesman.com

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APME NEWS APME’s First Amendment Committee encourages APME members to contact us if you know of situations that would benefit from exposure to sunshine. Contact committee chair Sonny Albarado at salbarado@arkansasonline.com or 501-344-4321 or on Twitter: @salbarado. Other committee members are Ray Rivera (rrivera@sfnewmexican.com), Jean Hodges (jhodges@gatehousemedia.com) and Mark Baldwin (mbaldwin@rrstar.com).

By Sonny Albarado The First Amendment Report

How to balance traditional access with privacy, public safety concerns

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ome days there just aren’t enough hours to deal with the constant assault on citizens’ right to know. On any given day you can find upward of a dozen news items on APME’s Open Records/FOI online update newsletter: http://www.apme.com/ ?page=openrecordsFOI One interesting aspect about the newsletter items: Journalists and news organizations aren’t alone in fighting for access to government information. Among the 13 items under April 8, for example, five involved citizens battling government agencies for public information. APME started this newsletter segment last year because of anecdotal evidence of an alarming increase in local, state and federal government efforts to close or inhibit longstanding access to a variety of information. The paradox of our information-heavy age is that while individually we have access to more and better information – including government data – than at any time in history, fear about privacy violations and often justifiable concerns about the pervasiveness and permanence of online information seem to be driving efforts to shut down the availability of some government data and access to bureaucracies. There has to be a way to balance traditional access with legitimate privacy and public safety concerns. That’s why your APME First Amendment Committee has worked since September’s convention to help government agencies protect the rights of individuals on a variety of access issues. Last fall, APME joined the National Press Photographers Association and other journalism groups and news organizations to oppose proposed rules by the National Forest Service to require paid permits to film in wilderness areas. The head of the Forest Service responded that the proposal and an earlier rule had been misconstrued as they affect newsgathering, and he issued a strong statement supporting journalists’ right to report news without having to have a permit. But the proposed rule is still under study after the Forest Service received more than 14,000 comments on it. Earlier this year, APME again joined NPPA and others in objecting to a similar permitting requirement promulgated

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by the Fairfax County (Virginia) Park Authority. In a February letter to the park agency, the signers urged the authority to revise its proposal “to craft an unambiguously worded policy that protects not only park resources, but our First Amendment guarantees.” We’re awaiting the park authority’s decision. In January, APME also joined scores of journalism groups and news outlets in support of bipartisan efforts in Congress to update the federal Freedom of Information Act so that it codifies the presumption of openness, improves public access to records and clarifies the use of fees. In March, APME, NPPA and more than a dozen other groups filed a friend-of-the-court brief in connection with photographer Paul Raef’s appeal of his conviction under California’s enhanced reckless-driving statute. As the brief notes, Raef didn’t contest his charges under reckless-driving laws, but rather the newer law that enhances penalties for photojournalists and others pursuing their First Amendment rights to newsgathering. In March, the Victoria (Texas) Advocate published a column during Sunshine Week by the APME First Amendment Committee chairman that highlighted public-access legislation in a number of states as state legislatures got to work this spring. Topmost of that column’s concerns was the ongoing debate regarding police body cameras and how much of the video they record can be considered public record. Privacy and open-government advocates were trying to navigate compromises in several states. On April 16, APME sent a letter to the Elkhart County, Indiana, prosecuting attorney urging him to withdraw a subpoena seeking a reporter’s notes, recordings and other materials stemming from her interview with a murder suspect who said police delayed providing him medical attention for a concussion and broken jaw while officers interrogated him. Indiana’s shield law prohibits authorities from compelling journalists to reveal their sources. The irony here is that the Elkhart Truth reporter’s sources are named in her story. The Truth is seeking to quash the subpoena and has expressed appreciation for the support of APME and other news organizations.


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2014 APME/ASNE CHICAGO CONFERENCE

great ideas

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ave you launched a great new feature, page or Web project, or used a social media tool in a great new way? Well, we want to recognize your great idea. Associated Press Media Editors recognizes a Great Idea every month on APME.com and we showcased monthly winners in our popular annual Great Ideas book, which will be released

at our next conference in October. This is a chance for your newspaper to show off great work and to help fellow editors by providing ideas that might work in their markets. It’s simple to submit your Great Idea. Just go to the Great Ideas page at APME.com, fill out the online form and attach an image or submit a link.

