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thedes覺gner ASSOCIATION OF

PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGNERS

Fall 2014

2014

INTERNATIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN AWARD

Winners


editor’sletter

Design Awards

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went to my first Academy Awards party in 1989. (In case you’re wondering, the best picture Oscar went to Rainman.) As the evening wore on I noticed a trend: the party guests riveted to the screen during the red carpet arrivals tended to wander off once the actual ceremony began. Others ignored the red carpet interviews, but focused intently on the winners of every category. My takeaway? Some of us responded to the beauty and stylishness of the award process, while others were all about its substance.

When it comes to design, most of us demand style and substance. That’s why I’m sure you will enjoy this special issue of The Designer. Devoted exclusively to the winners of the APLD International Landscape Design Awards, the winning landscapes were judged on a variety of criteria, including plant choice and composition, creativity, and technical merit. While I know you’ll be drawn to the stunning garden photographs, I encourage you to read the descriptions that accompany them. To provide insight into the judging process, each entry begins with a quote from one of the judges explaining why this particular landscape stood out from the rest. Working from the design briefs submitted by the designers, garden journalist and landscape designer Genevieve Schmidt created compelling narratives that shed light on how each garden’s features came together to create a winning design. So grab some popcorn and settle in to enjoy The Designer’s very own Oscar party. SUSAN MORRISON

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EDITOR@APLD.ORG


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FALL 2014 7 JUDGES 9 STUDENT COMPETITION JUDGES 13 PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 15 2014 APLD INTERNATIONAL DESIGNER OF THE YEAR Colin Miller GOLD AWARDS 21 Nancy Drobnick J U D G E S H O NO RABLE M ENTIO N

25 29 33 37

Allan Broadbent Julie Melear Scott Hostetler Scott Hostetler

39 41 43 45 49 51 53 55 57 59 61 63 65 67 69

MERIT AWARDS Debbie Gliksman Eva Chiamulera Patricia St. John, APLD Paul Connolly Matthew Cunningham Margie Grace, APLD Charles Hess Jan Johnsen J. Brandon Jones Colin Miller Janice Parker William Ripley, APLD Christopher Elkow Charles Hess Scott Hostetler

STUDENT AWARDS GOLD 73 Thomas Lawson SILVER 75 Thomas Lawson O N T H E COV ER & TH IS S P RE AD : P H OTO G R A P H S AND D E S IGN BY 2 014 A P L D I N T E R NATIO NAL D E S IGNER O F T H E Y E A R , COLIN M ILLER

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contents

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judges

Norman K. Booth FASLA

Kathleen Brenzel

Duncan Heather

Norman K. Booth, FASLA, is a Professor Emeritus at The Ohio State University where he taught landscape architecture for 31 years, including 7 years as head of the section of landscape architecture. Now retired from teaching, he devotes his professional time to writing and volunteer consulting. Booth is the author of Basic Elements of Landscape Architecture, Residential Landscape Architecture (coauthored with James E. Hiss), and mostly recently Foundations of Landscape Architecture.

Kathleen Brenzel is garden editor of Sunset Magazine. Born in Santa Monica, she spent summers in the Pacific Northwest and learned early on to love the differences between the cool forests around Puget Sound and balmy, palm-lined canyons of home. While overseeing the magazine’s garden content, she edited Sunset’s Gardening in the Northwest, California Top 10 Garden Guide, Gardening in the Southwest, and the Western Garden Book of Edibles. Sunset’s Western Landscaping Book, which she pitched, developed, and edited, led to a nationwide franchise. In 2007, she received The American Horticultural Society’s Horticultural Communication Award. This ninth edition of the New Western Garden Book is her fourth as the book’s editor.

Duncan Heather is an e-Learning entrepreneur and founder of MyGardenSchool and the Oxford College of Garden Design. He trained under, then worked for top international garden designer John Brookes before setting up his own design/build practice in Henley-on-Thames. At the age of 28 he started the Oxford College of Garden Design, widely regarded as one of the best design schools in the world and one of only two private schools in the UK to have offered a university credit rated postgraduate level diploma in Residential Landscape Design. In 2009 he started MyGardenSchool, offering four week online tutor led courses in all aspects of garden and landscape design.

On judging: What I appreciate the most in judging the APLD Landscape Design Awards, and find very challenging, is the ability to see and evaluate a wide range of projects located throughout the world. I am not aware of other landscape awards programs that encompass such a diversity of projects.

On judging: Judging the APLD Landscape Design Awards is like opening a window onto gardens around the world, each with its own unique style, and creative solutions to site problems. Very challenging, but what a delight!

On judging: It’s always a privilege to be asked to judge the APLD design awards. As a teacher and mentor, it’s important to instill a strong design philosophy in your students and this is something I hope I bring to the judging of this prestigious competition.


Billy Goodnick

Eric Liskey

Rosalind Reed FAPLD

Katherine StokesShafer APLD

Santa Barbara-based Billy Goodnick is actually a funk drummer parading as an awardwinning landscape architect, author, columnist and blogger at Fine Gardening magazine, college instructor, and in-demand speaker. His book, Yards: Turn Any Outdoor Space Into the Garden of Your Dreams (St. Lynn’s Press, 2013), teaches garden lovers the process used by professionals so they can improve their own design abilities or become a fully engaged client. He is also the brains behind Crimes Against Horticulture: When Bad Taste Meets Power Tools at Facebook, using humor to raise awareness about sustainable garden design.

Eric Liskey is deputy editor of gardens and outdoor living for Better Homes and Gardens magazine. Prior to joining Better Homes and Gardens, he was editor of Garden, Deck & Landscape, a Better Homes & Gardens special interest title. He has a bachelor’s degree in ornamental horticulture, and a master’s degree in botany, both from California State University at Fresno. He has worked in various green-industry positions over the past 20 years, such as park horticulturist, landscape contracting, and athletic turf management.

Rosalind is a fellow of APLD and principle of her firm Rosalind Reed Associates. She has been a landscape designer for 20 years and specializes in residential and roof gardens. Her work has been published in Fine Gardening magazine, WaterShapes magazine, the Chicago Tribune, and many regional newspapers. Her former garden, in Oak Park, IL was featured in Outside the Not So Big House: Creating the Landscape of Home. Her gardens have won gold merit awards from the Illinois Landscape Contractor’s Association and APLD. For four years running, she has been named as one of Chicago’s top landscape designers by Chicago magazine.

Kathy Stokes-Shafer, APLD, has been in the landscape industry for over 20 years. Since earning her landscape design degree from Temple University, she has managed a garden center and worked as a designer for a major design build firm. She has been a lecturer, a judge and a teacher for the Ohio Landscapers Association. She served on the board of APLD and currently is involved with the local chapter. Kathy now has her own business where she designs for several landscape companies. In her spare time she paints.

On judging: Critiquing the work of other professionals helps make me a better designer. By turning off the “I wouldn’t do it like that” voice, I get to enter another designer’s mind and take away a few lessons that I can apply to my own work.

On judging: Judging the APLD awards keeps me abreast of the latest trends in landscape design, and it’s also a great way to find outstanding projects that might make good stories in Better Homes and Gardens. And seeing so many beautiful landscapes is just plain fun!

On judging: This year, we had some wonderful submissions. Outstanding gardens demonstrated how the design related to the site, the house (in residential design) and, of equal importance, how circulation worked throughout the site.

On judging: So enjoyed judging this year. The scope and creativity of the projects were amazing. Very inspiring.

