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APRIL 2017

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ISSUE 49.

UPDATE 57 WOLGYE-RO 45GA-G I L , NOWO N- G U, S EO UL , 0 1 87 4 , KOREA

IN THIS ISSUE:

■ High School Talent Show ■ St. Stephen’s College Visit ■ Grade 3 Recorder Recital

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IN THIS ISSUE:

■ ■KAIAC Leadership Symposium Elementary Chinese & Japanese ■ ■What’s Cooking at APIS? Faculty Retreat ■ Student Spotlights


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E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

Grade 3 Students Earn Recorder Karate Black Belt

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or the past five months, third graders have been hard at work getting to know their new instruments: soprano recorders. “In music class, recorder isn’t the only thing we do. But what recorder helps us do is figure out, ‘Do I really enjoy playing a wind instrument?’” said Melinda Baum (music teacher). Students in Grade 2 receive beginning instruction in violin. Third and fourth grade music classes include soprano (Grade 3) and alto (Grade 4) recorder instruction. These experiences allow students, when they get to Grade 5, to make an informed choice as to whether they want to join the orchestra or band program at APIS. Elliot Kim (Grade 3) said, “I liked recorder because that was my first wind instrument.” Since the end of October, Grade 3 students have learned to play songs of increasing difficulty as they progress from white to black belt in their recorder karate music curriculum. “Hot Cross Buns,” the white belt song, progresses to “Ode to Joy,” black belt. On April 19, family members and teachers gathered in the CLC for a Recorder Karate Recital, where Grade 3 students shared their talents with loved ones. Some students had favored songs, but from the sounds of applause throughout the concert, it seemed every song was a hit with the audience. “For the recorder recital, I learned to be confident and not to be afraid of things you do on the stage,” shared Jimin Jung (Grade 3). At the end of the performance, Ms. Baum awarded students certificates of excellence, to celebrate the students achieving black belt soprano recorder status. "Today's recorder recital was the culmination of hours of hard work and perseverance. As the Grade 3 students performed on stage, it was easy to forget that they are a beginning ensemble. They played as a cohesive musical team. I am very proud,” said Ms. Baum.

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Who Am I as an Artist? By Anna Sea, Art Teacher

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What colors do I like to use? Which materials do I like using? What are my strengths and weaknesses as an artist? What do I want to express through art? Why do I enjoy making art? Why is art important to us?

hese are some of the essential questions I want students to answer as they grow as artists. Knowing your identity as an artist is important; it allows you to mature and refine your voice. The new visual art standards from NAEA (National Art Education Association) emphasize discovering one’s identity as an artist; I chose to address this standard through an artist statement project incorporated with our annual Pacific Pencil event. I was amazed by all the answers elementary students shared, and I cannot wait to share them with you during the Pacific Pencil event on May 18. I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of our elementary homeroom teachers for working so hard on supporting students through revisions of their artist statements during classroom writing lessons.

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MARK YOUR CALENDAR: Please join us on May 18, from 2-3:30 p.m., for our Pacific Pencil reception.

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High School Talent Show Winners

1st

2nd

3rd

Min Choi

Anna Frankl & Mei-Mei Timpson

Crystal Cho and Pastor John

SINGING and Playing piano LIP SYNC “사랑합니다” by TIM “Another Day of Sun” taken from La La Land (Award: 150,000 KRW) Arranged by Justin Hurwitz (Award: 50,000 KRW)

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SINGING "Like I’m Gonna Lose you" Megan Trainor (Feat. John Legend) (Award: 30,000 KRW)


Ready, Set, Go!

Grade 8 Rube Goldberg Machines Put to the Test

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he Thursday before spring break found Grade 8 science students taut with anticipation. Would their Rube Goldberg machines work? If not, how quickly could students navigate around unexpected problems and make their contraptions work? Adam Nollsch (science teacher) explained, “The eighth graders were studying potential and kinetic energy and how they interact with each other. Rube Goldberg machines are great examples of this because they combine all different kinds of potential energy into a series of different interactions. It was interesting to see all of the ideas that students came up with for their machines. An important part of the project was for them to learn how to problem solve and find ways to fix sometimes frustrating obstacles.” A Rube Goldberg machine, named after the American cartoonist and inventor who first developed such contraptions, is a series of domino effects, set into motion by one activating step, that ultimately completes a simple task. The experience “made us think more about different ways of creating a machine with different and unique items,” said Wookeun Ko (Grade 8). “It really made us think outside of the box.”

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SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

“Their Rube Goldberg Machines had to have at least five independent steps, be self-supported, accomplish some task, and could only have intervention at the start,” said Mr. Nollsch. Eighth graders worked in teams to accomplish one of the following tasks: open a cabinet, open a door, take a photo, drop a marble into a cup, turn on a power strip, pour water, pop a balloon, or sharpen a pencil. Several groups included dominos as part of their cascading series of events, and found how easy it was to have the spacing off, or inadvertently set the series in motion with a slight bump before they were ready to test. “The Rube Goldberg Machines were a good experience to make something of our own. It was interesting to make our own machine because I've seen them on Facebook but never made my own. It was also good practice in teamwork and being careful because it was hard,” said Irene Kim (Grade 8).