NOEL THOMAS’ ASTORIA MUSIC FESTIVAL SKETCHBOOK The Daily Astorian, Astoria, Ore. Laura Sellers WHAT THEY DID: Editor/publisher Steve Forrester noticed local artist Noel Thomas sketching during the annual Astoria Music Festival. While lunching with Thomas, the idea for an Artist’s Sketchbook for Opinion was born. We hope to continue this, on occasion, using local artists and themes. For nights at the Astoria Music Festival, Thomas carried a sketching pad and pens. He looked for a defining characteristic, “beyond what you see in front of you.”

BEST NEIGHBORHOODS Dallas Morning News, Dallas George Rodrigue WHAT THEY DID: We wanted to provide our readers with a scientifically valid report on neighborhood quality, and we wanted to make money. So we surveyed our readers, gathered a few gigabytes of statistics, mapped neighborhoods to census tracts, and created a set of print and digital products focused on neighborhood quality. Over the past two years, they’ve generated great reader gratitude, healthy Web traffic, and at least $400,000 in incremental revenue. Printed products focused on which neighborhoods best fit people in specific situations, such as families with kids or empty nesters. The website allows users to define the characteristics they care most about, and to find the neighborhoods that best fit those characteristics.

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GREAT IDEAS

THEN AND NOW AND QUINTESSENTIAL COLORADO PHOTO CONTESTS

SHARED APPOINTMENTS WITH LOCAL UNIVERSITIES Dallas Morning News, Dallas George Rodrigue WHAT THEY DID: The Dallas Morning News believes its future lies in better depth, watchdog, and perspective reporting. To deepen its talent pool, the newsroom has worked with several local universities to create “joint appointments.” These are journalists who work for us and also for one of the universities. The current team includes architecture critic Mark Lamster, epidemiologist and medical writer Seema Yasmin, science writer Anna Kuchment, and arts critic Rick Brettell. In print, on our blogs, and in real-life events, they’ve become thought leaders in their fields, and assets for the whole community.

THE MOJO LAB San Jose Mercury News, San Jose, Calif. M. Reynolds WHAT THEY DID: The Mercury News recently rolled out its new MoJo Lab, short for Mobile Journalism Laboratory. The 2012 Mercedes Benz Sprinter has two primary goals: 1) Serve as a mobile newsroom. 2) Serve as a mobile classroom for engagement courses taught by Bay Area News Group staff. The vehicle is equipped with a separate battery system that provides power when the engine is off, six outlets, personal lamps, Smart TV, five 4G hotspots and six workstations.

The Gazette, Colorado Springs, Colo. Jennifer Mulson WHAT THEY DID: The Gazette has had great success with reader photo contests. Quintessential Colorado, for example, draws hundreds of entries each year; this year, 1,500 entered. The success of “Then and Now,” however, was a surprise to us. A&E Writer Jen Mulson created the contest in a fun way by promoting it with “Then and Now” photos of Gazette staff members, including herself. We received nearly 50 “Then and Now” photos from readers. The story, video and photo gallery received tens of thousands of views and was in the “Top 5” of views on gazette.com for two weeks. The kicker: The Gazette now doubles the prize money given to winners who are subscribers. Thus, there's added incentive to subscribe and enter.