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judges Student Competition 9

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Claire Ehrlinger

Bob Perry FASLA

Karen Sumek

Claire Ehrlinger has been a professor of Horticulture at MiraCosta in Oceanside, California since 2004, and department lead since 2007. She has taught a wide variety of courses including Landscape Design, Plant Identification, Landscape Irrigation, Landscape Management, Plant Science and Plant Pest Control. The Horticulture program at MiraCosta College provides Certificates and Associate Degrees for career and transfer students in Landscape Architecture, Landscape Management, Nursery & Crop Production and Viticulture & Enology. Prior to moving to California and teaching at MiraCosta, she was the Dept. Chair of the Landscape Horticulture Dept. at Cincinnati State, a 2-year college located in Cincinnati, Ohio.

In 1972 Robert Perry, FASLA, Professor Emeritus of Landscape Architecture at Cal Poly Pomona, began an illustrious academic career that still continues today. He has taught landscape design and architecture in the UCLA Extension Program in Landscape Architecture, Landscape Architecture Studies at USC and at Cal Poly Pomona, emphasizing the relationship between plants and the conservation of water and energy. Bob previously authored two books considered classic references on waterconserving landscape plants: Trees and Shrubs for Dry California Landscapes, 1980, and Landscape Plants for Western Regions, 1992. His latest work, Landscape Plants for California Gardens, continues this tradition, greatly expanding the scope of coverage and providing comprehensive, high quality photography.

Karen Sumek’s education at Texas A&M, which culminated with a B.L.A., introduced her to the wonderfully diverse field of landscape architecture. Studying landscapes took her through Italy, back to Texas, and finally to California where she settled. She believes the richness of the landscape in Southern California coupled with the optimism of its inhabitants, makes it a perfect environment for design. Karen’s career as a landscape architect began in the commercial sector, working on museums, theme parks, planned communities, golf courses, and shopping centers, but she quickly found the need to create private gardens. She believes that a home is a personal refuge, a place to recharge and a place to enjoy friends and family. Karen teaches Introduction to CAD for Landscape Design, Advanced CAD for Landscape Design, and a short term course on hand drafting for landscape designers at Cuyamaca College.


Your Visions. Perfectly Realized.

Photo courtesy of McGregor Coxall

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thedesıgner EDITOR IN CHIEF Susan Morrison ART DIRECTOR Marti Golon CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Genevieve Schmidt EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Denise Calabrese ASSOCIATE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Lisa Ruggiers MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR Angela Burkett COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR Michelle Keyser DIRECTOR OF CONFERENCES & EVENTS Jen Cramer CERTIFICATION COORDINATOR Kelly Clark COMMUNICATIONS ASSOCIATE Courtney Kuntz BOOKKEEPER Jennifer Swartz MEMBERSHIP, FINANCE & EVENTS COORDINATOR Leona Wagner NEWSLETTER EDITOR Amy Bobb COPY EDITOR Claire Splan

➸ Click name to email us! For information on advertising in The Designer, contact ads@apld.org For submission guidelines click here

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DETA I L OF B A RDEN R ESI DE N CE DESI GN BY 2 01 4 A PL D I N TE RN AT I ON A L DESI GN ER OF T HE Y EA R, COL I N MI L L ER


thank you to our

sponsors Platinum

Gold

Silver Bronze

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president’smessage APLD International Design Conference

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ant to learn award-winning skills? We all have a unique opportunity to gather and learn from each other as well as experts in our field. Our 2014 Design Award winners will be recognized at the annual APLD International Landscape Design Conference in Orlando in early November. The conference will also dovetail with the International Pool, Spa, and Patio Expo, which is new for both groups. What really excites me about attending this year is the backstage tour at Disney. Why? No one, and I mean no one, manages and exceeds client expectations better than they do. I work with clients daily and I know firsthand about customer service—but I believe that I can do better at this most important task. I want to give my clients award-caliber service. APLD is giving me the opportunity to learn from a master and then discuss with my peers in the afterglow, making this just another great reason among many to go. Why wouldn’t you want to have this experience? For more information on the APLD International Design Conference, go here. Hope to see you there!

SUSAN COHAN APLD

The Designer is an official publication and member service of the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD), 2207 Forest Hills Drive, Harrisburg, PA 17112. Ph: 717-238-9780 Fax: 717-238-9985. Disclaimer: Mention of commercial products in this publication is solely for information purposes; endorsement is not intended by APLD. Material does not reflect the opinions or beliefs of APLD. APLD is not responsible for unsolicited freelance manuscripts and photographs. All printed articles become the copyright of APLD.

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Co-location:

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2014 APLD INTERNATIONAL LANDSCAPE

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Designer of the Year |

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B A R DEN R ESI DEN CE DESI GN BY COL I N MI L L ER

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designeroftheyear RESIDENTIAL DESIGN: Barden Residence, Danville, CA

Colin Miller F I R M : Envision Landscape Design Studio, Inc., Walnut Creek, CA U S D A Z O N E : 9b

Good site-specific features; fun with materials, shapes, and lines; droughttolerant and minimal plantings still offer color and beauty; and livability.

JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE:

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ooking at the photos of this cozy outdoor entertaining area, it’s hard to imagine the sight that greeted Miller on his first visit to the residence: A weedy and unplanted slope, unattractive pressure-treated wooden walls holding the soil in place, and a straight stucco wall with lighting and a fireplace, but no relationship to the visually overwhelming expanse of concrete patio. The ill-defined patio and back yard were transformed into a series of contemporary entertaining areas, with plantings that harmonize beautifully with the natural grassland beyond.

“We like to create outdoor rooms with specific uses,” says Miller. “We start by figuring out how the clients will use the space, and then develop it for purposeful outdoor living.” In this case, the clients wanted a shaded outdoor kitchen plus a dining area to enjoy al fresco dining, as well as other spots throughout the garden to entice them and their guests to venture outdoors. To create shade over the existing bar, Miller used a wooden and aluminum arbor, with kiln-dried redwood stained to match the ipe on the front of the bar. The aluminum on the arbor was painted to look like steel to echo the steel basin in the water feature.

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To create distinct areas for entertaining, it was important to divide the space into comfortable, human-sized places for interaction. Two smooth stucco apld.org


Above: Sheets of water spill into a steel basin, providing both visual and aural ambience. At left: Guests can move from the chic bar to the cozy fireside seating as the night progresses.

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planters were placed near the dining table and at the end of the garden wall to add interest and visually enclose each area. “We use clean, hard lines to organize the outdoor rooms, but warm up the space with materials such as wood or cor-ten steel,” explains Miller. “We don’t want the landscape to be a museum or place that you just look at, and wood warms up cooler materials like concrete and stucco.” Though the landscape is contemporary in style, it feels warm and inviting due to this careful mix of materials. Another element that contributes to the visual warmth of the landscape is the loose, nativeesque planting on the hillside. “The goal is to blur the boundaries between the natural environment and the garden rooms,” he says. The movement and color of the grasses reinforce the beauty of the golden California grassland beyond the garden fence. “On the upper slope, we almost thought of it like a fabric or print,” says Miller. “Up close you can see the detail of the pattern, but from afar it reads more like a textile.” The cohesive look of the grasses gave the designer the freedom to use some vivid splashes of color as effective accents.