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SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

KAIAC Leadership Symposium By Sarah McRoberts, ELA Teacher

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n Friday, April 7, 2017, four members of the HS SRC attended the first-ever KAIAC Leadership Symposium hosted by Seoul International School. Four schools from the KAIAC division were in attendance: SIS, KIS, YISS, and APIS. The purpose of the symposium was threefold: 1) give students a chance to collaborate on school issues; 2) build relationships among leaders at each of the schools; and 3) plan for the next symposium. Sean Hong (Grade 11), Henry Kim (Grade 10), Clara Park (Grade 9), and Mei-Mei Timpson (Grade 9) attended for APIS because of their desire to continue improving school culture next year. Henry said he seized this opportunity because “as a third year SRC member, I was interested in taking new opportunities to improve as a student leader. Getting a variety of perspectives from different schools will help me more effectively empathize with the student body.” Two students, Alice Yoo (KIS) and Joyce Lee (SIS), served as symposium leaders. They introduced the Design Theory strategy, something they learned about at an international leadership conference, to school leaders attending the symposium. Throughout the day, students applied the strategy to their own school, shared their findings with other representatives, and met with members of other schools to share what they do as leaders. The problem-solving strategy really stuck with Clara: “By bringing schools together to have a discussion of both a creative model and the question of school morality and ethics, we were able to come out of the meeting with a more distinct path to making student life more enjoyable for our students.” Mei-Mei found the chance to talk to others the most valuable: “The essential takeaway I received was my newly found confidence of where APIS was compared to other international schools … I understood better that APIS [SRC] was actually more developed and held lots of good qualities compared to the other schools.” The beauty of this mini conference was that it gave our students much-needed time to reflect on their own wins and struggles in a collaborative and caring environment. It was a wonderful experience for the students and the advisors.

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Environmental Science Class Visits Arisu Water Purification Center By Amanda Meyer, Biology Teacher

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he Honors Environmental Science class visited the Yeongdeungpo Water Purification Center on April 20 as an extension of their study of water resources. The class had previously learned about water treatment processes, and the students were curious about how the water in their own city was cleaned and prepared for their consumption. After the field trip, students were asked to write reflections about their experience. What follows is a compilation of portions of the students’ reflections. “It took us about an hour to get there and, once we arrived, the guide welcomed us and showed us a presentation of the basic information of the plant and how it operates, and a video that explained the purification process. The video explained the process surprisingly well and we realized how sophisticated a process it was.” Evan Chung, Grade 11

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SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

“Although we learned most of the details in class with Ms. Meyer, I felt like I was better able to grasp the big picture after watching the animation film [during the field trip] … After watching the video, we had the chance to visit the actual purification system. When we were there, the manager of the center explained to us some new information. I learned that the water was being pulled down from the upstream of the Han river and that there were six other purification centers in Seoul. The experiences that I had at the purification center really helped me understand and trust Arisu.” Paul Lee, Grade 12 “The trip to the Yeongdeungpo Water Purification Center provided the Honors Environmental Science students with a real-life visual representation of the water purification process we had learned about in class. Observing the physical structures and procedures involved with cleaning the Hangang water, we were able to learn more in-depth about the origins of the tap water used at home for cooking and cleaning.” Michelle Choi, Grade 11 “Many people probably don’t realize that there are multiple steps to get the water that we drink everyday. To learn more about these steps, we went to the Arisu water treatment center, which was so huge that you could not see where it ended. A brief introduction from a worker gave the students a glimpse at how the center functioned. The three big steps that are needed to purify the water are: separate the big pollutants, remove the small particles, and eliminate the agents that make the water smell and taste weird. After the field trip was over, the importance of water was well embedded in my head.” Kevin Jang, Grade 12

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College Counseling Column By Susan Carlson, Director of College Counseling