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APME

ASNE

AP PHOTO MANAGERS

2015 CONFERENCE

PREVIEW

sessions such as the Tom Rosenstiel’s latest research findings, Editors’ Roundtable with Jill Geisler and Butch Ward, Innovator of the Year and the awards luncheon. he second joint conference of APME, ASNE and Some of the topics were suggested by those who filled out AP Photo Managers will be in 3-D when it cona survey sent out by the planning committee, co-chaired by venes in October in California’s Silicon Valley. Jim Simon, Robyn Tomlin and Joe Hight. However, you won’t need special glasses to attend A new workshop this year will be the Ed Talks, 10-minute this conference Oct. 16-18 at Stanford University in talks by innovative thinkers and leaders, and Palo Alto, California. The theme of this patterned after the popular TED Talks. Another year’s conference fits its location: “3-D: Digital, one will be a special session on the “War on “The annual Diversity and Disruption.” Science” about reporting the facts behind Planning Committee members have been conference is increasingly polarized issues. Keynote speakers meeting since late last year to organize the conlike a massive such as Kelley and other special activities also ference. An estimated 340 editors, directors, will highlight the conference. journalism leaders and others attended last recharge of The conference hotel will be the Sheraton year’s first joint conference in Chicago. Palo Alto, a short walk from the Stanford camour collective “The annual conference is like a massive pus. The conference team has secured a special recharge of our collective batteries,” said Alan D. batteries.” nightly rate of only $169 for Friday, Saturday and Miller, APME president and managing editor for Sunday. Besides the workshops and other activiAlan D. Miller, news at The Columbus Dispatch. Miller is part ties, Miller noted the importance of the conferAPME president of the planning committee along with ASNE ence is the networking and sharing of stories, President Chris Peck. “I leave the conference tips and ideas. each year full of energy and ideas — and “Let's face it, I like hanging out at the hotel bar with all of renewed passion for the absolutely vital work we all do in you. Some of the best ideas in journalism are hatched in our communities.” those lobby ‘meetings,’ including one in 1930 that led to the The conference will kick off at 5 p.m. Friday, Oct. 18, with founding of APME,” Miller said. “Our partnership with welcoming remarks from Miller and Peck, followed by a ASNE for the Chicago conference last year and again this keynote by California innovator David Kelley, creator of he year in California has enhanced the beneficial effects of the Apple mouse and founder of the Institute of Design at conference, because these two groups representing newsStanford. The reception and annual auction will also be part room leaders are packed with bright, talented and influenof the evening festivities at Stanford's Alumni Center. tial editors who are committed to good journalism. Please The next two days will be filled with workshops on reachjoin us. You won’t want to miss this conference.” ing diverse audiences, community engagement, emerging By Joe Hight APME News

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leadership, social media, new media, data reporting, realtime news desks and more. There also will be the annual

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You can register for the conference by going to bit.ly/2015inStanford.


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By Bill Church APME Diversity Report

Diversity programming to focus on engaging communities

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et editors in the same room, and heads will nod in the same direction on the topic of diversity. We need to do a better job of hiring. We need more journalists of color and women in leadership roles. We need to better reflect our communities. The issues are not new, which is why the collaboration between ASNE and APME is going beyond planning for a joint national conference. There also is no better opportunity to work together than revitalizing the industry’s commitment to diversity. Karen Magnuson, a former APME national president and Robert G. McGruder Diversity Leadership recipient, leads ASNE’s diversity initiatives and is working with APME on diversity programming for the second ASNE-APME national conference, to be held Oct. 16-18 on the Stanford University campus in Palo Alto, Calif. Media organization leaders who attend the conference will get a chance to participate in discussions about how to engage communities and develop stories around diversity issues that can become divisive. The format likely will follow the successes of the first joint ASNE-APME conference in Chicago. Mike Fancher of

Journalism That Matters reached out to ASNE about approaching diversity as an opportunity to improve community engagement. Out of that discussion evolved The Engagement Hub and three pilot projects: • Oakland Voices from The Oakland Tribune • United Rochester from the Democrat and Chronicle of Rochester, New York. • We Create Here from the Gazette Company of Cedar Rapids, Iowa “The Engagement Hub emerged as we thought that there was value in creating a place for news organizations to connect with each other, to share stories and resources, and have a place to go to build more capacity for engaging community,” says Peggy Holman, executive director of Journalism That Matters. APME members will find ideas and resources on how to enhance community engagement at www.engagementhub. com. Watch for more details on this emerging opportunity for all media organizations. Church, chairman of APME’s Diversity Committee, is executive editor of the Sarasota (Florida) Herald-Tribune. He can be reached at Bill.Church@herald-tribune.com

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By Mark Baldwin APME Editor-Educator Exchange

Class act: Program unites editors, educators and students

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ow does the other half live? That was the idea behind March’s first APME Editor Educator Exchange, which sent former APME President Bob Heisse for four days to Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana, in an initiative designed to build bridges between working editors and journalism educators and students. Heisse’s host was Juli Metzger, a longtime editor who now directs the Ball State journalism program’s Unified Media Lab. Later in March, Heisse, executive editor of The Times of Northwest Indiana, hosted Metzger at his newspaper. “APME has long supported journalism education, and this program is a way for us to build stronger links between the classroom and the newsroom,” said Alan D. Miller, APME president and managing editor for news at The Columbus Dispatch. “With all of the rapid changes in the news business, the Editor-Educator Exchange will help ensure that journalism students are prepared to hit the ground running when they graduate and enter the newsroom.” Metzger said: “Both the academy and industry need this relationship. Not only does higher ed need to hear from industry, but specifically students need to see the men and women who do the shoe-leather work in their classrooms.” During his four days on campus, Heisse spoke to entrylevel and advanced reporting classes; met with student leaders; participated in planning meetings with student journalists; and met one-on-one with students to provide career advice. For Heisse, what amounted to a “reverse internship” at Ball State was revealing. “This visit opened my eyes to what colleges should be doing. Ball State has broken down silos and brought faculty — and students — together more than other colleges I’ve known or visited.” Heisse said time spent with Ball State’s Police and the Press course was a highlight of his campus visit. Students in the semester-long course in which students actually have class in the basement of the University Police Department headquarters. There, they hear from police what it’s like to deal with the press and obtain a source perspective on their work. Students learn about stories that are unique to crime reporting and about the importance of building a rapport with law enforcement. Heisse shared with the group his