Of course, a beautiful planting needs an attractive stage from which to shine, and the existing pressure-treated wood retaining walls started out a jarring shade of reddish-brown. Painting them with a custom black semi-transparent stain gave the wood a soft yet modern appearance. The matte black color has the dual effect of receding into the backdrop, while also adding drama to the silhouette of plants when viewed up close.

“In our landscapes, we avoid the thought that modern equals cold,” says Miller. By seamlessly blending a loose tapestry of plants with contemporary lines and materials, a new aesthetic emerges that gives a nod to modern styling while also embracing the relaxed look of the natural world.

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designeroftheyear

Above: The rich color of oiled wood is an effective contrast against the steel accents in this horizontal fence. At left: Contemporary styling gives way to the natural curvature of the land.

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goldaward

Judges Honorable Mention

S P E C I A LT Y P R O J E C T S : Sun/Moon Garden and Walkway, Bentleyville, OH

Nancy Drobnick

F I R M : Miriam’s River House Designs, LLC, Mentor, OH U S DA ZO N E : 5 JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE: Very

creative design executed with great care and craftsmanship. The use of stone is especially noteworthy. The entire structure of the design not only symbolizes the planetary systems, but also creates a place of refuge and renewal.

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esigner Nancy Drobnick calls herself a metaphysical land design artist, and from that title alone, you can see that her work has an added component beyond what most landscape designers aim to do. She carefully selects materials that act as symbols of the power of nature, giving visitors the opportunity to reconnect with their place in the universe. “Our work can be appreciated on many levels,” explains Drobnick. She plans her landscapes so that they can be enjoyed purely for the aesthetics, but exploring and focusing on the symbolism allows visitors to achieve a deeper meaning and more personal and powerful connection to the place. 21

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A metaphysical garden has information built into each structure. In this landscape, guests enter through a grand arch that celebrates the Earth’s formation. The river stone used in the arch, some pieces weighing up to 600 pounds, were quarried from the client’s property and feature unusual formations and beauty in the sandstone and hard al-

Embedded within this grand arch are a number of meaningful objects celebrating Earth’s formation.

P H OTO G R A P HY: DANIEL A. D RO BNICK

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goldaward

Judges Honorable Mention

luvial rock. A small built-in window on the south side of the arch allows light to focus directly upon the opposite north wall, where a polished granite stone containing fossilized remains of prehistoric sea creatures gleams in the light. “The artist who polished this piece followed the rib cages of these fish so they take on an otherworldly quality,” says Drobnick. “If the fish had only known where they would end up!” This and other meaningful artifacts provide a sense of connection to the ancient beginnings of life on our planet.

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After passing through the stone arch, you arrive in the sun and moon garden. Its centerpiece is a massive megalith millstone representing the sun, and a linear river stone representing the moon. “The slender, wrinkly surface of the linear river stone makes you think of the pockmarked face of the moon,” says the designer. These grounding focal elements are enclosed and surrounded by a layer of seven circular accents: lush and colorful plantings, a ring of boxwood, a gravel pathway, and a surrounding ring which represents the solar system, with upright barn stones standing in for the planets. The sense of human history in these pieces, from the upright stones that acted as a foundation for an old barn, to the old millstone that was used for grinding grains, is an additional touch point connecting the threads of human life to the larger world of the solar system beyond. apld.org


“Being in this garden makes me feel like I’m connected somehow to the past and present of what we are as a species and what our earth is,” Drobnick explains. “It’s more humbling than anything else. You can leave behind your worries, because you feel in touch with the fact that there is something so much more important than all of the daily stresses of life.”

Representative of the sun, a massive millstone sits as the centerpiece of this landscape.

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goldaward RESIDENTIAL DESIGN: Darien Residence, Darien, CT

Allan Broadbent

F I R M : The Laurel Rock Company, Wilton CT U S D A Z O N E : 6b JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE: We

always enjoy it when a design works so well with the home, which this one does. A nice solution to problems.

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his classically beautiful 1932 brick residence rests on 1.79 acres and sits under the dappled shade of mature oaks, hemlocks, and maples. When Broadbent first arrived on site, there were numerous challenges to consider, the first of which was creating an attractive arrival and parking area to greet guests and make it clear where they should park. The existing asphalt horseshoe drive led to an uninviting parking area near the garage, and all of that non-permeable space was causing problems with flooding and runoff.

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Reconfiguring the driveway into a cobblestone, gravel, and bluestone entry court, and reducing the asphalt parking area solved both problems. Outdated foundation plantings were transformed into a formal series of flowering shrubs, evergreen hedges and annual color, which emphasize the entry and uphold the elegance of the architecture. Boxwood topiaries adorn the entry, flanking the front door.


A brook running along the back yard made stormwater management even more of a pressing concern than it would usually be. With consistently saturated upland soils, it was important to deal with stormwater on site and not direct it towards the brook. To prevent water from flowing off the driveway and over the lawn, into the garage, and finally to the brook, Broadbent created a rain garden on the side of the garage with native wetland plants to slow and filter runoff.

A formal entry and driveway was reconfigured to address both drainage and parking issues.

PH OTO G R A P H Y: L AD INO P H OTO

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goldaward

He also worked to restore the wetland area towards the back of the property. Over 5000 square feet of lawn were removed from the wetlands and replaced with native trees and plants suitable to the site. In combination with the rain garden and added permeable surfaces on the drive, the wetland buffer zone ensures good stewardship of the natural areas surrounding. In addition to a fresh entry and responsible stormwater management, the clients wanted to revitalize their underused back yard by adding a swim27

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ming pool and spa with an adjoining pool terrace and changing rooms. The back-yard pool was surrounded by a limestone terrace and a whitewashed brick seat wall to define the space and add overflow seating for parties. A wrought iron fence creates a graceful pool enclosure. Changing rooms were cleverly constructed beneath the existing deck. Massed plantings of ornamental grasses and Joe Pye weed (Eupatorium) make a stunningly colorful late-summer show.

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Left: An inviting pool is bordered by classically beautiful plantings. Right: Native plants provide a transition between landscape and wetland areas.

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goldaward S H O W G A R D E N : Harvest Home, Irvine, CA

Julie Melear

(Janet Conroy & Mary Sper) The George Washington University, Springfield, VA U S D A Z O N E : 10a JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE: As

a show landscape setting this is a great illustration of design for space, place, case, time, and personality. The hardscaping perfectly complements the design of the residence (which is beautiful and inspiring) and the spatial design addresses the needs of a person with disabilities.

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n October 2013, 20 worldwide collegiate teams competed to design and build attractive and affordable zeroenergy homes for the U.S. Department of Energy’s solar decathlon. Team Capitol DC’s entry was this intriguing show garden, entitled Harvest Home. Situated on the tarmac at a

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former Marine Corps base in Irvine, California, this temporary home and landscape was subjected to harsh Santa Ana winds and a limited water supply, so in addition to meeting the sustainability challenges of the competition, it had to perform well under remarkably tough conditions. Harvest Home was designed as a healing home and garden for a returning war veteran suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. All aspects of the landscape were designed to enrich the emotional and physical health of the veteran, as well as to reconnect him to family, friends, and the broader community.

Elegant decking not only extends the beauty of the architecture, but also provides wheelchair accessibility.

PHOTO G R A P H Y: A D E LE AS H KAR, NICK GINGO LD (THE GEOR GE WASHI N GTON U N I VER SI TY), RYAN M C K I B B I N , JU L IE M ELE AR

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goldaward Edibles and flowers decorate the water rill on this table.