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his past month, the College Counseling Office has been a flurry of activity. Seniors received their application decisions and turned their focus toward making choices as to where to attend; while juniors began their search in earnest, whether it be through attending college visits here at APIS or exploring college websites online. Parents of both classes have come to APIS to get their questions answered as to where their kids are in the process. Please note: the College Counseling Office has created both a Facebook Group and a Twitter page for you. Feel free to consult either of these pages for updates, reminders, and the sharing of articles about the state of college admissions. https://www.facebook.com/groups/111570629389274/ https://twitter.com/APISCollege To Members of the Class of 2017: Congratulations! You’ve made your decision. Now is the time to celebrate your choices. Remember, you’re not finished yet though! Colleges will be looking at your final grades, and they will expect you to remain the student you presented to them in your application. Finish strong! You do not want to risk the loss of your offer of admissions, which is a very real possibility if you drop the ball on your coursework. If you are waitlisted at a college, you may want to send periodic updates to the Admissions Offices keeping them aware of your activities and your interest in attending their school. Please see me if you need support in this regard. Remember, colleges may or may not go to their waitlist, and it may or may not happen in May. The waitlist is a way for colleges to control their population and the diversity of the applicant pool. Because of that, we do not know if a school will use their waitlist, how many they will choose to take off it (it’s usually a very limited number), and when they will move on the list. Therefore, take steps to help yourself get off the waitlist, but do not plan on this happening. Be sure to promptly manage all requests from the college you’ve deposited at, so you do not delay visa preparation or jeopardize housing assignments. International students have already begun receiving requests for financial documentation so they can start the visa process. If you have to provide documentation and you have questions, please don’t hesitate to let me know, and I will advise as I am able.

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SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

To Members of the Class of 2018: Students have begun making requests for teacher recommendations and have been supplied with the teacher request form required to be completed and signed by both student and teacher. Once the form is completed, I will enter the teacher’s name in Naviance so the teacher will be able to upload the letter for submission with supporting documents. Summer plans are important! How students choose to spend their time over the summer can make the difference between an admit and a deny or defer. Using time well, whether it’s exploring an interest through an internship, taking a class, or even working a part-time job outside of the home can all be considered valuable experiences. Focus on discovering more about your interests. Go as deep as possible. For ideas, please don’t hesitate to reach out to me, Dr. Kim, or even some of the faculty members. We are all here to support you. There will be a college application workshop offered for students from June 12-23. Week one will feature Ms. Carlson, who will offer support around completing the Common Application and writing well-crafted supplementary essays. Students will also gain practice interviewing. Week two will feature Martin Walsh, a well-respected international educator, who will help students write an effective personal essay. This is a great opportunity for students to get a head start on completing their applications. Space is limited. For more information, contact either Andrew Murphy (high school principal) or Ms. Carlson. Lastly, parents, there will be a coffee hour on Wednesday, May 24 at 2 p.m. in the Faculty Lounge. Discussion topics will include what students can do over the summer to get a head start on their college applications, the role of the college interview, and how you can help them continue to explore and broaden their college options. We hope to see you there. w w w. a p i s . o r g

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St. Stephen’s College Visits APIS

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uring the week of April 17, (SSC) St. Stephen’s College, Hong Kong, visited APIS and Seoul, for a week of cultural exchange and sightseeing. The week began with SSC students shadowing APIS students through a school day, and culminated with a joint visit to the Chinese Embassy. The week was long anticipated by both APIS and SSC students. After 17 SSC students signed up for the trip last December, APIS Chinese language teachers matched them with 17 students from APIS. Since then, students have been exchanging emails and correspondence in preparation for the exchange. Speaking at a welcoming ceremony on April 18, High School Principal Andy Murphy observed, “This is our first time having an international school outside of Korea visit our school … we’re really excited to have you join us. I hope you [SSC students] are equally excited to be here, and that you enjoy your day at APIS. I hope you can learn from each other, build new friendships beyond your normal group, learn about each other’s cultures, and take this opportunity that has been given to you by your schools.”

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SSC Development Officer Veronica Yeung said, “The student exchange program between APIS and SSC finally came together in April 2017. The political tension in the background shows even more the pressing need to build a long-lasting friendship between Chinese students and Korean students. As the first SSC representative to visit APIS in November 2015, I could sense the strong presence of the Lord and His peace at APIS. I thought it would be His delight to see the two schools connect. The visit to the Chinese embassy on the last day was the highlight of the trip and marked the significance of Sino-Korean relationship on an educational level. I felt so honored and moved to have witnessed the sowing and reaping process and the tears and sweat invested by committed teachers like APIS' Grace Gao and her colleagues, along with SSC's Clinton Chong and Teresa Lui. Last but not the least, heartfelt thanks and blessings to APIS Principals Andrew Murphy and Bruce Knox, SSC Principal Carol Yang, and Education Counselor of the Chinese Embassy Dr. AI Hongge. I pray in Jesus’ name that God would continue to bless the students' friendship.” Reflecting on the week, APIS student Mei-Mei Timpson (Grade 9) said, “The exchange program was a time for different nationalities to explore each other’s traditions and grow closer from their diversities and similarities. This event was probably the highlight of my year so far as I got to make a lifelong friend while further educating myself on her country.” At the visit to the Chinese Embassy on April 21, students from both schools had the opportunity to connect with embassy staff and ask questions. Grace Gao (APIS Chinese department chair) said the opportunity to visit the embassy together was a fitting end to a week focused on connections and relationship building. “Yongquan Yu, the first secretary of the education section of the Chinese embassy, explained it is very important to learn other languages and understand other people and cultures so as to establish friendships and peaceful relationships,” said Ms. Gao. “Mr. Yu wishes SSC and APIS students will be the ambassadors of friendship between China and Korea. APIS students asked a few questions related to the recent sensitive issues between the two countries, and Mr. Yu said Korea and China have common interests so the we will have a good relationship.”