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experience partnering with law enforcement agencies in northwest Indiana to report on crime at the neighborhood level. During her visit to The Times newsroom in Munster, Metzger spent time with the publisher and advertising staff as well as with reporters and editors. At Ball State, “we’re training students in sales, marketing and promotions,” she said. “Discussing digital advertising, native advertising, content marketing and social media management helps me to make the case that more curricular attention is needed in these areas.” Ball State faculty members and students appreciated hearing from a newsroom boss. Faculty members “pointed out that while they may tell students things like ‘Get an internship,’ and to try their hand in audio and video, a professional visiting can make the same points and get their attention,” Heisse said. “I couldn’t be happier with the results of our first exchange,” Miller said. “Juli Metzger and Bob Heisse are pros who are driven to keep their students and newsrooms ahead of the curve, so it was no surprise when they volunteered to be the first in the program. They’ve helped us establish a model for a program we want to grow.” Mark Baldwin is executive editor of the Rockford (Illinois) Register Star. mbaldwin@rrstar.com


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Simon to lead APME in 2018

to continue working with the smart and creative people on the board to shape APME’s future.” “Amid the upheaval in the news business, APME has had to rethink how it can best support journalists and good journalism. That's an ongoing challenge. But I feel very positive about the direction APME is headed.” In recent years, he noted that APME has forged stronger partnerships with organizations like ASNE, launched a national reporting project with the Associated Press, developed new funding for its signature training program and is working on new initiatives like an editor-educator exchange with colleges. With Hayt's departure, Laura Sellers becomes the APME vice president and Bill Church the association's secretary. Sellers is managing editor of The Daily Astorian in Oregon. Church is executive editor of the Herald-Tribune Media Group in Florida. The Associated Press Media Editors is an association of news and broadcast leaders, and journalism educators and student leaders in the United States and Canada. APME works closely with The Associated Press to foster journalism excellence and to support a national network for the training and development of editors who run multimedia newsrooms. APME is focused on advancing the journalism profession, providing feedback to The Associated Press on its news and services, and is on the front line in setting ethical and journalistic standards for newspapers and broadcast outlets, and in the battle for freedom of information and the First Amendment. Its annual conference with ASNE is Oct. 16-18 in Palo Alto, California. Learn more at www.apme.com

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he Associated Press Media Editors is pleased to announce its 2018 president, Jim Simon, managing editor of The Seattle Times. The APME board of directors voted in February to move Simon to the leadership ladder following the resignation of APME Vice President Teri Hayt, who is now the executive director of the American Society of News Editors. Simon has been an APME director since 2011. He has served as conference planning co-chairman for two years. “Jim is as dedicated to APME and its programs as he is passionate about good journalism,” said Alan D. Miller, 2015 APME president and managing editor/ news at The Columbus Dispatch. “Jim brings a wealth of experience and enthusiasm for APME’s work to support journalists in newsrooms across the country. The board enthusiastically supported his move to the leadership ladder.” Simon has worked as an editor and reporter at the Times for most of his career, including stints covering the environment, politics and the statehouse, and as staff writer for the Times' Sunday magazine. As an editor, he helped oversee the team that won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news for its coverage of the killings of four suburban police officers. Prior to joining the Times, he worked as a UPI reporter in the Philippines. He has taught journalism at the University of Washington and Seattle University. He also has experience as a teacher and trainer in Southeast Asia, including serving as a Knight Journalism Fellow in Indonesia and East Timor. “I'm honored to join the leadership team and be selected as a future president,” said Simon. “It's a great opportunity

“I'm honored to join the leadership team and be selected as a future president. It's a great opportunity to continue working with the smart and creative people on the board to shape APME’s future.” Jim Simon