Anybody who has ever gardened can tell you what researchers have proven, which is that gardening is a restorative activity, capable of stimulating positive growth in people’s lives. To that end, two vegetable gardens provide fresh, organic produce so the veteran can experience the connection that comes from growing your own food. Edibles were planted in affordable and easy-to-use recycled milk crates. Stackable and modular, the arrangements can be changed based on the season and weather conditions.

A respect for and connection with the natural surroundings is another key element in a healing landscape. Many of the plants chosen were native to the coastal scrub plant community of the region, and so are able to withstand the adverse climactic conditions without added inputs. An innovative dining table featuring a water rill and herbs down the center provides an inviting way for the veteran to entertain and enjoy the company of others. The sounds of the water feature combine with rustling grasses on the north edge of the deck for a sensory experience that reinforces the restorative qualities of nature. Energy-efficient elements included a cistern to collect roof rainwater, which was used along with gray water to irrigate many of the plants. The team also used solar lighting, a beehive, a compost bin, and a clothesline to provide ways of saving energy, pollinating, and making the most of natural resources in a way that is both environmentally responsible and a pleasure to view.

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NON-RESIDENTIAL: Shanghai Zhaoxian Gemdale, Shanghai, China

Scott Hostetler F I R M : HZS USA Landscape, Atlanta, GA U S D A Z O N E : 8b JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE: This

project is inspiring, beautiful, and responsible. It not only transforms a lifeless, wasted space into an inviting garden that welcomes people and social interaction, but it mitigates an important environmental problem in a gentle, respectful way. The designer did not rely on floral color to create planting interest; rather he used subtle shifts in green and juxtaposing varying plant forms to create visual interest. The artistry in the placement and positioning of rocks and boulders is superb.

A

severely disturbed site over a Shanghai car park roof needed to manage on-site stormwater and filter pollution to prevent negative impacts to the adjacent Lao Song Tang River and Sheshan National Tourist Resort Nature Preserve. In order to reestablish a healthy ecosystem with self-renewing processes of filtration and cleansing, a series PHOTOGR A PHY: SCOTT HOSTETLER , CHA D I N GR A HA M

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goldaward

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goldaward of vegetated bioswales were used to convey runoff towards rain gardens and bioretention ponds. Microbes within the roots and stems of plants in the water and bioswales consume contaminants, which helps keep the river and nature preserve free of pollution. Aside from the obvious environmental benefits of reclaiming this land, the landscape reestablishes the beauty of the once ecologically sound river valley, and creates recreational and social opportunities for the adjacent residents. The landscaping in this park-like roof garden has ponds, cascades, rain gardens, forests, and native plant communities for visitors to experience.

Bioretention ponds consume contaminants and keep pollutants from washing into a nearby nature reserve.

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The plant palette emphasizes Shanghai’s four distinct growing seasons, with native trees, shrubs, grasses, and wildflower species selected for their tolerance to roof garden and aquatic conditions. The borrowed scenery of the nature preserve increases the majestic appearance of the landscape. The local area has already recorded positive benefits from this landscaped rooftop park. Because the stormwater management system reduces and delays peak stormwater discharge, it aids in eliminating riverbank erosion, which reduces the total suspended solids, phosphates, and nitrates downstream. In addition, creating a wildlife corridor with habitat and food has dramatically increased the number of wildlife sightings in the area.

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goldaward NON-RESIDENTIAL: Beijing Sky Ocean Canal No. 1, Beijing, China

Scott Hostetler F I R M : HZS USA Landscape, Atlanta, GA U S D A Z O N E : 6a JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE: The

project is rich in symbolism and integration of art, all of which makes for a strong sense of place and an engaging visual experience. In addition, there is a high level of craftsmanship and attention to detail.

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ordering the 2500-year-old Jinhang Canal in the heart of Beijing’s financial district, this luxury mixed-use office and restaurant development was designed with courtyard gardens inspired by the Ming Dynasty. Given the canal’s history as the biggest, longest, and first man-made canal in the world, the theme of water was incorporated throughout the landscape to pay homage to its historic importance.

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The opulent display gardens were designed in harmony with the architecture, incorporating moon gates, historic garden accents, and poetic art within this modern interpretation of a classic Ming Dynasty courtyard garden. The series of garden areas are connected with a simple and refined palette of fragrant and native plants, and a series of pedestrian bridges, paths, and waterways. The reflective water ponds are positioned to reflect the changing nature of the sky, moon, and passersby.

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The highlight of the landscape, the Garden of the Floating Cup, is the main area within the sunken courtyard garden. During the design process, office mates and restaurant guests gathered at the pond’s edge and placed cups of wine in the water, letting the cups float and circulate. If a cup stopped beside them, participants drank the wine and composed a poem, the best of which were integrated into the garden in the form of sculptural art panels constructed by commissioned local artists. This participatory poetic courtyard has become extremely popular, launching a tradition of writing poetry in the garden and connecting visitors with the culture, history, and community of the place.

Local artists were commissioned to create these sculptural art panels.

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PH OTO G R A P H Y: S COTT H OSTETLE R, C H AD INGRAHA M

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C O S T - E F F I C I E N T D E S I G N : Natural Stone Oasis, Los Angeles, CA

Debbie Gliksman

F I R M : Urban Oasis Landscape Design, Los Angeles, CA U S D A Z O N E : 10b JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE: Outstanding

accomplishment. The colors coordinate beautifully and add vibrancy to the space. Plants are creatively combined to soften the fence and walls and add interest.

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n outdated landscape comprised of raised brick beds, worn-out concrete, and overwhelming plantings presented a challenge to Gliksman: how to update the space and make use of an awkwardly-placed pool, while staying environmentally friendly and keeping within a small budget?

She began by replacing the uninspired paving with luxurious, rich red flagstone to add color and warmth to the garden. The perimeter walls were painted a light tone of butter yellow to brighten up the surroundings, and a brimming fountain, fire pit, and small kitchen with a builtin barbecue were added to create an inviting series of spaces for entertaining. Against this stylish backdrop, the drab pool within a sea of concrete has been transformed into an attractive feature of the landscape, and sparkles azure in the sun.

Exuberant plantings and creative reuse of materials allowed this garden to shine on a small budget.

Rather than dumping the old concrete, it was recycled to build a circular garden bench and raised garden beds. The design exploited the varying thickness and texture of the concrete to create a natural stone look. Keeping with the environmentally-minded theme, flagstone was laid on gravel to keep the surfaces permeable, and lawn was removed and replaced with lush, colorful drought-tolerant plants, many of which were recycled from a previous garden or grown from cuttings culled from clients and friends.

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P L A N T I N G D E S I G N : Children’s Garden, Fairfield, CT

Eva Chiamulera

F I R M : Austin Ganim Landscape Design, LLC, Fairfield, CT U S D A Z O N E : 7a JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE: The

off-site surroundings seem to fade away. It would be a great place to spend a summer afternoon.

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hen purchasing their home in the middle of a very snowy winter, the homeowners assumed there must be plants in the back yard to soften the slope and fences in the backdrop. Much to their surprise, when the snow melted they discovered fence-tofence lawn with a steep bank that was difficult to mow and unsafe for their children to play on. apld.org


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A Klotter Farms playhouse

Chiamulera stepped in with the design for a chilis the centerpiece of dren’s garden that would be divided into three this children’s garden. areas: a raised bird and butterfly garden running parallel to the house and fence, a fruit and berry patch, and a vegetable garden tucked out of sight. A strawberry-lined stone staircase weaves past dwarf fruit trees and blueberry bushes to connect the lawn area to a Kloter Farms playhouse.