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SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Reflecting on the value of such cultural exchange programs, Ms. Gao added, “I think this exchange program transforms the classroom into the real world; it motivates APIS students to learn Chinese language and culture, which fosters understanding and allows for a better and more peaceful world.”

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2017 AMIS Middle School Asian Girls and Boys Choir Honor Festival By Naarah Callender, Music Teacher

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uring the week of April 5-9, on the beautiful, tropical campus of Jakarta International School (JIS), over 200 middle school students, mostly strangers to each other at first, gathered to create wonderful, musical moments over the course of four days. Through long rehearsals and lots of singing, the students worked diligently under the direction of expert conductors. These dedicated moments culminated at the final Gala Concert, held April 8. AMIS is the Association for Music in International Schools. The organization, originally European based, has since expanded to include international schools in Asia and the Middle East, and continues to grow. This year, six of our middle school students became our school’s first group to participate in the AMIS Middle School Asian Boys and Girls Honor Choir Festival. Students Rin Choi (Grade 6), Ethan Ho (Grade 6), Kimberly Ho (Grade 8), Joanna Kim (Grade 6), Claire Park (Grade 6), and Justin Suh (Grade 7) enjoyed participating, most of them for the first time, in a mass choir of this size and intensity. The students worked extremely hard, singing nearly five hours in rehearsal each day with some breaks in between. “I [was] exhausted,” said Joanna. “But when we sing all together I get goosebumps, especially when I hear the harmonies.” When asked to scale their excitement level for the concert from 1-10, Kimberly replied “About a seven, because [this weekend] felt so short and the concert means that it’s over.” Although they were very tired, the expressions of happiness and excitement on the students’ faces during the final performance were priceless. AMIS is an unforgettable experience for both music students and music teachers. The students spend months of preparation, learning their individual parts, not truly knowing what the full sound will be until they arrive. However, by the end of the event, they leave with fond memories that will last a lifetime.

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Akbar the Great Named Ruler of the World Champion

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o coincide with “March Madness,” the annual U.S. NCAA basketball tournament, Jason Webster (social studies teacher) introduced a March Madness Rulers of the World tournament to his AP World History class. The structure for the tournament has evolved over Mr. Webster’s teaching career. The current format of the tournament is relatively straightforward, but the outcome is anything but. Students assume the role of a historical ruler and compete against another ruler in a debate, through single-elimination basketball-style brackets to see who can emerge as the best ruler. “The project is a fun way to get students to discuss and debate issues of historical relevance,” said Mr. Webster. “It challenges students to consider the various perspectives of history, to create and articulate historical arguments, and to perform purposeful historical research. All this while dressed up as a medieval emperor, modern-day president, or nationalist revolutionary leader. The project is a culmination of our efforts in class all year – to work hard and have fun in the process.”

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Each round of debates has a different format, designed to challenge the students in their ability to seek and portray point of view, refine their research skills, and display their creativity. The early rounds focus on the students defining themselves as rulers. What were your greatest accomplishments? What is your lasting legacy? What makes you a ruler worthy of this competition? Students are left to define "greatness" for themselves, thus allowing a ruler such as King Menelik II to square off against a Stalin. The debates place the appraisal of history into the hands of the students. As the jury, the remaining students must weigh the credentials of the various rulers, evaluate the arguments placed before them, shift focus continually between historical epochs, and frame the competition in their own minds as they cast their votes. This year’s tournament opened on March 23, with 16 students competing for the title. After four rounds, Akbar the Great (Grade 11, Noah Kim) defeated Abraham Lincoln (Grade 12, Eugene Park) and was named 2017 AP World History Ruler of the World Champion.

"The March Madness Ruler of the World Competition truly was mad (in the good sense, of course). I had to investigate the strengths of my ruler and craft an argument based on those strengths, while, at the same time, addressing the weaknesses and defending them. I believe what set this experience apart from other events was how much students were willing to assume these roles. We all had crazy fun dressing up, speaking in unique dialects, and liberating ourselves from being ‘us’ by becoming a different person for a day." (Noah Kim, Grade 11) w w w. a p i s . o r g

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Yale Young Global Scholars Program Accepts Junior