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APME NEWS By Linda Austin

Five affordable NewsTrain workshops offer vital digital skills

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egistration is open for five NewsTrain workshops that will deliver training in the digital skills identified by local journalists as vital to their success. Here are the locations, dates and skills that will be taught as NewsTrain kicks off its 12th year: • Orlando, May 15-16: Social media, smartphone video, data-driven enterprise reporting, beat mapping, mobile-first breaking-news coverage, career planning. http://bit.ly/OrlandoNewsTrain • Monroe, Louisiana, Oct. 15-16: Social media, mobile newsgathering, data-driven enterprise reporting, mobile-first breaking news coverage, journalism ethics in the digital age. http://bit.ly/MonroeNewsTrain • DeKalb, Illinois (65 miles west of Chicago), Oct. 29-30: Social media, smartphone video, audience analytics,

data-driven enterprise reporting, beat mapping, creative local features coverage. http://bit.ly/DeKalbNewsTrain • Philadelphia, Nov. 13-14: A digital-storytelling boot camp including social media, data-driven enterprise reporting, smartphone video and photos, writing news for mobile. http://bit.ly/PhillyNewsTrain • Lexington, Kentucky, Jan. 21: Social media, smartphone video, datadriven enterprise reporting. http://bit.ly/LexingtonNewsTrain The skills taught are chosen by a committee of local journalists in each town who conduct an assessment of the needs in their newsrooms. The experienced trainers are accomplished journalists and journalism professors. Among the instructors are Pulitzer Prize winner Michael J. Berens, investigative reporter at The Chicago Tribune; Steve Buttry, Lamar Family >> Continued on next page

Joe Ruiz, executive producer of new media at The E.W. Scripps Co. and KSHB.com, concentrates at the Las Vegas NewsTrain in October, 2014.

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New York NewsTrain

>> Continued from previous page

Visiting Scholar at Louisiana State University’s Manship School of Mass Communication; Kathy Kieliszewski, visuals director for the Detroit Free Press; and Ron Nixon, Washington correspondent for The New York Times. At each of these workshops, we’ll offer both discounted hotel rates and competitive diversity scholarships. Journalists, journalism students and journalism educators from diverse backgrounds are invited to apply for the scholarships, which cover the $75 registration fee. They are sponsored by the APME Foundation. To apply, visit the links on the previous page for each workshop. If you can’t make it to these NewsTrains, you’ll find the slides and handouts from these and past NewsTrain workshops at slideshare.net/newstrain. Want to bring a NewsTrain to your town? Later this year, we’ll seek applicants to host additional NewsTrain workshops in 2016.

It’s a great opportunity to get affordable training close to home in the skills that matter most to journalists in your area. For more information, visit http://bit.ly/HostNewsTrain. NewsTrain’s low tuition – $75 – is made possible by donors, big and small, who in 2015 included Advance Local, The Ethics & Excellence in Journalism Foundation, The Associated Press, The APME Foundation, Scripps Howard Foundation, GateHouse Media, the Samuel I. Newhouse Foundation and APME past and present board members. We’d also welcome your financial support. To help keep NewsTrain training coming to your community, please donate at the big red buttons on APME.com. For updates on NewsTrain’s next stops, follow us on Twitter @NewsTrain or like us at Facebook.com/NewsTrain. Linda Austin is the project director for NewsTrain. Contact her at laustin.newstrain@gmail.com on@LindaAustin_.

Thanks to departing NewsTrain Program Assisant Teresa Cooper

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fter 10 years and more than 60 workshops as the program assistant for NewsTrain, Teresa Cooper is leaving the program. “I’ve accepted a full-time position here in Charlottesville,” Virginia, Cooper said, “but leaving NewsTrain isn’t easy. It’s been a great ride, and I’ll miss the wonderful relationships and fun I’ve had.” NewsTrain’s part-time program assistant provides the behind-the-scenes logistical support that ensures the workshops’ success. The assistant works closely with workshop trainers, local

journalists and the NewsTrain project director. “NewsTrains are like weddings. They require keen attention to a relentless stream of details,” said Linda Austin, NewsTrain project director. “Teresa has been the unflappable person who’s kept NewsTrain on the rails.” Her successor is Beth Grace, who will join NewsTrain after the Orlando workshop in May. Grace is the former executive director of the North Carolina Press Association and a former AP bureau chief in Raleigh, North Carolina. She can be reached at bgrace.newstrain@gmail.com. M AY 2 0 1 5 y

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editors in the news

Industry’s promotions, appointments, awards and recognition

NPR names Michael Oreskes Senior Vice President of News NPR President and CEO Jarl Mohn has named noted journalist and author Michael Oreskes senior vice president of news and editorial director, effective April 27, 2015. Oreskes was currently vice president and senior managing editor of The ORESKES Associated Press and was previously executive editor of The International Herald Tribune and deputy managing editor of The New York Times. At NPR, Oreskes will lead a newsroom known for the excellence of its journalism and its leadership in multi-platform storytelling.