The hillside planting incorporates vibrant plants that remind the homeowners of their native South Africa, as well as shrubs and perennials to attract hummingbirds, butterflies, and other pollinators for the children to discover. The floral display changes with the seasons, with the soft hues of dwarf lilacs (Syringa) , blue catmint (Nepeta), and ‘Moonshine’ yarrow (Achillea millefolium ‘Moonshine’) in May giving way to the bold colors of summer’s butterfly bushes (Buddleja) and orange milkweed (Asclepias). The fall garden turns to shades of pink and white as ‘Pinky Winky’ panicle hydrangea blends with ornamental grasses and drifts of Joe Pye weed (Eutrochium fistulosum) to create a magical space for children that is beautiful enough for the whole family to enjoy.

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meritaward P L A N T I N G D E S I G N : A Mediterranean Garden, El Cerrito, CA

Patricia St. John, APLD F I R M : St. John Landscapes, Berkeley, CA U S D A Z O N E : 9b JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE: It

can be tough to get this much color in a xeriscape, but this is just stunning.

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sloping entry with no stairs, landings, or handrails presented a safety challenge to visitors, in particular to one of the homeowners, who has reduced mobility due to post-polio syndrome. Given that, one of the most important design criteria was to provide easy access to the front door from the driveway and street. Additionally, generous pathways and low retaining walls were needed so the homeowners could walk through the landscape for both enjoyment and maintenance.

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Low water The clients were deeply interested in the plant selection prodoesn’t mean cess, and requested deer-resistant, drought-tolerant choices that low color in would relate to the existing candelabra aloe (Aloe arborescens) this California and iris hybrids, as well as provide winter interest. Shades of xeriscape. blue, purple, yellow, chartreuse, and magenta were selected to echo and complement the existing plants. Lavender, rosemary, sage, thyme, Jerusalem sage (Phlomis), penstemon, grevillea, rock rose (Cistus), and succulents are woven throughout the beds and create a year-round tapestry of color and texture.

Given California’s periodic droughts, St. John selected plants native to Mediterranean regions as well as some California natives that must be watered only periodically using drip irrigation. Even with these constraints, this colorful entry garden is also low-maintenance, requiring only four hours of care per month. Locally sourced materials such as Sonoma fieldstone and locally-made brick add to the environmentally-friendly appeal. Because this is an area prone to earthquakes, dry stack walls were used, which tolerate occasional shifting.

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R E S I D E N T I A L D E S I G N : Dos Renos, Tucson, AZ

Paul Connolly, APLD F I R M : Sundrea Design Studio, Tucson, AZ U S D A Z O N E : 9a JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE: Colored

walls and an entry gate with a strong Southwest motif accent the new entry, and make the space look more contemporary. Although plantings are spare, they are right for the site and the region.

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nitially, the homeowners of this Southwest landscape thought that a simple planting renovation would give their entry and courtyards enough interest to enjoy using them. On designer Connolly’s first visit, however, he noticed the clients’ sophisticated and colorful taste in furnishings and art. Given that, he suggested a complete hardscape renovation to ex-

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Above: Artfullyplaced lighting highlights the dramatic forms in this Southwestern landscape. Left: Sculptural pieces within the beds provide contrast.

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pand their living area and create an exterior space as vibrant as the interior.

Bold shapes, angles, and colors were chosen to create playful, rhythmic patterns throughout the space. Within the courtyards, the color and scale of plants, walls, furniture, and pots had to be carefully considered due to their close proximity to one another. A triptych of metal panels was designed to provide vertical interest in the narrow space, and a dark brown Alumawood lattice roof was added—not so much for shade, but to define the space and coordinate with the dark brown trim around the doors and windows. For the entry, an abstract gate was designed so that each side is a reverse of the other; neither side is “the back.” Connolly created enchanting shadows, patterns, and textures using FX Luminaire landscape lighting, and a metal and glass sculpture within the planting bed complements the gate design, connecting the space from left to right. The colors chosen for the Ore containers, furnishings, and walls evoke the hues of the desert sky, while the dramatic silhouettes of plants make an eye-catching addition to the entry.

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T1402 A0 0 0 0

T RUST ED BY A RCHIT EC TS & DE SIGNE R S FOR OV E R 35 Y E A R S

R EQU E ST A C ATA LOG Sign up at www.CountryCasual.com or call 8 0 0. 2 89. 8325


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R E S I D E N T I A L D E S I G N : Beech Ledge, Brookline, MA

Matthew Cunningham

F I R M : Matthew Cunningham Landscape Design, LLC, Winchester, MA U S D A Z O N E : 6b JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE: Gorgeous.

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Great site-specific design.

tastefully restored early 20th century gambrel-style home stands prominently on a 2-acre parcel, but the lengthy home renovation process left the surrounding yard scraped clear, with vast areas of lawn and a large section of asphalt left behind. The new landscape needed a sense of character and immediate maturity to harmonize with the established country surroundings, as well as elegant solutions to driveway and parking issues. The homeowners, a busy professional couple with three children, were also looking for spaces where they could entertain and relax throughout the year. apld.org


The new landscape feels structured, contemporary, and alive, while still respecting the architecture. In the front, a natural cleft bluestone walkway is surrounded by mass plantings of variegated Japanese forest grass, while linear Fothergilla hedges create dynamic structure. The asphalt parking court is split into two separate zones: one area is for parking, while a second area is designed for playing basketball, street hockey, and biking. Perennial plantings invite the family outside, and a dazzling low-maintenance cutting garden provides armfuls of fragrant flowers as well as seasonal excitement. Different shades of green and the classy touch of white and purple blooms brighten up the shady areas under trees. Farther away from A restrained the home, expanses of lawn were converted to a soft meadow, palette reads adding texture and movement as the grasses wave in the sumas fresh and mer breeze. New cherry and dogwood groves give structure upscale in this Massachusetts and scale, so the home appears purposefully nestled into the garden. landscape.

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R E S I D E N T I A L D E S I G N : Ocean Bluff, Santa Barbara, CA

Margie Grace, APLD F I R M : Grace Design Associates, Santa Barbara, CA U S D A Z O N E : 10a JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE: Wonderful

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use of lines and shapes.

hen Grace Design Associates first viewed this property, the landscape demolition was complete and a new pool dominated the front yard, presenting the designer’s first challenge: making it clear to visitors how to get from the front entry gate, around the pool, and to the front door.

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The requirements of this landscape were unusual from the start. The skinny back yard overlooks a sea cliff area, where strict ordinances protect wildlife and guard against runoff and erosion. This had an impact on the plant selection, and made it impossible to have traditional recreational elements in the back yard, due to weight and water use. apld.org


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The owners Due to these considerations, creativity was required to turn wanted a tiny the spacious front yard into a retreat that felt private enough “beach� to sit for the homeowners to swim, entertain, and relax, while still and dip their keeping the front yard functional for visitors and presenting toes in the sand. a friendly face to the community. Between the pool and the street, Grace designed a frosted glass wall to provide privacy. The silhouettes of plants show through the glass, creating a living sculpture for passersby to enjoy.