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hat began as a winter break Google search looking at summer opportunities ended with Richard Jo’s (Grade 11) acceptance in March to the prestigious Biological & Biomedical Science Session of the (YYGS) Yale Young Global Scholars Program. Richard’s acceptance letter noted this year’s applicants represented the “largest, most diverse, and most competitive group of applicants” the program has ever received. “An official Yale University program, participants in the Yale Young Global Scholars Program for Outstanding High School Students can expect an amazing summer experience studying in beautiful campus lecture halls and classrooms, living in Yale’s historic residential colleges, eating in award-winning dining halls, meeting a talented community of fellow students, engaging with world-renowned professors, and interacting with extraordinary visiting practitioners.” (http://globalscholars.yale.edu/) When Richard read about the rigorous application process for YYGS, which includes two letters of recommendation, three essays, official school transcript, resume, and standardized test scores, he saw applying to the program as a “trial run” for his college application process. News of his acceptance left Richard feeling “overwhelmed” with joy. Getting in, he thought, was a long shot; even if he did get in, the expensive program, plus travel, would perhaps add up to too high a cost. However, news of Richard’s acceptance came with another highly coveted award … a full scholarship, plus travel. In 2016, with around 1350 students participating in the six various two-week long YYGS summer sessions, only 25 students received full scholarships plus travel. To Richard’s knowledge, he is the only student from South Korea to receive this scholarship for 2017, and possibly the first student from APIS to attend YYGS. Amanda Meyer (biology teacher) said, "Richard is very passionate about biology and innately curious about the natural world. He discovered YYGS on his own, driven by his desire to learn more and his joy in scientific pursuits. It will be an incredible opportunity for him to grow in his understanding of biology, explore personal research interests, and forge relationships with like-minded students from around the world.” Richard credits a lifelong interest in all things biology and a family member’s cancer diagnosis with igniting his passion for science. His three application essays covered his pet axolotls (Mexican salamanders), his experiences competing in speech, and unorthodox treatments for cancer. Tyler Sgrignoli (English teacher) gave Richard feedback as he crafted his essays, and Ms. Meyer looked over Richard’s full application before he submitted it. Both teachers also wrote letters of recommendation for Richard, which were part of his application. To others interested in applying for the program in the future, Richard encourages applicants to “Be specific in what you like.” Sincerity and focus come across in one’s application and are key to a successful application. During YYGS, students will work “in Capstone project groups to identify problems in a specific topic, conduct rigorous background research, and propose solutions to those problems to their peers and instructors.” (http://globalscholars.yale.edu/sessions/biological-biomedical-science) Additionally, students have the opportunity to connect with Yale admissions officers, and schedule on-campus admissions interviews. With regards to what he is most looking forward to, Richard said, “I’m just excited for everything.”

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Sophia and Ms. McRoberts Take Center Stage With Seoul Shakespeare Company By Sarah McRoberts, ELA Teacher

© Robert Michael Evans, professional photographer for Seoul Shakespeare Company

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or three weekends, starting April 15 and running through April 30, Sarah McRoberts (ELA teacher) and Sophia Shin (Grade 11) performed in “The Winter’s Tale” by William Shakespeare with the SSC (Seoul Shakespeare Company). Directed by Michael Downey, this Shakespearean masterpiece tells the tragic story of King Leontes and his Queen Hermione. The play moves from the tragic world of Sicilia to the whimsical world of Bohemia and back to Sicilia to show the journey that true forgiveness often takes.

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In December, over 70 interested actors auditioned for a role, and 17 were cast. Most of the cast and crew in this production are professional actors; Sophia is the youngest person ever cast in an SSC show. As Sophia reveals, “The most challenging part of being in 'The Winter's Tale' as a high school student was meeting the high expectations. I had to memorize my lines correctly, learn the meaning behind each word, analyze the tones my character used, and even be aware of how loud my footsteps were.” In this production, Ms. McRoberts played the role of Emilia and Sophia took on the role of Bohemian Servant. This is Ms. McRoberts’ third performance with SSC. Since accepting their roles, the cast and crew began having weekly rehearsals in January. For the first two months, actors rehearsed for 10 hours a week; by March, that number increased to 25-30 hours a week. Even though it could be stressful, it was worth it, as Sophia explains: “My favorite part was getting to know and learn from these experienced actors. Although they were older than me, I was able to create a friendly relationship with them. The adults gave great advice, and I was given chances to participate in other types of film productions as well.” While performing to sold-out shows is exhilarating, what really makes SSC magical for our APIS thespians is the fact that so many students and faculty from APIS attend the shows. Such support shows APIS community spirit in action and that Shakespeare is just as relevant today as he was 400 years ago. For more information about SSC, please visit: http://www. seoulshakespearecompany.org/.

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Stepping into the Shoes of Student

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By Bruce Knox, Elementary School Principal

n March 1, the faculty of APIS took a day to reverse their roles and become students. Not of the familiar subject matter of teaching, but of topics and subjects they knew nothing. They became NOVICE LEARNERS for a day. Amongst a wide variety of options, they learned to cook Chinese jiaozi, to build with wood and power tools, to juggle, and to tie Asian knots. And they learned, more than anything, how it feels to be learning something completely new. Please enjoy the poem below that digs into what the day meant for teachers.