AP names Joshi to top Southeast Asia news position Vijay Joshi, a veteran foreign correspondent and news leader for The Associated Press who has spent three decades covering Asia and the Middle East, has been named the cooperative's director of news for Southeast Asia. Joshi, 53, currently the assistant Asia-Pacific editor, will continue to be based in Bangkok. From there he will oversee day-to-day operations of more than three dozen AP journalists in 12 countries in the region, which contains nations from Myanmar to Papua New Guinea.

AP taps Karin Lamb as Jordan burean chief The Associated Press has named Karin Laub, a veteran Middle East correspondent, as its chief of bureau for Jordan. In her new role, Laub will also take a lead in producing stories of regional interest and remain involved in coverage of the Palestinian territories. Laub has written about and helped direct coverage of Israel, the West Bank and Gaza in previous roles as Jerusalem news editor and chief correspondent for the Palestinian territories.

Lauer joins Little Rock AP bureau Claudia Lauer, a state Capitol reporter for the Arkansas

Democrat-Gazette, has joined the staff of The Associated Press in its Little Rock bureau next month. The announcement was made by Kelly P. Kissel, the AP’s news editor for Arkansas and Oklahoma. Lauer will join the Arkansas staff April 1. Lauer, 34, has covered Little Rock City Hall and the

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Arkansas Legislature for the state's largest newspaper. She previously worked for The Sun News in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, and held internships at the Washington bureau of the Los Angeles Times and the Topeka (Kansas) CapitolJournal.

Veteran newsman named Montana Standard editor Veteran newsman David McCumber, who is the Washington, D.C. bureau chief for Hearst Newspapers, has been named editor of The Montana Standard. McCumber, 62, brings a wealth of experiMcCUMBER ence and professional accomplishments to the job, including seven years spent in Montana, where he published a magazine and researched a book. He also was part of a team that was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize in local reporting for the Arizona Daily Star in Tucson in 1984. In 1980, the paper won a Pulitzer for a series of stories McCumber helped to edit and direct.

Anger retiring as Detroit Free Press editor and publisher Detroit Free Press editor and publisher Paul Anger says he's retiring after 10 years

with the newspaper. The Free Press (http://on.freep.com/1FXCngL ) said March 26, that Anger's last day will be May 15. He became the Free Press’s editor ANGER and vice president after Gannett bought it in 2005 and became publisher in 2009. The 65-year-old Anger began his journalism career in 1967 taking bowling scores by phone for his hometown paper in Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

AP’s Juliet Williams named administrative correspondent in Sacramento Juliet Williams, an award-winning reporter for The Associated Press, has been named administrative correspondent in Sacramento, where she will oversee the AP’s California state government and politics coverage. After working at the Calgary Herald, Williams started with the AP as a reporter in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 2000, covering a >> Continued on next page


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range of topics, including education and religious issues. She joined the Sacramento bureau in 2005.

AP names Lefteris Pitarakis chief photographer for Turkey Lefteris Pitarakis, an Associated Press photojournalist based in London, has been named AP’s chief photographer for Turkey, based in Istanbul. Pitarakis, 40, started work with the AP as a freelance photographer in 1998 and covered the Balkans region with assignments in Macedonia, Montenegro and Kosovo, as well as Cyprus. From 2000 to 2005 he was based in the Middle East, mainly covering the Palestinian uprising against Israel.

Dusti Demarest named executive editor at The Olympian Dusti Demarest has been named executive editor of The

Olympian, of Olympia, Washington. Demarest, a South Sound native, started at the newspaper in 1994 as enterprise editor and later became the assistant managing editor. For the past six years, she has led a joint reporting team as features editor for The Olympian and The News Tribune. Both papers are owned by The McClatchy Company. Jeff Mayor, who joined The News Tribune in 2003 as adventure editor, became features editor for The Olympian and The News Tribune on April 6.

New editor announced at West Point, Miss., newspaper William B. Carroll, a lawyer who began a career in news-

papers in 2012 in Louisiana, has been named editor of the Daily Times Leader in West Point, Mississippi. The announcement was made March 19, by publisher Don Norman. Carroll, who attended school in Mississippi, earned a law degree in 2001 from Valparaiso University. He was a public defender and county prosecutor in Kingman, Arizona. He was in private practice from 2007 to 2010.