Celebrating the existing dragon tree (Dracaena) was key in giving the landscape an immediate sense of character and maturity, while concrete pavers, designed to evoke the feel of a boardwalk, give guests sturdy and attractive footing on their way to the front door. Mounded planter beds with light-colored pebbles echo the look of nearby sand dunes.

In the back yard, a bocce court and a seating area for homeowners to wiggle their toes in the sand are surrounded by a mix of low water and native plants. To prevent erosion, soil-stabilizing native plants sink their roots into the ground while hawk-friendly perches on the cliff encourage natural rodent control.

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PH OTO G R A P H Y: LE P E RE P H OTO GRAP H Y

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R E S I D E N T I A L D E S I G N : Pool Barn, Bryn Mawr, PA

Charles Hess

F I R M : Charles Hess Landscape Architects, Lansdale, PA U S D A Z O N E : 6b JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE: Creativity

is everywhere in this garden, from the transformation of the historic barn house to the new pavilion, hairpin enclosure fence, and spillway water feature.

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n existing rectangular pool became the central feature around which this backyard haven was designed. To bring the pool up to date, a raised spa was added on one end, along with a spillway water feature and runnel. This flowing ribbon of water connecting pool and spa trickles peacefully and stirs the curiosity of visitors. A roofed pavilion adjacent to the pool offers a comfortable place to rest in the shade, and the distinctive red chaise lounges offer an eye-catching contrast to the greenery surrounding.

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To give the garden immediate context and character, a historic barn was completely disassembled, relocated, and adapted for reuse as a pool house. The barn, which was slated for demolition on a New Jersey farmstead, was spared from the wrecking ball and given a new life as a sophisticated guesthouse and finished living space. Antique brick paving materials contribute to the timeless beauty of this landscape,

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and are arranged to function as “area rugs” to delineate the space. A delicately proportioned wrought iron fence establishes the required pool enclosure, but visually recedes from the landscape. Lush plantings were selected to provide long periods of color during the summer months when the pool is in heavy use, while underlying evergreens soften the architecture and provide visual structure during the winter months. Colorful purple wisteria growing over an arbor bursts into bloom at the same time as sun-tolerant evergreen vinca, while flowering trees such as yellowwood (Cladrastis) and ‘Ivory Silk’ Japanese tree lilac (Syringa reticulata ‘Ivory Silk’) carry the bloom season into early summer. Woody shrubs such as dwarf fothergilla and ‘Endless Summer’® hydrangea are massed for a stronger impact, while the fresh foliage of variegated Solomon’s seal (Polygonatum), white astilbe, and hosta add to the display.

STE P H E N G OV E L PH OTO GRAP H Y

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meritaward R E S I D E N T I A L D E S I G N : Riverhouse, Briarcliff Manor, NY

Jan Johnsen

F I R M : Johnsen Landscapes & Pools, Mt. Kisco, NY U S DA ZO N E : 6 JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE: Gorgeous.

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Great site-specific design.

his previously unusable hillside, characterized by large rock outcroppings and only a thin layer of topsoil, was transformed into a gracious, multilevel strolling garden that links a series of distinct outdoor spaces. An active and social lifestyle made it clear the family needed to develop the inhospitable land around their home, turning it into a beautiful and functional space that would support them in their daily life. A swimming pool, places for outdoor entertaining, flower gardens, a spot for ping-pong, a golf green, and both formal and informal entrances were desired.

To that end, Johnsen provided as much level, usable ground as possible, yet also transformed significant site features, such as the dramatic rock outcrops and the existing mature trees, into an integral part of the landscape. The Hudson River School painting style, known for its refined yet naturalistic style, served as inspiration for the overall look of the property. This juxtaposition between man-made and natural is seen throughout the entire design.

At the entry to the “Riverhouse,” lushly inviting grass steps serve as a graceful passage from the sweeping lawn to the stone staircase. The roughened texture of fieldstone, used to face the garden walls and terraces, is balanced by smooth bluestone and patterned brick. Dramatic rock outcroppings are enhanced by attractive plantings sturdy enough to tolerate both the intense summer sun and the beating winds off the Hudson. All of these elements come together to create a space that respects the naturally occurring resources and characteristics of the site while providing a comfortable and elegant place for the family to enjoy.

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R E S I D E N T I A L D E S I G N : Darien Pool Garden, Darien, CT

J. Brandon Jones F I R M : Glen Gate Company, Wilton, CT U S D A Z O N E : 7a JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE: An

amazing transformation, with elegant detailing: the fern focal point among hydrangea plantings, the rock mosaic on the sunning terrace, the pool gate and yellow and white flowers nearby.

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riginally part of a 100-acre estate, this turn-of-the-century home was constructed as a playhouse for the grandchildren of the original estate owner. As one of those grandchildren, the client grew up on the property, playing on the grounds, beaches, and in her current home. Over the years, multiple subdivisions left the landscape feeling segmented, with borders that didn’t reflect the current property lines, resulting in a false sense of scale. The client’s goal was to visually recapture the land, and introduce a pool in its own secure space.

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The pure rectangular form of the pool takes cues from the home’s architecture. Sited diagonally to the residence, it extends views from the pool’s main sunning terrace over the pool and across the expansive lawn to the Long Island Sound beyond. The entrance gate to the pool reflects mullion designs found in the windows of the home, while the arched inlay design of pebbles on the terrace reflects the arched windows. Adding a personal touch, to create the pebble inlay, the client harvested stones from her favorite childhood beach.

To define the boundary of the pool and provide privacy, an existing arborvitae hedge was transplanted and used in combination with a new privet hedge and an embedded fence. Surrounded by hydrangeas and set with a backdrop of the deep green arborvitae, a potted fern on an elegant pedestal makes a thoughtful focal point. On the patio, perennial borders framed by low boxwood hedges create a lively vignette of color.

P H OTO G R A P HY: LAND INO P H OTO

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meritaward R E S I D E N T I A L D E S I G N : Northridge, Lafayette, CA

Colin Miller

F I R M : Envision Landscape Studio, Inc., Walnut Creek, CA U S D A Z O N E : 9b JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE: This

garden addresses a pressing problem in the West: drought. Replacing a thirsty lawn with a stylish, contemporary patio was a good solution for this site. The space has a meditative quality, zen-like in its elegance.

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iven California’s periodic times of drought, the clients made the wise decision to replace an existing lawn with a tranquil patio from which to enjoy the views of their ridge-top home. Linear concrete pads with bands of crushed rock mass together to create a contemporary garden area on which to walk and relax. The smooth stucco walls define the patio area, and naturalistic groupings of waving grasses enliven and soften the straight lines.

Floating out from one of the stucco walls is a redwood bench for overflow seating when entertaining, while red lounge chairs draw the eye and provide a comfortable place for sunbathing or enjoying a cocktail. Vibrant kangaroo paws (Anigozanthos) in shades of orange, yellow, and red complement the color of the lounge chairs and stand out brilliantly against the more subdued sedges (Carex spp. and cvs.).

A basalt water feature set on a base of smooth pebbles lends the trickling sound of water, attracts birds, and provides an auditory focal point for visitors to the garden. The perimeter of grass-filled rolling berms blur the boundaries between this landscape and the surrounding land, making excellent use of borrowed scenery and visually taking ownership of the view beyond.

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Planters cut into this contemporary patio lend softness and color to the space.