From Teacher to Student It’s not every day you get to swap teams Take a view of the world that is more than it seems But on this day they did as they rested their feet And took stock of their classroom from a student’s seat. They came to their sessions with little background Took photos, cooked jiaozi, tossed juggling balls ‘round They folded and knotted and hammered and drew And most of their learning was novice and new. They struggled and questioned and wondered and tried The learning was tough – some nearly cried And all through the day as the teachers were taught New learners were learning. New appreciations bought. For spending a day as a novice to learn Was a lesson of value that none of them spurned. To step from their place as a teacher in view To that of a student, to be in their shoes. To feel how it feels when they just didn’t know To struggle with knowledge they just couldn’t show To wonder aloud and to ask for support To find it was harder than what they first thought. Important reminders for teachers they learned As their role in the classroom was quietly turned To feel for a day the life of a student Maybe changing their ways will now become prudent.

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H AWA I I C A M P U S

Preparing Students for the Future

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By Scott Paulin, Deputy Head of Academics

PIS Hawaii is a place where students are immersed in working together to solve real-world problems and connect academics to personal passions. It is a place where students are concerned with each other’s well-being as part of a team, and their concerns reach far beyond the classroom to others all over the globe. According to a growing body of indicators, in the near future, employers may not be so concerned with a diploma. They’ll look more at portfolios and examples of how students contributed to solving real-world problems. They’ll want to know how well students worked in a team and how well they can communicate with others and work toward innovative solutions. Likewise, top U.S. universities no longer have room to admit students who have not demonstrated the ability to apply their learning in real-world situations, think critically, and design innovative solutions, no matter how impressive their test scores and GPA. The administrative team at APIS Hawaii recently attended the Leading Schools of the Future Conference in Honolulu. We had the chance to not only hear from, but actually sit at the table and work with, innovative education consultants and researchers, Ted Dintersmith and Dr. Yong Zhao. Dintersmith has become one of America’s leading advocates for education policies that foster creativity, innovation, motivation, and purpose. He shares what skills are valuable in a world of innovation, and how we can transform our schools to prepare kids for their futures. Dr. Yong Zhao is a Foundation Distinguished Professor in the School of Education at the University of Kansas. His works focus on the implications of globalization and technology on education. He has published over 100 articles and 30 books. These two education consultants confirmed that APIS Hawaii is already implementing many of the education reforms they suggest. Both advocate for eliminating the traditional, single subject approach and instead working collaboratively through projects that require cross-disciplinary application of knowledge and skills to solve real-world problems. This approach is at the heart of the instructional design of APIS Hawaii. Every day, our students work with small teams of teachers on cross-disciplinary projects that require deeper understanding of the core academic content. Learning is active and students are not only encouraged, but expected, to pursue the things they are passionate about through the projects they choose. At APIS Hawaii, students experience an education that, as Dintersmith advocates, “puts wonder, creativity, and initiative at the very heart of the learning process and prepares students for today’s economy.” It’s exciting to see our students pushing beyond the limits of traditional schooling and developing the skills that top universities are looking for in their applicants and that students will need for success in the future workplace.

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Pushing Past the Boundaries of Advanced Placement at APIS Hawaii By Alyssa Amos, Studio Art and English Teacher

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APRIL 2017

H AWA I I C A M P U S

t APIS Hawaii, there are no boundaries for students in English Language Arts, as small class sizes allow for collegiate-level exploration. English Language Arts teachers are able to target specific needs of students and allow the students to excel in areas outside the standard curriculum. Particularly for English Language Learners, lessons can be tailored to reach the high level of analysis of which the students are capable, while finding the balance of an evolving knowledge of vocabulary and grammar. This prepares students to excel at the collegiate level, as they are able to indulge in the deeper thinking of English literature and rhetorical strategy analysis. In AP Language and Composition, Lia Kim (Grade 12) does not just study the standard AP curriculum. While she has a firm understanding of literary devices and rhetorical strategy, her time is spent far beyond the basic requirements of the AP test. At the beginning of the second quarter, she was asked what she wanted to study. This allowed for her education to be tailored to her interests and she is now working on learning the literary lenses that provide context and historical perspective to analyzing literature. She studies Rudyard Kipling’s “The White Man’s Burden” from a postcolonial perspective and then writes her own poetry from a feminist and postmodernist lense on the tragic history of comfort women in Korea. As Lia’s teacher, our one-on-one time allows me to delve into deep discussions on the meaning of vulnerability in the speeches of Abraham Lincoln and Martin Luther King Jr. It has afforded us the chance to examine the roles of advertising in female body image and the benefits and negatives of genetically modified organisms. I have seen tremendous growth in Lia’s academic writing and the depth of her understanding, which I firmly believe will aid her in her studies at the top university of her choosing. Matthew Manley (ELA teacher) echoes this sentiment on the improvement he sees in his students’ writing abilities. He comments, “writing, especially, is one area where I am freed by small class sizes to give a great deal of specific feedback. I am familiar with my students' common mistakes and areas of improvement, so I can keep their focus on the most critical elements of writing.” This consistent and frequent feedback allows students to move at a rapid pace and places them at a high standard for their age groups.This attention to detail at APIS Hawaii is a big advantage as students prepare to take on the rigorous academic demands of top universities and colleges. w w w. a p i s . o r g