Miller named Sioux City Journal editor A 35-year veteran of the Sioux City Journal has been named editor. The newspaper reports that Bruce Miller has been the Journal’s interim editor for the past several weeks, since Editor Chris Coates left to become watchdog and investigations editor for The News Journal in Delaware. Miller started at the Sioux City Journal as a reporter and later served as an arts and entertainment writer, as assistant managing editor and managing editor.

Tallahassee hires new executive editor The Tallahassee (Florida) Democrat has hired William Hatfield as its new executive editor. President and Publisher Skip Foster announced Hatfield’s selection. Hatfield is currently the editor of the Northwest Florida Daily News in Fort

Walton Beach. The Illinois native moved to Florida in 2000 to take a position as a copy editor and page designer at the Daily News. He replaces Bob Gabordi, who left the Democrat in January to become executive editor at another Gannett paper, Florida Today.

Weissert to head AP’s Austin bureau Will Weissert, an Associated Press political reporter and former longtime Latin America correspondent, has been named administrative correspondent in Austin. The appointment was announced by Maud Beelman, the AP’s editor for Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas. Weissert has served as interim administrative correspondent in AP’s Texas capital bureau since November. He has covered Texas politics since 2011, including the national rise of Gov. Rick Perry and Sen. Ted Cruz.

AP appoints Carley Petesch corrrespondent in West Africa Carley Petesch, a longtime editor in Africa who has reported from Nigeria and South Africa for The Associated Press, has been named a West Africa correspondent for the news organization. The appointment was announced by Africa regional editor Andrew Selsky. Petesch has served as an editor on the Africa Desk in Johannesburg since 2009, working with the AP’s stringers across the continent.

Veteran journalist Claire Galofaro joins AP bureau in Louisville The Associated Press has named Claire Galofaro, a veteran newspaper reporter who has covered criminal justice and social service issues, as its administrative correspondent for Kentucky and Tennessee. She will be based in her hometown of Louisville. The appointment was announced by South Region Editor Lisa Marie Pane and TennesseeKentucky News Editor Scott Stroud. Galofaro, 32, most recently worked at The Courier-Journal, where she covered criminal justice and social services. She previously reported for The New Orleans Advocate, The Times-Picayune and the Bristol Herald-Courier in the Appalachian Mountains of southwest Virginia.

New Castle News names veteran journalist Dan Irwin as its new editor A longtime writer and editor at the New Castle News has been named the western Pennsylvania newspaper's top editor. Dan Irwin’s appointment was announced by publisher Sharon Sorg. Irwin started at the News in 1978 as a sports writer. After 10 years in sports, he served as a copy editor, assistant managing editor and lifestyle editor. Sorg says the new editor's familiarity with the area and its readers is a great asset. Irwin succeeds Tim Kolodziej. >> Continued on next page

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Standard-Examiner Editor Howell resigns Andy Howell, the longtime executive editor of the Standard-Examiner, of Ogden, Utah, has resigned. Howell plans to return to Arizona to be closer to family. He says there are family health concerns that need to be addressed. He was raised in Tucson and graduated from the University of Arizona. Howell joined the newspaper in 1989 and became executive editor in 2003.

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AP hires William March to cover Florida Legislature The Associated Press has hired William March, The Tampa Tribune's former political reporter, to work in its Tallahassee bureau during the upcoming session of the Florida Legislature. March will be working with Tallahassee correspondent Brendan Farrington and reporter Gary Fineout to cover the 60-day session, which begins March 3.


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member

showcase

APME recognizes contributions to the AP photo report through the Showcase Photo of the Month Award. The competition is judged by AP and member photo editors. The monthly winners are displayed at the annual conference and a Showcase Photo of the Year Award is presented.

NOVEMBER AP Photo/ St. Louis Post Dispatch

David Carson A St. Louis County Police tactical team arrives on West Florissant Avenue to disperse a crowd as the Beauty Town store burns, Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, in Dellwood, Mo. The building and several others in-and-around Ferguson were burned during protests after a grand jury decided not to indict a white police officer in the killing of unarmed, black 18-year-old Michael Brown.

DECEMBER

JANUARY

AP Photo/The (Bowling Green, Ky.) Daily News

AP Photo/Naples Daily News

Austin Anthony

Corey Perrine

Desales quarterback Austin Johnson cheers with his teammates after Desales' 26-0 victory over Newport Central Catholic on Friday, Dec. 5, 2014, in the Class 2A State Championship at L.T. Smith Stadium in Bowling Green, Ky.