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R E S I D E N T I A L D E S I G N : Pool and Sculpture Garden, Ridgefield, CT

Janice Parker

F I R M : Janice Parker Landscape Design, Sherman, CT U S D A Z O N E : 7a JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE: Classic

in its elegance. The garden’s millstone fountain, “quilted” lawn panels and pool house make the most of this site, while the negative edge pool blends seamlessly with the adjacent reservoir.

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hen the owners purchased a neighboring property, they envisioned seamlessly joining the two outdoor areas to create a strolling sculpture park. A gracious canopy of oak, maple, and tulip trees overlooking an expansive reservoir provided a stately setting, yet a lower overgrown slope and the buried remains of the previous residence

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meritaward posed challenges. Discerning art collectors, the owners also wanted a landscape that would highlight their growing collection of outdoor art.

Parker conceived the landscape as a bold sculpture in itself, complementing the site’s natural elegance and providing a variety of experiences as you walk through each area. Anchored between two majestic tulip and oak trees, the central pool complex was set on a rise to overlook the lake. Letting the landscape guide the design, Parker used the generous infinity-edge pool as a visual extension of the lake below. Water as a reflecting surface unifies and echoes that theme, and a spa and water table sculpture platform balance the two ends of the pool.

On the quiet eastern side, contemporary stone paving runs in a quilted pattern throughout the panels of lawn. A bubbling millstone fountain grounds the design, while fresh, colorful plantings bring a lively spirit to this distinctive space. In the rest of the landscape, the planting design embodies the interplay between formal and informal elements. Boxwood hedging balances soft gravel walkways running through tumbling flower borders. Formal arcs of Stewartia are underplanted with bold ‘Blue Angel’ hosta, softly weeping spruces, and swaths of Japanese forest grass (Hakonechloa macra ‘Aureola’) to provide texture and contrast within a unifying bold geometry.

A gently bubbling a millstone fountain acts as a focal point against the quilted lawn panels.

P H OTO GRAP H Y: LAND INO P H OTO

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R E S I D E N T I A L D E S I G N : Burns Avenue, Wyoming, OH

William Ripley, APLD F I R M : Architectural Landscape Design, Inc., Cincinnati, OH U S D A Z O N E : 6a JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE: A

lovely formal garden with a restrained color palette and quality materials.

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fter a two-year home construction project, the owners of this historic Jacobean-style home, circa 1917, wanted to put as much effort into the exterior of the property as they had inside. Their impeccable attention to detail and insistence on high-quality materials such as clay brick, limestone, wrought iron, granite cobble, and stone flagging, allowed the designer to create this classically attractive formal garden. apld.org


An Italian hand-carved limestone armillary sundial from the 1600s is a dominant sculptural piece in the garden and acts as a focal point, surrounded by a gravel walk and a boxwood parterre planted with standard ‘Limelight’ hydrangeas, annual wishbone flower (Torenia), and a carpet of vinca minor as edging. In the side garden, an existing urn planted with seasonal color stands as the central feature and is surrounded by a burst of astilbe, hydrangeas, and other shrubs and perennials that brighten up the shade.

Next to the parterre, the entertaining and outdoor dining area is anchored by intricate pierced brick walls and columns, which give a timeless appeal to the landscape. In the seating area, dry-laid squares of quartzite match the terrace, and stepping stones of the same material are used in less formal areas of the garden for continuity. Behind the garage, a sports court provides a place for family and visitors to gather and stay active.

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meritaward S M A L L G A R D E N S : Minella Meditation Garden, New Canaan, CT

Christopher Elkow & Mark Hicks F I R M : Elise Landscapes & Nursery, LLC, New Canaan, CT U S DA ZO N E : 6 JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE: Very

creative use of space; an elegant

stripped-down approach.

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home office looks out on this soothing meditation garden, which began as a scrubby blank slate with only a few mature hardwood trees to set the scene. The client wanted an informal, beckoning woodland garden with seating, a pastel color palette, and enough privacy to enjoy a daily respite from the rigors of the workday.

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The clean curves of the Goshen stone walkway and lawn define the space and give it structure, while the more naturalistic stone pathway through the perennials changes the mood to let you know that you’re traveling towards a private area of relaxation. A teak bench is surrounded by naturalistic swathes of ghost ferns (Athyrium ‘Ghost’), Carex morrowii ‘Ice Dance’, lacecap hydrangea, and a colorful selection of False Spiraea (Astilbe).

Surrounded by trees, this woodland landscape is refined yet natural.

An evergreen screen of Norway spruce blends with existing mountain laurels to create a sense of privacy from the road. ‘Wolf Eyes’ dogwoods (Cornus kousa ‘Wolf Eyes’) and plants with variegated foliage combine with the sweet-smelling blooms and mottled bark of Japanese Stewartia (Stewartia pseudocamellia) to provide seasonal interest. A variety of ornamental flowering trees, shrubs, and perennials combine with the natural boulders found on site to create a casual yet cohesive design, which quickly grew into a mature garden.

PH OTO G R A P H Y: M ARK H IC KS

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Reclaiming the dunes from invasive Japanese black pines was accomplished through widespread community support.

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S P E C I A LT Y P R O J E C T S : 74th-75th Street Dune Vegetation Management, Avalon, NJ

Charles Hess

F I R M : Hess Landscape Architects, Lansdale, PA U S D A Z O N E : 6b

As a public site this is a great example of design, planning, and working with nature. The diversity and spatial arrangement is a beautiful mosaic that looks great while moving through the site and landscape.

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ceanfront dunes play a critical role in the survival of coastal communities, and until recently, New Jersey would re-vegetate these fragile ecosystems by inter-planting with Japanese black pines. Unfortunately, the pines outcompete native vegetation, generate tinder sources for fires, and host black turpentine and southern pine beetles, which ecologists are already struggling to control in the nearby Pine Barrens. Clearly, a better solution was needed.

The design team created a community program to eradicate the pines from the dunes and replace them with native species. Private landowners were invited to fund individual projects within the town, and with this community support, the designers developed a “McHargian” planting solution including a small range of hardy indigenous plants. American beach grass holds the sand down on the primary dune; bayberry, blueberry, and beach plum were selected for wildlife nourishment and cover; and groundsel (Baccharis halimifolia), seaside goldenrod (Solidago sempervirens), sweet fern (Comptonia peregrina), and prickly pear cactus (Opuntia humifusa) were incorporated onto the secondary dune. Due to the salt, seaside wind, and ever-shifting sandy soil, the team took great care to specify conditions that would ensure success. Hydrogel slurries, minimal soil amendment, a thin layer of mulch, and most importantly, a provision for temporary irrigation allowed the new plantings to thrive. New sapling pines were removed promptly to keep them from coming back. This collaborative effort with the community created an attractive and appropriate natural setting, beneficial and beautiful to both humans and wildlife.

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N O N - R E S I D E N T I A L : Shanghai CR Land the Bund, Shanghai, China

Scott Hostetler F I R M : HZS USA Landscape, Atlanta, GA

P R O J E C T L O C A T I O N : USDA Zone: 8b JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE: The

project succeeds in creating an oasis in an extremely dense urban area. Many of the spaces, architectural features, and other details do an excellent job of recalling the site’s history. The entrance gate is outstanding.

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he Huangpu River Bund is one of Shanghai’s most popular tourist destinations, and this site is part of a former historic park located adjacent to the riverfront. When the area became a world financial center, it was replaced with commercial buildings, financial institutions, hotels, and foreign embassies. Flooding from typhoons in the 1990s caused damage to the buildings, leaving this empty lot targeted for a luxury high-rise community. The developer and designer wanted to create a green oasis full of mature trees, flowering plants, and decorative accents honoring the history of the site.