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APRIL 2017

S C H O O LW I D E N E W S & E V E N T S

How Does Our Garden Grow? By Kim House, Grade 2 Teacher, and Carly Shinners, Math Teacher “Mary, Mary, quite contrary, How does your garden grow? With silver bells, and cockle shells, And pretty maids all in a row.” This is a popular nursery rhyme that we learn as children in the United States. However, our answer to the question, “How does your garden grow?” is that it takes a lot of teamwork, patience, having a good attitude, doing new things, experimenting, and not giving up! Three grade levels worked together over the last month to make our APIS garden successful. Since March, Grade 2 has been exploring plants and seeds as part of our integrated unit on biodiversity. We decided that we wanted to plant a garden for several reasons. We wanted to improve an area of the school property, investigate seeds and plants, and make the garden from scratch. Amanda Meyer’s high school environmental science class, made up of juniors and seniors, came to the Grade 2 classroom and shared a presentation with us about different vegetables that we could possibly grow. From their presentations, we decided to plant radish, pea, and lettuce seeds. Elementary School Principal Bruce Knox helped us to prepare the soil by digging it up and removing the rocks, large clumps of dirt, and weeds. When we were ready to plant the seeds, Ms. Meyer’s students helped us plant the seeds. Evan Chung (Grade 11) said, “I think it was a good experience to get out and get your hands dirty … It's important to know how hard it is to produce a product."

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"Planting a garden with elementary students was like planting a future." Paul Lee (Grade 12) w w w. a p i s . o r g


The high school geometry class applied their knowledge to assist in designing and building the fence around Grade 2’s garden. We worked with area, perimeter, surface area, and volume to consider the necessary amounts of paint, soil, and wood. We even had the opportunity to see how geometry applies to woodworking while building the fence under the guidance of Mr. Knox. When asked to reflect on the project, Andy Oh (Grade 9) said, “I thought cooperating with the second graders helped to use our math skills in real life. Also, we learned more than just math – we learned how to do woodwork.” Grade 2 started daily entry logs into their science journals. We began watering the garden daily in the middle of March. We saw some sprouts coming up when we returned to school after spring break. We were so excited to see so many radish sprouts! The week of April 10, we continued to water the garden daily and saw more radish sprouts, along with new pea sprouts and some lettuce sprouts. When asked to comment, Mr Knox observed, “This was such a fun project to be involved in! Working with the different age levels and seeing their enthusiasm to get involved was truly refreshing. The highlight for me was seeing the Grade 9 students really getting into the woodworking – using the power tools and building their confidence in their woodworking skills. I can't wait to be involved in more cross-grade-level projects like this!”

APRIL 2017

S C H O O LW I D E N E W S & E V E N T S

We assembled the fence and installed it on April 13. We are excited to harvest the vegetables when they grow, hopefully by June.

"Planting a garden with the elementary students was a refreshing experience. This opportunity allowed high school students, busy with their academic lives, to cooperate with younger students for a common goal." Michelle Choi (Grade 11)

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APRIL 2017

S C H O O LW I D E N E W S & E V E N T S

What’s Cooking at APIS? APIS Opens New Learning Kitchen

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s that banana bread? Something spicy? Fudge? Ever since the APIS kitchen classroom opened in the fall of 2016, scrumptious smells have drifted through the building as a steady stream of student chefs have used the new learning space to prepare a variety of culinary delights. Kindergartners through Grade 12 students have cooked everything from traditional cuisine in collaboration with foreign language teachers to classic American sweets and an afterschool feast for teachers. Wendy Wilson (Grade 5 teacher) and Catherine Gassner (Kindergarten teacher) have made regular use of the APIS learning kitchen during Grade 5 and Kindergarten buddy time. The space allows for multi-age cooking activities that incorporate science, math, and more, in addition to fostering social-emotional skills, such as problem solving and working cooperatively and collaboratively with others. Heumjae Cho (Grade 3) helps make hummus to serve as part of Grade 3's Saudi Arabia International Day booth.

Ms. Gassner said, “The new kitchen space is a great addition to the school. The students love to visit the kitchen with their fifth grade buddies to learn about measurement while making yummy snacks! I've also learned a lot about baking things from scratch from Ms. Wilson.” Adrian Yamanea (Grade 5) observed, "I like the kitchen because we get to read books with the kindergarten while we wait for our food to bake." During Read Across APIS in November, elementary students made super food chocolate chip cookies, to go along with this year’s theme of comics and graphic novels. Elliot Suh (Grade 3) said, "I like how the kitchen is big. I had fun baking cookies for Read Across APIS. I am excited to use it for other fun activities in the future." The kitchen allows foreign language classes to deepen their study of culture through the preparation of traditional dishes. While such activities had previously taken place at APIS, the size and layout of the new kitchen space allows for larger groups of students and more difficult cooking projects. This new learning space continues to delight students and teachers. Every week, there is something new cooking at APIS!