Adam Abadir swings his daughter Hanna, 2, during the grand opening at the new Bonita Springs Dog Park. Droves of people brought their canines to romp through the new fenced play areas. The nearly 6 1/2-acre dog park cost an estimated $360,035.

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APME NEWS By David Minthorn

AP Stylebook minute Stylebook adds ‘suicide’ entry and offers delicate handling

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P’s longtime practice is to report a suicide or a suicide attempt only if the person is well-known or the circumstances are particularly unusual or publicly disruptive. The guidance had taken the form of internal memos to AP reporters and editors, or passed along by senior editors on a case-by-case basis. An all-staff memo in 2013 from the AP Standards Center in New York noted, “suicide stories, when we write them, should not go into how-to detail on the methods used. The basics are enough. ...” Why, then, was “suicide” added for the first time to the 2015 AP Stylebook? The rationale came down to choosing the right language -using neutral words to report deaths linked to mental illness and shunning the traditional term “committed suicide” on our own because it can imply an illegal action. By the dictionary definition, commit means “to perpetrate an offense or crime.” But killing oneself or attempting to do so has long since been dropped as a prosecutable offense in the United States and many other places. When the AP Stylebook expanded the “mental illness” entry in 2013, how to cover suicide wasn’t in the guidance. Mental health professionals who focus on suicide prevention and Stylebook users who had experienced the trauma of suicide in their families noted the omission and requested that the Stylebook add the topic. Appeals sent to the AP Stylebook team underlined the scope of this mental health problem and using language that doesn't stigmatize those who choose to die by their own hand, or their survivors. Months of discussions starting in mid-2014 resulted in the drafting of what we consider to be suitable language on covering suicide. The suicide entry was unveiled March 27 at the American Copy Editors Society convention in Pittsburgh among other changes and updates to the Stylebook. For the first time in the Stylebook’s 62-year history, suicide is given a separate entry. It doesn’t ban “committed suicide” - a term widely used by authorities. But it urges staffers to avoid using the term except in direct quotations from authorities. It counsels alternatives like “died by suicide,” “took her own life” or “killed himself.” Reaction has been positive. Here’s the entry:

suicide Generally, AP does not cover suicides or suicide attempts, unless the person involved is a well-known figure or the circumstances are particularly unusual or publicly disruptive. Suicide stories, when written, should not go into

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What’s new in the stylebook? • Sports Guidelines have been updated with more than 60 new or revised entries, ranging over baseball playoffs, basketball’s NCAA Tournament, O-line and D-line in football, horse racing, injuries, Olympic Games, race distances, soccer tactics, titles and winter sports. • New or updated terms include ACL for anterior cruciate ligament, day to day, double axel, free agent, hat trick, heatstroke, MCL for medial cruciate ligament, Olympian, shoestring catch, Sweet 16, “tiki-taka,” Tommy John surgery, trifecta and zonal marking. • Global warming, which can be used interchangeably with climate change, is another new entry. Climate change is more accurate scientifically to describe the effects of greenhouse gases on the environment, including extreme weather and changes in rainfall patterns, ocean acidification and sea level. But global warming is used in common parlance and is widely accepted. • Other new or updated entries include abaya; Affordable Care Act; airsoft gun; animal welfare activist; Arab Spring; autism spectrum disorder; Crimea; dog walker; drop-down; drive-by; Ebola; execution-style; justify; Kathmandu; National Security Agency; obscenities, profanities and vulgarities; One World Trade Center; privacy; Schengen Area; Uber; and Ulaanbaatar. Entries on militant groups such as Boko Haram and Islamic State are also new this year. • Some terms that were previously in the Social Media Guidelines are now listed in the A-Z section. New entries include favorite, meme and Swarm. Druze and Wicca are new to the Religion chapter.

detail on methods used. Avoid using committed suicide except in direct quotations from authorities. Alternate phrases include killed himself, took her own life or died by suicide. The verb commit with suicide can imply a criminal act. Laws against suicide have been repealed in the United States and many other places. Do not refer to an unsuccessful suicide attempt. Refer instead to an attempted suicide. Medically assisted suicide is permitted in some states and countries. Advocacy groups call it death with dignity, but AP doesn't use that phrase on its own. When referring to legislation whose name includes death with dignity or similar terms, just say the law allows the terminally ill to end their own lives unless the name itself of the legislation is at issue.


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