P H OTO GRAPHY: SCOTT HOSTETLER , DOI B AQI R A N I R A N ON , CHA D I N GR AHA M

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This 33,000 m² park, 10,000 m² of which was built as a roof garden over the top of an underground parking garage, provides ample opportunities for residents to enjoy nature even in the midst of a populous urban center. A grand arched pedestrian gate made of steel stands as an iconic reminder of the former park’s historic entrance, while a classic gazebo inspired by the old bandstand provides a place for socializing and quiet contemplation. Tiled decorations in the community pool are patterned after the boxwood parterre in the historic park, and act as a creative connection between past and present. A park this size is very effective at reducing the urban heat island effect, and the mix of native and flowering plants chosen helps restore habitat and allows the park to act as a wildlife corridor. The site reduces storm water peak flow and runoff, and the waterproof membrane between the park and the underground garage is made of recycled content. The generously proportioned planting areas, water features, mature plantings, and pool feel in scale with the majestic surrounding buildings and are a fitting nod to the rich history of the site and region.

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Beautiful spaces. Intelligent design. Experienced professionals.

We define landscape design!

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R E S I D E N T I A L : Fire Island Beach House, Fire Island Pines, Sayville, NY

Thomas Lawson

Water Mill, NY

S C H O O L : New York Botanic Gardens

P R O J E C T L O C A T I O N : USDA Zone: 7a JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE: This

project as a stand-alone was easy to read and understand. The graphics were clear and well organized. The design addressed the client’s needs and site constraints.

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n aesthetically conscious fashion designer and partner wanted an outdoor entertaining area, dining table, and lounging space that would be in keeping with their modern, minimalist style. Previously, in order to make room for parties on the beach beyond the deck, they used removable modular wood platforms that allowed them to add temporary entertaining space without violating code. The designer expanded on this idea, creating a larger spot for gatherings, and a new approach along the side of the house so high-heeled guests do not have to go through the house to reach the beach. apld.org


I think we might want caption here is this a child's play house? sam con pe et esci

Of course, the movement of sand is always a consideration on properties placed within the dunes. Harsh seacoast winds and shifting soil demanded a native plant palette, which was interspersed with tough ornamentals currently growing elsewhere on the island. In this area, Lawson imitated a native rhythm, creating openings for views to the ocean while stabilizing the soil. On the side of the house, a tight walkway left little room for planting, so a green wall with wind- and salt-tolerant species was mounted on cantilevered brackets to maximize the space and screen out the neighbors.

To make a big impression at the front entrance to the property, a round David Harbor pebble sculpture called Dark Star was chosen to be the focal point during the day. It becomes even more dramatic at night, when it is lit from within and light escapes from the spaces between the stones. With a cistern for collecting rainwater for irrigation, the use of coastal natives, and the modular wood platforms constructed of reclaimed wood, this project offers sustainable solutions without sacrificing style.

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studentsilver

DESIGN 3-­‐PLANTING  DESIGN   R E S I D E N T I A L : NYC-Roof Terrace-Planting NYC   RManhattan, ESIDENTIAL   TERRACE   Design, NYC, NY

Thomas Lawson PHOTO COLLAGE   Water Mill, NY

S C H O O L : New York Botanic Gardens U S D A Z O N E : 6b

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Plan shows creativity in meeting the site challenges. Good sense of traffic flow and use of focal points. JUDGES’ PERSPECTIVE:

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New York City family with two children wanted to transform their rooftop into an inviting terrace on which to entertain, play, grow herbs for cooking, and retreat from the outside world. Weight restrictions and limited access via a service elevator provided some constraints within which to work.

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Lawson installed a recycled glass water feature wall, which has colorful chunks of glass in an irregular translucent surface. Constructed in panels to allow easy transportation in the service elevator, the innovative feature is lit with LED lighting so the brilliant multihued pieces shine vividly day or night. Water trickles over the surface of the glass and collects at the bottom in a steel basin filled with small river rock.

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Numerous living, green walls are utilized throughout the rooftop garden, since they have the benefit of a small footprint and modular construction, and can double as screening to hide less attractive neighboring views. A green wall in a koi pond pattern is the main focal point from inside the living room, linking interior to exterior space. The koi are created using white variegated ‘Arctic Fox’ bugleweed (Ajuga reptans ‘Arctic Fox’), which catches the light during both day and evening, linking it to the glowing glass water feature. An herb kitchen wall acts as a backdrop to the dining space, with ornamental varieties of edible herbs that can be picked for use on the outdoor cooktop.

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2014 board of directors PRESIDENT Susan Cohan, APLD Susan Cohan Gardens, LLC 69 Hedges Avenue Chatham, NJ 07928 (973) 665-9260 PRESIDENT-ELECT Colleen Hamilton, APLD Bloomin’ Landscape Designs 7122 Willey Way Carmichael, CA 95608 (916) 961-0191 SECRETARY/TREASURER Jock Lewendon, APLD Outdoor Living Spaces, LLC 766 Schoolhouse Lane Bound Brook, NJ 08805 (732) 302-9632 IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT Marti Neely, APLD DMS Estate Management 9811 Sprague Street Omaha, NE 68134 (402) 630-0050 ADVOCACY CHAIR Lisa Port, APLD Banyon Tree Design Studio 3630 Northeast 123rd Street Seattle, WA 98125 (206) 383-5572 CERTIFICATION CHAIR Maryanne Quincy, APLD Q Gardens PO Box 2746 Sunnyvale, CA 94087 (408) 739-5493

➸ Click name to email us!

COMMUNICATIONS & OUTREACH CHAIR Vanessa Gardner Nagel, APLD, NCIDQ Seasons Garden Design LLC 12517 Northeast 20th Avenue Vancouver, WA 98686 (360) 546-2746 EDUCATION CHAIR Ellen Johnston, APLD ETJ Designs 5543 Wateka Drive Dallas, TX 75209 (469) 628-3321

CONNECT WITH US!

GOVERNANCE CHAIR Eric Gilbey 7150 Riverwood Drive Columbia, MD 21046 (443) 542-0658 MEMBERSHIP CHAIR Tina Nyce, FAPLD Nyce Gardens 20521 NE 34th Place Sammamish, WA 98074 (425) 533-4292

➸ Click logo to go to webpage

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We believe trees have stories to tell. They enhance our communities and bear witness to the moments in our lives, both the exceptional and the ordinary. Davey supports those who serve to cultivate plants, green spaces and their memories to enhance our neighborhoods— and our world.

www.davey.com

thedesıgner needs you! The only magazine written by designers for designers, The Designer is looking for talented members like you to share your stories, teach new techniques, and inspire with your designs.

calling all writers

All submissions from APLD members are considered, but The Designer is particularly interested in articles that fit the issue’s editorial theme or are appropriate for one of the magazine’s recurring features, such as “Pro Plant Picks,” “Technology Spotlight,” “Design 101,” or “Design Master Class.”

Learn more about the submissions process and view the 2014 editorial calendar here.

Not sure if your story is a good fit? Editor in Chief Susan Morrison is happy to discuss your idea with you. Reach her at editor@apld.org.


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CREATING A SENSE OF PLACE SWIMMING POOL DESIGN ATTRACTING POLLINATORS

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APLD The Designer Fall 2014  
APLD The Designer Fall 2014  
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