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Making Gyoza 餃子作り

By Claire Shin, Grade 11 I’ve always taken dumplings for granted. Each Lunar New Year’s Eve, my mother would sit down at the kitchen table stuffing dumplings by hand, carefully shaping each one in a half moon. With her nimble hands, she crafted each one like a machine would. She becomes a one-woman dumpling factory. Mom made making dumplings seem so easy. Even when my fellow Japanese classmates and I were watching Gyoza (Japanese dumplings) cooking tutorials, we all thought that it would be simple – we imagined that we would just chop vegetables, make the stuffing, and then shape the Gyoza. Period. Well, after the entire cooking experience, I beg to differ. Things didn’t go so smoothly from the start. I couldn’t even chop the scallions quickly. It was hard not to cut myself and chop the scallions into equal, small pieces simultaneously. Making the stuffing was okay, but when we had to shape the dumplings, oh boy. Gyozas are shaped differently from traditional Korean dumplings; the openings of Gyozas have to be folded up like the creases of a fan, unlike Korean dumplings where the opening is just sealed by pressing the edges together with your fingers. As a result, most of our dumplings ended up being rather aesthetically unpleasant. Cooking them was difficult as well because we had to add water in the middle – too little water would burn the Gyoza and too much water would moisten the Gyoza too much. I never realized the importance of temperature control until then. Like always, cooking was a great experience. I got to work with people I normally don’t talk to, and I got to make things that I probably wouldn’t get a chance to make at home. But, more importantly, cooking made me appreciate my mother’s cooking more. Now that I understood how hard making dumplings is, I finally realized the fact that I’ve been taking my mother’s cooking for granted. As clichéd as it sounds, perhaps next time my mother prepares a meal, I will give her a sincere thank you for doing this three times per day every day.

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APRIL 2017

S C H O O LW I D E N E W S & E V E N T S

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APRIL 2017

S C H O O LW I D E N E W S & E V E N T S

Librarian's Picks By Jin Yu, School Librarian The Dot By Peter Reynolds

L E V E L: K-12

This hand-lettered book is all about encouragement of artistic selfexpression. When Vashti’s teacher encourages her to just “make a mark and see where it takes you,” she responds by stubbornly jabbing her pen into a piece of paper. The teacher doesn't miss a beat, by calmly asking her to sign under her “dot,” and the next time Vashti sees the paper, it has been put in a gilded frame. Still defiant, she resolves to show her teacher she can do an even better dot, and before long she has busily produced loads of imaginative works – many fantastic variations of a simple dot – enough for an exhibition. Mr. Reynolds illustrates his book using watercolors, ink, and tea. The illustrations prompt the reader to turn page after page, looking forward to Vashti's next artistic endeavor. They remind us all that we have some buried creative expression that needs to be unearthed.

A Chair For My Mother By Vera B. Williams

L E V E L: K-3

This book is filled with images of family and love. Vivid colors and detailed illustrations captivate the eyes of young readers. Rosa's family is poor and has suffered a terrible loss due to a destructive fire that has basically left them without material possessions. Rosa's family remains optimistic, focusing on the positives, such as family togetherness, community, and how, after the fire, Rosa's family and neighbors rally to provide emotional support and necessary furniture. Although it does take some time for the family to save enough the book concludes with a full jar of change, enough to purchase a comfortable chair, transforming the dream for a chair for mother into a reality.

Girl In Translation By Jean Kwok

L E V E L: YO U N G A D U LT

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It is a wonderful tale of a Chinese mother and daughter who migrate to America and find it not to be the land of plenty they had dreamed of. The narration beautifully illustrates the struggles of being pushed into a foreign world, where people look different, have other traditions, other norms, and speak an entirely different language. Based on her own childhood experiences as an immigrant from Hong Kong, Jean Kwok tells the story of young and exceptionally intelligent Kimberly Chang who finds herself doing the splits between a life in Chinatown, wasting away as a sweatshop worker and living in a run-down apartment, and striving for a successful career at a fancy private school. Kimberly translates herself back and forth between a world where she can barely afford clothes and a world where, in spite of her intelligence, she's supposed to look the part as she reaches for higher education.

w w w. a p i s . o r g EDITORIAL TEAM: ■ Euysung Kim Director ■ Lily Jung Art & Design Editor ■ Sunok Nam Communications & PR Team Leader ■ Caroline Webster Lead Writer/Editor

Issue 49 Apis Online Update April 2017  
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